US2227611A - Tractor filling device - Google Patents

Tractor filling device Download PDF

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Publication number
US2227611A
US2227611A US27087839A US2227611A US 2227611 A US2227611 A US 2227611A US 27087839 A US27087839 A US 27087839A US 2227611 A US2227611 A US 2227611A
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fuel
tank
tube
portion
means
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Walleser Ernst Loren
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VICTOR CORP
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VICTOR CORP
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60KARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PROPULSION UNITS OR OF TRANSMISSIONS IN VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PLURAL DIVERSE PRIME-MOVERS IN VEHICLES; AUXILIARY DRIVES FOR VEHICLES; INSTRUMENTATION OR DASHBOARDS FOR VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH COOLING, AIR INTAKE, GAS EXHAUST OR FUEL SUPPLY OF PROPULSION UNITS, IN VEHICLES
    • B60K15/00Arrangement in connection with fuel supply of combustion engines or other fuel consuming energy converters, e.g. fuel cells; Mounting or construction of fuel tanks
    • B60K15/03Fuel tanks
    • B60K15/04Tank inlets

Description

Jan. 7, 1941- E. WALLESER TRACTOR FILLING DEVICE Fild April 29, 1939 Ems? Lore/2' Wed/war.

Patented Jan. 7, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE TRACTOR FILLING DEVICE Application April 29,

Claims.

The present invention relates to a device for filling tractors and like internal combustion engines.

On the large farms of the Middle West it is 5 extremely difficult to get a tractor to a filling station. Again, it would be a great waste of time to do so. Accordingly large drums of fuel are taken out into the field and the tractor refueled there.

The present device is one which utilizes the reduced pressure of the exhaust manifold to pump fuel from the supply drum into the fuel tank of the machine as may be observed from the drawing; The device is a relatively inexpensive one to manufacture yet it issturdy, satisfactory and serviceable.

The present invention presents two principal advantages. The first is intended to overcome the disadvantage in a device of this type wherein the splash of fuel in tank gives rise to a heavy mist and droplet formation, the fuel is drawn into the intake manifold of the engine and stops or drowns it. At best the engine performance is greatly interfered with. The present device clelivers much of the fuel under the surface of the fuel already in the tank thus minimizing splash and droplet formation. Also the end of the delivery tube is positioned in a place remote from the holes through which the air above the fuel is drawn into the vacuum tube leading to the intake manifold. Also these holes are positioned within the neck portion of the fuel tank where it is diflicult for the droplets to get.

A second principal advantage of the present 35 device is the elimination of all clamps and holding means and the utilization of the pressure differential between the inside of the tank and the atmosphere to hold the filling device firmly in place. The use of a soft pliable gasket greatly 4E0 improves the seal and makes this second function possible.

In the drawing Fig. 1 is a plan view of the device with part broken away to show a valve control detail.

45 Fig. 2 is a sectional view along the line 22 of Fig. 1.

In the drawing element I is a body member which is disk shaped and provided with strengthening headings 2 on its upper portion. Through 50 the upper portion 4 of body member I is channel 5 extending across the disk shaped body member I. From one end of channel 5 leads a tube 6 which connects the channel 5 with a point of reduced pressure such as the intake manifold 55 of the engine. If desired a petcock valve or the like may be used to connect tube IS with the intake manifold. Tube 6 is attached firmly to the disk I by means of nut I and threaded tubular member 8.

60 Into the opposite end of channel 5 is threaded 1939, Serial No. 270,878

an intake adjusting screw 9 having a kerf III so that the position of the screw 9 may be easily adjusted with a screw driver. Leading downwardly from channel 5 is vertical channel II.

In Fig. 2 it may be seen how the adjustment of screw 9 controls the fluid flow from channel ,II to channel 5.

The lower part of disk I is provided with 2. depending portion I2 which is provided with an enlarged portion I3 connecting with channel 5. The transition portion I4 between channels 5 and I3 is of frusto-conical shape and serves as a valve seat.

Vacuum tube I5 is of such diameter as to experience a force fit with channel portion I3. Tube I5 is provided with a series of small intake holes It placed as near the depending portion I2 as is feasible.

Within tube I5 is a. float I1 made up of three parts. The upper or head portion I3 of float I1 is shaped so as to mate with frusto-conical surface I4 and seat thereon. These two surfaces 4 and I8 form a valve. Middle portion I9 of float II is made of fine screen so as to catch as many small fuel droplets as possible and prevent them from entering channel 5. The bottom portion of float I! is afloat member 29 made of cork or a sealed metal tube. The member 20 has sufficient buoyancy to carry portions I8 and I9 and cause the whole float IT to rise with the fuel level. Pin 2| prevents the float I! from falling out of tube I5 when not immersed in fuel.

Depending portion I2 is provided with another vertical channel portion 22 into which fuel delivery tube 23 is forced. Fuel delivery tube 23 is substantially larger than vacuum tube I5 so that any fuel splash and droplet formation is kept well away from intake holes I6 or even the bottom of tube I5. Again by having delivery tube 23 long, much of the fuel may be delivered under the surface of the fuel with a minimum of splash. If desired the end of tube 23 may be made flexible so as to rest on the bottom of tanks of different depths.

Near the upper end of tube 23 and as near portion I2 as feasible is provided a vacuum breaking hole 24 which is located on the opposite side of tube 23 from tube I5. Vacuum breaking hole 2 3 prevents the syphoning of fuel from the tank when the valve I l--I8 is closed or the engine stops. In many tractors the fuel tank is on top and several feet above the level of fuel in a drum resting on the ground.

Body member I is provided with a horizontal channel portion 25 forming a continuation of channel portion 22. Fitting in the open end of channel portion 25, and experiencing a force fit therewith, is reduced end 26 of threaded coupling means 21. Threaded outer coupler 28 mates with the threaded portion of coupler means 2i. Gasket 29 makes a tight joint possible.

Hose 39 fits tightly over ferrule 3! which is held firmly against gasket 29 by outer coupler 28. The other end of hose 38 is placed in a drum of fuel to be pumped into the tractor tank.

The lower surface of body member I is provided with a soft gasket 32 intended to rest in sealing contact with upstanding neck 33 of tractor fuel tank 3 3.

In operation tube 6 is connected with the intake manifold of the tractor engine and the free end of hose 3% placed in a drum of fuel. Tubes l5 and 23 are placed into the open tank 34 and gasket 32 caused to firmly contact the lip neck 33 so as to form. a complete air seal. With the engine running, the valve on the intake manifold to which tube 6 is connected, is opened. The atmospheric pressure differential causes air to flow from within tank 3a through tube l5, channels I3 and 5 and out through tube 5.

This flow unbalances the pressure on the shrface of the fuel in the supply drum and causes it to flow through tube 39, channels 25, 22 and tube 23 into tank 34. When the fuel flows into the tank 34 splash results and mist or droplet formation would be drawn into tube 6 and drown the engine were it not for the construction of the device. Without any elaborate or expensive controls this danger is eliminated by placing hole I6 high up tube l5 and within neck portion 33. This greatly reduces the likelihood of drops of fuel entering the tube 6. Again the end of delivery tube 23 is far away from hole 16. Droplets rising through tube [5 from the bottom are caught by the eddies caused by screen 19. Since most of the fuel delivery is under surface, delivery droplet formation is minimized during the later stages of filling. However, the rise of float IT in tube i5 brings it in front of holes I5 as the surface of the fluid nears them. This further blocks droplets entrained in the air.

The rate at which the fuel is pumped may be controlled by the relative position of screw H3 and channel i i. It is shown wide open for maximum delivery.

The fuel level in tank 341 rises until head id of float i"! meets surface [4 and closes channel l3. This stops fluid flow even though the tractor engine continues to run and so eliminates the danger of tank overflow with resultant wastage and fire hazard.

The intake valve is shut off or the engine is stopped. Leakage soon brings the interior of the tank to atmospheric pressure and a reverse flow of fluid in hose 39 takes place due to the longer arm leading to the supply tank. When the level in tank 3-! falls to the hole 24- in fuel delivery tube 23 air is introduced into the line and the syphon effect is broken. It will be noted that hole 2% is also within the neck portion 33 of tank 3d.

It is not usually necessary to provide holding means to fasten the filler to the tank (-54 since the pressure differential within and without the tank is sufficient to do so. This brings out the importance of having gasket 32 soft. However, if it is desired to attach the filler permanently to the tank, suitable clamping or screw fastening means may be used.

The above description sets forth one form the invention may take. Others may be made without departing from the spirit thereof. For instance tube 23 may be continued through the top of housing I and the hose 3 connected directly to it.

I claim:

1. In a filling device for the fuel tank of an internal combustion engine, a tank sealing member of sufficient size to cover the filling opening of the fuel tank of an internal combustion engine having an upstanding neck, a fuel delivery conduit means of such length as to deposit fuel well within said tank and adjacent the bottom thereof so that much of the filling is done under the surface of the fuel in the tank, an evacuating conduit, said conduit means having a hole through which gases may be removed, said hole being sufficiently close to said tank sealing member as to be within the upstanding neck of the fuel tank, whereby a minimum of spray and drops of fuel is carried to the engine through the evacuating conduit, automatic shut off means within said evacuating conduit adapted to rise as the level of the fuel in the tank rises and close said evacuating conduit when the fuel reaches a desired level, a portion of said shut off means being so positioned that the gases withdrawn from the tank pass around it during the final stages of filling whereby fuel droplets are trapped, said automatic shut off means comprising a screen float in said evacuating conduit, the screen of said float so arranged as to be in front of said hole during the final stages of filling so as to catch fuel droplets when the fuel level within the tank is close to said hole, a valve seat in said evacuating conduit arranged to receive the upper portion of said screen valve float.

2. In a filling device for the fuel tank of an internal combustion engine on tractors and the like, a tank sealing member of suflicient size to cover the filling opening of a fuel tank having an upstanding neck, a fuel delivery means supported by said tank sealing member, an evacuating conduit associated with said tank sealing means, said evacuating conduit having a hole therein substantially within the upstanding neck portion of said tank through which gases may be removed, perforated means within said evacuating conduit and positioned across said hole during the final stages of filling said tank whereby fuel droplets entrained in the gases being withdrawn are caught by said perforated member and returned to the tank and the uninterrupted operation of the motor is facilitated.

3. The combination set forth in claim 2, said perforated means comprising an automatic shutoff float the position of which is controlled by the fluid level in the tank, a valve seat in said evacuating conduit constructed to receive said float.

4. The combination set forth in claim 2, a valve seat in said evacuating conduit, a float within said evacuating conduit having an upper portion shaped to seat in said valve seat, a lower portion of low density and a central portion constituted by said perforated means.

5. The combination set forth in claim 2, a valve seat in said evacuating conduit, a float valve means within said evacuating conduit adapted to seat in said valve seat, said float valve having said perforated means mounted thereon, the clearance between the walls of said evacuating conduit and said float valve means being small whereby said perforated means may be positioned close to said hole.

ERNST LOREN WALLESER.

US2227611A 1939-04-29 1939-04-29 Tractor filling device Expired - Lifetime US2227611A (en)

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2650747A (en) * 1950-09-16 1953-09-01 Elmer W Rinne Fuel transferring apparatus
DE1131111B (en) * 1959-07-21 1962-06-07 Mueller & Co Kg Pressurized tank head for refueling of motor vehicles
US3073358A (en) * 1957-05-31 1963-01-15 Procter & Gamble Filling nozzle
US3280858A (en) * 1964-08-21 1966-10-25 Clarence E Paulson Liquid transfer apparatus
DE1253084B (en) * 1960-02-05 1967-10-26 Grundstueckverwaltungsgesellschaft Mueller & Co Kg Apparatus for refueling Kraftstoffbehaeltern for motor vehicles, in particular for military vehicles
US3455346A (en) * 1966-06-23 1969-07-15 Atlas Copco Ab Fuel supply apparatus
US3640319A (en) * 1969-08-21 1972-02-08 Kenneth O Hougen Vacuum actuated automatic transfer device
DE3506848A1 (en) * 1984-05-29 1985-12-05 Raab Karcher Ag Filling device for heating oil tanks
US20020050293A1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2002-05-02 Knowles Steven M. Fluid system service apparatus and method
US20020062862A1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2002-05-30 Knowles Steven M. Service system and method
US20030102028A1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2003-06-05 Knowles Steven M. Method and apparatus for removing fluid from a fluid system
US6742535B1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2004-06-01 Prime Solutions Llc Method and apparatus for servicing a fluid system

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2650747A (en) * 1950-09-16 1953-09-01 Elmer W Rinne Fuel transferring apparatus
US3073358A (en) * 1957-05-31 1963-01-15 Procter & Gamble Filling nozzle
DE1131111B (en) * 1959-07-21 1962-06-07 Mueller & Co Kg Pressurized tank head for refueling of motor vehicles
DE1253084B (en) * 1960-02-05 1967-10-26 Grundstueckverwaltungsgesellschaft Mueller & Co Kg Apparatus for refueling Kraftstoffbehaeltern for motor vehicles, in particular for military vehicles
US3280858A (en) * 1964-08-21 1966-10-25 Clarence E Paulson Liquid transfer apparatus
US3455346A (en) * 1966-06-23 1969-07-15 Atlas Copco Ab Fuel supply apparatus
US3640319A (en) * 1969-08-21 1972-02-08 Kenneth O Hougen Vacuum actuated automatic transfer device
DE3506848A1 (en) * 1984-05-29 1985-12-05 Raab Karcher Ag Filling device for heating oil tanks
US20020062862A1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2002-05-30 Knowles Steven M. Service system and method
US20020050293A1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2002-05-02 Knowles Steven M. Fluid system service apparatus and method
US20020100502A1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2002-08-01 Knowles Steven M. Service system and method
US20030102028A1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2003-06-05 Knowles Steven M. Method and apparatus for removing fluid from a fluid system
US6584994B2 (en) * 2000-10-27 2003-07-01 Prime Solutions Llc Service system and method
US6588445B2 (en) * 2000-10-27 2003-07-08 Prime Solutions Llc Fluid system service apparatus and method
US6612327B2 (en) * 2000-10-27 2003-09-02 Prime Solutions Llc Service system and method
US20040084082A1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2004-05-06 Prime Solution Llc, A Michigan Corporation Service system and method
US6742535B1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2004-06-01 Prime Solutions Llc Method and apparatus for servicing a fluid system
US6883533B2 (en) * 2000-10-27 2005-04-26 Prime Solutions, Inc. Service system and method
US6959717B2 (en) 2000-10-27 2005-11-01 Prime Solutions Llc Method and apparatus for removing fluid from a fluid system

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