US2223561A - Beehive - Google Patents

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Publication number
US2223561A
US2223561A US288957A US28895739A US2223561A US 2223561 A US2223561 A US 2223561A US 288957 A US288957 A US 288957A US 28895739 A US28895739 A US 28895739A US 2223561 A US2223561 A US 2223561A
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cells
parts
honey
matrix
bottoms
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Expired - Lifetime
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US288957A
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Garriga Juan Bizcarro
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Garriga Juan Bizcarro
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01KANIMAL HUSBANDRY; CARE OF BIRDS, FISHES, INSECTS; FISHING; REARING OR BREEDING ANIMALS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; NEW BREEDS OF ANIMALS
    • A01K47/00Beehives

Description

Dec..3, 1940; .1.l B. GARRIGA BEEHIVE Filed Aug. 8, 19:59

5 Sheets-Sheet 2.

- Inventor gna/uga: Y

.JQ B. GARRIGA 2,223,561

BEEHIVE Filed Aug.- 8, 1959 s sheets-sheet s..

FIEL? y l Inventor I W- Attorney Patented Dec. 3, 1940 y PAT-ENT orner.

BEEHIVE Juan Bizcarro Garriga, Igualada, Barcelona,

Spain Application August 8, 1939, Serial No. 288,957 In Spain April 21, 1939 3 Claims.

Beehives with cells made of metal have been constructed now for some time; these are preferably made of aluminium since the qualities of this metal -and of its alloys are very suitable for 5 'the purpose.

By the use of the beehive cells according to my invention all the operations of extracting the honey from the hives are greatly simplied by dispensing with manipulations in the interior of 10 `the hives with the result that the work of collecting the honey, which is long, fatiguing and even dangerous, is converted into a short and easy operation, which can be performed by any per- SOIl'. f

15 On the other hand the bees are not annoyed by the operations which have to be carried out in order to gather and store the honey, thus avoiding diminution in the amount of honey produced, all of which is to the benefit of the ,2O bee-keeper. I

' It follows from the improvements herein referred to that the extraction of the honey can be carried out in the same hive without the beekeeperhaving to resort to fumigation, nor need .2 5 he come into contact With the bees thereby avoiding all-danger of being stung.

.The principal feature of the invention resides in the fact that the cells are composed of three parts, two of them being lateral parts anda third .0D central part hereinafter referred to as the matrix wall. flhevmatrix wall is adapted for a certain extent of movement relatively to the lateral or side parts whereby the matrix Wall is enabled to take up a suitable position whereby the honey fat: produced and contained in the cells can drain towards the outside and pass to receptacles which can be conveniently removed by the bee-keeper. Other advantages and features of the invention will hereinafter be described.

.As is well known, the cells constructed by the lbees consist of a very large numberr of small receptacles, cells or vessels of hexagonal section joined together `in juxtaposition so that they touch'feach other at the sides top and bottom.

,4:5 The bottoms are constituted by a pyramid of triangular section the sides of which are equal and arei connected together atan equal inclination, so that the vcell is constituted as a whole by a hollow body of hexagonal section with a py- 50 ramidal bottom, the arrangement being such that the bottom of each cell acts partly as the base of three other contiguous cells.

The bodies of the cells form two symmetrical series with openings leading to each side of the 55 cell, each one of these series occupying part of the thickness of the cell and a central wall or Amatrix wall forming the bottoms of the cells and separating the cells of series from those of the other. The central axis of each cell is at an opposite inclination to the cell on the other side, 5 thus preventing the escape of the honey which remains stored and contained in the cells.

The invention is diagrammatically illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a front sectional elevation of a beehiveconstructed according to the invention.

Figure 2 is a detail in vertical transverse section on an enlarged scale, of part of two cells.

Figure 3 is a side elevation of the hive show- 15 ing how the honey is extracted from the cells.

Figures 4 and 5 are theoretical diagrams on a reduced scale showing the relative positions of the side walls of the cells.

vFigure-6 shows diagrammatically a modica- 20 tion.

The hive has provided at I the habitation 4of the bees, above which are provided two series of cells, as at 2 and 3, which are mounted ina wooden frame Il, which is itself mounted, asr at 25 5 and 6, between the walls of the habitation I the said cells being capable of being removed from and replaced in this frame.

According to the .present invention each cell consists essentially of three enclosing parts. 3G Two of the said parts 'I and 8 (Figures 4 to 6) form the longitudinal prismatic cavities such as 9, 91, of hexagonal section, and the other part II), which is adjustably mounted between the 'first two parts, forms the bottoms of the said cells in the form of triangular pyramids, the said bottoms being arranged in such a way that those on one side form the bottom of the cells on one side and the others form the bottom of the cells on the other side. The relative positions of these three'parts are variable to suit requirements as will be explained hereinafter.

The three parts or members above referred to composing each cell are constructed with the greatest precision, so that by suitably connecting them together, the walls of the cells of the side parts vmay be extended and their bottoms fit exactly to the matrix or central wall so as to produce when assembled complete cells.

The matrix or dividing wall of each cell (Fig- 50 ures 1 and 2) is mounted on a supporting member I I by means of a screw-threaded rod I2 which passes through the supporting member I I, and on which is screwed a nut I3 which rests on the supporting member so that the matrix or dividing 55 'be provided above the part I of the hive.

wall in each case may be adjusted in the vertica direction.

The central or matrix wall I which carries the bottoms of the cells corresponding to the side portions 'I and 9 is mounted by means of linkage I4 (Figure 2) on a screw-threaded pin I5, on to the screw thread of which is screwed a nut IB-by means of which it is possible to determine exactly the correct position of the matrix wall I0 with respect to the side walls 'I and 8, so that the longitudinal hollow parts of the cells shall coine cide exactly with the corresponding bottoms.

All the matrix or central walls of the cells of a hive are mounted in a supporting member such as II, so that they can be caused to slide simultaneously as a whole when so desired by the beep keeper.

It is by means of this sliding movement 'thaty coincidence is obtained between the bottoms of the cells in each matrixwall and the longitudinal hexagonal cavities of the cells, so that the matrix wall assumes with respect tothe walls on either side a position as shown in the cell illustrated on the right hand side of Figure 2, when the bee'- keeperrwishes to extract the honey from the cells.

This adjusting movement is shown diagrammatically in Figures 4 and 5. In Figure 4 is shown'the position of the matrix wall I0 with respect to the side walls 1 and 8 when the cell is in position to receive the honey produced b-y the bees', the bottoms of the cells provided in the matrix 'wall being adjusted to the hexagonal openings of the cells formed in the two side Walls. In Figure 5 the matrix wall has been moved longitudinally with respect to the side walls 'I and 8, with the result that at the positions I'I and I8 the ends of the hexagonal openings such as 9 are uncovered, so'that the honey contained in the cells 9 escapes in a continuous stream from the top downwards. The result of this is that the honey automatically ows from the lower part of the cell and for the purpose of collecting it a collecting receptacle I9 (Figure 3) is placed in the hive which has connected to it a curved pipe through which the honey flows from the receptacle I9 to an externally disposed receptacle 2I whence it is removed by the bee-keeper.

Each cell is of trapezoidal form as will be seen from Figure 1, so that the cells can conveniently The 'invention is not limited to the particular construction hereinbefore described. Thus for example instead of arranging the matrix wall to ybe movable longitudinally in relation 'to the side Walls, 'the discharge of the honey fromthe cells 'may be eected by imparting a lateral movement to the side walls so as to separate them from the matrix wall in a horizontal direction as indi-` cated in Figure 6. In such case, owing to the hexagonal recesses being yseparated from their respective bottoms, channels such asv 22, 23 .are

formed, down which the honey escapes to the lower part of the cell.

` In the case shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3 it is of,

"importance to the bee-keeper that the cells should be provided with means for Iraising the matrix walls as `a whole. This can be eiected by various mechanisms, one of which is hereinafter described by way of example.

The matrix walls of the cells on each side of the hive are suspended from or connected to the rectangular section supporting members II, carried on rollers 24, mounted at the upper ends of links 26, 21 which are pivoted on spindles and 1 the lower ends of which are articulated at 30, 3l to a horizontally extending `bar 32, to which is also articulated at 33 a lever 34 the pivot pin of d which is located at 35 and which is provided with a knob or handle 36. There is thus formed a system of articulated parallelograms controlled by the lever 34.

By turning the lever 34 by means of the handle 36 from right to left, the above mentioned system of articulated parallelograms causes the rollers to rise, thus elevating the rectangular supporting members I I andconsequently the matrix `walls of the cells as a Whole. By moving, the lever34 in the opposite direction the matrix walls are returned to their original positions afterl the honey has flowed from the cells. f I

This mechanism may be replaced by any other mechanism which will produce the same result. In the foregoing description no mention -has (been made of the vknown practical operations whichy the bee-keeper will have to employ when using* metallic beehivevcells, such for example as the covering of the cells with a thin-l coating of `wax so that the bees shall ybe in their habitual element; when this coatingv of wax is broken'owing to the movement of the cells as hereinbefore described, the bees themselveswil1 instinctively proceed to repair the damage. f j l The invention has been described Vwith reference only to cells madewholly or partly of a metal such as aluminium or alloys of'aluminium, but is applicable to cells made of othermaterials. Iclaim: w l. 1. A beehive including cells for the 'honey made of a number of fixed parts with movable parts interposed, the xed parts being set atanv inclination and forming the walls of the cells and linkage operated through yan operating lever` for raising said movable parts out of coincidence with the lower ends of the stationary parts to permit the honey to flow from the cells.

2. A'beehive including cells for the honey made of a `number of xed parts and movabley parts forming the bottoms ofthe cells and A'means for moving the bottoms of the cells in arvvertical direction out of coincidence with the ends of the xed parts to permit honey to ow from the cells.

sof

3. A beemve including @e for the hney'made of a number of iixed -parts and movable parts, the movable parts being set at anl inclination and forming the walls of the cells and the xed parts being disposed between the movable parts 'and forming the bottoms of the cells'and` means ifor moving the movable -parts in a direction .away

from the xed parts so as jto enable the honey` to nowvfrom the bottoms of the cells. Y

JUAN BIZCARROGAR'R GA.

US288957A 1939-04-21 1939-08-08 Beehive Expired - Lifetime US2223561A (en)

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2631307A (en) * 1950-01-13 1953-03-17 Sugano Genji Device for automatic honey extraction from combs
US2779037A (en) * 1952-04-12 1957-01-29 Mari Jose Rovira Construction of honeycombs
US4651372A (en) * 1983-11-24 1987-03-24 Matthias Schmidt Plastic bee comb and method for breeding more efficient and more resistant bees
USD790776S1 (en) * 2015-02-27 2017-06-27 Cedar Anderson Component for artificial honeycomb
US9826721B2 (en) 2011-12-21 2017-11-28 FlowBee Australia Pty. Ltd. Apiculture
WO2018187877A1 (en) * 2017-04-13 2018-10-18 Schulte Francis Honey collection and extraction system and method
EP3257371A4 (en) * 2015-11-11 2019-01-02 Lou, Kai Ching Multilayer artificial honeycomb

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2631307A (en) * 1950-01-13 1953-03-17 Sugano Genji Device for automatic honey extraction from combs
US2779037A (en) * 1952-04-12 1957-01-29 Mari Jose Rovira Construction of honeycombs
US4651372A (en) * 1983-11-24 1987-03-24 Matthias Schmidt Plastic bee comb and method for breeding more efficient and more resistant bees
US9826721B2 (en) 2011-12-21 2017-11-28 FlowBee Australia Pty. Ltd. Apiculture
AU2016231608B2 (en) * 2011-12-21 2018-01-18 Flowbee Australia Pty Ltd Improvements to apiculture
USD790776S1 (en) * 2015-02-27 2017-06-27 Cedar Anderson Component for artificial honeycomb
EP3257371A4 (en) * 2015-11-11 2019-01-02 Lou, Kai Ching Multilayer artificial honeycomb
WO2018187877A1 (en) * 2017-04-13 2018-10-18 Schulte Francis Honey collection and extraction system and method
US10470442B2 (en) 2017-04-13 2019-11-12 Francis Bernard Schulte Honey collection and extraction system and method

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