US2221202A - Cushion foot support for shoes - Google Patents

Cushion foot support for shoes Download PDF

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Publication number
US2221202A
US2221202A US31428440A US2221202A US 2221202 A US2221202 A US 2221202A US 31428440 A US31428440 A US 31428440A US 2221202 A US2221202 A US 2221202A
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Prior art keywords
shoe
cushion
foot
portion
pad
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Expired - Lifetime
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Raymond R Ratcliff
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Raymond R Ratcliff
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/142Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the medial arch, i.e. the navicular or cuneiform bones
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/143Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the lateral arch, i.e. the cuboid bone
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/1445Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the midfoot, i.e. the metatarsal

Description

Nov. 12, 1940.

R. R. RATCLIFF CUSHION FOOT SUPPORT FOR SHOES Filed Jan. 17, 1940 Patented Nov. 12, 1940 UNITED STATES '7 Claims.-

This invention relates to a cushion foot support for incorporation in footwear, either with the manufacture of the shoe or thereafter as a separate unit serving the heel, shank and medial rear part of the ball or fore portion of the shoe.

The tendency in shoe manufacture, particularly for womens wear, is to fashion the shoe to be extremely light in weight, offering incomplete protection to the foot against percussion when 1O- the foot.

An object of the invention is to provide a shock absorbing cushion for a shoe for the weight bearing portion of practically every bone in the transverse and longitudinal arch of the foot to assist in preventing the bones from spreading or being misplaced when the foot is in motion while bearing weight.

Another object of the invention is to provide a cushion to serve beneath the entire cuboid bone of the foot, the fourth and fifth metatarsal, and the fore part of the os calcis.

Another object of the invention is to provide a cushion beneath the cuboid bone at the outer side of the foot and beneath the cuneiform arch at the inner side, with the opposite margins thereof extending laterally upward to cradle and straddle the foot in the shoe, and is of reduced dimension longitudinally medially to provide a socket to prevent the foot from sliding forward.

Another object of the invention is to provide a series of cushions respectively for the heel, shank, and central rear part of the top or ball portion of a sole of the shoe relatively spaced and fixed upon the under side of a pliable insole layer or sock lining, or directly applied to the insole of a shoe,

Various other features and advantages of the invention will be more fully set forth in a descrip' tion of the accompanying drawing, in which: 2

Figure 1 is a central vertical section through a shoe, showing the series of improved cushions in position within a shoe and a skeleton diagramin side elevation of the bones of the foot.

Figure 2 is a bottom plan view of the cushion secured upon the under side of a shoe insole layer or sock lining, showing. the bones of a footin dotted lines.

Figure 3 is a section on line 3-3, Figure 2, as it conforms when disposed within a shoe.

Figure 4 is a sectional view, similar to Figure 3,

showing a modified form of arch cushion.

Figure 5 is a bottom plan view similar to Fig-; ure 2, showing the cushions applied-on a three,

quarter size sock lining with a detachable metatarsal pad.

Referring to the drawing, the structure of the shoe may be of any conventional type; and not forming a part of the present invention, no detail; disclosure or description thereof will be made herein. As the cushions. are cemented'or adhesively secured to a pliable layer of insole outline for the fore and heel portions of the shoe, and may be applied as a unitwithin the shoeeither at the time of finishing its manufacture or afterwards inserted by the user or wearer, the description in detail will be directed to its structure as a unit to constitute an articleof manufacture in itself. For convenient application and correctly positioned into the shoe, the cushions are preferably secured to the underside of a thin pliable layer I of leather kid stock or other material which may function eitheras an insole or sock lining. The upper side of the layer, when employed as a sock lining, has a finished surface, andv the fore and heel portions are cutto an outline of conventional PATENT oF Ics 1 pattern to fit within a given size of shoe. The

tive to an extension commonly employed for in- I soles and sometimes referred to as a cookie.

The rib or extension 3 for the other side of the shoe has an approximately straight longitudinal edge providing only a slight extension from a normal insole outline to extend upwardly above the plane of the insole, and to overlie the adjacent portion of the shoe upper. The opposite sides, by reason of the extensions, extend upwardly into the shoe to more or less clasp or straddle the foot. An arch cushion 4 for the shank por tion of the shoe is secured to the under side of the lining l havinga plain upper side adjoining the flat under side ofthe lining and secured thereto by an adhesive. The cushion is preferably formed from a sponge rubber material of exceedingly fine texture, thus more or less of solid structure, although extremely yielding It is obvious, however, that the pads can be made of other cushioning materials.

The arch cushion for its opposite side has its edges in configuration, corresponding substantial- 1y to the outline of the lining, with the edges parallel, and slightly scant of the width of the lining so that the edges set slightly inward and are overlapped by the lining. Therefore, the inner edge is curved to correspond with the wing or section 3 and the outer edge straight, parallelling the edge of the outer wing or extension 3.

The forward and rear ends of the arch cushion, each has a recess 5 medially producing a reduced length for the intermediate portion of the cushion centrally of the shank. The particular outline shape of the cushion, as illustrated in Figure 2, provides for supporting the three cuneiform bones, the scaphoid and cuboid bones, the rear ends of the five metatarsals, and a portion of the forward end of the os calcis.

The cushion is of uniform thickness with its top surface plain or flat and gradually tapering at its margins to a thin or feather edge, excepting for the crotch portions at the base of the recesses 5. It will also be effective made from a'thin material of the same thickness in its entirety, with just the edges skived. In some instances it is desirable to make the cushion so that the portion, on the inside arch, is a trifle thicker, gradually tapering to the cuboid or out side. As this side of the arch of the bone structure is low, it can be raised only slightly without using special lasts, which add increased expense. As illustrated in Figure 4, the arch cushion 4 is thicker, as indicated at a, for the portion or section located at the inner side of the shoe approximately medially of the inner section or inward from the margin of the wing from which it tapers to the opposite outer edge or outer wing. The curved rear end, due to the central recess, gives a shape which comes directly in front of the os calcis bone and around and in front of the permanent part of the os calcis bone in a low and flexible part of the foot bone structure,

and is extended lengthwise so, that the front end comes under the rear end of the metatarsal bones, providing a definite shock absorbing cushion for the entire transverse and longitudinal arch. It

- can be used in building shoes on regular standard lasts and patterns, without filling up the shoes to an extent that would distort the fit. While the cushion has an irregular shape ,to narrow the front part, this permits it to rest prop-- erly on the insole and assist in locating it conveniently as well as properly fitting under the bone structure of thefoot.

The lateral wings or extensions 2, 3, for the relative opposite longitudinal sides of the cushion provide a greater width dimension to extend beyond the normal insole dimension and within the shoe bend upwardly respectively overlapping a relative portion of .the shoe upper at both the inner and outer sides. This formation causes the layer and cushion to clasp and cradle the foot in the shoe to retain proper position regardless of the height of the heel. The outer Wing extends the cushion so that it comes completely under the cuboid bone for deadening jar or impact thereto, and the inner Wing extends completely under the cuneiforms so that both assist to prevent the instep portion of the foot from rocking sidewise. The inner wing being more extensive reaches up to a higher elevation beneath the instep than the outer wing, so that to a degree it overlaps the side of the scaphoid bone which has its bottom portion inclining upwardly.

The arch cushion, individually, can be applied and cemented or secured into the shoe, for instance, directly over the insole, with the opposite ends or margins of the inner and outer sections projecting beyond the conventional outline pattern of the insole to extend laterally upwardly over the adjoining portions of the shoe upper. A sock lining, either full or shorter insole length size, can be applied over the insole in the usual manner covering the pad, serving and occupying the same position as heretofore described when initially applied or secured to the under side of the lining. Likewise, the arch cushion can be imbedded within the insole by splitting the insole so as to receive the cushion, and have its opposite inner and outer ends projecting beyond the corresponding opposite edges of the insole to' overlie the upper. Also, the insole, when the pad is directly applied thereon or incorporated therewith, may .possess wing extensions to either under or overlie the relative margins of the pad as outlined heretofore for the sock lining.

While beneficial results are obtained in the use of the shank cushion alone, it is more effective when used in connection with a heel cushion 6 to correspondingly elevate the heel of the foot. The heel cushion 6 has its forward part of a definite outline to provide an extension I at the inner side, with its forward edge curved, and partially extends into the rear intermediate recess of the arch cushion. The extension accommodates and underlies corresponding extensions of the heel bone, and thereby increases the efficiency of the heel cushion. The heel cushion tapers at its margins, and the taper is more gradual for the forward margin than for the sides and rear 'end. The heel and arch cushions are spaced from one another, and together form a socket to hold the foot against forward slide within the shoe. The heel cushion is of uniform thickness for its body area, and of corresponding height with the medial portion of the arch cushion.

A third cushion 8, for location under the metatarsal section of the foot, is secured upon the lining or backing layer I, medially thereof, and in front of the arch cushion 4. It is of approximate quadrilateral outline of a trapezium form with its narrow or rear end toward or adjacent the arch cushion, gapping the recess therein, and has its opposite side edges respectively in parallelism with the relative corresponding edges of the lining or backing layer l. The metatarsal cushion tapers from an intermediate point or line toward each of the edges, giving it a crown shape. The taper for the forward marginal portion is of a greater pitch to render the same more abrupt, owing to its lesser length, than from the peak rearwardly which is gradual for the major portion of its length, or to a marginal portion from which the taper is more abrupt. and conforms to a degree correspondingly to taper for the opposite sides.

The corners are all rounded, and to whlchthe body surface is sloped so that its shape and contour is most acceptable for a metatarsal support. The pad or cushion has, similar to the arch and heel cushions, a fiat surfaced base to lie fiush against the joining plane surface of the lamina or backing layer I, to which it is adhesively secured.

When positioned in the shoe, the lining or backing layer is uppermost and the unit is cemented or otherwise permanently secured to the upper side of the insole, or the lamina may provide a lamination of the insole with the cushions confined within the body structure of the insole. The cushions absorb shocks for deadening impacts to the foot when in motion as well as comfort and relieve the foot that is affected with ordinary ailments cause from walking over hard pavements.

In Figure 5, the several cushions are shown as initially applied upon a three-quarter size lining layer 9 as a separate marketable unit to be placed in the shoe by a retail dealer or shoe wearer. The forward end H of the lining, as a tab, is of a pattern outline to margin the pad and separately defined from the major portion or body of the lining by a line of perforations l2 along which severance can be made in the event the metatarsal pad is not desired.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A foot arch cushion support for shoes, comprising: a lamina shaped to provide heel and shank portions, the shank portion of extended Width providing wing extensions for the opposite side edges thereof adapted to extend upwardly Within a shoe to respectively overlap relative portions of the shoe upper, and a supporting and foot bone cushioning pad for the shank portion secured to one side of the lamina having its fore and rear ends recessed to provide a reduced length medial portion, the pad of uniform thickness for the body portion thereof with its margins tapering toward the edges, and a pad substantially covering the heel portion.

2. A foot arch cushion support for shoes, comprising: a lamina having a fore and rear part of conventional shoe insole outline, and an intermediate or shank portion of extendedwidth providing wing extensions for the opposite side edges thereof adapted to extend upwardly within a shoe to respectively overlap relative portions of the shoe upper, and a supporting and foot bone cushioning pad for the shank portion having its fore and rear ends recessed to provide a reduced length medial portion, the pad of uniform thickness for the body portion thereof, a supporting pad for the metatarsal section of the foot spaced from the fore end of the shank pad, and a pad substantially covering the heel portion.

3. A foot support for a shoe, comprising: a lamina shaped to the insole pattern of the shoe to provide a fore, shank and a heel portion, a pad secured on said lamina and substantially covering th heel portion and a part of the shank at the inner side thereof, a supporting pad secured on said lamina for the shank portion having an outline to provide a pair of relatively longitudinal side portions centrally transversely joined by a reduced length medial portion with the outer edges of the side portions in parallelism with the corresponding edges of the shank portion of the lamina, and a supporting pad secured on said lamina for the metatarsal section of the foot at the rear end of and centrally of the fore portion of the lamina.

4. A foot cushion support for shoes, comprisingzi a lamina of a pattern to fit over the insole of the shoe for the shank and heel portions thereof, a resilient pad for the shank portion of an outline pattern to provide recesses medially in the fore and rear ends thereof, the margins respectively for the inner and outer shoe side portions extending laterally upwardly from the insole to overlie the adjoining portions of the shoe upper, a pad for the heel portion having a forward projection for the inner side of the shoe, the lamina having an extension at its forward end of an outline to margin a metatarsal pad, the extension separable from the lamina along a transverse line of perforations, and a metatarsal pad for said extension.

5. A foot cushion support for shoes, comprising: a lamina of a pattern to fit over the insole of the shoe for the shank and heel portions thereof, a resilient pad for theshank portion of an outline pattern to provide recesses medially in the fore and rear ends thereof, the margins respectively for the inner and outer shoe side portions extending laterally upwardly from the insole to overlie the adjoining portions of the shoe' upper, a pad for the heel portion, the lamina having an extension at its forward end of an outline to margin a metatarsal pad, the extension separable from the lamina along a transverse line of perforations, and a metatarsal pad for said extension.

6. A foot arch support, comprising: a pad of resilient material having central recesses respectively within its opposite forward and rear ends forming opposite side portions joined by a reduced length medial portion, one of the side portions having an approximately straight edge longitudinally with the outer side of the foot, and the opposite portion having a curved edge longitudinally for the inner side of the foot, the pad having an extended width over the normal shank width of the shoe bending its inner and outer margins upwardly from the plane of the body portion of the pad.

7. A foot arch support, comprising: a pad of resilient material having central recesses respectively within its opposite forward and rear ends forming opposite side portions joined by a reduced length medial portion, one ofthe side portions having an approximately straight edge longitudinally with the outer side of the foot, and the opposite portion having a curved edge longitudinally for the inner side of the foot, the pad marginally tapering toward its edges for the pad outline and having an extended width over the normal shank width of the shoe bending its inner and outer margins upwardly from the plane of the body portion of the pad.

' RAYMOND R. RATCLIFF.

US2221202A 1940-01-17 1940-01-17 Cushion foot support for shoes Expired - Lifetime US2221202A (en)

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Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2421088A (en) * 1945-10-01 1947-05-27 Sims James Manning Insert sole
US2498624A (en) * 1948-03-23 1950-02-21 Garnett C Skinner Foot cushion
US3099267A (en) * 1961-07-06 1963-07-30 Earl L Cherniak Foot balancing device
US3135265A (en) * 1962-06-11 1964-06-02 Universal Stay Company Inc Foot cushioning device
US3724106A (en) * 1971-06-29 1973-04-03 H Magidson Insole structure
US3903621A (en) * 1974-09-26 1975-09-09 Benjamin B Dubner Conforming supportive innersole device
US4631841A (en) * 1985-03-14 1986-12-30 Hickey John L Shoe insert device
US5164878A (en) * 1989-04-24 1992-11-17 Hauser John P Orthopedic pad
WO1992021258A1 (en) * 1991-05-31 1992-12-10 Insole Control, Inc. Tripod support for the human foot
WO2000003615A1 (en) * 1998-07-17 2000-01-27 Kellerman Company, Llc Adjustable orthotic
US20050050771A1 (en) * 2003-04-23 2005-03-10 Dananberg Howard J. Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing a high-heeled shoe
WO2006040416A1 (en) * 2004-10-07 2006-04-20 Dynapodal Orthopaedic sole comprising a transversal rear element provided with lateral elevated wings
US20060090377A1 (en) * 2004-10-29 2006-05-04 Sergio Segalin Sole for footwear
US20080072461A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Howlett Harold A Cushioned orthotic
US20100146815A1 (en) * 2008-12-17 2010-06-17 La New International Corporation Insole that functionally adjusts its supporting curvature according to the heel height
US20100307024A1 (en) * 2009-06-06 2010-12-09 Tzann-Yuh TZENG Pressure-Reducing Device
WO2012054958A1 (en) * 2010-10-29 2012-05-03 Mentec Holdings Pty Ltd A footwear cushion
US20150223566A1 (en) * 2012-10-19 2015-08-13 Young-Soul PARK High heel for exercising achilles tendons while walking
USD748387S1 (en) * 2013-04-24 2016-02-02 Stable Step LLC Insole
US20160095382A1 (en) * 2013-06-21 2016-04-07 Bmz Ltd. Insole for shoe

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2421088A (en) * 1945-10-01 1947-05-27 Sims James Manning Insert sole
US2498624A (en) * 1948-03-23 1950-02-21 Garnett C Skinner Foot cushion
US3099267A (en) * 1961-07-06 1963-07-30 Earl L Cherniak Foot balancing device
US3135265A (en) * 1962-06-11 1964-06-02 Universal Stay Company Inc Foot cushioning device
US3724106A (en) * 1971-06-29 1973-04-03 H Magidson Insole structure
US3903621A (en) * 1974-09-26 1975-09-09 Benjamin B Dubner Conforming supportive innersole device
US4631841A (en) * 1985-03-14 1986-12-30 Hickey John L Shoe insert device
US5164878A (en) * 1989-04-24 1992-11-17 Hauser John P Orthopedic pad
US6205685B1 (en) * 1989-09-14 2001-03-27 Kellerman Company Llc Adjustable orthotic
WO1992021258A1 (en) * 1991-05-31 1992-12-10 Insole Control, Inc. Tripod support for the human foot
US5170572A (en) * 1991-05-31 1992-12-15 Insole Control, Inc. Tripod support insole
WO2000003615A1 (en) * 1998-07-17 2000-01-27 Kellerman Company, Llc Adjustable orthotic
US7594346B2 (en) 2003-04-23 2009-09-29 Hbn Shoe, Llc Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing
US7962986B2 (en) 2003-04-23 2011-06-21 Hbn Shoe, Llc Method of shifting weight in a high-heeled shoe
US20100263238A1 (en) * 2003-04-23 2010-10-21 Dananberg Howard J Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing a high-heeled shoe
US7322132B2 (en) * 2003-04-23 2008-01-29 Hbn Shoe, Llc Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing a high-heeled shoe
US7814688B2 (en) 2003-04-23 2010-10-19 Hbn Shoe, Llc Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing a high-heeled shoe
US20050050771A1 (en) * 2003-04-23 2005-03-10 Dananberg Howard J. Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing a high-heeled shoe
US20090255148A1 (en) * 2003-04-23 2009-10-15 Dananberg Howard J Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing a high-heeled shoe
US20080110062A1 (en) * 2003-04-23 2008-05-15 Dananberg Howard J Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing a high-heeled shoe
WO2006040416A1 (en) * 2004-10-07 2006-04-20 Dynapodal Orthopaedic sole comprising a transversal rear element provided with lateral elevated wings
US7581336B2 (en) * 2004-10-29 2009-09-01 Sergio Segalin Sole for footwear
US20060090377A1 (en) * 2004-10-29 2006-05-04 Sergio Segalin Sole for footwear
US20080072461A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Howlett Harold A Cushioned orthotic
US7958653B2 (en) 2006-09-21 2011-06-14 Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc. Cushioned orthotic
US8800169B2 (en) 2006-09-21 2014-08-12 Msd Consumer Care, Inc. Cushioned orthotic
US20100146815A1 (en) * 2008-12-17 2010-06-17 La New International Corporation Insole that functionally adjusts its supporting curvature according to the heel height
US20100307024A1 (en) * 2009-06-06 2010-12-09 Tzann-Yuh TZENG Pressure-Reducing Device
US8484864B2 (en) * 2009-06-06 2013-07-16 Tzann-Yuh TZENG Pressure-reducing device
WO2012054958A1 (en) * 2010-10-29 2012-05-03 Mentec Holdings Pty Ltd A footwear cushion
US20130232816A1 (en) * 2010-10-29 2013-09-12 Mentec Holdings Pty Ltd. Footwear Cushion
US20150223566A1 (en) * 2012-10-19 2015-08-13 Young-Soul PARK High heel for exercising achilles tendons while walking
US9730489B2 (en) * 2012-10-19 2017-08-15 Young-Soul PARK High heel for exercising achilles tendons while walking
USD748387S1 (en) * 2013-04-24 2016-02-02 Stable Step LLC Insole
US20160095382A1 (en) * 2013-06-21 2016-04-07 Bmz Ltd. Insole for shoe

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