US2214506A - Automatic tuner including manual adjustment means - Google Patents

Automatic tuner including manual adjustment means Download PDF

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US2214506A
US2214506A US297136A US29713639A US2214506A US 2214506 A US2214506 A US 2214506A US 297136 A US297136 A US 297136A US 29713639 A US29713639 A US 29713639A US 2214506 A US2214506 A US 2214506A
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shaft
plunger
manual
tuning
plungers
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US297136A
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Dana C Manning
Leonard S Depweg
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CROSLEY Corp
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CROSLEY CORP
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H03BASIC ELECTRONIC CIRCUITRY
    • H03JTUNING RESONANT CIRCUITS; SELECTING RESONANT CIRCUITS
    • H03J5/00Discontinuous tuning; Selecting predetermined frequencies; Selecting frequency bands with or without continuous tuning in one or more of the bands, e.g. push-button tuning, turret tuner
    • H03J5/02Discontinuous tuning; Selecting predetermined frequencies; Selecting frequency bands with or without continuous tuning in one or more of the bands, e.g. push-button tuning, turret tuner with variable tuning element having a number of predetermined settings and adjustable to a desired one of these settings
    • H03J5/14Discontinuous tuning; Selecting predetermined frequencies; Selecting frequency bands with or without continuous tuning in one or more of the bands, e.g. push-button tuning, turret tuner with variable tuning element having a number of predetermined settings and adjustable to a desired one of these settings operated by auxiliary power
    • H03J5/22Settings determined by a number of separately actuated driving means which adjust the tuning element directly to desired settings

Description

SePt- 10. 1940 D. c. MANNING ET AL 2,214,506
AUTOMATIC TUNER TNCLUDTNG MANUAL ADJUSTMENT MEANS Filed Sept. 29, 1939 3 Sheets-Sheet l ,4WD/:NA C5 MANN/NG BY LEM/.4R0 S. DEPn/EG A TTORNEYS.
Sept. 10` 1940. D. c. MANNING Er AL AUTOMATIC TUNER INCLUDING MANUAL ADJUSTMENT MEANS 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 29, 1939 INVENTORIS. ANA C MANN/NG BY "d fo/vaga 6'. fPn/fe. ATTORNEYS,
Sept. 10, 1940. D. c. MANNlNG ET' A1. @214,506
AUTOMATIC TUNER NCLUDING MANUAL ADJUSTMENT MEANS Filed sept. 29, 1959 3 shams-sheer s Emil.
. -Wannalap a0 716.15 El?. 14.
INVENTORS.
. ATTORNEYA.
`Patented Sept. 10, 1940 PATENT OFFICE AUTOMATIC TUNER INCLUDING MANUAL ADJUSTMENT MEANS Dana C. Manning, Detroit Depweg, Cincinnati, O Crosley Corporation, poration of Ohio Application September 29,
16 Claims.
Our invention relates to so-called automatic tuning means for radio sets of the character in which a tuning of the radio set to a particular station 4is effected by manual actuation of a plunger, push button or other means appropriate to the station in question. Our mechanism as herein described is related to the mechanisms of the co-pending cases of Howard J. Tyzzer, Serial No. 192,258 filed Feb. 24, 1938; Serial No. 226,520 filed Aug. 24, 1938: and Serial No. 226,520, filed Aug. 24, 1938; Julius J. Hobing, Serial N0. 275,232, filed May 23, 1939, and Manning and Depweg, Serial No. 218,580 filed July 11, 1938; but departs from the teachings of these cases in certain ways which will be apparent hereinafter.
It is our object' to provide an automatic tuning means wherein the setting operation is rendered much more simple, and may be effected 'by purely manual means as distinguished from tools, and effected during the operation of the set if desired.
It is an object of our invention to provide an automatic tuning means in which when a plunger has been depressed, its setting may be effected or varied by the mere operation of the normally/l provided manual tuning means for the radio set.v
It is an object of our invention'to provide new types of plunger structures in automatic tuning apparatus.
It is an object of our invention to take care of the problems of frictional resistance especially in connection with the means whereby the setting of the several plungers is effected or changed, as will hereinafter be set forth.
It is an object of our invention to make the provisions outlined above in an apparatus of essentially simple and inexpensive character, without complication of parts and without a construction lkely to come out of adjustment or repair.
These and other objects of our invention which will be set forth hereinafter, or will be apparent to one skilled in the, art upon reading these specications, we accomplish by that certain construction and arrangement of parts of which we shall now describe certain exemplary embodiments.
Reference ismade to the drawings wherein:
Figure 1 is. a horizontal sectional View of one form of our apparatus, the view being taken below the level of the gang condenser.
Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a type of shaft which we may use.
Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a portion of a plunger.
, Mich., and Leonard S. hio, asslg'nors to vThe Cincinnati, Ohio, .a cor- 1939, Serial No. 297,138
(Cl. 'I4-10) Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a yoke member adapted to be actuated by the shaft of Fig. 2. Fig. 5 is a perspective view of a portion of a switch member.
Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view through the 5 apparatus of Figure 1, taken along the lines 6-6 of that figure.
Fig. 7 is a similar view of a portion of Fig. 6, but showing the relationship of the members when the plunger arrangement has been manu- 10 ally actuated.
Fig. 8 is a vertical section taken along the lines 8-8 of Figure 1.
Fig. 9 is a partial perspective view of the solenoid actuated driving member for the plungers.
Fig. 10 is a perspective view of a clutch device.
Fig. 11 is an end elevational view of the apparatus of Figure 1.
Fig. 12 is apartial view showing a different type of clutch arrangement.
Fig. 13 shows a clutch member and is a view taken alongthe lines I8-I3 of Fig. 12.
Fig. 14 is a partial elevation of a gear arrangement and is a View taken along the lines Il-II of Fig. 12.`
Fig. 15 is anelevational view of another form of plunger assembly.
Fig. 16 is a plan view thereof omitting the shaft and holding means.
Fig. 1'7 is a view in perspective of one of the 30 positioning members.-
Fig. 18 is a view of la spring clip.
Fig. 191s a perspective view of the other of the ypositioning members employed vwith the plunger structure of Figs. 15 and 16.
Briefly inthe practice of our invention we provide a plunger actuated tuning mechanism, the plungers bearing positioning means for a positionable member connected with a condenser gang. The plungers are of a type, the motion 40 of which is initiated manually by means of push buttons or their equivalents preferably, and the further motion of 'which is effected by solenoid driving means. This however, does not form a limitation upon certain general aspects of our 45 invention as will hereinafter be clear. The plungers are of the type in which the positioning means is concurrently adjusted by a shaft bearing right and left hand threads. Common driving means are provided for the shafts of the sev- 60 eral plungers, and these driving means are connected to the manual tuning means'for radio sets. The shafts of the plungers are arranged to be connected to the driving means respectively when their plungers are actuated, but not 55 otherwise. Consequently the manual tuning means can effect setting of the plunger only when the plunger is actuated.
The manual tuning means is also connected to the shaft of the condenser gang so that it may be employed in tuning the condenser when the automatic tuning means is not being employed. Means are provided to disconnect the manual tuning means however from the condenser gang when a plunger is actuated. 'Ihis relieves frictional drag on the condenser gang when automatic tuning means is being used, so that the automatic tuning means neither has to drive the manual tuning means nor the setting means, as will hereinafter be made clear. Also by reason of the structure aforesaid, when it is desired to effect or change a setting of any plunger, the positioning means on the plunger effects the change of the position of the condenser gang, and at that time the condenser gang is disconnected from the manual tuning means.
In the exemplary embodiment of our invention, as most clearly shown in Fig. 6, a condenser gang I is mounted upon a base 2, and this base in turn is mounted on the sub-base 3. The shaft 4 of the condenser gang bears a pinion 5 meshing with a gear segment 1, attached by an arm 9 to a plate I8, mounted for rocking or rotary motion longitudinally in the sub-base 3 on suitable pivots, as at II. It will be clear that if the position of the plate ID is changed about its pivots, the tuning position of the condenser gang I will thereby be altered. The sub-base 3 has rear and front depending extensions I2 and I5 in which the plunger mechanism next to be described is journaled.
The plunger mechanism proper in the embodiment of Figs. l to 11 inclusive, comprises a shaft I6 (Fig. 2), a pair of members I1 (Fig. 3), and means for adjusting the position of the member I1 by means of the shaft I6, and shown at I8 (Fig. 4). The shaft I6 is journaled in the rear extension I2, of the sub-base as shown in Fig. 6. One of the members I1 lies on each side of the shaft as clearly shown in Fig. 1. The members I1 are respectively journaled in slots for longitudinal movement in the rear and front extensions I 2 and I5 of the sub-base. T he members I1 comprise elongated bodies each having a positioning means I9 extending from one side thereof. Each member likewise carries a slot 26 or 20a, to accept a tail of the member I8 (Fig. 4). By forming both slots in each of the members I 1, we eliminate the necessity of making the members I1 in rights and lefts.
Considering Figures 1 and 6, it will be noted that one of the members I1 lies on each side of the shaft I6, and that the positioning means I9 on one of the members points upwardly While on the otherof the members it points downwardly. 'I'he member |8 (Fig. 4), is preferably formed of metal in a U shape, perforated as shown, at least one and preferably both of the perforations being threaded. One of the legs of the U is longer than the other as shown at 2|. The shaft I6 has right and left-hand threaded portions shown respectively at 22 and 23. In the assembly one of the members I8 engaging one of the threaded portions of the shaft, engages by means of its longer leg 2|, one of the members I1. The other of the members |8 engaging the other threaded portion of the shaft, engages by means of its longer leg, the other member I1. 'I'he longer leg 2| of the member I8, merely extends into one or the other of the slots 29 or 20a, to which, however, it may be fastened as by riveting. By this arrangement it will be evident that by rotating the shaft I8, the members |1 may be moved equally and in opposite directions producing concurrentl relative movement of the positioning projections I9. These positioning projections are rounded at their ends and are located to contact the plate l0, and when the plunger is drawn to the left in the several figures, these located projections I9 move the plate IIJ and thereby tune the condenser to a position appropriate to the adjustment of the position of the projections I9. The end of the shaft I6, where it passes through the depending subbase portion I2, may be provided with a washer 24, or the like, which, engaging the base projection I2 will limit the movement of the plunger assembly to the right in the several figures. This Washer valso has another purpose which will be set forth later. In order to draw the plungers to the right and therefore normally keep them in, inactive position, we employ a tension spring 25, engaged in some Way between the plunger assembly and a stationary frame portion. We have shown the spring engaged in a perforation in the lower positioning projection I9.
Preferably though not necessarily, we employ in our structure a solenoid actuating means for moving plungers after their movement has been initiated manually. We have shown therefore, a solenoid 26 mounted on the sub-base 3, and having an armature 21, which is connected to a driving plate 28, pivoted at its ends upon brackets or frame extensions 29 and 30. The lower end of the driving plate 28 is provided with actuating fingers 3|. The arc of the swinging movement of the plate and therefore of the fingers is shown at A in Figs. 6 and v7; and it will be observed that when the plunger assembly is drawn as far as it will go to the right, the actuating projections3| on the driving plate 28 meet the Washers 24. However, as in Fig. 7, when the plunger is manually moved slightly to the left, the washer 24 cornes into the range of movement of the actuating fingers 3|, so that if the plunger is so depressed and the solenoid 26 concurrently actuated, the fingers 3| engage the Washers 24, and, as the armature 21 ofthe solenoid moves to the right in the several iigures, the plunger assembly will be drawn to the left, bringing the positioning projections I9 against the plate IIl, and thereby tuning the condenser.
A longitudinally extending plate 32, parallels the depending portion I5 of the sub-base, and is attached to end plates or brackets 33 and 34. A series of meshing gears 35 (as best shown in Fig. 8), is journaled on the plate 32 by means of hollow grommets or the like 36. There is one of these gears for each of the plunger assemblies; and the shaft I6 of each of the plungers passes through one of these grommets. At the end of the train of gears 35 they may be connected by a pinion 31 to another gear 38 on the shaft 39, of a manual tuning arrangement. The shaft 39 extends through the front wall 40 of the radio set and may be provided with a suitable knob 4|. It will be evident that by turning the shaft 39 by means of the knob 4| the gears 35 may be rotated. In the train as shown, alternate gears rotate in opposite directions. In order that the manual tuning control may have the same effect on each plunger assembly, it is our practice to reverse the order of the threads on alternate plungers. 'I'his is to say: if one plunger has a right hand threadV on its left end and a left hand thread on its right end, in the next plunger the order of these parts will be reversed. Thus we provide that an operation of the manual tuning knob 4I in one rotary direction mayl bring about the same relative movement of the members I1 of any plunger assembly and vice versa.
It will now be clear that if any one of the gears 35 can be connected to the shaft I6 of the plunger' appropriate to that gear, the setting of the positioning means on that plunger can be changed merely by rotating the hand tuning device in theA usual manner. The Vshafts however. must be connected to the gears only at the times the plungers respectively are depressed, since otherwise the operation of the hand tuning mechanism would serve to vary the settings of all of the plungers simultaneously. As a consequence we provide clutches serving to connect a shaft of va particular plunger to its gear only when the said plunger is fully retracted. On the faces of th'e several gears we may provide a friction ri'ng 42, and we may provide a similar co-operating ring 43 on the face of a disk 44 surrounding the shaft I6.
We have shown the front end of the shaft I6 flattened at one side as at 45, and the disk 44 has a correspondingly flattened perforation 46 in it so that while the disk is slidable onthe shaft I6, it is non-rotatable with respect thereto. In order to control the position of the disk 44 on the shaft, we provide the disk with a thimble 41 attached to the disk and surrounding the shaft. Within the thimble there may be a washer 48 surrounding the shaft, and a compression cushioning spring 49 may be engaged between the disk and this washer. The iiattened portion on the shaft terminates in a shoulder 50, which engages the disk 44 and carries this part of the clutch couple to the right when the plunger assembly is furthest to the right. This separates the clutch elements as shown in Fig. 6. The front end of the shaft I6 is provided with a washer 5|, and a compression spring 52 is envgaged between this washer and the washer 48. Thus the clutch arrangement will be carried to the left as the plunger moves to the left; but after contact of the two friction rings 42 and 43 as shown in Fig. 7, the movable clutch portion will slide on the shaft against the compression of the springs 49 and 52.
We provide'a front plate portion 53 in which we mount push buttons 54, one for each plunger assembly. 'I'hese push buttons are hollow with-r in and accept the ends of the shaft I6 rotatably. The push buttons preferably contain indicia which may be marked with the call letters of the desired stations. The pressure of a finger on the push button will serve to move the plunger assembly to the left in the several figures suiciently to permit engagement of the finger 3| on the driving plate with the washer 24 on the shaft. The push button then remains depressed: but the plunger moves further. under theviniiuence of the solenoid as will be understood. But we cause the push buttons to operate a switch for the purpose of energizing the solenoid. 'Ihis switch r comprises an angularly bent plate 56 having a pintle 51, by which it may be pivotally mounted in ears or brackets 58. One of the angular arms of this plate is provided with projections 59, one
for each of the push buttons 54. On the other angular arm of the plate we provide a switch contact 60 which, co-acting with another contact suitably mounted and insulated, operates to form a switch. This switch is closed, as shown in Fig. '7, when any push button is depressed; and. the switch is located in the circuit of the solenoid.
provide a .A spring 6I urges the switch to open position and also urges the push buttons outwardly. The switch plate member serves to retain the push buttons in position. Thus, as will now be clear, when a push button 54 is depressed, its plunger is moved slightly to the left and the switch 60 is closed. Thereupon the solenoid through its driving plate is engaged with the plunger, and is energized, drawing the plunger as far as it will go to the left, and positioning the plate I0. At the same time the clutch appropriate to that plunger connects it with the appropriate gear 36 so that if there is any inaccuracy in the setting of the positioning members I9 on the plunger, or if a new setting is desired, this may be effected by rotating the manual tuning knob I4 while keeping the push button 54 depressed. ,The rotation of the tuning knob 4| effects rotation of the gear 35 for the plunger, and this through the clutch rotates the shaft of the plunger, changing its setting, through the operation of the right and left-hand threaded portions of the shaft. The set however, remains the same if the manual tuning knob is not actuated, and further when no plunger is actuated, all plungers are disconnected from their gears 35, so that rotation of the manual tuning knob under these circumstances will not alter the setting of the plungers.
We have shown the manual tuning shaft 39 connected by a flexible shaft 62, to a worm 63, suitably mounted on the frame and meshing with a worm gear 64 rotatably mounted upon the condenser shaft 4. At the end of this shaft we have fastened a sheave 65 non-rotatably. Between this sheave and the worm gear 64 we provide a Y friction or other clutch facing 66. We further magnetic clutch comprising a cup shaped core 61, and a central pole 68, both nonrotatably fastened to the shaft 4. A coil 69 is located within the cup. An armature 10 is fastened to the worm gear 64 and the compression spring l1| engages between the bottom of the cup and this armature, normally urging the worm gear 64 against the clutch facing 66. Thus rotation of the worm gear 64 will rotate the gang condenser shaft 4. Flexible leads may be em# ployed to the coil 69, because the condenser shaft 4 never rotates through more than a portion of a complete circle. 'Ihe coil 69 of the magnetic clutch is placed in circuit with the solenoid coil 26, so that when the solenoid is actuated, upon depressing one of the push buttons, the magnetic clutch is likewise actuated pulling the worm gear 64 away from the sheave 65, and effectively disconnecting it from the condenser shaft 4. 'Ihus when automatic tuning is being eected by means of a plunger, the manual tuning means together with its train of gears 35 to 38, is disconnected from the condenser shaft; and the automatic tuning means does not have to drive the manual tuning means and its train of gears.
The sheave 65 could in other arrangements be a mere clutch plate. We have employed a sheave in the illustrated embodiment so that we may pass over it a belt or cord 12. to pass over pulleys 13 and 14, by which its position is changed, and then to pass along the length of a dial plate 15 to a return pulley (not shown), at the other end thereof. A pointer,
'I'he clutch arrangements by which the gears This belt lis causedk 35 are connected selectively to the respective shafts of the plunger assemblies may be widely varied. We have shown an exemplary variant in Figures 12, 13 and 14. Here we have a washer 16, non-rotatably but slidably mounted upon the shaft iii.` A washer 11 engaged like the other washers, ineasuitable groove on the shaft, furnishes an abutment for the washer, andthe washer is urged against this abutment by means of a compression spring 18 engaging the end washer 5|. The spacing of the parts is such that when the plunger is fully retracted the washer 15 will come into substantial contact with its gear 35. The washer maybe provided with perforations 19 and the gear 35 may be provided with small studs adapted to engage in these perforations whereby to eiect'a switching connection.
Variations are likewise possible in a plunger construction, and one such variation is illustrated in Figs. 16 to 19 inclusive. Here the body of the plunger is indicated at 8|. At one end it is journaled in a depending back plate l2 of the sub-base. Where journaled it is provided with a tooth or dog 82, which may b e engaged by a I driving plate 28. At the other end of the body 8| it is turned over as at 83 and perforated to provide a bearing for the` shaft |6a. This shaft may be fixed in longitudinal position with respect to the body 8| by a washer 84 land a collar 85 engaging respectively on opposite sides of the turned over portion 83. The shaft passing through the grommet 36 forms a front bearing for the plunger assembly. The shaft is again provided with right and left hand threads as at 22a and 23a.
We provide movable members shown in Figs. 11 and 19, which have bodies 86 and 81 slotted as at 88 and 89.` Opposite ends ofv these members are turned over as at 90 and 9| and are perforated and threaded for engagement respectively with the right and left hand threaded portions of the shaft Ilia. Near the left hand end of each of the bodies 86 and 81 we provide the positioning projections |9a extending respectively above and below the bodies. The bodies are mounted in assembled relationship as shown in Fig. 16, the slots 88 and 89 in the bodies being engaged on studs 92 and 93, fastened to the body 8|. When the threaded shaft is in engagement with the ears 90 and 9| as shown in Fig. 15, the positioning projections |8a can be moved equally in opposite directions as has heretofore been explained. For the purpose of eliminating lost motion in the structure of Figs. 16 to 19, we have found it advisable to employ spring clips 94 as shown in Fig. 18. Each of these clips has at one end a bent portion 95, to engage one of the ears 90 or 9| (which ears may be notched for the vpurpose as shown in Fig. 17). At their other ends the clips 94 are bent as at 96 to engage the threaded shaft |6a. The manner of assembly will be clear from Fig. 15. The clips are preferably formed of spring wire. A
Modifications may be made in our invention without departing from the spirit of it.
Having thus described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Pat- A ent is:
1. In automatic tuning means for a radio set a positionable member, a series of manuals each having means for positioning said positionable member, means on each manual for adjusting said positioning means, a manual tuning means, a series of meshing gears connected therewith,
and individual friction clutches, one for each manual, operable upon depression of a manual for connecting its adjusting means with` the appropriate gear.
2. In automatic tuning means for a radio set a positionable member, a series of manuals each having means for positioning said positionable member, means on each manualior adjusting said positioning means, a manual tuning means, a series of meshing gears connected therewith, and individual friction clutches, one for each manual, operable upon depression of a manual for connecting its adjusting means with the appropriate gear, said adjusting means for said manuals comprising a threaded member rotation of which effects said adjustment.
v3. In automatic tuning means for a radio set a positionable member, a series of manuals each having means for positioning said positionable member, means on each manual for adjusting said positioning means, a manual tuning means, a series oi meshing gears connected therewith, and individual friction clutches, one for each manual, operable upon depression of a manual for connecting its adjusting means with the appropriate gear, said adjusting means for said manuals comprising a threaded member rotation of which effects said adjustment, the threads of the threaded members of alternate manuals being respectively of opposite hand to correspond with the opposite rotation of alternate ones of said meshing gears.
4. In automatic tuning means for a radio set a positionable member, a series of manuals each having means for positioning said positionable member, means on each manual for adjusting said positioning means, a manual tuning means, a series of meshing gears connected therewith, and individual friction clutches, one for each manual, operable upon depression of a manual for connecting its adjusting means with the appropriate gear, said adjusting means for said manuals comprising a threaded member rotation of which effects said adjustment, a member to be tuned, a drive between said manual tuning means and said member to be tuned, and means common to the several manuals for disconnecting said drive. .I
5. In automatic tuning means for a radio set a positionable member, a series of manuals each having means for positioning said positionable member, means on each manual for adjusting said positioning means, a manual tuning means, a series of meshing gears connected therewith, and individual friction clutches, one for each manual, operable upon depressionof a manual for connecting its adjusting means with the appropriate gear, said adjusting means for said manuals comprising a threaded member rotation of which effects said adjustment, a member to be tuned, a drive between said manual tuning means and said member to be tuned, and means common to the several manuals for disconnecting said drive, said means comprising a common switch, a magnetic clutch in said drive, and a connection between said switch and said clutch 6. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1 in which the said manuals are plungers and in which said adjusting means comprises a threaded shaft.
and 4left hand threads whereby they may be 75 Ywith right and left hand for engagement with said journaled on said asiatico adjusted, means at one end of each shaft for manually moving the plunger, a power translation means common to all plungers and means at the'other end of the shaft of each plunger power translation means upon said movement.
8. In automatic tuning means a frame, a series of plungers slidably journaled in said frame, each said plunger comprising a shaft with right and left hand threads, positioning means on said plungers engaging respectively said right and left hand threads whereby they may be ad justed, means at one end of each shaft for manually moving the plunger, a power translation means common to all plungers and means atthe other end of the shaft of each plunger for engagement with said power' translation means upon: said movement, said means for manually moving said plungers comprising manuals rotatably engaging the respective shafts whereby-said manuals cannot cause rotation of said shafts. i
9. In automatic tuning means a frame,V a series of plungers slidably journaled in said frame, each said plunger comprising a shaft threads, positioning means on said plungers engaging respectively said right and left hand'threads whereby they may be adjusted, means at one end of each shaft for manually moving the plunger, a power translation means common to all plungers and means at the other end of the shaft of each plunger for engagement with said power translation means upon said movement, meshing gears frame, one for each shaft and concentric with its shaft, a manual tuning means, a connection between said manual tun-- ing means and said meshing gears, and individual clutches mounted on each shaft for connecting said shaft with its respective gear upon manual movement vof the respective plunger.'
10. In automatic tuning means a frame, a series of plungers slidably journaled in said frame, each said plunger comprising a shaft with right and left hand threads, positioning means on said plungers engaging respectively said right and left hand threads whereby they' may be adjusted, means at one end of each shaft for manually moving the plunger, a power translation means common to all plungers and means at the other end of the shaft of each plunger for engagement with said power transla, tion means upon said movement, meshing gears journaled on said frame, one for each shaft and concentric with its shaft, a manual tuning means, a connection between said manual tuning means and said meshing gears, and individual clutches mounted on each shaft for connecting said shaft with its respective gear upon manual movement of the respective plunger, said clutches each comprising friction means non-rotatably mounted .on the respective shafts and adapted upon movement thereof to engagelthe faces of the respective gears.
11. In automatic tuning means a frame, a series of plungers slidably journaled in said frame, each said plunger comprising a shaft with rightand left hand threads, positioning means on said plungers engaging respectively said right and left hand threads whereby they may be adjusted, means at one end of each shaft for manually moving the plunger, a power translation means common to all plungers and means at the other end of the shaft of each plunger for engagement with said power translation means upon said movement, meshing gears journaled on said frame, one for each shaft and concentric with its shaft, a manual tuning means, a connection between said ing means and said meshing gears, and individual clutches mounted on each shaft for connecting said shaft with its respective gear upon manual movement of the respective plunger, said clutches each comprising an engagement portion on a gear and a cooperating engagement portion non-rotatably mounted upon the respective shaft.
12. In automatic tuning means a frame, a series of plungers slidably journaled in said frame, each said plunger comprising a shaft with right and left hand threads, positioning means on said plungers engaging respectively said right and lefthand threads whereby they may be adjusted, means ,at one end of each shaft for manually moving the plunger, a power trans.. lation 'means common to `all plungers and means at the other end of the shaft of each plunger for engagement with said power translation means upon said movement, meshing gears journaled on said frame, one foreach shaft and concentric with'its shaft, a manual tuning means, a connection between said manual tuning means and said meshing gears, and individual clutches mounted on each shaft for connecting said shaft with its respective gear upon manual movement of the respective plunger, the order oi. the right and left hand threads on alternateshafts being reversed to correspond with the opposite rotation of alternate ones of said meshing gears.
13. In automatic tuning means a frame, a series of plungers vslidably journaled in said frame, each said plunger comprising a shaft with right and left hand threads, positioning means on saidplungers engaging respectively said right and left hand threads whereby vthey may be adjusted, means at one end of each shaft for manually moving theplunger, a power translation means common to all plungers and means at the other end of the shaft of each plunger for engagement with said power translation means upon said movement, meshing gears ljournaled on said frame, one for each shaft and concentric with its shaft, a manual tuning means, a connection between said manual tuning means and manual tunsaid meshing gears, and individual clutches mounted on each shaft for connecting said shaft with its respective gear upon manual movement of the respective plunger, the order of the right and left hand threads on alternate shafts being reversed to correspond with the opposite rotation of alternate ones of said meshing gears, a means to be tuned, a drive between said manual tuning means and said last mentioned means,
a clutch in said drive, and means common to the several plungers for disengaging said clutch.
14. In automatic means a. means movably mounted in said frame, and a plunger for positioning said positionable means, said plunger comprising a shaft having right and left hand threaded portions and journaled at one end in said frame, a pair of positioning elements having respective engagement with said right and left hand threaded portions, and nonrotatably engaging said frame, engagement means at one end of the plunger forconnecting it.to a power drive, and manual means at the other end of the plunger for moving it.
15. In automatic means a frame, positionable frame, positionable means movably mounted in said frame, and a plunger for positioning said positionable means, said plunger comprising a shaft having right and left hand threaded portions and journaled at one end in said frame, a pair of positioning elements having respective engagement with said right and left hand threaded portions, and nonrotatably engaging said frame, engagement means at one end of the plunger for connecting it to a 1 power drive, and manual means at the other end of the plunger for moving it, a gear concentric with said shaft, and means non-rotatably mounted on said shaft for connecting it to said gear when said shaft is moved.
16. Apparatus as claimed in claim 15 in which said shaft is journaled at both ends in said frame and in which said shaft bears said engagement means.
DANA C. MANNING. LEONARD S. DEPWEG.
US297136A 1939-09-29 1939-09-29 Automatic tuner including manual adjustment means Expired - Lifetime US2214506A (en)

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2419968A (en) * 1944-07-26 1947-05-06 Gen Electric Push button tuner for multiband radio receivers
US2485223A (en) * 1943-12-31 1949-10-18 Zenith Radio Corp Preselected stop means for tuner elements
US2510156A (en) * 1948-01-19 1950-06-06 Motorola Inc Automatic tuner
US2512714A (en) * 1947-09-16 1950-06-27 Colonial Radio Corp Screw and nut gearing
US2513353A (en) * 1944-06-14 1950-07-04 Freeman H Owens Mechanism for adjusting and setting radios or other apparatus
US2522973A (en) * 1945-01-30 1950-09-19 Rca Corp Push-button ultra high frequency tuner
US2573801A (en) * 1946-09-20 1951-11-06 Magnavox Co Tuning control
US2775127A (en) * 1952-11-25 1956-12-25 Harry J Laiming Shaft positioning device
DE964616C (en) * 1952-12-13 1957-05-23 Graetz Kg Push button system for radio and / or television equipment
DE966337C (en) * 1952-06-29 1957-07-25 Blaupunkt Werke G M B H Zweign Arrangement for tuning high-frequency devices by means of a push-button selector with power drive
US2851887A (en) * 1955-12-15 1958-09-16 Gen Motors Corp Combined signal seeking push button and manual tuner
US3064091A (en) * 1959-06-12 1962-11-13 Proctor Silex Corp Position selection means
US3165000A (en) * 1961-08-31 1965-01-12 Radio Condenser Co Remote control tuning system
DE977299C (en) * 1952-05-20 1965-10-28 Telefunken Patent Receiver with either usable continuous voting or push-button voting
JPS4843204A (en) * 1971-10-01 1973-06-22

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2485223A (en) * 1943-12-31 1949-10-18 Zenith Radio Corp Preselected stop means for tuner elements
US2513353A (en) * 1944-06-14 1950-07-04 Freeman H Owens Mechanism for adjusting and setting radios or other apparatus
US2419968A (en) * 1944-07-26 1947-05-06 Gen Electric Push button tuner for multiband radio receivers
US2522973A (en) * 1945-01-30 1950-09-19 Rca Corp Push-button ultra high frequency tuner
US2573801A (en) * 1946-09-20 1951-11-06 Magnavox Co Tuning control
US2512714A (en) * 1947-09-16 1950-06-27 Colonial Radio Corp Screw and nut gearing
US2510156A (en) * 1948-01-19 1950-06-06 Motorola Inc Automatic tuner
DE977299C (en) * 1952-05-20 1965-10-28 Telefunken Patent Receiver with either usable continuous voting or push-button voting
DE966337C (en) * 1952-06-29 1957-07-25 Blaupunkt Werke G M B H Zweign Arrangement for tuning high-frequency devices by means of a push-button selector with power drive
US2775127A (en) * 1952-11-25 1956-12-25 Harry J Laiming Shaft positioning device
DE964616C (en) * 1952-12-13 1957-05-23 Graetz Kg Push button system for radio and / or television equipment
US2851887A (en) * 1955-12-15 1958-09-16 Gen Motors Corp Combined signal seeking push button and manual tuner
US3064091A (en) * 1959-06-12 1962-11-13 Proctor Silex Corp Position selection means
US3165000A (en) * 1961-08-31 1965-01-12 Radio Condenser Co Remote control tuning system
JPS4843204A (en) * 1971-10-01 1973-06-22

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