US2214269A - Air conditioning apparatus - Google Patents

Air conditioning apparatus Download PDF

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US2214269A
US2214269A US150597A US15059737A US2214269A US 2214269 A US2214269 A US 2214269A US 150597 A US150597 A US 150597A US 15059737 A US15059737 A US 15059737A US 2214269 A US2214269 A US 2214269A
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chamber
walls
furrows
casing
burner
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US150597A
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Charles L Bryant
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C L BRYANT Corp
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C L BRYANT CORP
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT GENERATING MEANS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H3/00Air heaters having heat generating means
    • F24H3/02Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation
    • F24H3/06Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation the air being kept separate from the heating medium, e.g. using forced circulation of air over radiators
    • F24H3/065Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation the air being kept separate from the heating medium, e.g. using forced circulation of air over radiators using fluid combustibles

Description

Sept. l0, 1940.
C. L. BRYANT AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS Filed June 26, 1937 5 Sheets-Sheet l ffd l ff Chnrl. Lrgmc IQVLNTQR BTM www ATTORNE'S Sept. 10, 1940. c. Enmnlwrr 2,214,269
AIR GONDITIUNING APrARATUS l Filled June 2e, 1937 .s sheets-sheet 2 Anw-GRN afg Sept. l0, 1940. c. I.. BRYANT AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS Fileduune 26. 19s? es sheets-sheet Eis; 5
Sept 10, 1940 c. L. BRYANT AIB oNDITIONING APPARATUS Filed June 26. 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 BVMW Sept. 10, 1940. c. 1 BRYAN-r AIN CONDITIONING APPARATUS 5 Sheets-Sheet Filed June' 2e. 195'.'
P m5 o IT 7 9 a r v T In n.5 M l@ L m 3 n h W B w Patented Sept. 10, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS corporation of Ohio Application June 26,
9 Claims.
This invention relates to air conditioning apparatus, and the object of this invention is to provide new and improved apparatus of this type.
In the drawings accompanying this specification and forming a part of this application, I have shown, for purposes-of illustration, one form which my invention may assume, and in these drawings:
Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view through the apparatus, certain parts being shown in elevation and certain parts being broken away.
Figure 2 is a front elevational view of the embodiment shown in Figure 1, parts being broken away,
Figure 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view corresponding substantially to the line 3-3 of Figure l,
Figure 4 is an enlarged broken vertical sectional view corresponding substantially to the line 4;-4 of Figure 2,
Figure 5 is a transverse sectional view corresponding substantially to the line 5-5 of Figure 4,
Figure 6 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view corresponding substantially to the line 6-6 of Figure 5,
Figure '7 is a transverse sectional view corresponding to the line I-I of Figure 4, parts being broken away to better accommodate the view to the sheet,
Figure 8 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional view corresponding substantially to the line 8-8 of Figure 5, l
Figure 9 is a fragmentary sectional view corref sponding to the line 9 9 of Figure l, parts being omitted for the sake of clearness,
Figure 10 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view showing, in enlarged relation, the upper portion of the apparatus shown in Figure 1, some parts being shown in elevation,
Figure l1 is a sectional view corresponding generally to the line I I-I I of Figure 1I), and
Figure l2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of a detail.
Referring to the drawings, the apparatus includes an outer casing I5 and an inner casing I6, the outer casing vbeing more or less of an ornamental nature, and in some instances this casing may be omitted. The outer casing is provided'with a removable panel Il, providing access to the interior of the casing, and this panel may be quickly attachable to and detachable from the casing by means of a catch device I8. As best shown in Figure 5 the outer casing I5 is transversely spaced from the inner casing I6,
1937, Serial No. 150,597
the spacing at the side carrying the panel being considerably greater than the spacing at the remaining sides, and this greater spacing 'provides a compartment I9 for housing mechanism hereinafter referred to.
As shown in Figures 1 and 2, the outer chamber I5 rests on a base 20 comprisinga rectangular member 2|, formed of bar iron, and strengthened by a plurality of cross-bars 22. Disposed upon the cross-bars 22 is a supporting plate 23, formed of any suitable material. Means are provided to effect leveling of the base, these means, in this instance, comprising a bolt 2Ia (see Figures 1, 2, and 12) positioned at spaced parts of the base 20, preferably at the corners of the base, these bolts 2Ia screw-threadedly taking through apertures formed in aA horizontal portion of the member 2|, and the end of the bolt being engageable with the supporting surface. Thus, it will be lapparent that if the supporting surface is uneven, the bolts 2Ia. may be adjusted` so as to bring the base 20 to a desired position.
As suggested in Figure 4, the outer casing I5, adjacent its upper end, `has a detachable connection with the upper end of the inner casing I6, this connection also receiving the lower Open end of a casing structure 24 forming at least part of a bonnet chamber 24a. This casing structure- 24 may be of various lengths, to suit the needs of risers 25 leading from the bonnet chamber 24a to receiving means, such as rooms, spaced from the apparatus.
The inner casing I6 closelyl encompasses a chamber member 26, having a top wall 2l, a bottom wall 28, a front Wall 29, a rear wall 30, and side walls 3|. As best shown in Figures 5 and 7, the front and rea-r walls 29 and 30 respectively, and the side walls 3| are corrugated, so as to provide recesses or furrows on the inner surfaces of these walls, and recesses or furrows on the outer surfaces of these walls, the inner and outer recesses being complementary. Referring to Figure 7, it will be noted that the inner and outer furrows 32 and 33 of the side Walls 3|, are deeper thany the inner and outer furrows 34 and 35 of the front and rear walls 29 and 30.
The inner casing I6 circumscribes' the outer crests formed by the corrugated walls, a plurality of spacing members 36, such as spaced wires secured to either the chamber 26 or the interior of the inner casing I6, serve to space the inner casing I6 from the chamber 26. At the forward lower end of the chamber 26 an opening 31 is formed, dei-ined by a lateral rectangular extension 38 of theiront wall 29, this extension being of a width substantially equal to the width of the corrugated portion of the front wall 29, and having its lower wall formed by an extension of the bottom wall 28 of the chamber 26. The corrugations in the front wall 29 are longitudinally interrupted to provide a space 39 above the lateral extension 38. 'I'he top wall 21 closes the upper end of the corrugations in the front wall 29, and an inwardly extending wall 49 serves to close the lower end of these corrugations, and also cooperates, with the top of the lateral rectangular extension to define the space 39.
The corrugated walls of the chamber 26 do not extend into the corners of the inner casing i6,
thus forming elongated pockets adjacent these corners, and these pockets are partially blocked up bytubular members 4| and 43, the members being formed with closed ends. As shown in Figures 1, 7, and 9, the tubular members 4I adjacent the front wall 29 extend from the upper wall 21 of the chamber 26 to a point substantially in line With the wall 49 defining the lower end of the corrugations of the front wall 29. The tubular members 4| t against the adjacent walls of the inner casing, but are spaced from the adjacent surfaces of the front and side walls 29 and 3| respectively, to provide elongated passageways 42, as seen in Figure '1. Tubular members 43, similar to the members 4|, are positioned adjacent the rear wall 39 of the chamber 26, but in this case the members 43 extend from the top wall 21 of the chamber 26 to the bottom wall 28, and these members are spaced from the adjacent surfaces of the rear wall 39 and the side walls 3| to provide elongated passageways 44. In the particular construction illustrated, the chamber 26 has its front, rear, and side walls, formed of lsheet-metal and as separate units, these walls being joined by welded connections as shown at 45 in Figures 5 and '1. The top and bottom walls 21 ari/d 28 may also be formed 4separately and welded to the other walls. Of course the chamber 26 may be formed in any other suitable manner, as will be obvious.
The bottom wall 28 of the chamber 26, and the lower marginal surfaces of the inner casing |6 rest upon a flange 46 partially formed around an opening 41 in a generally rectangular receptacle 48, the front wall of the receptacle being inclined as shown at 49 and notched to receive the extension 38. The rear Wall of the receptacle is provided with a iianged aperture 59, adapted to receive the outlet end of a blower mechanismY 52. The blower mechanism 52 comprises a casing formed with an axial inlet, and the casing has a fan disposed therein, the fan being driven through a suitable driving connection with an electric motor 53. The blower mechanism 52 is secured to the base 23 by means of upright strips 54 and horizontal strips 55, respectively secured to the blower mechanism 52 and the cross-bars 22. The blower mechanism 52 is disposed within a casing 56, supported on the base 29, and secured to the rear wall of the outer casing l5, and has an inlet duct 51, and air ltering means 58, interposed between the inlet duct 51 and the inlet of the blower mechanism 52.
The top wall 21 of the chamber 26 is apertured as shown at 59, and a ue pipe 69 is secured to the top wall 21 in any suitable manner, such as Welding or the like, this iue pipe having an opening 6| in line with the opening 59, the' flue pipe 69 leading outwardly from the inner casing I5 and cuter casing I6 to within a draft hood 62, and a pipe 63 leading from the draft hood to a suitable exhaust, such as a chimney (not shown). It will be apparent that the inner furrows 32 of the side walls 3|, and the inner furrows 34 of the front and rear walls 29 and 39, form paths leading generally from the bottom of the chamber 26 to the exhaust aperture 59.
The opening 31 formed by the lateral rectangular extension 38 of the chamber 26 is closed by a plate 64 having a marginal ange 65 circumscribing the opening 31 of the lateral extension 38. The plate 64 is preferably made in upper and lower halves 66 and 61 respectively, and the halves have an overlapping joint 68 held together by a bolt connection 69. Adjacent the upper end 66 of the plate 64 a door 19 is provided,
- hinged to the plate 64 as shown at 1|, and provided with an inspection Window 12. The lower half 61 cf the plate 64 is formed with means providing a pair of vestibules 13 and 14, each vestibule communicating with the interior of the chamber 26. The vestibule 13 has a lower open side 15 closed by a door 16, and the vestibule 14 has a lower open side 11 closed by a door 18. The doors 16 and 18 may be integrally connected with a strip 19, here shown to be of T-cross-section for strengthening purposes, and each door carries a hinge part adapted to be pivotally connected to a hinge part carried by the plate 64, as shown at 89.
A burner construction 8| is carried by the lower wall 29 of the chamber 26, this construction being substantially similar to the construction shown in my co-pending application, Serial Number 74,929, filed April 1'7, 1936, and only a brief description of this construction is believed to be necessary. The burner construction 8| comprises a manifold device 82 having a central trough-shaped channel 83 communicating with a conduit 84 leading from a source of fuel supply. The walls of the trough 83 dei-lne shallow troughs 85 and 86 upon eitherside of the trough 83, these troughs 85 and 96 extending the length of the manifold device 82, as suggested in Figure 4. Communicating with the trough 85 is a pair of mixing chambers 81, and communicating with the trough 86 is a pair of mixing chambers 88. The mixing chambers 81 respectively connect to burners 90, and the chambers 88 respectively connect to burners 9|. The burners 99 and 9| are provided with feet 92 and 93 respectively', which rest on the lower wall 28 of the chamber 26. Supported by the burners 99 and 9| are chambered baie means 94 and 95' respectively, each having an angular part 96, forming a support for a plate 91, the plate 91 at its forward end is extended .as shown at 98 to fit within the opening 31 defined by the lateral extension 38, and the forward surface of the plate'91 abuts the plate 64, and rests on a ange 99 secured to the plate 64. The plate 91 also has a downwardly extending back part |99 cooperating with the feet 92 and 93 to form a generally rectangular compartment at the lower part of the chamber 26.
The pipe 84 extends outwardly from the compartment formed by the plate 91 and feet 92 and 93, through an' aperture in the plate 64, and is connected to a manual shut-off valve |9|. valve 9| is in turn connected to the outlet chamber |92 of a valve |93, the inlet chamber |94 of this valve being connected to a pipe |95 leading to a pressure regulator |96. 'I'he pressure regulator |96 may beof the type wherein a valve is connected to a diaphragm within the diaphragm chamber |91, the lower side of 'the diaphragm communicating directly with the fuel .pressure The in a pipe |08 leading to a source of supply, and the upper side of the diaphragm communicates with the atmosphere through a conduit |09.
The entire burner assembly 8|, together with the valves and pipe connections may be assembled on the lower section 61 of the plate 64, and this assembly may be moved to proper position within the lower interior of the chamber 26, and then the lower section 61 may be secured to the upper section 66', by means of the bolts 69. 'Ihe plate 64 may be secured to the lateral extension 38 in any suitable manner, as by means of bolts not shown.
Opening and closing of the valve |03 may be electrically controlled by a motor device I|0 connected to the stem of the valve member within the valve |03, movement of the motor device ||0 not only eecting movement of the valve stem but simultaneously effecting movement of a lever ||2 extending outwardly from the casing of the motor device ||0. The lever ||2 is connected to a lug I3, formed on the door 16, by means of a.chain H4, a spring ||5 being interposed in the length of chain so as to prevent straining of the chain. The lug ||3 is provided with a plurality of openings for receiving the lower end of the chain ||4, the opening to be chosen being dependent upon the input requirement of the apparatus. v
The burner construction 8|, in this particular instance, uses gas as a fuel, although it will be evident that the burner construction'may be such as to use other types of fuel.
When the motor device ||0 moves to ope'n up communication between the ports |02 and |04 of the'valve |03, this movement also lowers the lever |I2 so as to open the doors 18 and 18, thereby uncovering the openings 15 and 11 of the vestibules 13 and 14, so that primary air is directed to the mixing chambers 81 and 88 and secondary air is directed to the lower ends of the chambered baiiles 94, 95. '.On the other hand, when the motor device ||0 moves to close comimunication between the ports |02 and |04 of the valve |03, this movement raises the arm ||2 so as to move the doors 16 and 18 to closed position, thereby cutting off the supply of air to the burner mechanism. In event that the .chain ||4 shouldbreak for any reason, the doors 16 and 18 will fall to open position under the influence of gravity, so that if the valve |03 is opened, an accumulation of raw gas is prevented from filling the chamber 26.
Pilot burners I6 and ||1 are provided for each pair of burners and 9|, these pilots being carried by supporting blocks ||8 which are attached to the respective feet 92 and 93. The pilot burners have connection with a conduit ||9, in turn connected by a T-connection with a pipe |20 leading from the inlet port |04 of the valve |03. A hand cock |2| may be interposed in the pipe line |20 to manually control the flow of fuel to the pilot burners ||6 and ||1. Carried by one of the supporting blocks ||8 isa tube |22, this tube being connected to the tube |09 leading from. the upper side of the diaphragm chamber |01 of the regulator valve |06, and the purpose being that in event the diaphragm should spring a leak, fuel from the diaphragm chamber will pass along the tube |09 and vent through the tube |22 to a point adjacent the pilot `flame, so that this escaping fuel will be consumed.
Carried by each of the connecting blocks ||8 is a thermally responsive device |23 leading to a control device |24. As best shown in Figure 8, a
thermally responsive device |23 positioned adburner, in the case of Figure 8, the device is positioned adjacent an aperture ||1a formed at an intermediate portion of the pilot burner I1, and a ame from the aperture ||1a plays on the thermally responsive device |23 when the pilot burner ||1 is burning. One form which the thermially responsive device |23 and control device |24 may take is suggested in Figure 8, and as shown, the responsive device |23 houses a thermo-electric junction |25 leading to a magnet |26 within the control device |24. When a ame is burning at the aperture ||1a, a small current will be generated within the thermal responsivevdevice |23 to energize the magnet |26, so that a plate |21 will be drawn to the poles of a magnet against the action of a spring |29. Should-the flame at the aperture ||1a be extinguished, the spring |28 will urge the plate |21 away from the magnet |26, and cause a bridge |29 to engage the contacts |30. The electrical connection of the contacts |30 with the motor device |0 is such, that when the bridge engages the contacts |30, the motor device will move to close communication between the ports |02 and |04 of the valve |03, and also move the doors 16 and 18 to closed position. A reset button |3| is provided for effecting proper relation of the fuel control system. Inasmuch as two pilot Aburners are used in this construction, two control devices |24 are shown for operation with respective pilot burners, and as a matter of convenience, these control devices are carried on the upper surface of the vestible 14 by means of machine screws, the vestibule 14 being provided with a pair of apertures |32, one of which is shown in Figure 8, for the passage of a conduit |33 leading to the thermal responsive devices |23.
.A connection |34 (Figures 1 and 3) in the pipe line |05 may screw-threadedly engage the top of a foot |35, so that most of the weight of the fuel conduits and control devices is carried by this foot.
Within the chamber 26 and adjacent the top wall 21 thereof is a baille plate |36, supported in position by means of rods |31, the lower end of each rod having nuts |38 clamped on opposite sides of the baille plate |36, and the upper end of each rod passing through an aperture in a strip |39, the extremity of the upper end screwthreadedly receiving a nut |39a. As best shown in Figures 4 and 11, each strip |39 spans the opening 6| formed in the ue pipe 60. The bafiie plate |36 is formed with upwardly extending legs |38a, the extremity of each leg bearing against the inner surface of the top wall 21 of the chamber 26. The baille plate |36 may be held against displacement by drawing up on each of the nuts |39a. The plate |36 is provided with short fingers |40 extending into the furrows 34 formed by the corrugations in the front and rear walls 29 and 30, and is4 provided also with longer ngers |4| extending into the furrows 32 1 and 6, that the flame issuing from the mouths 90a and 9Ia ofthe burners 90 and 9| is directed by the baille means 94 and 95 toward the furrows 32 formed in the side walls 3 I.
Referring to Figures 10 and 11 there is shown a humidifying device |42 for furher conditioning the air Within the inner casing I6 and the bonnet chamber 24a, this humidifying device |42 comprising a pair of sheet-metal supporting plates |43 hinged together at one end as at I44, and each having a trough |45 formed at its other end. Each trough '|45 is provided with a Water outlet I 46 leading to a suitable drain (not shown). of each supporting plate are extended and bend back upon the supporting plate to form guideways |41 between which is guided the side surfaces of a plate |48, the lower end of each plate terminating adjacent the bottom of a respective trough |45, and the upper end having margins inclining upwardly toward the central part of the plate, as shown at |49, a recess |50 being formed at the junction of the inclined margins |49. The plate |48 is formed of material having at least some absorbent characteristics, While at the same time having heat resistant characteristics, and one material found suitable for this purpose is asbestos. The plate |48 is provided with a plurality of apertures |5I for the purpose of permitting heat to escape from the supporting plates |43. As shown in Figure 11, the humidifying device |42 straddles the ue pipe 60, and detachable connections |52 may be used for holding the humidifier device in position with respect to the chamber 26.
A collecting cup |53, having a pair of nipples |54, is positioned above the humidifier device |42, so that the nipples are directly in line with the respective recesses |50 formed in the plates |48. As shown in Figure 10, the cup |53 is supported on a tube |55, leading exteriorly of the bonnet chamber 24a, and through a bracket |56, the tube |55 communicating with a cup I 51 positioned directly beneath an outlet aperture in a valve |58. The valve |58 is connected to a source of water supply by means of a tube |59, and the amount of water dripping into the cup |51 may be regulated by a manual adjustment |60. A thermostat I6| extends into the bonnet chamber 24a and is. influenced by the temperature -within the bonnet chamber 24a, to automatically control the outlet aperture of the valve |58.
- 'Ihe troughs |45 of the humidier device |42 may have readily disconnectable connections ,with the drain conduits I 46, so that the device |42 may be removed from the chamber 26, and because of the hinged joint, the legs |43 may be folded together, so that the entire device can be Withdrawn from the bonnet chamben 24a through an opening such as for a riser 25.
A switch housing |62 is disposed within the compartment I9 formed by the outer casing I5, and contains switching devices |63 and |64, these devices being operated by a thermostat l|65 leading into the bonnet chamber 24a, and
disposed along one side of the humidifying device I42. The switches |63 and |64 may be of the mercury type, the switch I 63 controlling operation of the blower mechanism 52, and the switch |64 being connected to the motor device IIO.
To operate the apparatus hereinbefore described, the switches |63 and |64 contained in the switch housing |62 are adjusted.l to operate at predetermined temperatures. The reset but- 'Ihe side marginal surfacesl inwardly of the device casing so as to separate the bridges |29 from the contacts |30, and the pilot burners II6 and II1 are manually lighted, lighting ofthese pilot burners also providing a flame at the small apertures, such as the aperture |I1a. After a suicient interval, current will be generated by the thermo-electric junction |25 to energize the magnet |26 so as to hold the bridge |29 out of engagement with the contacts |30. When the bridge |29 is moved from engagement with the contacts |30, electrical connection of the control devices |24 with the motor device I |0 is such as to effect movement of the motor device to open communication between the ports |02 and I 04 of the valve |03, thus supplying the burners and 9| with gas, and this gas is ignited by the pilot burners II6 and |I1. Of course, the motor device |I0 simultaneously opens the doors 16 and 18 of the vestibules 13 and 14 so as to supply primary and secondary air to the Iburner construction 8|. The heat and products of combustion issuing from the burner conduits 90a and 9Ia will be directed by the baiiles 94 and 95 into the furrows 32 formed by the corrugated side walls 3|, the products of combustion generally following the furrows 32; and being further urged toward the surfaces defining these furrows by the fingers I4I of the baille |36. Some of the products of combustion will move toward the central part of the chamber 26, and also run upwardly along the furrows 34 formed by the corrugated front and rear walls respectively, but because of the choking-off action producedby the fingers |40 of the bafe |36, the majority of the 4products of com-bustion will passalong the furrows 32 and outwardly of the chamber 26, through the flue pipe 60.
After the temperature in the bonnet chamber 24a reaches a predetermined amount, the thermostat |65 will actuate the switch |63 so as to energize the motor 53,`and cause operation of the blower mechanism 52. Air will be drawn into the blower chamber 56 through the conduit 51 and pass through the filtering means 58, this air entering the inlet of the blower mechanism and being expelled from the outlet of this mechanism into 'the compartment 48. The inclined wall 49 of the compartment 48 serves to direct the air upwardly through the exterior furrows 33 formed on the side walls 3|, and the exterior furrows 35 formed in the front and rear walls 29 and 30, as shown by the arrowsV in Figures 1 and 9. Figure 9 also shows, by means of arrows, the air passing around the lateral extension 38 and being directed toward the furrows 35 in the front Wall 29 by means of the tubular members 4|. Inasmuch as the airv is confined to within the inner casing I6, air will also be forced upwardly along the elongated passage-Ways 42 and 44 formed by the tubular members 4| and 43 and the' adjacent surfaces of the walls 29, 30, and 3|'.
It will be obvious then that the heated prodi ucts'of combustion will be directed along the interior furrows 32 and 34, while the air to be heated is directed along the exterior furrows 3 and 35, and because of the large surface presented by th'e corrugated' walls, a rapid exchange of heat is effected. The air is blown upwardly into the bonnet chamber 24a., and from there outwardly through the risers 25 to the rooms to be heated. Should the blower be powerful enough to lower the temperature in the bonnet chamber 24a, to a predetermined low tons I3I of the control devices I 24 are pushed setting, the thermostat |65 will energize the switch |63 to stop operation of the blower until a proper temperature may again be built up in the bonnet chamber 24a. On the other hand, if the temperature in the bonnet chamber 24a reaches a predetermined high value, the thermostat |65 will effect operation of the switch |64 so as to cause movement of the motor device to close communication between the ports |02 and |04 of the valve |03, and also close the doors 16 and '|8, until the temperature in the bonnet chamber 24a falls below the predetermined high setting.
The operation of the valve |58 controlling the water supply to the humidifier |42 is also controlled by the temperature in the bonnet 24a, a low temperature in this chamber causing restriction of the water supply to the humidifier, while a high temperature in the bonnet 24a causes more Water to flow to the humidifier |42. It will be seen that as water drops from the nipples |54 of the cup |53 into the recesses |50 formed in the plates |48, this water will ow along the inclined surfaces |49 and over the edges of the surfaces |49 and recesses |50, and then gravitate over the outer surface of the plates-|48. vSome water will also be drawn upwardly of each plate |48 from the troughs |45 by capillary action. Heat within the bonnet chamber 24a, and heat supplied by radiation from the iiue pipe 60 and the chamber 26 is sufficient to cause vaporization of the water gravitatingl over the surface of the plates |48, this heat being further distributed throughout the area of the plates |48 `by reason of the apertures formed in these plates.
A thermostat |66 may be placed in a room remote from the apparatus, and may be so connected to the motor device I0 so that if the room is not at the desired temperature, the device ||0 will be energized to cause a supply of gas and air to flow to the burners. Of course, it will be apparent that the motor device |'|0 is also a1- ways under control 'of the switch |64 and th control device |24.
Referring to Figure 7, it will be noted that the corrugated construction of the walls 29, 30, and 3| provides for lateral expansion of\ the chamber 26, this expansion being taken up mostly by the corrugations, so that little expanding force is transmitted to the interior chamber I6, thus doing away with the objectionable cracking usually heard when the apparatus heats or cools. Also, because the chamber 26 is supported only on the flange 46 of the compartment 48, longitudinal expansion may also take place without any objectionable cracking noise. A
It has been found preferable to increase the depth of the corrugations of the side walls 3|, and so construct and arrange the heating means that the greater amount of heat is delivered along these side walls, since these walls are usually free of doors, iiues, or the like. It will be appreciated that the furnace herein shown has a greater heating capacity than one where the corrugations of all the side walls are even. The heating capacity of the furnace herein shown can be increased by increasing the extent of the side walls 3|, and since the burners extend along the side walls, it is a comparatively simple matter to increase the heating effect by adding additional burners to the burner assembly.
From the foregoing it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that I have accomplished at least the principal object of my invention, and
it also will be apparent to those skilled in the art' that the embodiment herein described may be variously changed and modified, without departing from the spirit of the invention, and that the invention is capable of uses and has advantages not herein specifically described; hence it will be appreciated that the herein disclosedembodiments are illustrative only, and that my invention is not limited thereto.
I claim:
l. Air conditioning apparatus, comprising: means, forming a main chamber, and having a corrugated wall portion defining at least a part of said main chamber, said wall portion providing extending ridges and furrows; means within said main chamber, forming an auxiliary chamber; manifold means, for mixing fuel with primary air, said manifold means being disposed within said auxiliary chamber; burner means, connected to said manifold means, the burner opening of said burner means being disposed within said main chamber; means, providing for the supply of secondary air to said auxiliary chamber; and directing means, so positioned as to direct the products of combustion from said burner opening into the furrows of said wall portion, said directing means having conduit means, the lower end of which receives secondary air from said auxiliary chamber and the upper end of which terminates above said burner opening, to supply` secondary air to the rising products of combustion.
2. Air conditioning apparatus, comprising: means forming a chamber of generally-polygonal cross-section, the Wall portions defining said chamber being corrugated, providing longitudinally extending interior and exterior furrows and ridges, and adjacent wall portions at the corners of said chamber being so joined as to form a furrow at each corner, each of said corner furrows being defined bysides inclined with respect to each other an amount greater than the inclination of the sides defining the furrows intermeidiate the corner furrows;` casing means, circumscribing the exterior ridges of said wall portions,
forming spaces with the exterior intermediate.
` means forming a chamber of generally polygonal cross-section, the wall portions defining said chamber being corrugated, providing longitudinally extending furrows and ridges, and adjacent wall portions at the corners of said chamber being joined; a casing, polygonal in cross-section, circumscribing the exterior ridges of said wall portions, forming spaces with the exterior furrows through which a uid to be heated may be circulated, said casing at the corners of said chamber providing additional spaces through which a fiuid to be heated may be circulated, each of said additional spaces being greater in cross-sectional size than the cross-sectional size of a space provided by any one of said exterior furrows; and means, within said additional spaces, so constructed and larranged to reduce thecross-sectional size of these spaces, so that fiuid ow is distributed about the exterior of said chamber. i
4. Air conditioning apparatus, comprising: means forming a chamber of generally polygonal cross-section, the wall portions dening said chamber being corrugated, providing longitudinally extending furrows and ridges, and adjacent wall portions at the corners of said chamber means being joined; a casing polygonal in cross-section, circumscribing the exterior ridges of said Wall portions, forming spaces with the exterior furrows through which a iluid to be heated may be circulated, said casing at the corners of said chamber providing additional spaces through which a uid to be heated may be circulated, each of said additional spaces being greater in cross-sectional size than the crosssectional size of a space provided by any one of said exterior furrows; and hollow members positioned within said additional spaces, so con-A structed and arranged to reduce the cross-sectional size of said additional spaces and to provide for iiuid vflow along the adjacent surfaces of said chamber, so that fluid now is distributed about the exterior of said chamber means.
5. Air conditioning apparatus, comprising: means forming a main chamber; means within said main chamber, forming an auxiliary chamber; manifold means, for mixing fuel with primary air, said manifold means being disposed Within said auxiliary chamber; burner means, connected to said manifold means, the burner opening of said burner means being disposed within said main chamber; means, providing for the supply of secondary air to said auxiliarychamber; and deflecting means, so positioned as to direct the products of combustion from said burner opening, said deflecting means being hollow and the lower end receiving secondary air from said auxiliary chamber, and the upper end of said deiiecting means terminating above said burner opening, to supply secondary air to the rising products of combustion.
6. Air conditioning apparatus, comprising: means forming a heating chamber; manifold means for mixing fuel with primary air; burner means connected to said manifold means and deecting means positioned adjacent said burner means, directing products of combustion from said burner means against the peripheral wall of said chamber, said burner means and said deilecting means being so constructed and arranged that given parts of said peripheral wall are heated a greater amount than certain other parts, and said given parts being of greater area per unit of peripheral extent, said deflecting means having passage means constructed and arranged to provide for passage of secondary air, said passage means terminating adjacent said peripheral wall opposite said given parts;
7. Air conditioning apparatus, comprising: a generally rectangular sheet-metal receptacle,
forming a heating chamber; manifold means for,
mixing fuel with primary air; a pair of burners extending along opposite walls of said receptacle, each burner being connected to said manifold means; and deflecting means positioned adjacent each of said burners directing products of combustion from said burners against respective ones of said opposite walls so that said opposite walls are heated a greater amount than the other opposite Walls, and said opposite walls being of greater area per unit of peripheral extent than said other opposite walls, each of said deiiecting means being hollow to form a passageway, one'end of said passageway communicating with a source of secondary air and the other end terminating above a respective burner and adjacent a respective one of said opposite walls, to supply secondary air to the products of combustion rising along said respective wall.
8. Air conditioning apparatus, comprising: a sheet-metal receptacle forming a heating chamber, said receptacle -being generally polygonal in cross-section, and each of the walls of said receptacie being of corrugated construction, the corrugations extending generally upright, and the corrugations of certain of said walls being deeper than the corrugations of the other walls so as to form deeper interior andexteriorfurrows; means for heating the .interior cfg: said chamber including burner means extending along said certain of said lwalls and means for directing heated matter from said burner'means into the lower end of the deeper interior furrows; and baille means spaced upwardly from said heating means and spaced downwardly from the upper endand the exhaust opening of said heatking chamber, said baiiie means extending unbroken across said heating chamber, and having marginal surfaces forming spaces With the adjacent surfaces of said walls, said marginal sur- .faces and said Walls being relatively So constructed and arranged that a larger space is formed at said certain of said walls, so that a greater amount of heated matter is encouraged to iiow along the upper end of said deeper interior furrows.
9. Air conditioning apparatus, comprising: a generally rectangular sheet-metal receptacle forming a heating chamber, each of the Walls of said receptacle being of corrugated construction, the corrugations of two opposite walls being deeper than the corrugations of the other two walls; means for heating the interior of said chamber including burner means respectively extending along said two opposite walls transversely to the corrugations formed therein so that heat is delivered in a greater amount along said two opposite Walls; and baffle means constructed and arranged to direct heated matter gvithin said chamber toward the walls of said receptacle before Asuch heated matter is exhausted from said heating chamber, said baffle means having finger means extending into each of the interior furrows formed in the walls of said receptacle but stopping short of contact with the adjacent surface of respective furrows to provide a space through which heated matter may flow, the nger means in the deeper in-
US150597A 1937-06-26 1937-06-26 Air conditioning apparatus Expired - Lifetime US2214269A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2612943A (en) * 1948-08-11 1952-10-07 Iron Fireman Mfg Co Gas burner
US2622586A (en) * 1949-05-11 1952-12-23 John N Loughner Gas burning heating apparatus
US2976917A (en) * 1957-12-23 1961-03-28 Chrysler Corp Hot air furnace
US3018773A (en) * 1957-08-30 1962-01-30 Air Exchangers Ltd Furnace and heat exchanger for heating gases
US3355155A (en) * 1966-09-21 1967-11-28 John H Heltzen Humidifier for air conditioning systems
US3481321A (en) * 1968-04-11 1969-12-02 Dunham Bush Inc Hot air generator
US4922890A (en) * 1982-09-30 1990-05-08 Narang Rajendra K Fuel burning furnace
US4987881A (en) * 1982-09-30 1991-01-29 Narang Rajendra K Fuel burning furnace
US20070182034A1 (en) * 2004-04-08 2007-08-09 Mikuni Corporation Natural evaporation humidifier, humidifying element of the humidifier, and case for the humidifier

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2612943A (en) * 1948-08-11 1952-10-07 Iron Fireman Mfg Co Gas burner
US2622586A (en) * 1949-05-11 1952-12-23 John N Loughner Gas burning heating apparatus
US3018773A (en) * 1957-08-30 1962-01-30 Air Exchangers Ltd Furnace and heat exchanger for heating gases
US2976917A (en) * 1957-12-23 1961-03-28 Chrysler Corp Hot air furnace
US3355155A (en) * 1966-09-21 1967-11-28 John H Heltzen Humidifier for air conditioning systems
US3481321A (en) * 1968-04-11 1969-12-02 Dunham Bush Inc Hot air generator
US4922890A (en) * 1982-09-30 1990-05-08 Narang Rajendra K Fuel burning furnace
US4987881A (en) * 1982-09-30 1991-01-29 Narang Rajendra K Fuel burning furnace
US20070182034A1 (en) * 2004-04-08 2007-08-09 Mikuni Corporation Natural evaporation humidifier, humidifying element of the humidifier, and case for the humidifier
US8006960B2 (en) * 2004-04-08 2011-08-30 Mikuni Corporation Natural evaporation humidifier, humidifying element of the humidifier, and case for the humidifier

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