US2213435A - Tool - Google Patents

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US2213435A
US2213435A US177067A US17706737A US2213435A US 2213435 A US2213435 A US 2213435A US 177067 A US177067 A US 177067A US 17706737 A US17706737 A US 17706737A US 2213435 A US2213435 A US 2213435A
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Prior art keywords
barrel
stock
end
tube
breech
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US177067A
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Jr Robert Temple
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Jr Robert Temple
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B25HAND TOOLS; PORTABLE POWER-DRIVEN TOOLS; MANIPULATORS
    • B25CHAND-HELD NAILING OR STAPLING TOOLS; MANUALLY OPERATED PORTABLE STAPLING TOOLS
    • B25C1/00Hand-held nailing tools; Nail feeding devices
    • B25C1/08Hand-held nailing tools; Nail feeding devices operated by combustion pressure
    • B25C1/10Hand-held nailing tools; Nail feeding devices operated by combustion pressure generated by detonation of a cartridge
    • B25C1/18Details and accessories, e.g. splinter guards, spall minimisers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B25HAND TOOLS; PORTABLE POWER-DRIVEN TOOLS; MANIPULATORS
    • B25CHAND-HELD NAILING OR STAPLING TOOLS; MANUALLY OPERATED PORTABLE STAPLING TOOLS
    • B25C1/00Hand-held nailing tools; Nail feeding devices
    • B25C1/08Hand-held nailing tools; Nail feeding devices operated by combustion pressure
    • B25C1/10Hand-held nailing tools; Nail feeding devices operated by combustion pressure generated by detonation of a cartridge
    • B25C1/12Hand-held nailing tools; Nail feeding devices operated by combustion pressure generated by detonation of a cartridge acting directly on the bolt
    • B25C1/126Hand-held nailing tools; Nail feeding devices operated by combustion pressure generated by detonation of a cartridge acting directly on the bolt operated by a hammer blow
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S30/00Cutlery
    • Y10S30/04Explosive
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/53Means to assemble or disassemble
    • Y10T29/53796Puller or pusher means, contained force multiplying operator
    • Y10T29/53839Puller or pusher means, contained force multiplying operator having percussion or explosive operator

Description

TOOL

Filed Nov. 29, 193'?I 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 www QS. WN. IIL .H Y QM. Wn QM. ww .www 89037 $1/ @MJ S uw S mw 1 NNI/ n l .W r/V/ u w c R GNN QN S1 f E NNN @QN QN NW. NW Q Ng www Sw ma Nw SN QN www wmv R. TEMPLE. JR 2,213,435

- TooL Filed Nav. 29, 1957 l 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 m5 M35 www NHT WQ k @N www NHVM www QQ Y BY UbW/mdw v M ATTORNEY@ WITNESSES.-

Patented Sept. 3, 1940 16 Claims.

This invention relates to velocity power tools wherein a die, piercing pin or like element is driven by detonated explosive means to perform useful work and is particularly concerned with tools of this character adapted for use in or out of water and for facilitating ship repair as by the removal of rivets or the driving of connector elements through superimposed metal plates.

Velocity power tools of the type described have been provided heretofore but these have been open to certain objections. Often such tools can not readily be used or reloaded under water and, moreover, they have not been constructed to carry the explosive forces and the stresses on the parts of the apparatus directly to the stock or handle thereof. Further, I have found that known tools may on occasions be inadvertently iired with the attendant danger of injury to the operator, or persons or property near-by. Perhaps the best explosively operated tools known today and the only ones which have had any widespread use are those disclosed in my fathers Patents Nos. 1,365,869 and 1,365,870. These tools have been proven to be quite satisfactory in use.

However, my present invention is concerned with further improvements to the apparatus disclosed in my 'fathers patents.

It is the general object of my invention to 3o avoid and overcome the above and other diiiiculties of and objections to certain known types o f velocity power tools operated by detonated explosive charges and this is accomplished by the provision of improved tools which can not be accidentally fired, which are relatively lightreadily operated and reloaded both in and out of water.

Another object of my invention is to provide an improved explosively operated tool in which the forces of the powder charge when detonated are absorbed directly by the stock and handle of the apparatus.

-Another object of the invention is the provision of an improved tool of the character described, which is capable of knocking out rivets and which can be4 readily operated and reloaded under water.

The foregoing and other objectsof my invention are achieved by the provision of an explosively actuated tool including a stock, a firing pin adapted to be xedly held in the stock, a barrel slidably carried in the stock, a projectile tool received in the barrel, and a powder charge and detonator behind the tool and the barrel. The barrel is adapted to be moved back into the stock to engage the ring pin and the detonator and to` simultaneously engage the inner end of the barrel with the stock so that the back-re of the detonated m powder charge is carried directly to the stock.

weight but strong and rugged, and which can be Means are included in the combination for locking the barrel positively in its outermost position and these means may include other nfeans for repositioning the ring pin so that the apparatus can not accidentally be red. I further prefer- 'ably include in the combination a barrel carrier in the stock and surrounding the firing pin, and

quickly releasable means for securing the barrel and barrel carrier together whereby reloading of the apparatus is facilitated both in and out of Water. I have discovered further that by shaping the projectile tool in the form of a. punch I am able to knock out instantaneously and quietly either flat-head, round-head or countersunk rivets by driving the punch through the axis of the rivet to punch out the stem.

Fora better understanding of my invention reference should be had to the accompanying drawings in which Fig. l is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of one embodiment of my invention; Fig. 2v is a view similar to Fig. 1 but with only portions of the apparatus being shown in section and illustrates another embodiment of my invention; Fig. 3 is a view similar to Figs. 1 and 2 and shows still another form of my invention; and Figs. 4, 5 and 6 are transverse cross-sectional views taken on lines ZIV-IV, V--V, and VI-VI, respectively, of Fig. 3.

While the principles of my invention can be used broadly to construct a variety of tools capable of use in many relations, they are particularly benecial in the manufacture of tools of the driver type in which a projectile tool, such as a punch, die, pointed pin, or the like is adapted to be driven with high force and velocity against work, such as superimposed plates, positioned against the end of the apparatus. Hence my invention will be described in conjunction with driver types of tools and has been so illustrated.

Referring particularly to Fig. 1, the numeral l0 indicates generally a stock having a longitudinal bore i2 therethrough and a handle i4 secured to the end of the stock. The end of the stock l0 opposite the handle .It is preferably formed of an enlarged external diameter to which` is secured, as by complementary threads l5, a barrel guard i8 which forms '1n effect a continua* tion of *he stock illl; The barrel guard i' may be made integral with the stock l0 but this is not preferred inasmuch as the construction,

assembly and repair of the parts is greatly facilr itated by the two-part construction described.

Slidably received in the bore l2 of the stock i0 is a barrel'carrier 2-0 which is normally urged by a helical compression spring 22 outwardiy o the stock l0. A plug 24 closes the end of the bore i2 of the stock l0 adjacent the handie id and likewise serves to support a firing pin 2B axially of the bore I2, which pin extends into a longitudinal aperture 28 provided in the barrel carrier 20. The barrel carrier 20 is formed of an enlarged external diameter at its end remote from the spring 22 and has secured thereto a carrier retainer 30. vThis may be accomplished as illustrated in the drawing, by complementary threads 32 and locking screws 34.

The carrier retainer 30 is provided with longitudinally extending grooves 36 which are open at the carrier end to the inside of the guard I8 and which extend at their other ends into communication with holes 38 drilled at circumferentially spaced points into the end of the barrel guard I8. The carrier retainer 30 has sliding engagement with the inner surface 40 of the barrel guard I8, as will be evident from. the drawings. The end of the barrel guard I8 adjacent the holes 38 is formed with an internal flange 42 which retains the barrel carrier 20 and the carrierretainer 30 in the barrel guard by engagement of the carrier retainer 30 with the flange.

A barrel, indicated as a whole by the numeral 48, includes an internally threaded end 50 adapted to be screwed over the threaded end of the barrel carrier r20, as is illustrated in the drawings so that the barrel carrier 20 in effect forms a continuation of the barrel. The end 50 of the barrel slides within the iiange 42 of the barrel guard and within the carrier retainer 30 so thata readily releasable threaded connection is provided between the barrel and the barrel carrier 20. The barrel 48 is formed with a bore 52 which receives a cup 54 carrying a projectile tool, such asa pointed pin 56 having a threaded backportion58. The pin 56 is secured to the cup 54 by a threaded rod 60 which also secures the cup to a primer block 62 with an interspaced cartridge sealing washer 64 serving to seal a body of explosive powder 66 within the cup 54. The-rod 60 is preferably formed with a center portion 6I of reduced diameter so that the rod breaks in the operation of the apparatus-as hereinaiter described.

As illustrated in the drawings, the primer block 62 and sealing washer 64 are of greater over-al1 diameter than the cup 54 and engage with a shoulder 68 formed in the barrel. A ilash slot 'I0 in the threaded rod 60 connects the primer cap 'I2 of the primer block with the powder 66 in the cup 54. The entire cartridge assembly is normally held in place in the barrel 48 by a breech nut 'I4 threaded to removably fit within the threaded end 50 ofthe barrel. The breech nut I4 includes a transverse wrench receiving slot 'I6 which permits ythe introduction of the end of the firing pin 26 into a longitudinal aperture 'I8 in the breech nut so that the iiring pin can strike the primer cap 12.

The end of the barrel 48 opposite to the breech is externally threaded and receives a muzzle cap 80 having a longitudinalv bore 82 and an enlarged bore 84 terminating in a shoulder 86. The bore 84 receives an arresting block 88 which engages with the shoulder 86 and which functions to clamp a muzzle sealing disc 90 of relatively soft metal, such as copper, against the end of the barrel 48. The arresting block 80 is formed with a reduced bore 92 and associated shoulder which, in the operation of the apparatus, engages with the normal operation of the piercing pin 66 since the centering plug is made of relatively soft, easily displaced metal or if. made of harder metal is made relatively thin.

Incorporated with my improved apparatus just described are means for positively locking the barrel carrier 20 in its outermost position and in the embodiment of my invention illustrated these means include a ring extending around the stock I0 and secured in position by a collar |02. The internal diameter of the ring I 00 is slightly greater than the external diameter of the stock so that it can be moved in a. radial direction with respect to the stock. Normally the ring |00 is held to one side of the stock I0 as by compression spring |04 having an end received in a suitable recess inthe stock and positioned indiametrically opposite relation to a pin |06 secured to the ring |00 and extending through a radial hole in the stock`I0. Pin |06 is received at its radially inner end in a recess |08 formed in the barrel carrier 20. The barrel carrier 20 is further provided with a longitudinal groove IIO in alignment with the recess |08 but of less depth than the recess.

Completing my improved apparatus are radial apertures II2 in the stock I0 adjacent the handle I4 to permit the escape of liquid Within the stock and between the plug 24 and the barrel carrier 20. Likewise I form the carrier retainer 30 with radial apertures I I4 to permit the escape of any liquid from between the end 50 of the barrel and the barrel carrier 20 or the retaining the barrel carrier 20 is in its outermost posi-- tion, the end 50 of the barrel 48 is slipped in the flange 42 of the barrel guard I8 and within the carrier retainer 30 until its internally threaded end is in engagement with the threaded end of the barrel carrier. Relative rotary movement of the parts now eiects a quickly releasable but positive and tight connection between the barrel 48 and the barrel carrier 20. With the parts in this position the tool can be handled substantially as desired and can not accidentally be fired.`

When it is desired to operatethe apparatus, the end of the barrel carrying the muzzle cap l0 is positioned with respect to the work and, if the centering plug 94 is used, so that the plug aligns the apparatus and the work. Now the ring |00 adjacent the spring |04 is pressed radially to move the locking pin |06 out of the recess |08, and pressure on the handle I4 moves the locking pin |06 out into the groove IIO of the barrel carrier 20 and the barrel carrier moves back into the bore I2 of the stock I0 against the action of the spring 22. Continued movement of the handle toward the barrel moves the barrel guard I8 over the barrel 48 and brings the firing pin 26 into detonating engagement with the primer cap 12. This causes the explosion of the powder charge S6 which, after a predetermined force has been reached by the charge, breaks the threaded rod 60 near its weakened portion 6I and moves the cup 54 and .pin 56 rapidly and with great force through the barrel 48 to piercethe sealing disc 90 and the centering plug Si so that the pin is driven into the work at least up to the threaded portion 58. The cup 5i engages with the shoulder of the arresting block 88 and the pin 56 pulls loose from the short threaded end of the threaded rod 60.

At the time of firing, the barrel carrier 20 is back in the barrel guard I8 and is substantially in engaging relation with the end of the stock |0. Specifically, the surface 20a. of the barrel carrier 20 engages with the surface Illa of the end of the stock I0. Thus the kick backward of the barrel 48 upon the forward movement of the cup 5d and pin 55 is directly carried to the barrel carrier 20 and to the stock I 0 and into the handle It held by the operator. After ring, the handle I@ and stock I0 are moved away from the work and the spring 22 forces the barrel carrier 20 and the barrel iiil outwardly of the stock I0 and barrel guard I8 until the end of the carrier retai`ner strikes the flange 42, at which time the 'parts are in the original full line position ex'cept that the pin 56 has been red out of the barrel. At this time the pin |06 drops into the recess |08 and the barrel 48 can be unscrewed.

Ordinarily in under-water operation when it is desired to re the apparatus a second time, a complete new barrel with the cartridge assembly therein is screwed into place on the barrel carrier. However, in operation above water a new cartridge assembly can be substituted for the discharged cartridge while making use of the same barrel and this can be accomplished by removal of the barrel from its holder and the removal of the muzzle cap 80 from -the barrel` The sealing washer 90 is ordinarily replaced although this is not necessary for use of the tool above water. The holes |I2,- 38 and IILl permit the assembly and operation of the parts in or out of water or other liquid without jamming, as will be recognized, and in operation in water the parts of the apparatus which would be aiected by water are carefully sealed against the entrance of water so that the apparatus is particularly adapted for ready and repeated operation below the surface of water.

In the embodiment of my invention illustrated in Fig. 2 many of the parts are similar to those illustrated in Fig. 1 and described above in detail, and where this is true the parts have been indicated by the same numerals except that the suffix a has been added.

One Vimportant difference in the apparatus of Fig. 2 is that the firing pin 26a is secured to a plug |20 which plug is slidably mounted in the end of the stock |0a adjacent the handle Ia of the apparatus. The plug |20 is normally in the full line position illustrated and is held against movement out of the stock I0a by a bell crank |22 pivotally mounted as at |24 upon a pair of lugs |26 provided on the handle Ida. With the `plug |20 in the full line position shown, the ring pin 26a is slightly retracted so that the parts can never be moved into detonating relation. The bell crank |22 is provided with a ring |28 at the end of its arm remote from the plug |20 so that the operator can readily stick his :linger through the ring and move the bell crank I 22 from the full-line position shown to the dotted-line position, which moves the plug |20 into the stock I0a a short distance and thus carries the iiring pin 25a forward to operating position.

Instead of employing the cartridge assembly illustrated and described in conjunction with Fig.

1, the embodiment of my invention shown in Fig. 2 employs, a cartridge assembly of the type'shcwn in my Patent No. 2,064,503. This assembly includes a cylindrical member |30 slidably received in the breech portion of the barrel 28a. and held against movement out of the breech portionl and through the barrel by cooperating shoulders 68a.. The cylindrical member |30 is formed in effect of two parts, namely a cup or piston and a breech portion. These parts may be made separately and connected together in any way so that the breech portion removably receives a blank cartridge |32 and the 'piston or cup portion carries a tool, such as a punch |36. Upon detonation of the blank cartridge |32 the breech portion of the cylindrical member |30 remains fixed in the barrel 48a between the shoulder 68a and the end of the barrel carrier 20a. The cup portion of the cylindrical member is retained in engagement with the breech portion until the force of the detonated blank cartridge exceeds a predetermined maximum, at which time the full force of the powder charge is realized and the cup portion of the cylindrical member is moved away from the breech portion.

While the exact type of connection between the cup portion and the breech portion of the cylindrical member |30 can take a variety of forms to obtain the function just described, it is convenient to make the cylindrical member |30 from an integral piece and to provide a groove |36 or other zone of weakness between the cup portion and the breech portion of the cylindrical member. `The thickness of the metal beneath the groove |36 controls the breaking force required to separate the cup portion and the breech portion of the cylindrical member |30.

The muzzle cap a of the apparatus is removably secured as by complementary threads to the end of the barrel 48a and an arresting block 88a is secured between the end of the barrel and the muzzle cap. Sealing discs a and 90b are clamped at the ends of the arresting block 88a so as to prevent the entrance of liquid into the barrel 08a when the apparatus is used under water.

The embodiment of my invention just described is particularly adapted to knock out rivets or perform similar operations under water to facilitate ship repair or the like. Thus, I have specifically shown in the drawings a plurality of plates |80 secured together by a rivet IZ of any known type including either countersunk, i'lat or round heads. In the operation of the apparatus, which is similar to that above described and which will not be repeated in detail, the axis of the apparatus is aligned with the axis of the rivet |02 with the muzzle cap 80a against the rivet head. The punch |33 is of a size slightly less than the diameter of the rivet body and in the operation of the apparatus is driven with high force and velocity against the rivet head to punch the stem of the rivet out of the rivet hole and release the plates |00.

In the punching operation the cup portion of the cylindrical member |30 engages with `the arresting block 88a to prevent the escape of gases from within the barrel @0a and thus eliminate noise and shock in the use of the apparatus. The relatively short threaded connection between the punch |32 and the cylindrical member |30 is severed, usually by stripping of the thread, to permit the above-stated operation of the punch.

, The repeated use and reloading of the apparatus in or out of water is facilitated by changing the complete barrel although it should be understood that in use out of water the same barrel can be used over and over again by providing a new cartridge assembly and sealing discs if desired. In this connection it should further be appreciated that with the apparatus of either the form shown in Fig. 1 or the form shown in Fig. 2 I am able to use a punch, die, pointed pin or other shaped projectile in the same barrel and that barrels carrying different types, sizes and weights of projectiles and differentrtypes or sizes of cartridges or powder charges are readily interchangeable with each other and the tool can be adapted to perform work of any desired character.

The form of my invention shown in Figs. 3 toV 6 differs from those illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 in that the apparatus of Figs. 3 to 6 is not adapted, ordinarily, for use under water but is most advantageously employed above water where it can be readily reloaded in the field in a minimum of time and without special tools. Having particular reference to Figs, 3 to 6 the numeral |50 indicates a handle to which is secured a firing pin |52 by bolt |54. The bolt |54 likewise secures a disc |56 to the handle which is externally threaded to engage with the internal threaded end of a stock |58. A screw |60 may be provided to secure the disc |56 and stock |58 together at all times and a circular flange |62 may be provided on the handle |50 to receive the end of the stock |58. The stock |58 is of tubular shape near the handle |50 as best seen in Fig. 6, but is provided adjacent its end remote fromjthe handle with a longitudinal slot or opening 64 illustrated in Figs. 3 and 5 which opening extends somewhat more than half the length of the stock and which is of such width as to receive a barrel as hereinafter described.

Slidably received in the stock |58 is a tube or barrel carrier |66 to which is secured a breech block |68 also adapted to be slidably received in the stock |58. The breech block and tube have been illustrated as being connected together by complementary threads which are held against movement lapart by a screw |10.l The breech block |68 is formed with a cup-shaped cavity |12 which receives one end of a coil compression spring |14 having its other end surrounding the firing pin |52. It will be recognized that the spring |14 normally pushes the tube |66 and breech block |68 outwardly of the stock |58. The outward movement of the tube |66 in the stock |58, as iniiuenced by the spring |14, is limited by a pin |16 secured to the tube and received in a slot |18 which extends circumferentially of the stock through approximately 180 degrees. At one end of the circumferential slot |18 the stock |58 is formed with a longitudinally extending slot |80 which, as shown in Fig. 3, is of such length as to receive the pin |16 and permit movement of the tube 66 inwardly of the stock |58 until the firing pin |52 is forced into operating relation with the breech block |68 as hereinafter described. At the other end of the circumferential slot |18 a short longitudinal slot |82 is provided which extends in the stock only in a direction away from the handle |50. When the pin |16 is received in the slot |82, as shown in Fig. 5, the apparatus can not be operated since the tube 66 can not be pushed back into the stock |58 because the pin |16 engages with the end of the slot |82 adjacent the end of the circumferential slot |18. The slots |18, |80 and |82 are covered by a U-shaped metal shell |83 which is secured tightly around the stock |58 so that an operators fingers cannot be pinched in the slot and so the slots are kept free of foreign matter.

The tube |66 like the stock |58 is formed with a longitudinal slot or opening |86 which is of the same transverse size as the opening |64. The openings |64 and |86 are of a, width substantially equal to the internal diameter of the tube |66 and permit the lateral movement into the tube |66 of a barrel |88 formedwith a longitudinal bore |90 and provided at one end with a breech which removably receives a working element`|92 and explosive means |94 including a detonator portion adapted to register with the breeclr block |68. The working element, explosive means, and detonator constitute preferably a unitary element which can be readily dropped into the breech portion of the barrel and which can be plucked out after ring simply by hand or with the aid of ordinary tools, such as a pair of pliers.

The end of the barrel |88 opposite the breegh and a 'satisfactory manner of accomplishing the desired result is to provide internal threads at the end of the tube and to externally' thread the arresting block-202. A knurled knob 206 is secured to a projecting boss 208 on the arresting block and is provided with a iiange 2|0 extending slidably over the end of the tube |66. Thus rotation of the knob 206 moves the arresting block 202 in and out of the end of the tube |66. to tighten the barrel |88 in place in the tube or to permit it to be removed laterally from the tube through the openings 86 and 64.

In the operation of this embodiment of my |66 and with the openings |64 and I 86 in alignment the breech end of the barrel |88 is dropped through the aligned openings and substantially into engagement with the breech block |68. The muzzle end ofthe barrel is then moved laterally through the openings into position in axial alignment with' the arresting block 202. The knob 206 is now tightened to clamp the arresting block 202 against the muzzle end of the barrel |88 and to force the breech end of the barrel and particularly the detonator portion of the explosive means tightly into engagement with the breech block |68.

The barrel, the working element and the explosive means are now securely locked in the tube |66 but with the openings |64 and |86 in alignment the apparatus can not be fired since the pin |16 prevents movement of the tube |66 towards the handle end of the stock |58. 'I'hus after loading as just described the tube |66 and barrel |88 must be moved through k180 degrees with respect to the stock |58 before the apparatus can be fired. In this movement of the parts the operator grips the handle |50 with one hand and with the other holds the tube |66 so that by combined movement of his hands together and a relative rotary movement thereof the pin |18 is moved out of the short slot |82 where it has been held by the spring |14, circumferentially through the slot |18 and into the short portion of the slot |80 most remote from the handle |50. In this position the opening |68 will be diametrically opposite the opening |86 as will be understood.

The apparatus is now. readyto be red which can be readily accomplished by engaging the arresting block 208 with the work and depressing the handle |50 towards the work. In this depressing movement of the handle the tube |66l slides back in the stock |58 toward the handle |50 with the pin |16 sliding .in the long slot |80 until the firing pin |52 strikes the detonator portion of explosive means |88 to detonate the explosive. The detonated explosive then drives the working element |82 usually with the aid of a piston or cup forwardly through the bore |80 of the barrel |88 and through the bore 204 of the arresting block 202 and into the Work to per.- form the desired function. The arresting block 202 stops the cup or piston of the explosive means and prevents the escape of gases so that the noise and flame usually attending an explosion is eliminated. Once the apparatus has been fired the pressure on the handle A|50 is released and the spring |14 forces the breech block and tube outwardly of the stock |58. Relative rotary movement of the tube |86 and stock |58 through 180 degrees realigns the openings |88. and |86. Ro-

tary movement of the knob 206 away from the barrel |88 releases it so that the barrel can be tipped sideways out of the aligned openings. The discharged cartridge element is then removed from the barrel and the apparatus is again reloaded as above described and the operation is repeated. It will be recognized that reloading is relatively simple and fast and that a large number of desired working operations can be performed by a single operator in a short time.

From the foregoing it will be recognized that the objects of my invention have been achieved by the provision of relatively simple but sturdy and long-wearing velocity power tools of., the driver type which are capable of ready and continued use in or out of water. The stresses of operation are absorbed directly by the stock and handle of the apparatus and one or more positively acting safety mechanisms are incorporated in the structure to completely prevent accidental operation thereof.

Although I have speciiically illustrated and described two embodiments of my invention, it should be understood that my invention is not limited thereto or thereby but is defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In combination, a barrel, a breech on the barrel adapted to receive a projectile and an explosive charge, a barrel carrier removably carrying the barrel, a breech block on the carrier closing the breech end of the barrel when carrying the barrel, a stock slidably supporting the barrel carrier, a firing pin supported in the stock, and resilient means yieldably holding the barrel carrier outwardly of the end of the stock carrying the firing pin but allowing the carrier to be moved into the stock to force the iiring pin through the breech block.

2. An explosively actuated tool including a stock, a tiring pin associated with the stock, a barrel slidably carried in the stock and having a breech portion adapted to receive e\ powder charge, said barrel being movable back into the stock to engage the breech portion of the barrel with the stock, said flring pin being positioned to be in operative relation with the breech portion of the barrel only when the breech portion is back against the stock, means for locking the barrel in its outermost position, a barrel carrier in the stock and surrounding the iiring pin, and quickly releasable means for securing the barrel and barrel carrier together.

3. An explosively actuated tool including a stock, a firing pin adapted to be xedly held in the stock, a barrel slidably carried in the stock and having a breech portion at its inner end, said barrel being adapted to be moved back into the stock to position the flringpin in the breech portion and simultaneously engage the inner end of the barrel with the stock, means for locking the barrel in its outermost position, a barrel carrier in the stock and surrounding the firing pin, and quickly releasable means for securing the barrel and barrel carrier together.

4. An explosively actuated tool including a stock, a firing pin adapted to be xedly held in 'the stock, manually operable means for quickly of the barrel with the stock, means for locking,

the barrel in its outermost position, a barrel carrier inthe stock and surrounding the firing pin, and quickly releasable means for securing the barrel and barrel carrier together.

5. An explosively actuated tool including a stock, a ring pin adapted to be iixedly held in the stock, a barrel slidably carried in the stock and having a breech portion at its inner end, said barrel being adapted to be moved back into the stock to position the iiring pin in firing relation with the breech portion and simultaneously to engage the inner end of the barrel with the stock, and a removable barrel guard secured to the stock and extending over the barrel in sliding relation therewith.

6. An explosively actuated tool including a stock, a ring pin adapted to be xedly held in the stock, a barrel slidably carried in the stock and having a breech portion at its inner end, said barrel being adapted to be moved back into'the stock to position the firing pin in firing relationwith the breech portion, a ring around the stock oi greater internal diameter than the outside of the stock, means holding the Aring against endw'ise movement on the stock, a pin secured to the ring and extending through the stock into releasable engagement with a recess on the barrel, and resilient means on the ring holding the pin normally in engagement with the recess.

7. An explosively actuated tool including a stock, a firing pin associated with the stock, a barrel carrier slidably mounted in the stock and surrounding the firing pin, a barrel, quickly releasable means for securing the barrel and barrel carrier together, and means normally holding the barrel carrier outwardly of one end of the stock but allowing the barrel carrier to be moved back into the stock to position the end of the barrel adjacent the iirlng pin.

8. An explosively actuated tool comprising a stock having a longitudinal bore therethrough, a

handle Secured to the stock, a barrel guard secured to an end of the stools and having a longln tudinal bore, a barrel slidably receivedin the' bore of the barrel guard, a barrel carrier sldably received in the bore of the stock and having a threaded end adapted to be threaded in breech block relation with the end of the barrel, a firing pin extending axially through the bore of the stock and through an axial bore in the barrel carrier and secured at one end of the stock. adjacent the handle, and resilient means urging the barrel carrier outwardly of the stock.

9. An explosively actuated tool comprising a stock having a longitudinal bore therethrough, a handle secured to one end of the stock, a barrel guard secured to the other end of the stock and having a longitudinal bore, a barrel slidably received in the bore of the barrel guard, a barrel carrier slidably received in the bore of the stock and having an end adapted to be removably secured in breech block relation with the end of the barrel, a firing pin 'extending axially through the bore of the stoel: and through an axial bore in the barrel carrier and secured at one end of the stock adjacent the handle, and a centering plug associated with and closing'the end 'of the muzzle end of the barrel.

10. An explosively actuated tool comprising a stock having a longitudinal bore therethrough, a handle secured to one end of the stock, a barrel guard secured to the other end of the stock and having a longitudinal bore, a barrel slidably received in the bore of the barrel guard., a barrel carrier slidably received in the bore of the stock and having a threaded end adapted to be threaded in breech block relation With the end of the barrel, a nring pin extending axially through the bore of the stock and through an axial bore in the barrel carrier and secured at one end of the stock adjacent the handle, resilient means urging the barrel carrier outwardly of the stock, a manually releasable lock positively holding the'bar- .rel carrier at the outermost portion of its travel in the stoclr, and a centering plug associated with and closing the end of the muzzle of the barrel.

1l. An explosively actuated tool comprising a stock having -a longitudinal bore, a firing ein mounted at one end of the stock, a tube slidably mounted in the stock, a breech block closing the end of the tube adjacent the firing pin, resilient means normally but yieldably holding the breech block away from the firing pin, a barrel removably carried by the tube, a breech on the barrel adjacent the end next to the breech block, an arresting block removably and adjustably secured to the end or" the tube remote from the firing pin and adapted to clamp the barrel in the tube against the breech block, said tube and stock having lateral openings formed therein to permit the introduction or removal or" the barrel laterw ally when the arresting block is backed oli, and means connecting the tube and the stock whereby the lateral openings thereof can be moved into and out of register and the tube moved back into firing position only when. the lateral openings are not in register.

l2. An explosively actuated tool comprising a stock having a longitudinal bore, a iiring pin mounted at one end of the stools, a tube slidably mounted in the stock, a breech block: closing the end 'of the tube adjacent the silient means normally but yleldably hoir breech block away from ythe firing p' removably received by the tube, means and adjustably secured to the end c'4 the remote from the tiring pin and adaptedt'o cla the barrel in the tube against the breech blc K. said tube and stock having lateral openings formed therein to permit the introduction or re moval of the barrel laterally when the arresting s block is backed olf, and means connecting'the tube and the stock whereby the lateral openings thereof can be moved into and out of register'and the tube moved back into firing position only` when the lateral openings are not in registen A 13. An explosively actuated tool comprising a tube, a breech block closing one end of the a barrel removably received by the tube, a deech y on the barrel adjacent the end next to the breechV block, means adjustably secured to tl'iefendor" the tube remote from the breech of the 'b'frrel and adapted to clampthe barrel *1 against the breech block, said tubehat eral opening formed therein to permit thai .ao# j duction or removal of the barrel laterally when the adjustable means secured to the tube is backed off, and mechanism for ring an explosive charge carried by the barrel and capable-of operation only after complete loading of the tool. j 14. An explosively actuatedtcol comprising tube, a breech block closing one end of the tube, a barrel removably received by the tube, a breech on 'the barrel adjacent the end next to the' breech block, and means adjustably secured to the other end of the tube and adapted to clamp the barrel in 'the tube and longitudinally against the block, said tube having a lateral opening formed therein to permit the introduction or removal the barrel laterally when the adjustable i secured to the tube-is backed 15. An explosivelyI actuated tool comprising a stock having a longitudinal bore, a tube mounted in the stock, a breech block closing one end-of the tube, a barrel removably receivedby the tube, a breech on the barrel adjacent the end rie-:t to the breech block, means removably and ad- `iustably secured to the other end of the tube and adapted to clamp the barrel in the against the breech block, said tube having lateral openings formed therein to pe the introduction or removal ofthe barrel lat ally when the securing means is backed off, mech anism for detonating an explosivecharge carried in the breech of the barrel, and means tor operating the detonating mechanism only plete loading of the tool.

i6. An explosively actuated tool cornprisirf7 stock having a longitudinal bore, a tube mounte in the stock, a breech block closing one the tube, a barrel removably received by the tu a breech on the barrel adjacent the end next the breech block, and means removably and adjustably secured to the other end of the f and adapted to clamp the barrel n against the breech block, said t` having lateral openings formed th the introduction or removal of '2 orally when the securing means is

US177067A 1937-11-29 1937-11-29 Tool Expired - Lifetime US2213435A (en)

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Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2470117A (en) * 1943-11-24 1949-05-17 Portable Ind Inc Gun and projectile therefor
US2491516A (en) * 1944-01-12 1949-12-20 Charles S Piggot Method and means to safely deactivate explosive bearing ordnance
US2518395A (en) * 1946-09-16 1950-08-08 Stephen M Dunn Device for inserting bolts in concrete
US2614633A (en) * 1947-10-08 1952-10-21 Associated Engineers Inc Bushing inserting tool
US2775762A (en) * 1951-09-10 1957-01-01 Hilti Martin Explosively actuated fastener driving tool
US2778021A (en) * 1955-12-12 1957-01-22 Elmer F Pfaff Fastener device
US2790972A (en) * 1955-05-04 1957-05-07 Remington Arms Co Inc Holder for expanding workpiece
US2810910A (en) * 1954-02-04 1957-10-29 Walter Schulz Method for driving bolts into metallic bodies
US2835894A (en) * 1951-11-21 1958-05-27 Behrend Herbert Explosion-operated tool
DE973783C (en) * 1951-06-23 1960-06-02 Langensiepen Kg M Method and apparatus for the production of Duebelloechern
US2963707A (en) * 1953-11-26 1960-12-13 Walter E Schulz Driving tool
US2970314A (en) * 1957-04-09 1961-02-07 Mine Safety Appliances Co Explosively actuated nail driving tool
US3133408A (en) * 1962-02-15 1964-05-19 Albert M Stott Thruster
US3133287A (en) * 1954-08-17 1964-05-19 Olin Mathieson Explosively-actuated tools with captive fastening units therefor
DE1297555B (en) * 1966-08-01 1969-06-12 Hilti Hansa Gmbh A powder driven Setzgeraet for driving bolts in steels of higher strength
US3565312A (en) * 1967-06-29 1971-02-23 Mine Safety Appliances Co Explosively driven stud unit
US3982465A (en) * 1973-02-04 1976-09-28 Schabauer Fritz M Cartridge case decapping tool
US5425488A (en) * 1993-11-05 1995-06-20 Thompson William J Impact actuated tool for driving fasteners
US5533254A (en) * 1993-08-13 1996-07-09 The Whitaker Corporation Tool for applying wedge type electrical connectors to the conductors of electrical distribution networks
EP0726832A1 (en) * 1993-11-05 1996-08-21 Innovative Quality Products Corporation Self-powered fastener system
US5890273A (en) * 1997-06-18 1999-04-06 Haytayan; Harry M. Method for detaching plastic components from automobiles and other products
US20090145018A1 (en) * 2007-12-05 2009-06-11 Reitenbaugh Sr Vernon J Percussive rodent trap
US20140165521A1 (en) * 2012-12-19 2014-06-19 Makita Corporation Vegetation cutter
US9062942B1 (en) * 2014-10-24 2015-06-23 PTKH Associates Powered telescoping knife handle

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2470117A (en) * 1943-11-24 1949-05-17 Portable Ind Inc Gun and projectile therefor
US2491516A (en) * 1944-01-12 1949-12-20 Charles S Piggot Method and means to safely deactivate explosive bearing ordnance
US2518395A (en) * 1946-09-16 1950-08-08 Stephen M Dunn Device for inserting bolts in concrete
US2614633A (en) * 1947-10-08 1952-10-21 Associated Engineers Inc Bushing inserting tool
DE973783C (en) * 1951-06-23 1960-06-02 Langensiepen Kg M Method and apparatus for the production of Duebelloechern
US2775762A (en) * 1951-09-10 1957-01-01 Hilti Martin Explosively actuated fastener driving tool
US2835894A (en) * 1951-11-21 1958-05-27 Behrend Herbert Explosion-operated tool
US2963707A (en) * 1953-11-26 1960-12-13 Walter E Schulz Driving tool
US2810910A (en) * 1954-02-04 1957-10-29 Walter Schulz Method for driving bolts into metallic bodies
US3133287A (en) * 1954-08-17 1964-05-19 Olin Mathieson Explosively-actuated tools with captive fastening units therefor
US2790972A (en) * 1955-05-04 1957-05-07 Remington Arms Co Inc Holder for expanding workpiece
US2778021A (en) * 1955-12-12 1957-01-22 Elmer F Pfaff Fastener device
US2970314A (en) * 1957-04-09 1961-02-07 Mine Safety Appliances Co Explosively actuated nail driving tool
US3133408A (en) * 1962-02-15 1964-05-19 Albert M Stott Thruster
DE1297555B (en) * 1966-08-01 1969-06-12 Hilti Hansa Gmbh A powder driven Setzgeraet for driving bolts in steels of higher strength
US3565312A (en) * 1967-06-29 1971-02-23 Mine Safety Appliances Co Explosively driven stud unit
US3982465A (en) * 1973-02-04 1976-09-28 Schabauer Fritz M Cartridge case decapping tool
US5533254A (en) * 1993-08-13 1996-07-09 The Whitaker Corporation Tool for applying wedge type electrical connectors to the conductors of electrical distribution networks
US5425488A (en) * 1993-11-05 1995-06-20 Thompson William J Impact actuated tool for driving fasteners
US5429291A (en) * 1993-11-05 1995-07-04 Thompson William J Compression actuated tool for driving fasteners
US5465893A (en) * 1993-11-05 1995-11-14 Thompson William J Impact actuated tool for driving fasteners with safety mechanism
US5518161A (en) * 1993-11-05 1996-05-21 Illinois Tool Works, Inc. Impact actuated tool with configurable muzzle for driving varying length fasteners
EP0726832A4 (en) * 1993-11-05 1997-02-05 Innovative Quality Prod Corp Self-powered fastener system
EP0726832A1 (en) * 1993-11-05 1996-08-21 Innovative Quality Products Corporation Self-powered fastener system
US5890273A (en) * 1997-06-18 1999-04-06 Haytayan; Harry M. Method for detaching plastic components from automobiles and other products
US20090145018A1 (en) * 2007-12-05 2009-06-11 Reitenbaugh Sr Vernon J Percussive rodent trap
US8051599B2 (en) * 2007-12-05 2011-11-08 Triple-T Machining Specialties, Inc. Percussive rodent trap
US20140165521A1 (en) * 2012-12-19 2014-06-19 Makita Corporation Vegetation cutter
US9062942B1 (en) * 2014-10-24 2015-06-23 PTKH Associates Powered telescoping knife handle

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