US2208128A - Pickup and loader apparatus - Google Patents

Pickup and loader apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
US2208128A
US2208128A US244396A US24439638A US2208128A US 2208128 A US2208128 A US 2208128A US 244396 A US244396 A US 244396A US 24439638 A US24439638 A US 24439638A US 2208128 A US2208128 A US 2208128A
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Prior art keywords
moldboards
pan
frame
shaft
earth
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US244396A
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William F Holbrook
Christopher L Jordan
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William F Holbrook
Christopher L Jordan
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65GTRANSPORT OR STORAGE DEVICES, e.g. CONVEYORS FOR LOADING OR TIPPING, SHOP CONVEYOR SYSTEMS OR PNEUMATIC TUBE CONVEYORS
    • B65G65/00Loading or unloading
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65GTRANSPORT OR STORAGE DEVICES, e.g. CONVEYORS FOR LOADING OR TIPPING, SHOP CONVEYOR SYSTEMS OR PNEUMATIC TUBE CONVEYORS
    • B65G2814/00Indexing codes relating to loading or unloading articles or bulk materials
    • B65G2814/03Loading or unloading means
    • B65G2814/0301General arrangements
    • B65G2814/0326General arrangements for moving bulk material upwards or horizontally
    • B65G2814/0328Picking-up means
    • B65G2814/0331Belt or chain conveyors
    • B65G2814/0334Scraper conveyors

Description

ulylfi, 1940- w. F. HOLBROOK ET AL 2,208,123
PICKUP AND LOADER APPARATUS Filed Dec '7, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTORJ'. HOLE/800K VV/L L IA M F. gge/sro flsp JORDAN X ATTORNE? July 16, 1940.
w. F. HOLBROQK ET AL 2,208,128
PICKUP AND LOADER APPARATUS Filed Dec. '7, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 92 INVENTORS T/V/LL AM F HOLBROQK CHRISTOPHER L. JORDAN ATTORNE July 6, 1940. w. F. HOLBROOK ET AL 2,203,128
PICKUP AND LOADER APPARATUS Filed Dec. '7, 1938 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 mlm. I I
m (ga INVENTORS VV/LL/AM 1". HOLBROOK C'uelsro usn L. JORDAN Patented July 16, 1940 UNITED STATES PICKUP AND LOADEB APPARATUS William F. Holbrook, Burlingame, and Christopher L. Jordan,
Belmont, Calif.
Application December '7, 1938, Serial No. 244,396
8 Claims.
This invention relates to machines for the handling of loose dirt and like materials. More particularly the invention relates to the provision of an apparatus which will effectively and cfficiently pick up and load loose or excess dirt which has accumulated on roadsides and in contiguous areas such as ditches and the like.
It is a well-known fact that one of the most vexatious problems in the maintenance of the 110 modern highway is in the gathering and removal of loose dirt which has collected along the roadside as an incident to the maintenance thereof or which has been scraped from.the adjacent ditches wherein ithas accumulated as a result of i5 erosion and the like.
It is true that there are instances in the prior art where others have sought to devise machines which will accomplish the aforementioned purposes, but it has been our observation that the 20 prior art structures fall short of filling this particular need and that as a consequence none of them have been adopted for universal use. On
the contrary, it has been our experience that those charged with the maintenance of the at modern highway have almost without exception continued to rely on manual labor for the gathering and removal-of such accumulated dirt and refuse. The manual handling of this material is costly; far out of proportion to its relative im- 30 portance in highway maintenance.
In the maintenance of highways it is accepted practice to first scrape excess dirt and like materials which have accumulated in the marginal ditches, by means of an implement, such as a 35 conventional grader, by which the material is moved into windrows on the highway proper or the adjacent shoulder, from whence it is manually gathered and loaded upon dump trucks for hauling to some other place.
40 The objects of this invention are attained, in general terms, through the provision of a wheeled vehicle, adapted to be propelled along the aforementioned surfaces and effectively gather the dirt or material in the windrows and mechanical- 45 ly deliver the same to dump trucks or other conveyances. In terms of general inclusion this is accomplished by the provision of a vehicle having forwardly diverging moldboards or blades, with a material moving apparatus working within the so effective gathering area of the aforesaid moldboards and an endless elevating and conveyor means for moving the material ,thus gathered for convenient dumping into a separate conveyance.
These and other objects of the invention will 55 become more apparent as this specification proceeds and the novelty of the invention will be particularly pointed out in the appended claims.
In the drawings forming a part hereof,
Fig. l is a side elevation of the earth gathering apparatus forming the subject matter hereof, 5 Fig. 2 is a plan view of the earth gathering end of the apparatus with certain parts removed for sake of clarity,
Fig. 3 is an end elevation of the machine of Fig.1 showing the details of the earth gathering in and moving means,
Fig. 4 is an end elevation of the machine opposite that of Fig. 3,
Fig. 5 is a side elevation ofthe earth gathering end of the machine, opposite that shown in Fig. 1, with certain parts removed for sake of clarity,
Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section through the earth gathering end of the machine, along the lines G-6 of Fig. 3,
Fig. '7 is a fragmentary sectional view, taken on line 1-1 of Fig. 3,
Fig. 8 is a sectional view of the earth gathering end o"f the machine embodying a modification of the earth moving means, and
. Fig. 9-is a plan view of a detail of construction 95 along the line 8-9 of Fig. 8.
In the form selected for purposes of illustration of the principles of the invention we employ a vehicle having a chassis ID, a motor ll, driven wheels l2 and the idling steered wheels l3. While as this specification proceeds it will be appreciated that the vehicle is driven in reverse during the material gathering operation, in which a steering mechanism, generally designated by the numeral ll, acts upon the wheels l3, it will be appreciated that this is a mere detail of construction and that one may choose to power the wheels i3 and steer by the wheels 12.
The machine of our invention utilizes a pair of forwardly diverging moldboards or blades 20, in combination with the endless earth moving means 2| working within the effective gathering area of the moldboards, and an endless belt conveyor 22 serving to move and elevate the material for deposit in a separate conveyance, such as that indicated in dot-dash lines in Fig. 1 of the drawings and designated by the numeral 23.
The forwardly diverging blades 20 are illustrated to best advantage in Fig. 2 in which the endless earth mover means 2| has been removed for sake of clarity. Here it will be seen that the blades are suitably curved and that they converge into an integral pan 25, of slightly less width than the belt 22 and that the blades are each given a twist, as at 26, to provide sidewalls for the pan 5;
. by means of the cranks 4! (see Figs.
25. Extension sidewalls 21, connected to the sidewalls 26, extend over the end of the belt 22 and are tapered inwardly, as at 28, to center the material passingtherethrough as it is taken up on the belt 22. In Figs. 2 and 6 it will be noted that the pan 25 extends over the end of the belt 22.
The moldboards 20 and pan 25 are supported on the H-shaped frame member 30, the legs of which, through the medium of a shaft 3|, are pivotally connected to the forked rods 32. The rods 32 are, in turn, pivotally connected to the lugs 33 on the dead axle 3 8 of the vehicle.
It should be here noted that adjustment is provided for the elevation of the moldboards 20, and particularly the outer ends thereof. An overhead frame member 35 is supported on the angle irons 36 and 31 bolted or otherwise secured to the vehicle chassis I0. Arms 38, the lower ends of which are connected to the legs of the frame member 30 by means of the lugs 39, have an operative connection with the rotatable shaft 40, horizontally disposed in the frame member 35, 1 and 5). In order to rotate the shaft to, and hence by the means just described, raise or lower the blades 2!) and the pan 25 relative to a surface, we provide the conventional worm gear arrangement indicated by the numeral at (see Fig. 5), there being a connecting rod 45 extending forwardly of the vehicle and having at its opposite end a. hand wheel $6 in juxtaposition to the operators station or seat ti.
The mechanism just described is adapted to particularly adjust the. toes of the moldboards 26. It will be appreciated that in some cases independent adjustment of the moldboards 26 will be desirable, such as in thecase of work done on an. uneven surface, like .a crowned road. There are many ways in which such adjustment may be accomplished. One such means is illustrated in conjunction with the modification disclosedin Fig. 8 of the drawings in which a block 50 is disposed at the end of the crank ii. The frame supporting rod 5! extends through the block 50 and the nuts 53 engaging the threaded portion of the rod 5! effect the adjustment of the elevation of the moldboard by permitting the relative lengthening or shortening of rod 5 l. The helical springs 52, disposed on the rod 5!, above and below the block 50 and between the nuts 53, serve as shock absorbers. l
Adjustment of the inner ends of the blades 2i] and the connected pan 25 is accomplished through other means which will be hereinafter discussed in conjunction with the description of the conveyor 22.
It is, as stated, the function of the endless earth mover means 2| to move the earth gathered between the forwardly diverging moldboards 20 over the pan 25 onto the and belt 22. This mechanism is shown to best advantage in Figs. 1, 5 and 6, as consisting of the endless chains 60, having thereon the paddles M, which chains turn on the sprocket 62 on shaft 63 and sprocket 68 on shaft 65. The shafts 63 and 64 are journaled in the frame members 66 and it will be noted that the bearing members for shaft 63 are adjustable lengthwise of the frame 66 to take up the slack in the chain 60 (see Figs. 5 and 6).
The inner end of the earth mover mechanism 2! is pivotally supported by the bars Ill, rigidly connected at one end to the frame members 66 and connected at their other ends to the angle irons 36 by means of the pivots H (see Figs. 1, 5 and 6). The outer end of the earth mover 2! is supported and rendered adjustable with respect to the.
blades 20 and the earth surface by means of the chains 13, one end of which has a resilient connection with frame members 66 through the medium of the spring member 14 and the loops I5, the other end of which is taken up on the shaft 16. Shaft 16 is manually turned by means of the conventional worm designated by the numeral 11, there being a connecting rod 18 therefor and a hand wheel 19 at the operator's station designated by the numeral 41. It will thus be seen that when the wheel 19 is turned the earth mover 2| is caused to be raised or lowered as against its pivotal connection H with angle irons 36. Moreover, the earth mover 2| is full floating in the sense that the whole mechanism may rise or fall according to the depth of the material gathered between the moldboards 20.
The endless belt 22, as will be noted from Figs. 1 and 3, extends longitudinally of the vehicle, on an incline from the moldboards 20 and the earth mover means 2i, running on a driven pulley 80 at its discharge end and an idler roller 8! at its intake end, both of which are on shafts suitably journaled in a frame member 82. The frame member 82 is supported at its intake end, and may be elevated to various heights, by means of the chain 53 and the block 85, theformer being attached at one end to the angle iron 36, the
other end being taken up on the shaft 88. Shaft 86 may be caused to rotate by the worm gear Bl, the rod 83 and the handwheel 89, the latter being at, the operator's station 41. Blocks 85 are attached to rods 32 and thus the taking up of chain 8% on shaft 86 will cause the elevation of the frame member 30, carrying with it the inner ends of moldboards 23, pan 25, and the intake end of conveyor 22 and its frame member 82 (see Fig. 2).
The opposite end of the frame 82 is suspended, in its relation to chassis Ill, by means of the cables 95, secured at one of their ends to the frame and passing over the sheaves 96, on shaft 91, through the blocks 98, on the frame 82, and thence to theconventional winding drums 99. This mechanism is supported by the posts [00, bolted to the vehicle chassis iii, in which shaft 31 is suitably journaled.
It will thus be seen that both intake and discharge ends of conveyor 22 may be elevated to different levels, independently of each other, to meet varying conditions.
In order to prevent the pan 25 from gouging the earth and belt 22 from wear bycontact there with, we provide an idler roller lid on the bottom of the cross-bar of frame (see Fig. 6). Additionally, we have found it desirable and therefore provide a series of idler rollers ill, on frame 82, to support the belt 22 during its course. These rollers are disposed on opposite sides of the frame and pitched at slight angles to raise the edges of the belt to define a slight trough to prevent spilling of the material being handled (see Fig. 6). As a means of cleaning idler roller 8| and thus reducing wear'and tear we have provided a scraper I I2 therefor (see Fig. 6).
Power for the driving of the belt 22 and the earth mover M is derived from the motor H through the medium of the mechanisms shown to best advantage in Fig. 1. A live shaft H5, journaled in post I00 and post H5, has an operative connection with the main drive shaft of motor ll through a belt Ill and pulley H8 (see also Fig. 4).
A clutch I20, on the shaft l2l, upon being engaged by any conventional means, such as the clutch finger I22, causes shaft I2I to rotate and the sprocket I23 thereon transmits power to shaft I24 by means of the chain I25 and sprocket I26.
Shaft I21, having a universal coupling I28 with shaft I24 to compensate for regulation of the height above ground of the discharge end of belt 22, energizes shaft I29, on which is mounted pulley 80, through suitable gearing I30. Thus belt 22 is caused to travel over roller 8I and pulley 80 in the direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. 1.
A second clutch I35, engageable by suitable means, such as the lever I36, transmits the power of shaft I2I, when connected by clutch I20 to shaft II5, to shaft I31 to drive the earth mover means 2|. Here shaft I31, through suitable gearing I38, the chain I39 and sprocket I40, causes shaft 65 to be rotated and thus set in motion the chains 60 having thereon the paddles GI.
While we have illustrated and described a practicable, operative driving means for belt 22 and the earth mover means 2|, it will be appreciated that other mechanisms may be substituted as a matter of choice without departing from the spirit of this invention. For instance a separate prime mover may be employed to drive belt 22 and earth mover 2I,
and thus eliminate the relatively remote connection with motor II. Or a more direct connection with motor II or its main shaft may be devised. With this in mind we show the above described power transmission means merely for purposes of illustration.
The operation of the above described mechanism is as follows: The vehicle is put in reverse, with respect to the motor II, the forwardly diverging moldboards being directed at the windrow or material to be handled, such as that illustrated in Fig. 3. The clutches I20 and I are thereupon engaged causing the endless belt 22 to be drawn over the pulley 80 and the idler I roller 8I (in a clockwise direction looking at Fig.
1) and the endless earth mover means 2| to run in a counterclockwise direction (looking at Fig. l). The loose material is gathered between the moldboards 20 and due to their rearward convergence forced into the area for effective han-,
dling by the paddles SI of the earth mover means 2I by which it is moved rearwardly over the pan 25 through the throat defined by pan 25, moldboards 20 and the earth mover means 2I, and thence onto the endless belt 22.
The material progresses with conveyor belt 22 for discharge beyond the end of the chassis I0, as for example, into a dump truck such as that indicated in the dot-dash lines (see Fig. 1). In
. this connection it should be noted that we have provided a pair of vertically disposed bumper posts I as a supplement to the conventional bumper I46, the same having shock absorbing springs I4'I disposed between the bars I45 and the vertical posts I00, to prevent damage to the mechanism as dump trucks are backed into position under the discharge end of conveyor 22.
In Fig. 8 there is shown a modification of the earth mover means 2I, consisting in the substitution of a single wheel I having paddles I5I secured at the periphery thereof, for the endless chain members illustrated in Figs. 1 and 6. In this form the wheel I50 is mounted on the shaft63, the latter being caused to rotate by means of its connection with a driven shaft through the medium of a chain I52 and the sprocket I53. The particular shape of the padof the machine, the mover justment of the machine dles I5I is shown in Fig. 9 as having inwardly bent ends to more effectively move the earth gathered between the moldboards 20. It is quite probable that many would prefer a paddlewheel of this character working within the effective earth gathering area of the blades 20 to cause rearward movement of the dirt to the conveyor 22', since the gearing and driving means therefor could be more easily sealed against wear and tear caused by the material being handled.
It is believed apparent from the foregoing disclosure that we have devised a machine which is highly efficient for the purposes intended. Test runs of a full size machine have proved that loose dirt may be quickly and conveniently handled under the average conditions incident to road maintenance at but a fraction of the cost of the manual handling thereof or the operating costs of such equipment as there is in the prior art for this particular purpose.
It should be noted that one reason for the eflicient performance of -the apparatus is the novel floating construction of the material mover 2 I. It has been observed that when a deep windrow of material is encountered, such as would seemingly be greater than the normal capacity 2I swings upwardly on its pivot II and the paddles GI bite downwardly into the pile until all of the gathered material is loaded upon conveyor 22.
Moreover, it was noted that due to the yieldable support for the outer end of the mover 2|,
clods of earth were readily broken up for easy movement due to the fact that the paddles GI were continually striking the lumps from above, as contrasted with an attempt to force such clods through a rigid mechanism.
Were the mover 2I rigidly mounted this degree of eilicient operation would not be attainable in the absence of some provision for self-adto the quantity of material to be moved.
We have shown one form of our invention and modifications of details of construction thereof for purposes of illustration. Since it will be appreciated that the invention may take many other forms without departing from the spirt thereof, we desire protection to the full scope of the appended claims.
The invention claimed is:
1. In an apparatus of the class described, a wheeled vehicle, a pair of forwardly diverging moldboards disposed on one end thereof, a pan wardly of their forward ends, an endless conveyor extending longitudinally of the vehicle and having its intake end overlapped by said pan, adjustable supporting means for the discharge end of said conveyor, an auxiliary frame supporting the moldboards, the connected pan and the intake end of said endless conveyor, means for effecting adjustment of the relative positions above ground of the members supported by the auxiliary frame, a floating endless paddle means disposed between the moldboards to assume a position dependent on the quantity 'of gathered material and operative to move the material gathered between the moldboards over said pan and onto said conveyor, and means for effecting adjustment of the position above ground of the said endless paddle means.
2. In a device of the class described, a wheeled vehicle having a main frame, an auxiliary frame on one end thereof, a pair of forwardly diverging moldboards at the same end of the vehicle as the auxiliary frame, a pan connecting said moldboards, said moldboards having portions extending forwardly beyond said pan, a pair of bars pivotaliy connected to the auxiliary frame, and floating means disposed between said moldboards for clearing the area between the moldboards of material gathered therein, the inner end of said clearing means being connected to the ends of said bars opposite theirpivotal connection to said auxiliary frame and means suspending said clearing means being yieldably and adjustably supported by said auxiliary frame.
3. In a device of the class described, a wheeled vehicle having a main frame, an auxiliary frame on one end thereof, a pair of forwardly diverging moldboards at the same end of the vehicle as the auxiliary frame, a pan connecting said moldbeards, said moldboards having portions extending forwardly beyond said pan, bars pivotally connected to the auxiliary frame, and floating means disposed between the moldboards for clearing the area between the portions and the pan of material gathered therein and thereon, the inner end of said clearing means being connected to the ends of said arms opposite their pivotal connection to said auxiliary frame and means supporting the outer end of said clearing means being yieldably and adjustably supported by said auxiliary frame.
4. In a device of the class described, a wheeled vehicle having a main frame, an auxiliary frame at one end thereof, a pair of forwardly diverging moldboards at the same end of the vehicle as the auxiliary frame, a pan connecting the moldboards, said moldboards having portions extending forwardly beyondsaid pan, material moving means disposed between the moldboards operative to clear the area between the said portions of material gathered therein and for moving the same across said pan, a conveyor means adapted to receive material from said pan, said material moving means and said pan and said moldboards defining a throat for the passage of material, and means in conjunction with said auxiliary frame for floatingly supporting the material moving means to permit variation in the area of said throat.
5. In a device of the class described, a wheeled vehicle having a main frame, an auxiliary frame at one end thereof, a pair of forwardly diverging moldboards at the same end of the vehicle as the auxiliary frame, a pan connecting the inner ends of the moldboards, said moldboards diverging forwardly of the pan, material moving means disnot to interfere posed between said moldboards operative to clear the area between the moldboards of material ing means and said pan and said moldboards defining a throat for the passage of material, means on the auxiliary frame suspending the forward end of said material moving means, and means pivotally connected to said auxiliary frame supporting the rear end of said material moving means for floating movement.
6. A wheeled vehicle having diverging moldboards thereon, .a pan connecting said moldboards, a frame having legs connected to the moldboards and having a transverse means disposed beneath said pan for travel on the ground, means pivoting said frame to the vehicle, and a floating clearing means operative between said moldboards to move over the pan that material which is gathered between the moldboards.
7. A wheeled vehicle having diverging moldboards thereon, a pan connecting said moldboards, a frame having longitudinal legs connected at one end to the moldboards and a transverse means disposed beneath said pan for travel on the ground, means pivoting said frame to the vehicle, an auxiliary frame means extending upwardly and forwardly having an overhead portion, supporting means connected to the overhead portion and said moldboards, bars pivoted on said auxiliary frame means, and a clearing mechanism fioatingly mounted by said bars located between the moldboards and operative to move over said pan that material which is gathered between the moldboards.
'8. A wheeled vehicle having frame means thereon, forwardly diverging moldboards thereon, forwardly extending bars pivoted on the frame means, frame members pivoted to the forward ends of said bars, a clearing means floatingly mounted by said frame members between said moldboards for variation of its operative position dependent on the quantity of gathered material between the moldboards, a pan connecting said moldboards, said moldboards having portions extending forwardly beyond said pan, and a drive connection from the vehicle to said clearing means, said drive connection being flexible so as with the floating movement of the clearing means.
WILLIAM F. HOLBROOK. CHRISTOPHER L. JORDAN.
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Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2415617A (en) * 1945-02-05 1947-02-11 Werner Henry Pickup grain loader
US2460441A (en) * 1944-04-19 1949-02-01 Everett H Appel Agricultural loading machine
US2491353A (en) * 1945-10-15 1949-12-13 Russel D Acton Bale loader
US2515966A (en) * 1944-06-20 1950-07-18 Polisena Bernardo Article gathering apparatus
US2522304A (en) * 1946-12-26 1950-09-12 Joseph M Schuch Beet loader
US2547752A (en) * 1946-12-24 1951-04-03 Severin E Koop Snow loader
US2597219A (en) * 1947-10-17 1952-05-20 Everett H Appel Bale loading machine
US2600028A (en) * 1950-05-05 1952-06-10 Samuel T Steffen Bale-loading machine
US2639022A (en) * 1949-02-05 1953-05-19 Athey Products Corp Power actuated conveyer type loader
US2669338A (en) * 1952-05-23 1954-02-16 Athey Products Corp Power operated conveyer-type loading machine
US2691835A (en) * 1950-03-20 1954-10-19 Henry Mfg Company Inc Excavating scraper bowl construction
US2696287A (en) * 1950-05-11 1954-12-07 J D Adams Mfg Company Mobile loader
US2735562A (en) * 1956-02-21 Kazanjian
US2748720A (en) * 1952-12-06 1956-06-05 Athey Products Corp Track cleaner
US2762141A (en) * 1952-07-01 1956-09-11 Tourneau Robert G Le Excavating machine
US2835098A (en) * 1955-04-04 1958-05-20 Horace D Hutne Harvester for pumpkins and similar crops
US3179263A (en) * 1962-08-06 1965-04-20 Walter Ross Tobacco harvester
US3390755A (en) * 1967-05-19 1968-07-02 David L. Stacy Coal loader

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2735562A (en) * 1956-02-21 Kazanjian
US2460441A (en) * 1944-04-19 1949-02-01 Everett H Appel Agricultural loading machine
US2515966A (en) * 1944-06-20 1950-07-18 Polisena Bernardo Article gathering apparatus
US2415617A (en) * 1945-02-05 1947-02-11 Werner Henry Pickup grain loader
US2491353A (en) * 1945-10-15 1949-12-13 Russel D Acton Bale loader
US2547752A (en) * 1946-12-24 1951-04-03 Severin E Koop Snow loader
US2522304A (en) * 1946-12-26 1950-09-12 Joseph M Schuch Beet loader
US2597219A (en) * 1947-10-17 1952-05-20 Everett H Appel Bale loading machine
US2639022A (en) * 1949-02-05 1953-05-19 Athey Products Corp Power actuated conveyer type loader
US2691835A (en) * 1950-03-20 1954-10-19 Henry Mfg Company Inc Excavating scraper bowl construction
US2600028A (en) * 1950-05-05 1952-06-10 Samuel T Steffen Bale-loading machine
US2696287A (en) * 1950-05-11 1954-12-07 J D Adams Mfg Company Mobile loader
US2669338A (en) * 1952-05-23 1954-02-16 Athey Products Corp Power operated conveyer-type loading machine
US2762141A (en) * 1952-07-01 1956-09-11 Tourneau Robert G Le Excavating machine
US2748720A (en) * 1952-12-06 1956-06-05 Athey Products Corp Track cleaner
US2835098A (en) * 1955-04-04 1958-05-20 Horace D Hutne Harvester for pumpkins and similar crops
US3179263A (en) * 1962-08-06 1965-04-20 Walter Ross Tobacco harvester
US3390755A (en) * 1967-05-19 1968-07-02 David L. Stacy Coal loader

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