US2174731A - Combined telegraph printer and perforator - Google Patents

Combined telegraph printer and perforator Download PDF

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US2174731A
US2174731A US42692A US4269235A US2174731A US 2174731 A US2174731 A US 2174731A US 42692 A US42692 A US 42692A US 4269235 A US4269235 A US 4269235A US 2174731 A US2174731 A US 2174731A
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selector
lever
tape
cam
code
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US42692A
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Robert F Dirkes
Evan R Wheeler
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Western Union Telegraph Co
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Western Union Telegraph Co
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L17/00Apparatus or local circuits for transmitting or receiving codes wherein each character is represented by the same number of equal-length code elements, e.g. Baudot code
    • H04L17/16Apparatus or circuits at the receiving end

Description

19-39. a. F. DIRKES er AL 7 couuumflpsemra PRINTER AND PERFORATORI pagan Filed Sept. 28, 1935 7 sheets-sheet -1 w l. l NI My, VH AIM INVENTORS RF. DIRKES BY ERWHEELER a maaw ATTORNEY 06 i. 3, 1939. D|RKEsuET AL 2,174,731
COMBINED TELEGRAPH PRINTER AND PERFORATOR Original Filed Spt. 28, 1935 7 Sheets-Shet 3 FIG. 3}
lupin,
AT ORNEY Oct. 3, 1939. R DIRKES ET AL 2,174,731
COMBINED TELEGRAPH PRINTER AND PERFORATOR Original Filed Sept. 28, 1935 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 [7 e 179d I790 INVENTQRS 3 RF. DIRKES BY ERWHEELER 291 6A WQBW 2B9 AT ORNEY Oct. 3, 1939. R F. D'IRKES ET AL COMBINED TELEGRAPH PRINTER AND P ERFORATOR 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 Original Filed Sept. 28, 1955 ATT Patented Oct. 3, 1939 COMBINED TELEGRAPH PRINTER. AND
PERFORATOR.
Robert F. Dirkos, Jamaica, N. Y., and Evan R. Wheeler, Plainfield, N. J., assignors to The Western Union Telegraph Company, New York,
Application N. Y., a corporation ot New York September 28, 1935, Serial No. 42,692
Renewed July 18, 1938 6': Claims. (01. 1 78--92)' This invention relates to a combined recording telegraph printer and perforator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature in which both the printing and perforating operations oc- 5 cur'on and in a single tape, respectively.
Commercial telegraph systems generally employ two general classes of circuits; trunk wire circuits and tie wire circuits. The trunk wires extend between central oflices and are usually operated by a multiple channel multiplex system- The tie wires terminate-in central ofllces and serve to connect branch oflices to the central office. A plurality of branch oflices may be connected to a central ofilce through one tie wire,
ingon the amount of traffic therefrom. In certain types of subscribers telegraph services, of which the so-called -timed wire service is an example, the subscriber will have one endof a tie wire terminating in his oflice. Thus a subscribers office functions to transmit and receive telegraphic communications similarto a branch officeand may be considered as such. Because of the expense, maintenance and attention re-- quired to keep multiplex apparatus in operation,- the equipment provided to operate the tie wires is of the start-stop or simplex type. When it is desired to carry on telegraphic com-' munciations between two branch ofllces'associated with the sanie central ofiice, it is entirely feasible to makedirect switchboard connection between their two tie lines. However, ordinary the "branch oifices are located. in remotely separated localities so that they are associated with separate central offices. It is also entirely possible to repeat signals received at one central 'oflice from a simplex operated tie wire directly to a multiplex channel of a trunk wire and extend the channel at the other central ofiice directly to another simplex tie wire.- Due to the slow speed of operation of the simplex systems as compared with multiplex operated systems, the above system of connecting does not efliciently utilize .the multiplex channel. Other objections to the above system are that when a call is received in a central ofiice from a branch oflice indicating a desire to communicate with a remote'branch oflice, a certain length of time is required to complete such necessary through connections during which time the transmitting branch oflice must'stand idly by. If the'called branch ofllces tie,line is busy at this time, the completion of the through circuit inay be delayed for a substantial period and after connections are made, the rate of transmission over the start-stop system may be the number of branch ofl'ices necessarily dependfar below the maximum speed of the multiplex channel. Moreover,'in order that a multiplex channel will be immediately available for making such through connections, it is necessary to provide a large number of normally idle multiplex '5 channels. 7
It has been found, therefore, that such messages can be handled expediently and economically by providing signal storage devices at each central oflice adaptedto receive signals from a 10 branch oflice tie line at any desired rate and from which the signals can be'subsequently retransmitted over the first available multiplex channel at the maximum speed thereof. At the opposite central oflicE, these signals are again stored and 15 repeated over the second bramch ofiice's tie line, the multiplex circuit thus beingimmediately available for other service. By this arrangement the calling branch oflice immediately upon calling the central ofiice with which it is associated may 20 begin the transmission of its message. Any short delays incident to the retransmission of such messages over the multiplex channel do not in any way inconvenience or delay the calling branch ofllcex In addition to the signal storing device, it is necessary to employ'at each central office a telegraph printer by which the calling branch oflice can communicate to the central oflice the identity of thecalled branch omce and by which general 30 telegraph business can be transacted. The printer is also required for record and check purposes.
It is the present practice to employ at each central oflice means for recording the signals on two separate tapes, one tape being in the form of a printed record, and the other in the form of a perforated tape. These recording means are necessarily of two general types, one responsive to signals of the start-stop variety and theother responsive to signals of the multiplex variety.
In certain cases and especially when messages from a branch oflice are received with practically no intervening time intervals therebetween, it requires considerable checking of the printed record against the perforated tape to insure that the perforated tape will be retransmitted through the proper transmitter. This same checking opera-- tion must be performed at the secondcentral ofllce to insure that the messages are retransmitted over the correct'tie wire. Delays incident to these checking operations are very objectionable both from the standpoints of economy and lost time. If the printed and perforated records both occurred on one tape,, it' would greatly 5 facilitate the handling of such messages in the central omces.
It is therefore one of the objects of this invention to-provide a mechanism by which signals 5 may be recorded in the form of a printed record and a. perforated record on and in a common tape, respectively, and in which both of said recordings register on the same transverse section of said tape.
Another object of this invention is the design 7 of the parts of a combined printer and perforator whereby such parts may be easily and cheaply manufactured and thus reduce the manufactur ing and maintenance costs of the machine to a 15 minimum.
Still another object of this invention is to prostart-stop five unit code'although it is to be understood that with modifications it may be adapted to operate in conjunction with other 25 codes without departing from the spirit of the invention.
As is well known to those versed in the art. this code is composed of a start impulse which is always of uniform line condition followed by five a intervals of impulses of two different line conditions in various combinations thereof which in turn are followed by a stop impulse which is always the same and of opposite line condition from that of the start impulse.
code is thirty-two and in order to provide the requisite number of selections to record letters, figures, punctuation marks, and printer functions, case grouping of signals is employed. Accord- 40 ingly, two case shift signals are required, called a shift signal and an unshift signal. The purpose of the shift signal is to position the recorder so that the following selections received will be properly recorded in the figures group. The un-' 45 shift signal positions the recorder to properly record signals in the letters group.
The selecting mechanism of this recorder comprises a single line magnet responsive to line impulses cooperating with an independently rotat- 50 able cam sleeve to variably and selectively position a set of primary selecting elements in accordance with the received impulses. The selection set up in the primary set of selectors is transferred in a short interval of time to a second set of selectors 65 whereupon the first set is free to operate in response to a following signal code while the second set has nearly the entire interval of one signal to operate the character selecting, printing and perforating mechanisms.
' 00,, The typewheel stop unit comprises a typewheel "shaft normally tending to rotate and a drum type stop unit for selectively stopping the rotation of the typewheel shaft and typewheel.
The tape perforating mechanism comprises a 65 series of punch pins and elements adapted to be selectively interposed between said pins and a rockable'member to selectively perforate the tape in accordance with the received code combinations of impulses. A tape feed mechanism coacting with feed holes perforated in the tape,
intermittently feeds the tape through the machine. a
The structural part of the machine comprises a base plate upon which is mounted an upright 7 frame casting. The casting serves as journal ments.
The maximum. 35 number of selections available with the ,five unit points for the various shafts and as a support for mechanismsthat comprise the machine.
Individual subcombinations of mechanisms that perform the related functions oi, the complete mechanism are so arranged that they may be easily .and readily re'movedand interchangeably replaced when requiring repairs or adjust- Thus the replacement of a complete recorder is not necessary.
An electric motor secured to the base furnishes local power for'all selecting and recording operations through appropriate gearing and clutch mechanisms, the selector magnet having practically no work to perform, it acting -in response to the received impulses to only control the selection.
A more complete and thorough understanding of this invention may be had from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings showing a preferred embodiment thereof, in which:
Figure 1 is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the invention in which the front of the machine is shown at the bottom of the drawing;
Figure 2 is a-front elevational view thereof;
Figure 3 is a left end elevational view thereof;
Figure 4 is a face view of a section of tape perforated and printed upon by the machine herein described;
Figure 5 is a rear elevational view of the machine; 1
Figure 6 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on line 6 -6 of Figure 1;
Figure 7 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on line 'l--'l of Figure 1;
Figure 8 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line 8-8 of Figure 6 Figure 9 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line 99 of Figure 6;
Figure 10 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on line llll0 of Figure 1;
Figure 11 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line ll-ll of Figure 10;
Figure 12 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line l2-l2 of Figure 10;-
Figure 13 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on line |3-|3 of Figure 1;
Figure 14 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on line l4-l l of Figure 13;
Figure 15 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on line 5-45 .of Figure 1;
Figure 16 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line "-46 of Figure 15; and
Figure 17 is a plan view of the mechanism shown in Figure 16.
Referring first to Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 5, a base plat 2| has attached to it by screws 22, a main frame casting comprising mainly, two vertical plate sec.- tions 23 and 24 extending traversely of the machine and suitable integral connecting members therefor. These vertical plate members and their connecting members with various projection's'and sections of the main frame provide journal'and mounting points for the various mechanisms. The connecting members and sections of the main frame will be given separate reference nu merals when referred to hereinafter in this specification. 4
Referring to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the drive mechanism of the machine will now be described. A group of four posts 25 (two only of which are shown in Fig. 2) attached to the base 2| has mounted thereon by screws 26 an electric motor M. A pinion 21 secured to the motor shaft 28 meshes with a gear 29'. The gear 29 is secured to a flanged hub 3I- by screws 32, (Fig. 15) the hub 8| being attached by a'set screw 33 to an operating cam shaft 34 for rotation therewith. The operating cam shaft 34 is tr'aversely journaied in flanged bushings 35 and 38 which are held in place by the bushing clamping members 31 and 38 respectively. The clamping members 31 and 38 are attached toathe sections 33 and 4| ofthe main frame casting by screws 42 and 43 respectively. Fixed to the shaft 34 by a set screw 44 is a flanged gear hub 45. A gear 48 is secured to the hub 45 by screws 41 for rotation therewith and meshes with a gear 48. The gear 48 is secured by screws 5| to a flanged gear hub 43, best shown in Fig. 10, which in turn is secured by means of a pin 52 to a countershaft 53. The countershaft 53 is journaled in flanged bushings :54 and 55 which are held in the plate member 23 and in a section 58 of the main frame casting.
respectively, by bushing clamping members 51,
one of which is shown dotted in Fig. 15. Fixed 23. In mesh with the idler gear 83 is another idler gear 88 fixed to a hub 68 by means of screws II, the hub 63 being rotatably mounted on a stud I2 in the plate framemember 23. A typewheel shaft drive gear I3 meshes with the idler gear 88 and is driven therefrom. The typewheel shaft gear I3 and the selector cam shaft gear 64 serve to rotate their respective shafts in a manner that will be hereinafter described in connection with their respective mechanisms.
Selecting mechanism 2 and 18', is located in the bracket 11 and piv otally mounted on the rod 82 is a U-shaped armature lever 83. An armature 84 in operative relation with the selector magnet 14 is rigidly attached to the pivoted end of the armature lever 83. The stroke of the armature 84 and the armature lever 83 rigidly connected thereto is limited by the adjustment'of a stud 85 in the bracket ll Q and a flanged self-locking nut 88 thereon in operative relation with the armature 84.
A spring tension indicator lever 8'I (Figs. 2 and 3) pivotally mounted by a pin 88 in a left extension 88 of the selector mounting bracket 71 has thereon ahorizontal projection 3| engaging with the upper end of an adjusting screw 82 carried by a horizontal projection 84 of the left extension 88. A retractile spring 83 has one end attachedto the lever 81 and the other end attached adjacent the left end of the armature" changing the positioniof the spring indicator ;lever 81 by means of the adjusting screw 32. By
changingthe adjustment of screw 82 the time.
when the magnet is energized. Also, the greater the tension on the spring 83 the quicker the armature 84 will be returned to its back stop when the selector magnet is deenergized. The etchings 35 oh the extension 88 of the bracket I'I serve to indicate the relative tension of the spring 83.
As heretofore described, the gear 84 (Fig. 10) is continuously rotating due to the power communicated thereto from the continuously rotating motor M through the described gear train. The gear 64 is fixed by screws 38 to a flanged hub 81 loosely mounted on a selector cam shaft 88.
The selector cam shaft 38 is traversely journalled in flanged bushings 38 and IN which are held by bushing clamping members I83 and I84 attached to the top of sections 23 and I82 of the main frame casting by screws I85 and 188 respectively. The flange of the gear hub 31 carries a series of three pins I81 (Figs. 18 and 11) equally spaced around the left face thereof. These pins engageradial slots I88 in associated Bakelite seg ments I88. A groove on-the'outer edge of the segments I88 has therein a circular coiled radially contractible spring I which causes the inner surfaces of the segments I83 to be frictionally engaged with a sleeve 2 on a hub' H3. The hub H3 is fixed to the selector cam shaft 88 by a set screw II4 for rotation therewith in abutting relation with the left side of the gear hub 31. The right side of the gear hub 31 is in abutting relation with the flanged bushing 38. It can be seen from the above description that, as the gear 54 and hub 81 rotate, the selector 'cam shaft 38 will tend to rotate therewith due to the action of the segments I88 frictionally engaged with the of a nut I25 in threaded engagement with the right end of the cam sleeve. A selector cam shaft stop-arm III is also attached to the shaft 88 for rotation therewith by means of a clamping screw II8 carried in said stop-arm. A spacing collar II3 on the shaft 88 between the cam sleeve H5 and the flanged bushing 83 co-acting with the gear hub 81, keeps the shaft '38 and the members carried thereby from longitudinal movement. A pointer pin I2I (Fig. 2) is located in the right end of the selector cam shaft 38 for rotation therewith and a radial scale I22 is etched on the bushing-clamping member I84. This pointer I2I and thescale I22 in conjunction with the adjustment ofthe stop arm I H on the selector cam shaft 88 determines the elapsed time between the release ofthe selector camshaft and the engagement of acam I23 with its associated se-- ditions are also called marking and spacing in- I I. pulses. In the preferred embodiment of this ingized. The tension of the spring 83 is varied by ventlon, the selecting magnet I4 is adapted to be rendered energized .by marking impulses and rendered deenergized by spacing impulses. The
marking impulses are therefore intervals during which current is transmitted and the spacing impulses are intervals during which no current is transmitted. The machine is so arranged that the start impulse is spacing and the rest impulse marking.
It will be assumed that a marking impulse is (Fig. 10) is restrained from rotation by the stop arm II1 rigidly secured thereto, the end of which is engaged with a horizontal projection I26 on the armature lever 83. This projection I26 is adapted to be interposed into the path of the end of the stop arm H1 when the armature and armature lever are placed in their marking position by the energization of the selector magnet 14. When the magnet 14 is deenergized, the spring 93 raises the armature lever 83 and moves the projection I26 thereupon free from the end of the stop arm H1, whereupon the selector shaft is free to rotate.
Referring to Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 15, a selector unit mounting plate I21 is secured in a vertical position to bosses I36 in the front side of the plate section 23 of the main frame casting, by
screws I28. Studs I291: to I29, (Fig. 15) extend horizontally from the front of the mounting plate I21 and have arranged thereon a plurality of selector lever guide plates I3I and spacers I32 intermediate" therebetween. Between the six front guide plates I3l are' located flve selector levers indicated in general at I33 in Fig. 15, and individually by reference characters I33a to I'33e in Fig. 3. The spacers I32 are slightly thicker than the selector levers I33 and therefore the selector levers are movable between the guide plates I3I. The selector levers I33 are not rigidly attached to the selecting unit or pivoted at any one point, but slide between the guide plates I3I. being restrained and guided in their movements by springs and guide pins. The springs attached to the selector levers are. indicated in general at I34 and I35 in Fig. 15, and individually by reference characters I34a to I34e in Fig.
3 (134a and I34e only being shown), and I35a tofl35e in Fig. 10. The fixed ends of the springs I34 and I35 are attached to spring posts I36 and I31 (Fig. 15) respectively, extending hori zontally from the selector unit mounting plate I21. The selector lever I33a is shown in its normal position in Fig. 15 with respect to its associated springs and guide memberswith the front guide plate I3I removed. The other four selector levers I 33b to- I 33c are held in their normal position in substantially the same manner-by their associated springs. The guide plates I3l and spacers [32 are clamped together by nuts position as positioned by the rest impulse of the proceeding signal and that it is desired to select another character; The electrical impulses that comprise the character code being received on the selector magnet in a predetermined arrangethe studs I29a to I29).- v
'of this impulse.
ment will be transformed-into mechanical selections of the selector levers I33 as will be hereinafter described. Assume that the character to be selected is represented by a code combination composed of the following flve intelligence impulses: spacing, marking, spacing, marking, and
marking. These impulses are preceded by a spacing start impulse and are followed by a marking stop impulse. The spacing start impulse, which is an interval of no current; renders the selector magnet 14 deenergized and thus allows the spring 93 (Fig. 2) to rock the armature 84 and armature lever 83 in a clockwise direction as seen in Fig. 2. The amount that the spring 93 is allowed torock the armature lever is determined by the position of the flange 85 on thestud 85. The flange 65' being so located thatwhen the armature 84 comes in contact therewith, the projection I26 (Fig. 10) extending from the side of the armature lever 83 will be withdrawn from the path of the end of the stop arm II1. The'receipt of the start impulse on the selector magnet, therefore, disengages the projection I26, and the stop arm 1, whereupon the selector cam shaft 98 is free to rotate with the gear 64 through the action of the heretofore'described friction clutch thereon. The speed of rotation of the selector cam shaft 98 is so arranged relative to the speed of transmission of the impulses that when the transmitting source is ready to transmit the first impulse, the cam shaft is revolved to the proper I26 thereon into the path of the end of the stop arm 1. At the end of a revolution of the selector cam shaft 98, the stop arm H1 and projection I26 will engage and bring the selector cam shaft to a stop thereat in its normal rest position.
When the selecting magnet is associated with and receiving signals from a distributor transmitter, the selecting cam shaft 98 may be geared to rotate a substantial amount faster than the transmitting shaft of the associated distributor transmitter. In such case the selecting cam shaft 98 will complete its revolution before the transmission of the complete signal. ference in speed, however, should be such that the marking rest impulse is being received on the selector magnet when the selector cam shaft between the rotation of the selector cam shaft 98 and the speed of transmission insures that the selector cam shaft will return to, and be stopped in its normal stop position before the The difcompletes its revolution. This difference in speed transmission of the start impulse of the following signal begins.
To return now to the five intelligence impulses that comprise the character to be selected. The
start impulse which was spacing rendered the' selector magnet deenergized, and as the first intelligence impulse is spacing, the selector magnet still remains deenergized for the duration During the first part of the time interval during which the first intelligence impulse is being transmitted and received on the selector magnet, the high part of the disccam I23a (Fig. 15) in operative relation with a verselector cam shaft 68 continues to rotate, the
arm of the first selector lever I630 starts to en'- tical projection I 69 on a rightwardiy extending gage said projection. .As the disc cam I261; continues to rotate, the high part thereof will rock the selector lever 533a in a clockwise direction high part of the disc cam I234; passes oi the projection 569 on the selector lever i83c and said selector lever is rocked in a counter-clockwise direction back into itsoriginal and normal position by the action of its attached springs Itda and WM. 1
The second intelligence impulse of the code com-- bination is marking, and the reception of this impulse energizes the selector magnet I6 and therefore the armature lever 83 is actuated into its marking position, as shown in Fig. 15. This brings the-cross-member I63 of the 'U- shaped armature lever 86 into operative relation with rightwardly extending projectionsidd adjacent the top of the selectorlevers'itta to I33e. During the first part of the time interval during which the second intelligence impulse is being received on the selector magnet, the high part of the disc cam 923i) engages with the projection I 36 of the selector lever I331). This rocks the selector lever i332; in a clockwise direction about the tip of its downwardly extending portion MI and brings the projectioni44 of said selector lever in contact with the cross-member N3 of the arms,- ture lever 83. Thus the rotation of the selector lever i331: with the stud I62 serving as a. pivot is stopped and as thecam i26b continues to rotate, the selector lever isrocked with the end of the projection I64 thereof in contact'with the crossmember Ida acting as a pivot point. As selector lever i331 rocks with the projection i4 3 acting as a pivot, the downwardly extending portion Idi thereof slides to the left and off the square-shaped pivot stud M2, whereupon the springs I861) and I351: actuate the selector lever I861) downwardly into its selected position. A selector lever B36 is shown in its selected position by the dotted outline in Fig. 15. The downward movement of the selector lever is limited by pins I45 and 846, upon which arms of the selector lever rest with the lever in its rotation.- As the sleeve member I6I rotates in its selected position.
The third impulse of the signal code is spacing and the third selector lever I33c will be left positioned in its normal position? in the same manner as the first'sele'ctor lever was left positioned in its'normal position. The-fourth and fifth impulses being marking, the fourth and fifth selector levers I 63d and .336 respectively will be actuated to their selected position in the same manner as the second selector lever I861) was actuated to its selected position.
From the above paragraphs it is evident that.
the reception of spacing impulses on the selector inag net are transferred to and represented by their respective selector levers being in their un-- selected or normal position. The marking impulses are transferred to and represented by their respective selector levers'being in their selected position. Hereinafter the unselected and selected 'positions of the selector levers will be referred to as spacing and marking positions respectively of said selector levers. r I I At a-predetermined point in the revolution. of
the-selector cam shaft98, a'high part of the cam I The purpose of the trip lever I231 engages the top-right end of a substantially T-shaped lever I41, the left end of which is pivoted on a pin I 46', which in turn is ri i y secured to the selector unit mounting plate I21. The lower-right end of the lever I41 rests on the upper horizontal section of an operating cam trip lever its (Figs. 2 and 10) which is pivoted on a tion therewith is an operating cam hub I54 which in turn has an operating cam I56 attached to it by screws I55 (Fig. 16). A spacing sleeve I61 (Fig. 15) on the shaft 34 between hubs 45 and I52, assists in keeping the operating cam I56 properly aligned with its associated parts. A
collar i56 attached to the shaft 34 by a pin I59 in abutting relation to the flanged bushing 36 prevents the shaft 34 from moving to the right. A
sleeve me'mber I6I slidably mounted on the sleeve I5! is operatively connected to the hub I54 by means of interengaging teeth members I62 (Fig. 2). .The sleeve member I6I comprises the driven member of a ratchet clutch by means of which the independently rotatable operating cam I56 is rotated. A spring I63 (Fig. 15) cofled about a sleeve portion of the hub I52 tends to keep teeth I64 disposed on the right face of the sleeve member I6I engaged with similar teeth I65 disposed on the left face of the gear hub 46. The gear hub 45 comprises the driving member of the ratchet clutch, it being attached for rotation therewith to the shaft 34. When the teeth I64 and I65 on the driven and driving members respectively are engaged, the operating cam :I66 will rotate with the shaft 84.
A side cam surface I66 (Fig. 2) disposed on a circumference of the driven member I6I, is in operative relation with the lower end I6! of the trip lever I48. With the teeth I64 and I65 (Figs. 2 and 15) engaged and the operating cam I66 rotating with the shaft 34, the side cam. surface I66 is so arranged thatit engages with the and E6! of the trip lever I46 at a predetermined point ber to the left and consequently the teeth I64 thereon are disengaged-from the teeth I65 of the driving member 46. A further projection of the side cam surface'l66 then engages the end I61 of I the trip lever and brings the operating cam as- I sembly to a stop in its predetermined rest position. When the trip lever I46 is tripped as herebefore described, the end I61 thereof and the side cam surface I66 are disengaged, which allows spring I63 to slide the drivenmember I6I to the right and cause its teeth I64 to be engaged with teeth I65 of the driving member 45, whereupon the operating cam will rotate with the operating cam shaft 34. Since the cam I26! and the T-lever I41 actuate the trip lever I48 for a short interval of time, the. trip lever'is quickly returned to its normal position by an attached spring I66 (Flg. 10) whereupon end I61 (Fig. 2) rides on the circumference of the sleeve member I6I in the path of the side cam surf I66. Thus as the operating cam B56 nears thee d or its revolution. the s side cam surface I66 and the trip lever I46 cause the disengagement of the ratchet clutch as heretofore described and bring said operating cam to a stop in its predetermined rest position. The
shaft 34 is geared to rotate a substantial amount faster than the selector cam shaft 98 and it will therefore complete its revolution and be stopped in its rest position before the selector cam I23 can actuate the trip lever I44 to again release the sleeve member I6 I in conjunction with a following ignal code combination.
The operating cam I56 (Fig. 15) is a disc with a portion I69 thereof, shown dotted in Fig. 17, disposed axially toward the left end of the machine. A gathering cam "I and a reset cam I12 attached to the left and right sides respectively of the operating cam disc I56 rotate therewith. These three cams, namely, the operating cam I56, the gathering cam "I and the reset cam- I12- comprise what will hereinafter be referred to as the operating cam assembly.
A latch lever I13 (Figs. 16 and 1'7) is pivoted on a shoulder screw I14 screwed-into a plate I15 which in turn is secured to a section 39 of the main frame casting. The end of the latch lever I13 is engageable with an edge of the gathering cam I1I when the operating cam assembly is in its stop position. A spring I16 attached to the latch lever I13 and to a pin I11 in the plate I15 normally keeps the latch lever I13 inoperative relation with the gathering cam I1I. The purpose of the latch lever is to prevent any rebound or rotationin reverse direction of the operating,
cam assembly that might occur due to its sudden stop by the operating cam trip lever I46.
The lower ends I16 (Fig. 15) of the selector levers I33 are bifurcated and are so placed in relation to the operating cam I56 that when they are in their selected or marking position, the bifurcated ends thereof straddle the disc of the operating cam I56 as shown by the dotted outline of a selected selector lever.
A series of flve code disc levers indicated in general at I19 in Fig. 15 and individually by reference characters I19a to I19e in Fig. 9 are held in position by the guide plates I 3|. The
code disc levers I19 rest on spacers I32 (Fig. 15) on the selector unit assembly screws I290 and I29!) and are prevented from moving upward by A selector lever in its spacing position is not adapted to be operatively engaged with its associatedcode disc lever. The code disc levers H911 to I19e have adjacent the center thereof projecti0ns'18la to I8Ie as shown in Fig. 9 that extend vertically a predetermined distance and are then bent to extend horizontally toward the front of the machine. The purpose of these projections will be described in following paragraphs.
Referring to Figs. 15, 16 and 17, as the operating cam assembly starts to rotate, when released as heretofore described, and has completed about a quarter of a revolution, the gathering cam IH which is attached to the operating cam I56 and rotating therewith, comes into operative relation with the-downwardly extending projections I62 on the right ends of the code disc levers I19. Due to theshape of the section I83 of the gatheringcam I11 and its rotating movement, it progressively slides all the code disc levers I19 that may be in their left position to their right position. Some or all or none of the code disc levers I19 may be in their left position depending on the previous character selected. Thus all the code disc levers I19 are to the right and in position to have the selection that is set up in the selector levers I33 transferred to them in a manner that will hereinafter be described. As the operating cam assembly continues to rotate, the operating cam disc I56 slides in the bifurcated ends I16 of the selected selector levers I33 and after about a half a revolution'of said disc, the displaced portion I69 thereof actuates the bifurcated ends of the selected selector levers toward the left. As the bifurcated ends of the selected selector levers move to the left, the left sides thereof engage with the right ends of their associated code disc levers I19 and consequently slide said code disc levers to the left into their left position. As will be remembered, the second selector lever I33b, the fourth lever I33d, and the fifth lever I33e, were positioned to their selected or marking position in response to received code combination of impulses. Consequently; the second, fourth and fifth code disc levers I191), "941, and I19e, respectively, will he slidto the left into their marking position, as the displaced portion I69 of the operating cam disc I56 actuates the selector code disc levers: The first and third code disc levers H941 and I190 will remain as positioned by the gathering cam I" in their right or spacing position because their associated selector levers I33a and I33c remaining in their normal or spacing position retain their bifurcated ends I16 out of .engagement with the operating cam disc I56.
The code disc levers I19 remain in either their spacing or marking positions corresponding to the selection transfered to them from the selector levers until the first part of the subsequent revolution of the operating cam assembly, whereupon all the code disc levers in a marking position are again moved to their spacing position by the gathering cam I1I.
Individual to each code disc lever disc lever detent pawl I64. These detent pawls I64 are pivoted on a common stud I65 attached to the selecting unit mounting plate I21. Individual springs I66 attached to an arm of each detent pawl and to a spring post I81, keep said pawls'engaged with a wedge-shaped portion I68 of their associated code disc levers The detent pawls I64 in conjunction with their associated springs I66 act as jockeys and tend to keep the code disc levers I19 in either their marking or spacing position as set by the operating or-gathering cams respectively.
As the operating cam assembly rotates further, the displacedportion I69 of the operating cam disc I56 in passing out of operative relation with the bifurcated ends of the selected selector levers return said selector levers to their right hand position. Further rotation of the operating cam assembly brings the reset cam I12 into operative relation with the bottom of the selected selector levers and due to the shape of the reset cam and its rotating movement, the selected selector levers are raised. When the'portion I of each of the selector levers is high enough to clear the pivot stud m, attached springs I35 pull the selector levers over onto the stud I42. The reset cam I12 76 I19 is a code.
then passes out from beneath the selector levers and they stay in their spacing position, as the stud I42 prevents them from returning to their marking position. Thus all the selector levers I33 that were actuated to their marking position by the selector' cams I23 in conjunction with the armature lever 83 are returned to their spacing or normal unselected position and all the selector levers I33'are ready for the next character code selection. Further rotation of the operating cam assembly is stopped after one complete revolution as previously explainedby the operating cam trip lever I48.
' The various functions of the selector cam and of the operating cam assembly are so timed that there is no interference in their operation, the selector cam having completed'its selection before the operating cam assembly starts to transfer this selection to the code disc levers H9.
Typewheel stop mechanism The typewheel stop assembly, indicated in general by the reference numeral 589 (Figs. 13 and 15), comprises a flanged bearing sleeve 59! surrounding a typewheel shaft sleeve I92, a typewheel shaft I93 and associated parts. The typewheel shaft sleeve I92 is attached to the typewheel shaft I93 for rotation therewith by a pin I90. Attached to the bearing sleeve I!" by screws I90, only one of which is shown in Fig. 13, is a left stop member guide plate I95 and 'a'stop unit mounting plate I96. A clamping washer I91 between the plate I96 and a stop member pivot disc I98 keeps said pivot disc against the left guide plate I95. Screwed into the right face of the left guide plate I95 are a series of four posts I99. On the right side of the flange of the sleeve I9I is a spring plate 2!", a series of spacers 202 and a series of filler-washers 200. Supported on each filler-washer are code discs indicated in general at 204 in Fig. 15, and individually by reference characters 204a to 2,00 in Fig. 13. The spring plate 2!", spacers 202, and fi1ler-washers 203, are held fast and in position by a right stop member guide plate 205 attached to the posts I99 by screws 206 in the right ends thereof. As the filler-washers 203 are slightly thicker than the code'discs 200, the discs are not clamped tight but are free to rotate on the filler-washers 203, being limited in the amount of their rotation by elongated holes I80 therein, through which pass the posts I99. The code discs 200 are provided with V-shaped notches I60 out along their circumferential edge in a manner well known in the disc 206 has two positions.
art.
As will appear from the following, each code For each combination of settings of these discs corresponding V- shaped notches I60 on each disc will be in align- At right angles to and code discs and guided in radial slots 201 and 208 in the right and left guide plates 205 and I95 respectively, are a series of stop members indicated in general by reference numeral 209. Each stop member 209 is pivotally or otherwise carried on the periphery of the supporting and pivot disc I98 adjacent the left end thereof and is provided with a V-shaped edge on the'section engageable with the circumferential edges of the code discs 204. Each stop member has one end of an indiv'idual coil spring -2II attached to it, the other' end of the spring being attached to the spring plate'20l. By the action of these springs. the stop members 20.9 are pulled radially inward and sleeve I9I.
are urged into engagement with the V-shaped notches in the code discs 204.
As'stated above, for each setting of the code discs 204 one of the stop members 209 will have six of the notches under it in the six discs in alignment and will accordingly be pulled by its attached spring into said notches, it being understood by those skilled in the art that the notches are so cut around the circumference of the discs 204 that onlyone such alignment of notches can exist at a time. The five code discs 204a to 2041; are in operative relation with the five code disc levers I'I9ato I'I9e respectively. lilach code disc lever I19 (Fig. 15) is provided on the left end thereof with a downwardly extending projection so mounted in relation to the code disc levers I19 that a transverse motion of the'levers imparts a rotary motion to, the code discs about the bearing The code discs remain 'as positioned by the code disc levers I19 until the following rotation of the gathering cam I1I (Fig. 17) whereupon all the discs 204 in a marking position are rotated .a few degrees in a clockwise direction (Fig. 15) into a spacing position by their associated code disc lever acting in conjunction with said gathering cam as heretofore described.
With a signaling code composed of five impulses, there are 32 possible selections and in order to increase .thenumber of possible selections without the addition of another impulse, I
. case shift signals are employed called shift and unshift signals. These two signals by means hereinafter described control the movement of the code disc 204i. The notches on the code discs 204a to 204e -are soarranged that for a predetermined number of combinations of settings two rows of notches'therein are in alignment.
Which one of the two stop members 209 associated with the aligned notches will be operated toward the axis of the stop unit is determined by the position of the code disc 204/, called the shift disc. In one position of the shift disc 204] those stop members associated with the unshift signals are selectable and in the other position the stop members associated with the shift signals are selectable. The selection of the shift and unshift signals cause the stop members 209a and 20% respectively (Fig. 14) to' be actuated toward the axis of the stop unit. The disc 204i has no control of the selection of the stop members 209a and 20% as it is cut away beneath these stop members and therefore either of these stop members are selectable for either position of the shift disc 20.
Pivotally mounted on a pin 2I5 in the top of the right stop member guide plate 205 is a shift disc lever 2I6. The lower end of the' lever 2I6 is "engage the right side ofthe shift disc lever 2I6. Thespring 2| I attached to the stop member 209bactuating said stop member causes the shift lever 2| 0. to rotate about its mounting point a few degrees. The shift lever in turn causes the Shift 26 disc 204i to be rotated a few degrees in a counterclockwise direction to a position corresponding to its shift position whereinafter the stop members 209 associated with the shift signal are selectable. With the shift disc in its shift position, a selection of the unshift stop member 2094: will 'cause said disc to return to its unshift-position whereinafter the stop members associated with the unshift signal are selectable. It will be noted, therefore, that with the shift disc 204! in one position a certain stop member is allowed to be moved toward the center in response to a certain signal code combination and a different stop member is allowed to be moved toward the center by the same signal code combination when the shift disc is in its other position.
A shift disc detent lever 2|9 (Fig. 15) pivotally mounted on one of the studs I99 is engageable with a detent roller 22I pivotally mounted on a pin 222 in the shift disc 204i. A spring 223, one end of which is attached to the detent lever 2I9 and the other end to a spring clip 224, keeps the end of the lever engaged with the detent roller 22I. ciated parts is to keep the shift disc in filthGlrOf its actuated positions duringreception of signals following the shift or unshift signals.
Loosely mounted for independent rotation on the left end of the typewheel shaft sleeve I92 (Fig. 13) is a flanged gear hub 225. Attached to the gear hub 225 for rotation therewith by screws. 226 is the gear 13. A flanged hub 221 on the left end of the shaft I93 is clamped in abutting relation-to the sleeve I92 for rotation therewith by means of a nut 228 in threaded engage- .ment with the left end of the typewheel shaft .I93. On the periphery of th hub 221 .are placed a series ofthree friction members 229 which are held in place by a circular coiled radially contractable spring 23L Radial slots 233, (Fig. in the friction members 229 engage the three pins 232 carried in the left side face of the' gear hub 225 (Fig. 13). The friction members 229 are frictionally engaged with the peripheries of the hub 221 by the spgpg '23I and tend to rotate said hub therewith. The above described members comprise a friction clutch which is constructed to operatein substantially the same manner as the hereinbefore described friction clutch on the selector cam shaft 98 shown in Figs. and 11.v As heretofore described,-the gear 13 (Fig. 5) iscontinually rotating due to the power communicated thereto from the idler gear 68 and therefore the typewheel shaft I93 will tend to rotate by means of the power communicated thereto through the attached friction clutch.
'Anindex or typewheel stop member 234 (Fig. 13) secured to the typewheel shaft sleeve I93 for rotation therewith, by means of a clamping screw 235 therein, rotates in operative relation to the right ends of the stop members 209. The stop members are normally out of the path .of the end of the stop arm 234 as it rotates with the typewheel shaft. However, when one of the stop members is positioned in a row of aligned notches, the right end thereof moves into the path of said stop arm 234 and blocks the rotation thereof, thus bringing the typewheel shaft 193 to rest in a selected angular position. By selecting various stop members, the typewheel shaft may be selectively stopped at various positions in its rotation. It is to be understood, however, that as'the code discs 204 are moved in response to a different 'code'combination' of impulses, the
The purpose of the detent lever and assoselected stop member 209 will be cammed out of its selected position into its normal position, the right end thereof being thus disengaged from the stop arm 234. The stop arm is then free to rotate with the typewheel shaft until stopped by the stop member selected by the new positions of the code discs 204 corresponding to the new code combination of impulses. When the typewheel shaft is stopped, the friction members 229 slide on the periphery of the hub 221.
On the right end of the typewheel shaft I93,
. secured by a screw 236, is a flanged typewheel Printing, perforating and tape feeding mechanisms Clamped to the top right side of the bracket 242 by screws 244 is a bushing clamping member 245 which serves to hold a flanged bushing 246. Referring to Fig. 10, the right end of an independently rotatable shaft 241 is journaledin the bushing. 246. A bushing clamping member 248 attached to the section 24 of the main frame casting by screws 249 hold a flanged bushing 251 which serves as another journal for the shaft 241. The shaft 241 and the countershaft 53 are on the same axis and the shaft 241 is adapted to be independently rotated from said countershaft by means of a hereinafter described ratchet clutch. The ratchet clutch comprises a driving ratchet integral with the hub 49 attached to the shaft 53 and continuously rotating therewith and is keyed to the shaft 241 for rotation therewith but is adapted to be slid along said shaft to bring its teeth 254 into. or out of engagement with the teeth 253 on the driving member 49. The means by which the driven member 252 is actuated along the shaft 241 will be described hereinafter. A circular coiled spring 258 around the sleeve portion of the driven member 252 tends to keep the driven member engaged with the driving member.
A side cam surface 259- (Fig. 12) on the hub portion of the driven member 252 is adapted to be operatively engaged with a cam follower 26I on the lower end of a trip lever 262. The trip lever 262 is pivotally mounted on a stud 263 in the frame section .24. A pin 264 (Figs. 2, 12, 16 and 1'1) secured to the hub I54 of the operating cam assembly is-arranged toengage the upper A member 334 attached adjacent the, left end of the lever 234 by screws 335'; has pivotally mounted on a pin 336 in the left'end thereof a feed pawl 331 best shown in Fig. '7, the upper end of which is adapted to operatively engage the feed ratchet wheel 33I. A spring 330 attached to the feed pawl 331 keeps the upper end operativ'ely engaged with the feed ratchet wheel 33I. An arm 339 pivoted on an eccentric shoulder screw 3 secured to the plate 296, has a detent pin 342 in the right end thereof in operative relation with the star wheel 7 .9. Aretractile spring 343 attached to the arm 339 and a pin 344 in the plate 296 holdsthe pin 342 in engagement with the star wheel 329.
The plate 349 (Fig. 6) has a vertically extending portion 354 upon which a tape retaining finger 356 is pivotally mounted at 355. A- spring, not shown, keeps the tape retaining finger. 356 operatively engaged with the cylindrical portion 332 of the shaft 324. The purpose of the retaining finger 356 is to keep the pins 333 on the cylinder 332 engaged in the feed holes in the paper tape.
Referring to Fig. 9, the right ends of the horizontal projections I 8Ia. to I M e of the code disc levers I19 are operatively engaged by springs 351 to individual transfer levers 358a to 358e. The transfer levers 358a to 358e are individually bent and shaped, being pivoted adjacent the center thereof on a common shoulder screw 359 horizontally secured to the section 24 of the main frame casting. Secured by screws 36I to-the each transfer lever is rounded and is engaged by the right bifurcated end of its associated sliding bar 293. i
The operation of the printing, perforating and tape feeding mechanisms will now be described in conjunction with the operation of the selector mechanism. As is evident from Figs. 6 and 9, transverse movements of the code -disc levers I19 will rock the transfer levers 359 about their pivot mounting point. As was heretofore described, the gathering cam I1I (Figs. 16 and 17) during the first part of the revolution of the operating cam assembly positioned all the code disc levers to their spacing position, thus rendering them adapted to receive the selection set up in the selector levers I33. As any of the code disc levers I19 were moved to the spacing position, its attached transfer lever 353 (Figs. 6 and 9) will be rocked in a clockwise direction whereupon its associated sliding bar 293 will be slid to the left into its spacing position. Thus all the sliding bars 293 will be in their spacing position which renders the left vertical section 366 thereof unengageable with the lower end of their associated punch pin 304. As the second, fourth and fifth code disc levers I191), I191! and I19e, in the example heretofore assumed, are moved totheir marking position by the operating cam I56 and associated selector .levers I33, the transfer levers 358a, 35807 and 3586' will be rocked in a counterv Near the end of the revolution of the operating cam assembly the pin 264 (Fig. 12) actuates the trip lever 262 to initiate the rotation of the shaft 241 with the countershaft 53.
therewith. After having completed about ahalf a revolution, the low part of the print cam 216 (Fig. 6) is operatively engaged with its associated.
.the typewheel, which is dampened with ink by means hereinafter described, will take an impression therefrom. The typewheel was selectively stopped in a position that would bring the character corresponding to the received code combination of impulses into operative relation with the projection 322 on the print lever as was hereinbefore described; The shaft 241 in rotating about a half a revolution from its rest position also brings a high part of the cam 211 into operative relation with its associated cam follower 236 and consequently causes the lever 284 to be rocked in clockwise direction about'its pivot mounting point. This brings the vertical sections 366 of the sliding bars 293 in a marking position in contact with the bottom of their associated punch pins 304 and forces the pins upward, causing the upper ends thereof to punch holes in the paper tape P. As the lever 284 rocks in a clockwise di rection, the plate 294 engages the bottom of the feed hole punch pin 341 and causes a feed hole to be punched in the tape. The left end of the lever 284 in rising also allows the pawl 331 (Fig. '7) to rise and engage a higher tooth on the feed ratchet wheel 33I, and as the lever is returned to its normal position by the spring 3I8, as the cam 211 approaches its rest position, the feed ratchet wheel will be. stepped an amount equal to one tooth on said ratchet wheel. The ratchet wheel 33I in stepping one step causes the paper tape P to be advanced a distance equal to one letter space by means of the pins 333 in the enlarged cylindrical portion 332 of the shaft 324 engaging feed holes in the tape. This presents a fresh surface in the paper tape P to be in operative relation with the typewheel 239, the feed hole. punch pin 341 and the punch pins 304. The pin 342 on the arm 339 engaging the star wheel 329, keeps theshaft 324 and attached members in position after being stepped. The lever 234 in returning to its normal position also allows the springs 346 and 352 on the punch pins 304a, 304d and 341 to return the actuated pins to their normal lower position. The feed pawl 331 is adapted to rotate the feed ratchet wheel 33I after the punch pins 304 and 341 are disengagedfrom the paper tape.
From the above paragraphs it is evident that on every revolution of the shaft 241 a. feed hole will be punched in the tape and the tape advanced one letter space.- It is also evident that the pins 304 will punch a combination of holes in the tape that will represent the selected characters and that the print lever 3I5 will be actuated to cause the impression on the typewheel representing the selected character to be recorded on the paper tape.
Referring to Figs. 4 and 6, the feed holes 361 The print and perforating cams 216 and 211 (Figs. 6 and 10) being attached to the shaft 244, will rotate,
are punched by the feed hole punch pin 341. The holes 363a to 366a are punched by their associated I3 315. The tape container 315 (Fig. 2) is adapted 2,174,781 punch pins 3040. to 304e and the character prints .in two forms. The imprint of the typewheel represents the character in a printed form and the combinations of holes represent the combinations of .impulses in a perforated form. In the preferred embodiment of the invention the printing and perforating operations for a character are adapted to be recorded and register on the same transverse section of tape. The selection of a character composed of the following impulses, spacing; marking, spacing, marking, and marking, was described and such a character will be registered on the tape by the transverse sections indicated by the reference numeral 31! (Fig. 4).
Referring to Fig. 5, a bracket 312 attached to the base plate 2!. by screws 313, has-attached to its upper end by screws 314 a tape container to hold a roll of tape 316 and allow it to be freely unrolled as it is fed through the machine. A roller 311 pivotally mounted on a shoulder screw 318 attached to the section 24, of the main frame assists in guiding the tape P through the ma-' chine.
A typewellinking means comprising an absorbent ink roller 319 (Fig. 2) an intermediate roller 38!, and a container 382 for the rollers 319 and 38l is supported by an arm 385 which is attached to the main frame section 24 by screws 383. The rollers 319 and 38l are pivotally carried by the container 382 and the circumference of the intermediateroller 38l is in contact with the circumference of the typewheel 239 and with the circumference of the ink roller 319. Thus the circumference of the typewheel is dampened with ink as the typewheel rotates.
Two spring clips 386 and 381 (Figs. 2 and 3), are attached to the machine by the mounting screws I 303 and 22, respectively. These clips holda container 388 adapted to receive the tape punchings. Two hollow members 389 and,39l attached to the top of the plates 309 and 351 respectively, (Fig. 6) by 'the plate mounting screws, are adapted to guide the tape punchings into the container 388 as they are forced from the plates 309 and 35L 4 A spring arm. 392 (Fig. 6) attached to the plate 296 by the mounting screw 291 has the upper end thereof engaged with the typewheel shaft I93. The am 392. assists in steadying the typewheel shaft as it rotates.
In some of the views the ink rollers container 382 andthe tape punchings container 388 are not shown in order to more clearly show some of the other essential parts.
While this invention has been shown in but one form, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that it is not so limited but is susceptible to various changes and modifications without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof, and it is desired, therefore, that only such limitations shall be placed thereon as are imposed by the prior art or are specifically set forth in the appended claims. 7
What is claimed is:
v 1. In combination, a selector mechanism re sponsive to received code combinations of impulses, a typewheelshaft, a typewheel rotatable with said typewheel shaft, a power driven means continually tending to rotate' said typewheel shaft, means controlled by said selector-mechanism for selectively stopping said typewheel shaft, a plurality of independently rotatable members, a print lever operable by one of said imdependently rotatable members to actuatea paper tape against said typewheel to take impressions therefrom, a plurality of punch pins, means coacting with said selector mechanism and operable by another of said independently rotatable members to selectively actuate said punch pins in accordance with received code combinations of impulses to form. "perforations in said tape, said perforations conforming to a predetermined code arrangement representative of and in register with the impressions taken from said typewheel, means for forming feed holes in said tape and means engaging said feed holes for advancing said tape for every received code combination of impulses. Y
2. In a. combined perforating and printing machine, the combination of a single magnet selector, a printing mechanism and a perforating mechanism jointly controlled thereby, a tape, means for supporting said tape whereby a common transverse section thereof is simultaneously in operative relation withsaid printing and perforating mechanism, and means foradvancing said tape sequentially with printing .and per forating operations. a
3. In a printing telegraph system the combination of a receiving printer and perforator, a com.- mon selecting mechanism therefor, means for effecting printing and perforating in register on a common tape, means for forming feed holes in said tape simultaneously with said perforating operation, and means engaging said feed holes for feeding said tape sequentially with said printing and perforating operations.
4. In combination, a plurality of primary selectable elements, a selector mechanism respon sive to received code combinations of impulses to selectively position said primary selectible elements, a set, of secondary selectable elements, means for transferring a selection in said primary selectable elements to said secondary selectable bers adapted to have projections thereon selec-,
tively interposed between said punch pins and said punch lever, means operable by said secondary selectable elements to actuate said movable members in accordance with the setting of said secondary selectable elements, a. print lever in operative relation with said typewheel, means for operating said print lever and said punch lever sequentially with the setting of said secondary selectable elements, a .papertape, means for advancing step-by-step said tape and means for supporting said paper tape in operative relation with said typewheel and punch pins whereby said printing and perforating operations register on the same transverse section of said tape.
. 5. In a telegraph recorder, a primaryset of selectors, a selector mechanism for positioning said primary selectors, a secondary set of selectors, means for transferring the selection set up in said primary selectors to said secondary selectors, a printingmechanism, a first means operable by said secondary selectors for controlling said printing mehcanism, a perforating mechanism, a secand means operable .by said;secondary selectors simultaneously with the operation of said printing mechanism and means operable by said transferring means to position said printing and perforating mechanisms to normal after each operation thereof.
6. In a telegraph recorder, a'single magnet selector mechanism responsive to received code combinations of impulses, a rotatable typewheel selectively positioned by said selector mechanism, a perforating mechanism comprising a series of punch pins, a series of associated interponent members and a punch lever for carrying said interponent members, a print lever in operative relation to said typewheel, means for positioning said interponent members whereby, on the operation of said punch lever, said punch pins will be selectively actuated in combinations according to the signal received on said selector mechanism, and means operating in timed relation to the operation of said selector mechanism for operatively actuating said print and punch levers.
7. In a telegraph recorder, the combination of a printing means and a perforating means for recording telegraph signals in associated dual forms on a common recording medium, a single magnet selector mechanism, means for supporting said recording medium whereby said perforating and printing means are adapted to register on a common section of said recording medium and means for advancing said recording medium in the direction of its length sequentially with the operation of said printing and perforating means.
8. In a telegraph printer, a rotatable typewheel, a paper tape, a printing mechanism adapted to take impressions from said typewheel onto said tape, a feed hole perforating mecha nism adapted to perforate feed holes in said tape, means for concomitantly operating said printing and perforating mechanisms and means coacting with feed holes perforated by said feed hole -perforating mechanism whereby said tape is sequentially advanced with said printing and perforating operations.
9. In a printing telegraph receiver, a paper tape, a rotatable typewheel, means for forcing said tape against said typewheel to take impressions therefrom, means operative concomitantly with said first mentioned means to form feed holes in said tape and means, operative intermittently with said first. and .second mentioned means for utilizing said feed holes to advance said tape. 1
. 10. In a telegraph receiver for recording code combinations of impulses, a paper tape, a perfoperforating cams for controlling the operation of their associated mechanisms; and means for advancing said tape in the direction of its length to effect letter spacing.
11. In combination, a typewheel printer comprising a typewheel shaft and typewheel rotatable with said shaft, a perforator comprising a series of punch pins, a paper tape, means for pressing said tape against said typewheel to take imprints therefrom, means for supporting said perforator with said punch pins movable in a plane including said typewheel shaft and means for selectively moving said punch pins in said plane to form holes in said tape in registration with and corresponding tosaid typewheel imprint.
12. In a telegraph printer, a rotatable typewheel, a paper tape, a perforating mechanism comprising a plurality of punch pins, a support for said tape whereby the movement of said tape is between said punch pins and said typewheel,
means for moving said tape against said typewheel, means for selectively moving said punch pins against said tape and means for advancing said tape after each conjoined printing and perforating operation.
13. In combination, a selector mechanism responsive to received code combinations of impulses, a printing mechanism comprising,a typesponsive to said selector mechanism for selectively positioning said punch pin interponents, means operative thereafter to actuate said interponents whereby said punch pins are selec-.
tively actuated in said plane to form holes in said tape, means operative concurrently with the operation of said interponent actuating means for taking impressions of said typewheel in its selected position onto said tape, means operative on every operation ofsaid interponent actuating means to actuate said feed hole punch pin to .form feed holes in said tape in advance -of the printing position thereof and means for operating said tape feeding mechanism intermittently with the conjoined operation of said printing and perforating mechanisms.
14. In a telegraph receiver, a plurality of primary selectors, a notched code member corresponding to each selector, a punch pin and interponent therefor corresponding to each selector, means for setting said selectors in combinations in accordance with received code signals, an operating cam, means for rotating said operating cam in timed relation to received code signals and means operated by said operating cam for sequentially positioning said code members and said punch pin interponents simultaneously in accordance with the position of said primary selectors.
15. In a typewheel printer, 9. recording tape, a
typewheel having a single row comprising both upper and lower case characters formed inthe periphery thereof, positioning means therefor, a common code representativeof both upper and lower case characters, means operated by the last received one of two predetermined signals for deter'm-ining in which of said cases succeeding signals are to be recorded and means for recording by perforations in said tape all signals received by said printer.
16. In a permutation code device, a single row typewheel having upper and lower case characters and a plurality of blanks formed thereon, a common code representative of both upper and lower case characters and case shift signals, a recording tape, means for selectively positioning said typewheel in response to received signals, said means acting to bring a blank thereon into printing position on the receipt of a case shift signal, means for recording received signals in a perforated form on said tape and means whereby case shift signals are represented by representative perforations in said tape and by blanks in 7 the section of said tape in operative relation with of secondary selectors, means for transferring the settings of said primary selectors to said secondary selectors,-a set of punch pin interponents, means operative by said secondary selectors for positioning said punch pin interponents and means for perforating said tape in combinations representative of the positions of said interpo nents.
18. In a telegraph recording device employing a code comprising a definite number of variable impulses, a set of selectors having a normal and a selected position equal in number to the variable impulses in said code, means responsive to received impulses for setting said selectors in their selected position or leaving them in their normal position in combinations in accordance withreceived impulses, a set of associated punch pin interponents having a normal and a selected position, means for actuating said selected or 7 select levers to position associated interponents to a selected position, a set of associated punch pins, .means for operating said interponents whereby those in a selected position engage associated punch pins to form holes in said tape and means operative immediately following the operation of said last mentioned means for returning selected of said selectors and interponents to normal.
19. In a single magnet telegraph recorder, a paper tape, a printing mechanism for recording telegraph signals in a printed form on said tape, a punch ng mechanism for recording said telegraph signals in a punched code form on said tape and means for operating said mechanis substantially concurrently.
20..In a telegraph receiver, a recording tape, a printing means, a perforating means and cyclic means for concurrently operating said printing and perforating means, said cyclic means effecting the operation of said perforating means over a longer interval of time than the operation of said printing means.
21. In a telegraph recorder, a printing mechanism, a perforating mechanism 'and independently rotatable means for controlling the opera-- tion of said mechanisms, said means positively operating said perforating mechanism and acting to start the operation ofthe same in advanceof the operation of said printing mechanism.
22. Ina telegraph receiver, a selecting magnet,
a plurality of selector elements, a support for said selector elements, said elements having a normal position on said support and a selected posit on off of said support, a spring normally. retaining said selectors on said support, a cam for actuating said selector elements under the selective control of said magnet for idly pivoting said elements about said support or for moving. the same off said support into said selected position. and a perforating mechanism selectively. controlled by said elements in their selected position.
23.- In a telegraph receiver, a group of primary selectors having normal and selected positions, a selecting cam actingdirectly on said selectors to shift the same to a selected position under the selective control of line signals, a group of secondary selectors, transfer means for successively transferring the selection set up in -the primary selectors directly to the secondary selectors, a group of transfer means selectively controlled by said secondary selectors, a group of punch pin interponents selectively controlled by said transfer members, a group of punch pins, a paper tape, and means cooperating with said interponents whereby said punch pins are selectively actuated to form perforations in said tape.
24. In a telegraph receiver, a group of primary selectors, a selecting cam acting directly on said selectors to shift the same under the-selective control of line signals, a secondary group of selectors, transfer means for successively transferring the selection set up in the primary selectors directly to the secondary selectors, a group of punch pin interponents, means controlled by said secondary selectors operated simultaneously with the operation of said transfer means to 'position said punch pin interponents in accordance with the selection set up in said primary selectors.
25. A telegraph receiving apparatus comprising a series of elements having a plurality of varieties of motion but normally restrained from motion, power operated means to actuate said elements successively in one variety of motion, signal control means to positively restrain the movement of said elements in said first variety of motion whereby said power operated means compel the movement of said elements in. a second variety of motion in combinations according to the signals received and means to actuate elements which have previously been actuated in a predetermined one of said first two varieties of motion in a third variety of motion, a perforating mechanism .and means controlled by said elements insaid third variety of motion to selec-' tively control said perforating mechanism.
26. In a telegraph receiver, a group of primary selectors having normal and selected positions, a selecting cam acting directly on said selectors to shift the same to a selected position under the selective control'of line signals,'a secondary group of selectors having normal and selected positions, means for successively actuating said secondary selectors into their normal position, transfer means for successively transferring the selection set up in the primary selectors directly to the secondary selectors, a paper tape, a group of punch pin interponents operable by said secondary selectors, means whereby the selection set up in said secondary selectors is transferred to said punchpin interponents, a group of punch pins and means for operating said punch'pin interponents whereby those representing the selected, position of the primary selectors engage associated punch'pins to form perforations in th tape. y
27. In a telegraph receiver, a plurality of selectors, means for positioning said selectors in punch pins and means to operatively actuatev said punch pins in combinations representative of the setting of said punch pin interponents.
28. In a telegraph receiver, a plurality of selectors, means for positioning .said selectors into marking and spacing positions in accordance with received signals, a plurality of punch pin
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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2436229A (en) * 1943-07-29 1948-02-17 Emily Y Reiber Recorder
US2484838A (en) * 1940-08-03 1949-10-18 Western Union Telegraph Co Telegraph exchange system
US2495683A (en) * 1940-12-24 1950-01-31 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Communication system
DE872524C (en) * 1940-06-28 1953-04-02 Siemens Ag Telegraph device in which the letters and the step groups are punched on a single recording strip
DE759494C (en) * 1940-06-28 1953-05-11 Siemens Ag Telegraph device in which the letter is printed on a single recording strip and the associated combination image is punched in the same field of the perforated strip
US2993951A (en) * 1959-03-24 1961-07-25 Teletype Corp Mechanical recorder
US3014095A (en) * 1954-11-30 1961-12-19 Smith Corona Machant Inc Printer and perforator
US3065299A (en) * 1959-08-20 1962-11-20 Frey Erik Multi-purpose code recorder
US3150235A (en) * 1959-07-24 1964-09-22 Scm Corp Printer reperforator
US3255314A (en) * 1962-06-20 1966-06-07 Mite Corp Tape printer and perforator with reader
US3890488A (en) * 1973-12-05 1975-06-17 Leupold & Stevens Inc Digital print and punch tape recorder having read-write memory

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE872524C (en) * 1940-06-28 1953-04-02 Siemens Ag Telegraph device in which the letters and the step groups are punched on a single recording strip
DE759494C (en) * 1940-06-28 1953-05-11 Siemens Ag Telegraph device in which the letter is printed on a single recording strip and the associated combination image is punched in the same field of the perforated strip
US2484838A (en) * 1940-08-03 1949-10-18 Western Union Telegraph Co Telegraph exchange system
US2495683A (en) * 1940-12-24 1950-01-31 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Communication system
US2436229A (en) * 1943-07-29 1948-02-17 Emily Y Reiber Recorder
US3014095A (en) * 1954-11-30 1961-12-19 Smith Corona Machant Inc Printer and perforator
US2993951A (en) * 1959-03-24 1961-07-25 Teletype Corp Mechanical recorder
US3150235A (en) * 1959-07-24 1964-09-22 Scm Corp Printer reperforator
US3065299A (en) * 1959-08-20 1962-11-20 Frey Erik Multi-purpose code recorder
US3255314A (en) * 1962-06-20 1966-06-07 Mite Corp Tape printer and perforator with reader
US3890488A (en) * 1973-12-05 1975-06-17 Leupold & Stevens Inc Digital print and punch tape recorder having read-write memory

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