US2164876A - Hydraulic vane motor - Google Patents

Hydraulic vane motor Download PDF

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Publication number
US2164876A
US2164876A US152200A US15220037A US2164876A US 2164876 A US2164876 A US 2164876A US 152200 A US152200 A US 152200A US 15220037 A US15220037 A US 15220037A US 2164876 A US2164876 A US 2164876A
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spaces
walls
motor
valve
shaft
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US152200A
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Horlacher Herman
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Milacron Inc
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Cincinnati Milling Machine Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING, OR WEIGHT MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03CPOSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT ENGINES DRIVEN BY LIQUIDS
    • F03C4/00Oscillating-piston engines
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01CROTARY-PISTON OR OSCILLATING-PISTON MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01C19/00Sealing arrangements in rotary-piston machines or engines
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04CROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; ROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04C21/00Oscillating-piston pumps specially adapted for elastic fluids

Description

y 4, 1939- v i H. HQQRLACHYER 7 2,164,876

HYDRAULIC VANE MOTOR INVENTOR. HERMAN Hex/401512 ATTORNEY.

July 4, 1939. H. HORLACHER HYDRAULIC VANE MOTOR Filed July s, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 3 =ZUA1\M.W a 4, w Y 7 w, u m w w 4 v a m E m a IN VENTOR.

. HERMAN HORLACHER ATTORNEY.

Patented July 4, 1939 UNITED STATES HYDRAULIC VANE MOTOR I Herman Horlacher, Cincinnati, Ohio, assignor to The Cincinnati Milling Machine 00., Cincinnati, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application July 6, 1937, Serial No. 152,200

6 Claims.

This invention relates to hydraulic motors and more particularly to improvements in vane type motors.

One of the objects ot this invention is to pro- 5 vide a motor 01' the above type which is especially suitable for heavy work. Another object of this invention is to provide improved automatic means for controlling the rate of movement of a fixed stroke motor inja in manner to eliminate sudden stops at the end of the stroke which might otherwise causedamage to the parts.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention should be readily apparent by referll ence to the following specification, considered in conjunction with the'accompanying drawings forming a part thereof and it is to be understood that any modifications may be made in the exact structural details there shown and described, within the scope or the appended claims, without departing from or exceeding the spirit of the invention. I

Referring to the drawings in which like reference numerals indicate like or similar parts:

Figure 1 is a section through a motor embodying the principles of this invention.

Figure 2 is an expanded view of the rate control cam.

Figure 3 is an end view 01' the motor shown so in Figure 1 as viewed from the left end of that figure.

Figure 4 is a section on the lined-4 of Fig ure Figure 5 isa detail section on the line 5-! oi as Figure 3.

- Figure 6 is a detail section on the line l' of Referring to'Figure 1, the reference numeral l indicates the main housing or casing of the 40 motor in which is formed a cylindrical chamber II. A drive shaft l2 passes through the center of this chamber and is joumaled at It and- M in the opposing walls I! and II respectively of the. 6 housing. The center portion ll of this shaft has integral splines It, as more particularlyshown in Figure 4, upon which is mounted a double vane rotor, l9. I Y The cylindrical chamber II is divided into two so sub-chambers 20 and u by a pair of sector abutments 22 and 23; These abutments are held in position by bolts 24 which'pass through oppo-' site walls I! and it, as well as through the center oi the abutments to hold the same in fixed position. The circumferential length of these sectorswill naturally determine the length of the arcuate stroke or the motor.

The radial vanes 25 and 2S divide the subchambers 20 and 2| into two parts, the spaces :1;

and 28 serving, when put under pressure, to cause counterclockwise rotation of the rotor, and the spaces 29 and II serving, when put under pressure, to cause clockwise rotation of the rotor. When the diametrically opposed spaces 2! and ill, for instance, are put under pressnire the 1 spaces 21 and 28 are connected to exhaust whereby the rotor moves in one direction, and when the spaces 21 and 2! are put under pressure the spaces 29 and ill are connected to exhaust to cause movement in an opposite direction. For maximum eiilciency in operation, it is evident that the pressure spaces should'be sealed from the exhaust spaces, or in other words, there should .be as little leakage as possible of fluid from the pressure spaces into the exhaust spaces. To this end, the entire periphery of the blades are provided with spring pressed packing splines. As shown in Figure l, the blade is provided with two radial extending packing splines 3| and 32, which have a sliding fit in grooves 33 and 34. as

and a third packing spline II mounted in a groove 36 formed in the outer end of the vane and extending transversely thereof. A series of springs 31 serve to continuously urge these splines into'engagement withthe walls of the chambers. 80 It will be noted that the vane 2' is provided with similarly arranged packing splines, and specific description thereof is'not believed to be neces- In addition, the hub of the rotor ll has-circumi'erential. finished surfaces 38 and against whichbear the spring pressed splines II and which are mounted in the sectors 22 and 23 respectively. It will now be noted that the packing splines in the'rotor, serve to prevent leakage between chambers 21 and 2! and between chambers 28 and 30 and the packing splines ll and ll serve to. prevent leakage'between chambers 29 and '2. and between 21 and II.

For the purpose of admitting and withdrawing fluid to and from these chambers, the wall I! is provided withbores 42, ll, 44 and l! whichcommunicate with chambers 2., 21, SI and", respectively. It vwill be noted that these bores terminate adiacent to opposite sides of the sectors and that the sectors themselves have grooves 46 cut in the side thereof adiace'nt these parts to insure the admission of fluid pressure at the beginning of the stroke and, so that the vane posed in the bore between the end of the cam a groove 69 formed in 49 by means of 'the annular groove Ill. formed in follower and a fixed pin 51, which has a sliding fit, with the other end of the bore. It will now be apparent that the spring tends to urge the plunger continuously in one direction and this is for the purpose of holding the cam follower 54 against a cam 58 which is keyed to the end of the drive shaft l1.

7 r The two valve plungers are arranged diametrically opposite to one another and the cam 58 is provided with two control surfaces 59 and 50 which are exactly alike, as shown in the expandedview of the cam in Figure 2. The angular extent of the control surfaces 59 and 60, and indicated by the lines GI and 52 respectively, is substantially equal to the angular extent of movement of" the rotor. The curve 59 is of such a shape as to give constant acceleration as from the point 62" to the point 53 and constant deceleration from the point 63 to the point 64. This form'of curve is known as a gravity curve. If, now, the follower 5,4 of the throttle'valve is at either point 62' or 64, and the cam is rotated in such a direction as to cause the follower to traverse the curve, it will be apparent that, regardless of the direction of movement, that the throttle valve will move toward the right during the first half of the movement and toward the left during the last half ofthe movement.

The valve housing has a pair of ports 65 and 66 to which are connected pipes 51 and 58 which may lead to a reversing valve or other suitable means for alternately supplying pressure to one of these pipes and connecting the other to reservoir to obtain reversible operation of the motor. The port 55 isin constant communication with the throttle valve plunger the sleeve 55 and the radial ports H formed in the bottom of this groove. The sleeve 5| is pro-v vided with a second annular groove 12 in which is formed radial ports 13. These ports are adapted to be opened and close by the tapered portion 14 formed on the thro le valve plunger. In other words, when the plunger is all the way to the left, the port 13 is not entirely closed. This is for the reason that at the beginningof the next cycle, fluid must pass through this port regardless of whether it is at the moment a pressure port or an exhaust port in order to start the parts moving again. The annular groove 12 is connected by a bore 14' to channel 43 which leads to chamber 21, and as shown in Figure 6, by the channel 15 to the diagonally extending channel 16 whichterminates as shown in Figure 5 in the channel 45 leading to chamber 28. Thus, the annular groove 12 is connected to diametrically opposite spaces 21? and 28 of the motor.

r The sleeve 52 associated with the throttle valve plunger 50 has similar annular grooves 11 and 18, the former being 'in communication-with the pipe 68 and the flow to the latter being controlled by the throttle valve plunger. The groove" is connected by a cross bore I9 to channel 44 le d g 170 motor space 30 and by drilled holes 19', shown in Figure 5, and vertical hole 80, shown in Figure 3, to channel 42 which communicates with motor space 29. By virtue of these connections, it will be apparent that the annular groove 18 in the sleeve 52 is connected to the diametrically opposite motor spaces 29 and 30.

The manner of operation will now be briefly described. Assuming the two cam followers are bearing on the cam at the points 54 and Bi and that pressure is being admitted to port 66, the fiuid will flow to motor channels 42 and 44 by virtue of the fact that the throttle valve plunger 50 does not completely close channels 19 and 19', whereby the rotor will move in a'clockwise direction as viewed in Figure 4. As'its movement progresses, the cam will be'rotated by the drive shaft l2, and if in a downward direction as shown in Figure 2, the, throttle valves will be gradually opened, thereby increasing the rate of flow and causing constant acceleration in the movement of the rotor until the points 82 and 63 are reached on the cam, after which the rise on the cams will gradually close the throttle valves at such a rate as to cause a constant deceleration in the rate of movement of the rotor. At the end of the stroke, the pressure in the actuating chambers will be so reduced as to prevent the vanes from striking the sectors a hard blow and thereby causing damage to the parts.

It will be apparent that upon reversal of the connections to pipes 61 and 68 as by the reversing valve 82' that reverse rotation of the rotor may be effected.

For driving purposes, it will be apparent that the shaft l2 may be provided on its free end with any suitable form of driver such as the enlarged head 83 having a cross slot 84 formed therein whereby suitable connection may be made with,

an Oldham coupling.

By providingtwo diametrically opposite vanes and simultaneously applying pressure to-both of r 7 them in the same direction, that is, in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, the parts are obviously balanced thereby, practically eliminating friction and making it possible to develop a large torque on the driving shaft. By using the throttle valves on both the inlet and exhaust, the rate of movement of the motor is at all times under control, which is very important when moving heavy parts because it prevents the momentum from becoming too great and makes it easier to stop the movement at the desired time and without shock.

What is claimed is:

1. Ahydraulic motoixlliiaving a housing, a plurality of chambers circ ferentially arranged in said housing, a vane movable in each of said chambers, means connecting said vanes to a common rotor, a first channel for supplying fiuid under pressure to said chambers to apply an actuating force to the corresponding side of each of said vanes, a second channel means for conveying. exhaust fluid from said chambers, a

throttle valve in each of said channels, resiliently operable means for normally urging said valves to an open position, and cam means carried by said rotor for positively moving said valves in a direction to throttle the fiow in both of said channels.

2. A hydraulic motor comprising a cylindrical housing having a plurality of sector-shaped chambers circumi'erentiaily arranged therein, a vane movable in each of said chambers, a rotor integrally connected to each of said vanes, a pair of pipes connected said housing and adapted gravity curve.

to be alternately connected to a pressure source and to exhaust, throttle valves respectively connecting said pipes to said chambers, and'means responsive to rotation of said rotor for controlling the position of said throttle valves including a cam having a control surface in the form of a 3. A hydraulic motor comprising a housing having a cylindrical chamber formed therein, a

rotatable shaft journaledin the end walls bf said chamber, a pair of fixed abutments located between said end walls and dividing said chamber into two spaces, radial vanes attached to said ,shaft and projecting into said spaces, a valve block mounted on an end wall of said chamber,

a pair of valve plungers slidably mounted in said valve block for movement in a direction par- .each space, whereby allel to the axis of said'shaft, a passageway con.- trolled by one of said valves and terminating in a pair of diametrically opposite ports, one in 4. A hydraulic motor comprising a housing having end walls and a cylindrical chamber formed therein, a shaft rotatably mounted in said end walls, means separating said chamber into two spaces, vanes projecting from said shaft into a the respective spaces, each space having a pair of ports formed in one of said end walls; a valve housing supported by one of said end walls, a pair of pipes connected to said valve housing and adapted to of valve 'membersmounted in said valve block for regulating the flow between the respective pipes and a respective pair of ports in said end wall, and'means carried on the end of said shaft for simultaneously moving said valve members to increase andthen decrease the rate of flow during one direction of rotation of said shaft.

5. A hydraulic motor comprising a housing having a cylindrical bore formed therein, end

walls closing the end of said bore to form a cylindrical chamber therein, a shaftv passing through said chamber and admission of pressure will be alternately connected to a source of -fluid pressure and to exhaust, a pair iournaled in said end warns, segments interposed between said walls and dividing said chamber into a plurality of spaces,

' said shaft having radial vanes projecting into the respective spaces and sealing contact with the walls thereof, ports formed inone of said end walls and at opposite ends of said spaces and positioned in diametrically opposite pairs, a valve .blocl; attached to one of said end walls, means connecting one 'pair of diametrically opposite ports to a valve in said block, means connecting another pair of opposite ports to a second valve in said block, external channels connected to the respective valves, said channels adapted to, be alternately connected to a source of pressure or to exhaust} said valves being normally in a slightly open position wherebyupon admission of pressure to one ofisaid channels, said vanes will be actuated to causezrotation of the shaft, and

means responsive to rotation of theshaft to effect further and simultaneous openingofsaid valves to increase said rate of rotation to a predetermined maximum.

'6. A hydraulic motor comprising a housing having a cylindrical bore formed therein, end walls attached to said housing to forms cyllndri cal chamber therein, a shaft passing through said chamber and journaled in the opposing end walls,

segments interposed between viding said chamber into two spaces, said shaft "having radial vanes projecting into the respective spaces and in sealing contact with the walls thereof, ports formed in one of said end walls and at opposite ends of said spaces and positioned in diametrically opposite pairs, a valve housing attached to one of said end walls, means connecting one pair of diametrically opposite ports to one of said valves, means connecting the other pair of opposite ports, to the other valve, apair of external channels connected to the respective valves, said channels adapted to be alternately connected to a source of pressure and said walls and dito exhaust, said valves being normally in a slight- I 1y open position whereby upon admission of pressure to one of said channels said vanes will be actuated to cause rotation of the shaft, means responsive to rotation of the shaft to effect further and simultaneous opening of said valves to increase said rate of rotation, means also acting to close said valves during the last half of the stroke of said vanes to effect deceleration of said shaft;

HERMAN noamcnnn.

said last named

US152200A 1937-07-06 1937-07-06 Hydraulic vane motor Expired - Lifetime US2164876A (en)

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Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2459475A (en) * 1943-12-02 1949-01-18 Fred K Van Almelo Differential pressure fluid servomotor
US2606534A (en) * 1948-05-20 1952-08-12 Kenneth H Pond Operating mechanism
US2667173A (en) * 1946-11-26 1954-01-26 Int Cigar Mach Co Cigar machine
US2670720A (en) * 1949-01-08 1954-03-02 Trico Products Corp Fluid motor valve means
US2708907A (en) * 1953-10-28 1955-05-24 Mansfield Dev Inc Hydraulic oscillating vane motor
US2743705A (en) * 1952-10-10 1956-05-01 Sidney P Johnson Fluid regulator for a power-driven remotely-controlled valve
US2750929A (en) * 1951-08-27 1956-06-19 Douglas Aircraft Co Inc Cycle control valve for hydraulic motors
US2805665A (en) * 1946-11-26 1957-09-10 Int Cigar Mach Co Cigar machine
US2811142A (en) * 1955-03-23 1957-10-29 Shafer Valve Co Rotor bearing seal for fluid motor
US2893278A (en) * 1952-10-20 1959-07-07 Adele M Stevens Multiple stage, predetermined torque release apparatus for tightening threaded fastening elements
US2893354A (en) * 1955-09-27 1959-07-07 Bendix Aviat Corp Fluid pressure motor
US2951470A (en) * 1957-10-15 1960-09-06 Richard E Self Oscillating actuator
US2956567A (en) * 1946-11-26 1960-10-18 Int Cigar Mach Co Cigar machine
US2969778A (en) * 1957-04-15 1961-01-31 Houdaille Industries Inc Hydraulic rotary actuator
US3014462A (en) * 1959-06-30 1961-12-26 Douglas Aircraft Co Inc Rotary actuator seal
US3023741A (en) * 1960-04-29 1962-03-06 Clemco Aero Products Sealed rotary actuator
US3030934A (en) * 1958-06-17 1962-04-24 Bogue Elec Mfg Co Hydraulic actuator
US3128594A (en) * 1961-01-10 1964-04-14 Gen Motors Corp Hydraulically operated windshield wiper actuating mechanism
US3153985A (en) * 1959-04-06 1964-10-27 Trico Products Corp Windshield wiper
US3185105A (en) * 1959-03-30 1965-05-25 Borg Warner Variable displacement hydraulic apparatus
US3188919A (en) * 1961-05-01 1965-06-15 Joseph M Sills Windshield wiper
US3576150A (en) * 1967-12-05 1971-04-27 Dowty Hydraulic Units Ltd Retarding mechanisms for rotary fluid pressure operable actuators
DE4337769A1 (en) * 1993-11-05 1995-05-11 Fichtel & Sachs Ag Swivel motor for a split stabiliser
US20150252804A1 (en) * 2014-03-05 2015-09-10 Japan Hamworthy & Co., Ltd. Working oil chamber sealing system of rotary vane steering gear actuator

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2459475A (en) * 1943-12-02 1949-01-18 Fred K Van Almelo Differential pressure fluid servomotor
US2805665A (en) * 1946-11-26 1957-09-10 Int Cigar Mach Co Cigar machine
US2667173A (en) * 1946-11-26 1954-01-26 Int Cigar Mach Co Cigar machine
US2956567A (en) * 1946-11-26 1960-10-18 Int Cigar Mach Co Cigar machine
US2606534A (en) * 1948-05-20 1952-08-12 Kenneth H Pond Operating mechanism
US2670720A (en) * 1949-01-08 1954-03-02 Trico Products Corp Fluid motor valve means
US2750929A (en) * 1951-08-27 1956-06-19 Douglas Aircraft Co Inc Cycle control valve for hydraulic motors
US2743705A (en) * 1952-10-10 1956-05-01 Sidney P Johnson Fluid regulator for a power-driven remotely-controlled valve
US2893278A (en) * 1952-10-20 1959-07-07 Adele M Stevens Multiple stage, predetermined torque release apparatus for tightening threaded fastening elements
US2708907A (en) * 1953-10-28 1955-05-24 Mansfield Dev Inc Hydraulic oscillating vane motor
US2811142A (en) * 1955-03-23 1957-10-29 Shafer Valve Co Rotor bearing seal for fluid motor
US2893354A (en) * 1955-09-27 1959-07-07 Bendix Aviat Corp Fluid pressure motor
US2969778A (en) * 1957-04-15 1961-01-31 Houdaille Industries Inc Hydraulic rotary actuator
US2951470A (en) * 1957-10-15 1960-09-06 Richard E Self Oscillating actuator
US3030934A (en) * 1958-06-17 1962-04-24 Bogue Elec Mfg Co Hydraulic actuator
US3185105A (en) * 1959-03-30 1965-05-25 Borg Warner Variable displacement hydraulic apparatus
US3153985A (en) * 1959-04-06 1964-10-27 Trico Products Corp Windshield wiper
US3014462A (en) * 1959-06-30 1961-12-26 Douglas Aircraft Co Inc Rotary actuator seal
US3023741A (en) * 1960-04-29 1962-03-06 Clemco Aero Products Sealed rotary actuator
US3128594A (en) * 1961-01-10 1964-04-14 Gen Motors Corp Hydraulically operated windshield wiper actuating mechanism
US3188919A (en) * 1961-05-01 1965-06-15 Joseph M Sills Windshield wiper
US3576150A (en) * 1967-12-05 1971-04-27 Dowty Hydraulic Units Ltd Retarding mechanisms for rotary fluid pressure operable actuators
DE4337769A1 (en) * 1993-11-05 1995-05-11 Fichtel & Sachs Ag Swivel motor for a split stabiliser
US20150252804A1 (en) * 2014-03-05 2015-09-10 Japan Hamworthy & Co., Ltd. Working oil chamber sealing system of rotary vane steering gear actuator
US9567998B2 (en) * 2014-03-05 2017-02-14 Japan Hamworthy & Co., Ltd. Working oil chamber sealing system of rotary vane steering gear actuator

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