US2161695A - Rotary pump for hot fluids - Google Patents

Rotary pump for hot fluids Download PDF

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Publication number
US2161695A
US2161695A US222526A US22252638A US2161695A US 2161695 A US2161695 A US 2161695A US 222526 A US222526 A US 222526A US 22252638 A US22252638 A US 22252638A US 2161695 A US2161695 A US 2161695A
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shell
pump
inlet
cylindrical
outlet
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US222526A
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George E Bigelow
Arthur R Weis
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PACIFIC PUMP WORKS
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PACIFIC PUMP WORKS
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04DNON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04D29/00Details, component parts, or accessories
    • F04D29/60Mounting; Assembling; Disassembling
    • F04D29/62Mounting; Assembling; Disassembling of radial or helico-centrifugal pumps
    • F04D29/628Mounting; Assembling; Disassembling of radial or helico-centrifugal pumps especially adapted for liquid pumps
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04DNON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04D1/00Radial-flow pumps, e.g. centrifugal pumps; Helico-centrifugal pumps
    • F04D1/06Multi-stage pumps
    • F04D1/063Multi-stage pumps of the vertically split casing type

Description

June 6, 1939. G. E. BIGELow ET AL ROTARY PUMP FOR HOT FLUIDS Filed Aug. l, 1958 Sheets-Sheet l 5 w M W n w M M n k & Q i @f1/L Ws S hm, 1S am www wi K OQ 5 m8 Q v3 m6, AQ x QM, 9m, m bn am QQ vom, QM, www wm R, Q8 ww vw w@ n, www bww mm wm 3 n. m www @s X11 L O mum; wm km, klm; m m, 1 ww Sr mw om, bm QAM o. w l &1 F www, mw om wx 1 1 Q .QQ .mw n@ Twin@ h: JI/ bw omQ @u om E Q uw Q \%w Qwmmm y, o w E, uw

w mw .R R u w E GA Y ww June 6,'1939.

G. E. BIGELow ET Al. 2,161,695

ROTARY PUMP FOR HOT FLUIDS Filed Aug. l. 1938 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 @0965 i. /Giz. o w

ARTHUR A. W15/5 V HA ,QR/s, /f/.fcf/I Fos MR HARP/s FOI? THE FIRM June 6, 1939- G. E. BIGELow ET A1. ,2,161,595

ROTARY PUMP FOR HOT FLUIDS Filed Aug. 1, l1958 4 sheets-sheet s l r Y G l W 6\ n 64I Y/ i G4 43 J 65 63 55 6G if o 67 Go l 43 /sa 5 /3/ /O HA RR/s, K/g cH, Fos TER 3 HA RR/s June 6, 1939. G. E, BlGELOw ET AL 2,161,695

ROTARY PUMP FOR HOT FLUIDS Filed Aug. l, 1938 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 FOR THE FIRM A Trop/vins.

Patented June 6, 1939 ROTARY PUMP FOR HOT FLUIDS George E. Bigelow, Southgate, and Arthur R.' Weis, Huntington Park, Calif., assignors of one-half to Pacilic Pump Works, Huntington Park, Calif., a corporation of California Application August 1, 1938, Serial No. 222,526

15 Claims.

Our invention relates to rotary pumps and, more particularly, to a novel construction of a pump of this character which may be operated to pump fluids at extremely high pressures and temperatures.

Although the invention has utility in various industries, it is particularly useful in the pumping of extremely hot oil vunder high pressure from one stage of an oil refining process to another. It has been discovered that our pump gives unexpectedly improved results over the use of reciprocating pumps in this capacity, effecting a constancy of pressure which results in prolonged life of thev refinery equipment, albetter refining action, and the production of rened products of unexpectedly better characteristics. The invention will be particularly described with reference to a rotary pump for pumping hot oil, but it will be clear that the invention is not necessarily limited thereto.

It is not uncommon for a pump of the type hereindisclosed to receive a uid at a temperature of 750 F. and operate at a discharge pressure as highl as 2300 lbs./sq. in. The pump herein-disclosed finds particular utility in pumping hot oil at a temperature from 500 F. to 850 F. and at .a pressure of 500 to 2500 lbs./sq.. in. Ordinary centrifugal pumps are entirely unsuited for such use and the problems encountered in the design of such a high-temperature high-pressure pump are ,not common with those present in the design of cold-uid or low-temperature pumps. v

Pumps of the type herein-disclosed actually attain a dull cherry red color when viewed in the dark and operated at the temperatures for which they are designed. Under such extreme conditions of heat, it is essential to provide a pump 1 which maintains its alignment and sealing efficiency regardless of extreme temperature changes, and itis an object of the present invention to provide such a rot`ary pump.

At the high temperatures to which' this pump is subjected, the metal from which the pump is constructed must necessarily decrease in tensile and compressive strength. However, the problem cannot be solved by the simple expedient of increasing the thickness of parts on conventional pumps.' It is ofv paramount importance that the ma'ss of the various elements of the pump should be so correlated with each other and Iwith respect to'various portions thereof that expansion at all peripheral positions, for instance, will be substantially equal. It can be readily understood that uncompensated forces due to expansion can be extremely large. If,.for example, unequal peripheral expansion of the shell or insert structure of the rotary pump takes place, the resulting unequal forces will` cause the heat-weakened metal to deform, with the rcsult that accurate en alignment and maintenance of sealing effectiveness at dierent parts of the pump will be impossible. To that end, the invention is concerned with a structure in which expansion is so consealing the internal structure with respect to the shell. In the preferred embodimentvof the invention we use a massive cylindrical shell with an inward-extending shoulder positioned between the inlet and outlet ports of the pump. Mating with this shoulder is an annular surface of one of the stationary pump inserts. If the shoulder is formed in a plane radial to the shaft, a proper sealing action can only be maintained at this point by preventing deformation of this shoulder from its radial plane and preventing deformation of the mating annular surface from this plane. To this end, it is important to use a massive cylindrical shell which is of substantially uniform thickness at all peripheral portions thereof. It is important, likewise, to apply the heat substantially uniformly to the interior of this shell. If one peripheral portion of the shell'is heated more than another, or if one peripheral portion contains substantiallymore metal than another,the consequent difference in expansion between these peripheral portions will throw the annular shoulder out of its radial plane and may result in destructive stresses. Likewise,.it is desirable that the stationary pump inserts formingv the insert structure should be of such character as to maintain the mating annular surface in a radial plane. Uniform peripheral expansion of the shell is more important than uniform peripheral expansion of the insert structure, particularly if resilient means is provided to compensate for the excess expansion of the insert structure. Thus, various types of insert structures can be lused without departing from the spirit of the invention, though best results can only be obtained if all peripheral portions of the insertstructure are of substantially uniform mass or thickness and are equally heated by the hot fluid flowing therethrough.

It is'an object o f the present invention to correlate expansion between a shell and an insert structure therein in such manner as to maintain a seal between the inlet and outlet ports of the Pump.

Another object of the invention is to provide a sealing means between the inlet and outlet ports comprising a shoulder extending inward from a massive cylindrical shell adapted to mate structure and the shell at said position between said inlet and outlet ports.

Another object of the invention is to provide an expansion-permitting means within the shell to compensate for greater expansion of the insert structure while maintaining the Aparts of the pump in accurate alignment, and while maintaining a seal between` the insert structure and the shell at a point intermediate the inlet and outlet ports. y

Another object of the invention is to facilitate uniform peripheral expansion of the shell by use of detachable head members which are of substantially uniform mass at all peripheral portions thereof.

It is another important object of the present invention to provide a novel pump construction including recessed heads to the end that the shaft length between outboard bearings shall be a minimum, thereby reducing vibration, decreasing size,.and facilitating pump maintenance.

Another object of the invention is to so support lthe pump as to permit maintenance of equal ex- Ppansion conditions of the shell and its related parts.

Another object of the invention is to provide a pump which can be readily disassembled, and in which inspection of the internal surfaces near the ends therec'f can be made without removal of the head members or the insert structure.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel construction for preventing deposits,

commonly known as coke deposits, in such a pump and which make removal of the parts very dif'cult. It is a further object of the `invention to facilitate removal of the pump insert members by preventing extremely close contact withv the shell at all peripheral portions.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved means for sealing the rotating parts of such a pump with respect to the stationary parts thereof.

Further objects and advantages will be a parent from the following description.

Referring to the drawings, which are for illustrative purposes only:

Figure 1 is a side view, partially in section, of one embodiment of the invention.

Figure 2 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken on a plane represented by the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

. Figure 3 is an enlarged sectional view of the sealing means between the insert structure and the shell of the invention.

Figure 4 is a sectional View, similar to Figure 2,

showing an alternative construction.

Figure 5 is an enlarged sectional view of the area. enclosed by the circle 5 of Figure 1.

Figure 6 is a section'taken along the line 6--6 of Figure 5.

structure comprising a massive cylindrical shell I I and heads I3 and I4 detachably connected to the ends of the shell by screws means I5. Near the inlet end of the shell I I is an inlet tting I6 providing an inlet lport I1 which preferably extends radially inward to communicate with the interior of the enclosing structure. As shown, this inlet fitting I6 is threadedinto an opening of the shell Il and is then welded securely in place, as indicated at I8. Similarly mounted near the discharge end of the cylindrical shell Il isan outlet tting 20 providing an outlet port 2i.

The cylindrical shell I'I is preferably formed as a one-piece forging and the wall thereof is of substantially uniform thickness throughout all peripheral sections thereof. This is particularly important as to that portion of the shell lying between the inlet and outlet ports I1 and 2|, and insures substantially equal longitudinal expansion at all peripheral sections which would not be the case if theshell were cast in sections and bolted together along onegor more longitudinal planes. In addition to the other advantages of a forging, we have found that, by making the shell of `forged material, equal peripheral vexpansion will be obtained. Likewise, the heads I3 and I 4 are preferably forged.

The inlet head I3 includes a ange 22 held against the radial end surface of the shell II by the screw means I5. An annular rib 23 extends into a corresponding counterbore of the shell II in which is positioned a relatively narrow gasket 24 which seals the head with respect to the shellwhen the screw means I5 is tightened. In general, this inlet head I3 is recessed inward to provide a cavity 25 and includes, in addition to the flange 22, a boss 26 and an inward-extending` wall 21, the latter providing an opening 28 which is considerably larger than the main shaft of the pump, indicated by the numeral 30. Numerous advantages accrue from the use of a recessed sive stresses, as distinct from tension stresses' which would be present if the head structure were convexed outwardly. As shown, the cavity 25 can be made to extend inward to and beyond l the end surface ofthe cylindrical'shell II.

Removably extending into the annular space around the shaft and inside the opening 28 is a sealing member 3| held in place by bolts 32 extending through a flange thereof and into the inward-extending wall 21 of the head. This sealing member may be independently sealed with respect to the headby a gasket 33 disposed in a counterbore of the head and pressed between this head and a shoulder of the sealing member 3| entering the counterbore when the bolts 32 are tightened. .The sealing member 3i issuitably sealed with respect to a sleeve 34 attached to the shaft, for example, by use of packing 35 compressed in a cavity of the sealing. member by a suitable gland 36.

An outboard bearing 38 is provided for jour- I nailing the shaft 30 which extends therethrough to the prime mover. The use of such a bearing is very desirable as it removes the bearing surfaces from the vicinity of the hot shell and, in

conjunction with other expedients to be hereinafter described, maintains shaft alignment. In

addition it permits forming the heads with substantially equal amounts of material in all radial segments and at all peripheral portions and elimany heavy or solid materials so that they will not inates any tendency toward unequalexpansion of theheads or the shell due to its generally spaced relationship. One feature of the invention is to position the bearing 38 a suicient distance from the head so that the sealing member 3| can be moved leftward along the shaft, after removal of the gland 36, a sufficient distance to permit inspection of the interior spaces of the pump without removing the massive head I3. The preferred manner of mounting the bearing 38 is to attach it to a bracket 39 providing a ring I 48 set into a cavity in the head I3 and suitably similarly constructed and similar parts are indisuitable means 48.

securedthereto, as by welding. The head I4 and a bearing support for a thrust bearing 38 at the discharge end of the pump are cated by primed numbers set, forth with reference to the inlet head I3. It will be noted, however, that the boss 26 extends farther into the shell at this end of the pump so that the inward-extending wall 21 can be disposed opposite the outlet port 2|, if desired. On this head, an annular ledge 42 is formed to extend into the cavity 25' to form a chamber 43 at the inner end of the cavity. This chamber will be sealed from the atmosphere by the gasket 33. At this end of the pump, then, the sealing member 3l' extends into the chamber 43 which is bounded at its inner end by the inward-extending wall 21'.

A throttle or balancing means 45 is provided at the junction of this inward-extending wall 21 and the shaft 38, best shown in Figure 5. Referring thereto, this inward-extending wall 21 includes an opening 46 into which a flanged member 41 extends and is retained 'therein by Tins anged member provides'an opening 49 which isvonly slightly larger in diameter than the periphery of an inner rotating member 58 to provide a narrow annular passage 5I therebetween which commum'cates at one end with pump discharge pressure and at the other end with the chamber 43 so as to throttle any fluid flow to this chamber.

As best shown in Figure 5, this inner rotating member 58 provides a tapered part 53 which is locked on a tapered portion 54 of the shaft 38 by key means 55. The tapered portion 54 of the shaft terminates in a shoulder member or collar 56.

Also as shown in Figure 5, the sleeve 34' is threaded to the shaft 38 and provides an annular ledge 51 which engages the inner rotating meme ber 58 to force same leftward on the tapered portion 54. To seal the threads forming the connection between the shaft 38 and the sleeve 34 against access to the hot oil, and thereby preventing freezing or coking up thereof, we provide a sealing means 58 positioned in a cavity 59 inside the annular ledge 51 and comprising l packing rings which are compressed by a pistonlike compression means 68 in the form of a ring ofy angle cross section. As the sleeve 34 is tightened, the compression means 68 engages the inner rotating member 58 to compress the packing. The material forming the ring of the com- :sage 5I. For the purpose of throwing outward enter this narrow annular passage51, we provide a plurality of rotating vanes 62 which throw such particles outward beyond the passage 5I by centrifugal force and also function to break up anyl large solid particles. As best shown in Figures 5 and 6, these vanes are formed by notches cut in the periphery of a ring-63 secured by screws 64 vto the inner rotating member 58 at a position around the shoulder member orcollar 56. These vanes are of such length as to terminate nearl the annular passage 5I and yet Vbe removable along with theinner rotating member 58 through the opening 49 when inspection is desired.

This type of construction shown with. reference to the heads I3 and I4 is very desirable. In addition to the advantages of the recessed. heads previously mentioned, it will be noted that removal of the sealing members 3l or -3I' will permit access to the internal passages of the pump without necessitating` removal of the massive heads or the bearings. For example, removal of the sealing member 3l will permit inspection and cleaning of the passages at the inlet end of the pump, while removal of the sealing member. 3I will permit inspection of the chamber 43 and the throttle means 45.

With regard to the internal construction of the pump, one of the important features of the invention is the provision of a removable insert structure sealed with respect to the shell under varying conditions of temperature. To that end, and as best shown in Figures 1 and 3, the massive cylindrical shell I I provides a cylindrical cavity 69 which, if desired, may be slightly counterbored as indicated at 69. This cylindrical cavity terminates in an annular shoulder 18 of i the shell which, in turn, provides an opening 1I. This annular shoulder is disposed on an annular 4by the numeral 15 and includes a plurality of abutting stationary pump elements, indicated respectively by the numerals 16 to 19, as well as an. outlet end member 88, which occupy the space between the shoulder 18 and the head I4. The pump element 16 is of a size to be centralized in the 'cylindrical cavity 69. Each pump element provides an annular recess near'the periphery thereof adapted to receive. a corresponding mate portion of the adjacent pump element to centralize and align these elements. I f desired, pins 82 may be disposed in these recesses between the adjacent pump elements to prevent any relative rotation.

Each pump element also provides inward-extending walls 83 and 84providing a passage 85 traversed byl vanes 86. This passage receives fluid from a passage 81 of an adjacent pump element fed by a diffuser 88 held by pins 88. This diffuser B8 is disposed between these pump elements andv provides vanes 98 which guide the fluid as it flows from an adjacent impeller chamber 9I into the passage 81.

The rotating structure of the pump includes a plurality of impellers 93 which are suitably keyed on the shaft between the sleeves 34 and 34' and which are spaced `from each other by spacers 484.

These impellers may be of known design and` will force fluid outward through the passages thereof and through the passage means formed by the insert structure and including the spaces between thevanes 90, the passages 81 and the passages 05. Conventional wear rings are usually provided at the inner ends of the walls 94 around the .eyes of the impellers and at the inner ends of the 'walls 03, but are not illustrated in Figure 1 in order to simplify the showing.

We prefer to use pump elements which are of the non-volute type and which, consequently, can

be made to have walls of uniform thickness around the periphery thereof and equally'spaced ture to the end that an annular surface 96 of the pump element 16 will properly mate with the shoulder 10, irrespective( of temperature changes in the pump. By this expedient, the annular surface 96 will maintain, its position in a radial plane and will press against the annular shoulder 10 with substantially equal pressure at all. peripheral portions, thereby overcoming defects previ-v ously experienced when the mass distribution wasv `not substantially uniform and when one peripheral portion of the insert structure would expand longitudinally to a greater degree than another portion, thereby enormously increasing the pressure at this portion of the annular shoulder, with consequent tendency to bend or disalign the shell or the insert structure and to disalign the insert structure with respect tothe rotating shaft and impell s.

IAnother' eature of the invention 'is to provide an expansion-permitting packing means between the end of the .insert structure 15 and a portion of the enclosing structure, preferably between vthe outlet end member 80 and the head I4. For

this purpose, the head I4 provides an annular recess 99 containing one or more rings |00 of gasket character. Engaging this ring is the end of a cylindrical wall IOI of the outlet end member 80 whereby the expansive forces developed by the insert structure are' delivered at one end to the shoulder 10 of the shell and at the other end to this insert ring of gasket character. We prefer to make the insert structure of such over-all length between the annular surface 96 of the pump element "fand the end of the cylindrical wall |0I that the ring |00 will be somewhat compressed when the head t4 is belted into place to .hold the annular surface 96 against the shoulder 10. When the hot fluid is moving through the pump, the insert structure, being somewhat hotter, 'expands more than the cylindrical shell. with the consequence that the cylindrical wall IOI servesto compress the insert ring I 00 and tighten the mating contact between the shoulder andl the annular`surface' 96. A diffuser |03 between an outward-extending wall |04 of the outlet end member 00 and the head I4 is so designed as to permit this expansive movement, for example, by forming the vanes thereof of-insuillcient length to bridge the space until maximum expansion has taken lace. It is preferred to make the ring .|00

of a material having some resiliency and the pre- .ferred construction involves vthe provision of some small space into which the ring can expand when compressed. An aluminum ring only partially i'llling the corresponding recess has been found very effective in this regard.

To facilitate removal of the insert structure from the discharge end of the shell when the head- 4 is removed, we prefer to use a construction best shown in Figure 2. As there shown, the lower portion |05 of theperiphery of each pump element may be curved substantially the same as the cylindrical cavity 69 of the shell II. However, the peripheral wall 95 of each of the insert structures 11 and 18 is relieved for a major portion of its periphery distance so as to form a small annular space |06 (exaggerated in the drawings for purpose of clearness) which extends about two-thirds of the way around the upper portion of the pump element.

To assist in centralizing this insert structure and holding the pump inserts in such surface contact with the lower part of the shell as will pre-4 clude any tendency to form coke deposits therebetween, we prefer to use -a means at the upper end of the insert structure engagingv with the shell. substitute or supplement to the -pins 82 in preventing relative rotation between the. pump elements. In this connection, the preferred embodiment includes a pin or rod |01 slidable into a Such a means can, likewise, serve as av longitudinal groove |06 at the upper portion of the pump elements, the upper part of this rod engaging the shell II. 'I'he pump element 19 is shown as slotted'for only a portion of its length to receive the rod I 01. The remaining portion,

which is not relieved from peripheral contact with the shell, is indicated bythe numeral |09 and terminates in contact with the wall oi' the cylindrical cavity 69 of the-shell II solas to centralize this pump element and, at the same time, block the small annular space I 06 to prevent such free access of the high pressure hot oil as would effect a circulation therein which would tend to fill this space |06 with a deposit of coke.

' Serving the same purpose is an annular wall IIO of the outlet end member 80.

III throughout a major portion of the length of the cylindrical wall |0I. of this outlet end member, leaving an annular ledge I|2 on which this outlet end member 80 rests. `When the discharge head I4 is removed', the outlet' end member 80 need be withdrawn rightward for a distance only equivalent to the'length of this ledge II2 before coming adjacent the relieved portion indicated byA the numeral III, thereby making further rightward movement of the member 80 quite free from restraint. To complete the disassembly of the insert structure, the pump element 19 is next moved to aposition beyond the ledge II2. Thereafter,

the rod |01 can be withdrawn and the remaining I pump elements are then easily removed.

Disposed at the left 'of the insert structure 15 is an inlet end member IIS. To conserve space and increase the number of stages of the pump, we have shown this inlet end memberas including an. inward-extending wall II6 cooperating with the inward-extending wall 83 of the adjacent pump element 16 in deiining an impeller chamber I'I1in whichone of the impellers spaced'generally from the inlet head I3. This inward-extending wall I I9 provides an opening of a. size only slightly larger than the inner periphery of the sealing member 3| so as to receive this member, the joint at this point being insufficiently tight to prevent transfer of the inlet pressure of the pump to the space between this wall and the head I3. We prefer to form the inner surface o f the sealing member 3| so as to be a continuation of the inner surface of the inward- A .extending wall II9 so that these elements cooperate inguiding the incoming uid to the rst impeller.

In the embodiment 'shown in'Figure l, the inlet end member I IS is positioned in a cylindrical 'space |22 of the shell II which terminates at al radial shoulder |23 (best shown in Figures l and 3) and similar in vfunction to the shoulder 10. Abutting against the radial shoulderv |23 is an annular portion |24 of the inlet end member IIS. This inlet end member IIS also provides a centralizing ledge |25 fitting in the correspond- Y ing recess Aof the pump element 16. It is quite important, however, that this centralizing ledge should terminate short of the main portion of the pump element 16 to leave a small vspace |21. By this expedient, the shoulder 10 can remain the sole means taking leftward expansive thrust from the insert structure 1S without transferring this thrust to the head I3.

The extreme left end of the inlet end member IIS Iprovides an annular projection |20 which centralizesthe member IIS by extending into a corresponding recess. formed in the head I3. An

expansion-permitting means |29 is positioned in this recess to be Aclamped between the inlet end member IIS and the head I3, thereby permitting expansion of this member IIS in a manner similar to that previously describedl with reference to the insert structure 1S.

Another important feature of the invention resides in the designof the inlet and outlet end members IIS and whereby they provide substantially circular chambers through which a hot fluid flows, these chambers being of substantially constant radial dimension around the periphery of the shaft so that the massive cylindrical shell I I will be uniformly heated at all peripheral portions opposite these members. The inlet end member IIS provides such a chamber, indicated by the numeral |30, lbounded by the inward-extending walls I|6 and |I9 and by a cylindrical vwall |3'I which is desirably of substantially uniform thickness at all peripheral portions. rEhe upper end of this cylindrical wall I3I provides an opening |32 communicating openly with the inlet port I'I, and it is desirable, infacilitating removal of the inlet end member ||5, to make the outer periphery thereof 'slightly smaller in diameter than the cylindrical space |22 of the shell II.

Likewise, ,the outlet`end member 80 is preferablyformed with its cylindrical wall I0| of substantially uniform thickness at all peripheral portions. 'I'his cylindrical wall IGI cooperates with the annular wall I I0 of the outlet end member 80 and with an end wall |33 adjacent the ring I 00 in defining an outlet chamber |34 which communicates with the discharge of the last impeller and provides an opening |35 adjacent the outlet port 2|. 'The inner portion ofthe discharge chamber |34 is bounded by a cylindrical surface formed by the wall 21' of the head I4.

It is desirable to maintain the pressure in thechamber 43 of the head I4 at a pressure substantially equal to' the inlet pressure of the pump.

|38 of the head I4, this opening threadedly receiving an outward-extending portion of the pipe means |36. It is afeature of the invention to provide a notch |39 for this outward-extending portion, this notch being cut into the rig'htward end of the cylindrical shell II. By making the pipe means in units whichV can be readily disconnected, for example, by use of flange means |39', it becomes possible to disconnect the pipe means adjacent one of these ilange means so that the outward-extending portion thereof can be removed with the head I4.

In order that the expansion of the shell I I shall be equalized at all peripheral sections to insure mating engagement between the insert structure 1S and the shoulder 10, it is likewise important shown-in Figure '1. The chamber 43 communicates with the pipe means |36 through an opening lIi to use a supporting means for the enclosing struc- Extending upward from this base member |40 at opposite ends of' the enclosing structure, and preferably at opposite ends of the massive cylindrical shell I I, are two sets of pedestals, each set including two pedestals |4| extending upward on opposite sides of the enclosing structure. Suit- .ably secured, as by welding, to opposite sides of the giclosing structure to rest upon the pedestals are .supporting means shown as comprising` |4I sets of arm'members, each set includingtwo arm members |45, as best shown in Figure 2. It is desirable that these arm members |45 should exvtend outward from the shell at a position near the horizontal axis thereof so that transverse expansion of thaenclosing structure can take place substantially equally above and below the hori-y zontal planeof these arms. We prefer to v-weld the arms |45 to the periphery of the massive forge cylindrical shell II, and it is avery desirable resting upon a suitable foundation and traversing vthe entire space beneath the cylindrical shell' II'.

feature of the invention that these arms should extend outward on opposite sides of the shell in substantially lateral alignment with the inlet and outlet ports I1 and 2|, respectively, so that any forces due to expansion of the pipes normally connected with the inlet and outlet fittings I6 and 20 will be delivered in a plane substantially common to that occupied by the pedestals. Ex-

ternal forces thus applied through the piping connected to the pump are thus preventedfrom disaligning the shell II longitudinally,.or placing an unequal bending stress on this shellor the entire enclosing structure.

It is likewise desirable to use a supporting means for the pump which will compensate for longitudinal expansion of the enclosing structure. To this end, the pedestals are disposed between the members |40 and 45 and provision is made for expansion between these pedestals and the members |40 or |45. In the embodiment shown the pedestals are fixed to the base member |48 and K provide upper surfaces |48 upon which the arm members |45 slidably rest. The arm members |45 are held down against the pedestals |4| by bolts l|49.

'I'he expansive forces to be compensated for are both lateral and longitudinal. Expansion laterally with respect to the shaft is not severe at eitherend of the pump but is compensated for by permitting the arm members |45 to slide on the upper surfaces |48. Such movement is made possible by making the bolt-receiving openings |50 slightly enlarged with respect to the bolts |49. In order to maintain the axis of the shaft and of the shell in a fixed vertical plane, and in order to equalize lateral expansion on opposite sides thereof, we provide each set of pedestals |4| with a longitudinal channel |52 slidably receiving a rib ,|53 on the adjacent portion of the enclosing structure. For example, this rib |53 may be welded to the lower portion of the massive cylindrical shell To compensate for longitudinal expansion of the enclosing structure', the arm'mem-bers I 45 at one end may be made to slide longitudinally on the corresponding pedestal by proper elongation of the openings |50. It is preferred to permit this longitudinal expansion to take place at the outlet end while precluding the same degree of longitudinal expansion at the inlet end. The enclosing structure is guided in this longitudinal expansion by the interengagement between the ,rib |53 and the longitudinal channel |52. 'I'his type of supporting means for the enclosing structure maintains the temperature of the massive cylindrical shell substantially uniform at alli peripheral portions and permits longitudinal expansion without deformation of the base member |40, which is preferably hollow so that a cooling uid can be circulated therethrough to maintain the entire base structure substantially cool at all times. Y

Referring particularly to Figure 8, the alternative conmruction shown therein is generally sim-` ilar to that shown in Figure 1, withcertain exceptions, some of which will be specifically noted.'

`- pose, the inlet end member is spaced from the is relieved from contact with the shell for the complete length of this pump element to facilitate withdrawal, and any centralizing function of the unrelieved portion thereof shown in Figure 1 is made unnecessary in theembodiment of Figure 8 by the centralizing action of the opening 'Il of the shoulder 10, in which opening a portion of this pump element fits. f

Another modification in the embodiment shown in Figure 8 is that the massive cylindrical shell is not relieved at so that substantially cylindrical contact for the entire length of the outlet end member is provided. A

Another variation in the embodiment shown in Figure 8 is that the pin-receiving groove |08 extends completely through the last pump element toward the outlet end so that the rod |01 is withdrawable as soon as the outlet end member 80 is withdrawn. However, this outlet end member still provides the annular wall |0 for closing the small space 06against free circulation of the hot uid therethrough.

Also, the form shown in Figure 8 includes sealing members 200 and 200 corresponding, in general, to the sealing members 3| and 3| except that they provide passages for a cooling fluid which functions not onlyto maintain the sealing structure cool but also to cool the small throttled ow into the chamber 4'3,thereby preventing any possibility of flashing under adverse operating conditions. It will be noted that 'this chamber 43 is somewhat larger in the form of Figure 8 than in' Figure 1, but the same general pipe means is provided for by-passing this chamber to the inlet pressure of the pump. While the construction of the throttle or balancing means 45 is approximately the same, the embodiment in Figure 8 eliminates the rotating vanes 62 and substitutes for the tapered portion 54 of the shaft 30 a cylindrical portion ending in the shoulder member or.

collar 56.

l Various changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

'Ihis application is a continuation-impart of our application Serial No. 710,838, led February 12, 1934.

We claim as our'invention:

1. A pump of the character described, including: a cylindrical shell having an axial opening therethrough and inlet and outlet means near the ends thereof, there being a notch in the rearward end of said shell; an insert structure within said shell. and including an inlet member at the forward end thereof communicating with said inlet means of said shell and an outlet member at the rearward end thereof communicating with said outlet means of said shell there being a passageway in the insert structure between said inlet and outlet members; head means for the front end of said shell; head means detachably secured to the rear end of said shell and providing a chamber therein; a shaft extending through Vsaid chamber to said insert structure; sealing-pump elements in said passageway operatively connected to said shaft; .means around said shaft at the outer end of said chamber; throttle means around said shaft between said chamber and said outlet member; and piping extending along the exterior of .said shell, saldi piping having its forward end connecting through said shell with the interior of said inlet member and having the rearward end thereof connected to said chamber,

said piping passing through said notch in the rearward end of said shell. v

e 2. In a high-pressure hot-fluid rotary pump of the character described, the combination of: a

massive cylindrical shell providing inlet and outlet ports through the wall thereof near the respective inlet and outlet ends thereof, said shell providing an inward-extending ring in a plane perpendicular to the axis of said shell and lying between said ports and near said inlet port, said shell having forward and rearward supporting means, said forward supporting means being disposed on opposite sides of said shell and being substantially laterally aligned with said inlet port, and said rearward supporting means being disposed on opposite sides of said shell and being substantially laterally aligned with said outlet port whereby forces applied to said shell through the connection of inlet and outlet pipes to said ports will be transmitted directly through the wall of said shell in lateral direction to said supporting means; an insert structure in said cylindrical shell and including an inlet and an outlet section positioned on opposite sides of said ring, said insert structure providing an inlet communicating with said inlet port of said shell and providing an outlet communicating with said outlet port of said shell and a passageway between said inlet and outlet; pump elements in said passageway of said insert structure; a head closing the inlet end of said shell and forcing said inlet section into sealing engagement with said ring; and a head secured to the outlet end of said shell, said last-named head engaging said outlet sec tion of the insert structure and forcing the same against said ring.

3. In a high-pressure hot-fluid rotary pump of the character described, the combination of: a cylindrical shell providing inlet and outlet ports through the walls thereof near the respective inlet and outlet ends thereof, said shell having forward and rearward supporting means, said forward supporting means being disposed on opposite sides of said shell and being substantially laterally aligned with said inlet port, and said rearward supporting `means being disposed on opposite sides of said shell and being substantially laterally aligned with said outlet port whereby forces applied to said shell through the connection of inlet and ,outlet pipes to said ports will be transmitted directly through the wall of said shell in lateral direction to said supporting means; an insert structure in said shell and including an inlet section and an outlet section, said insert structure having an inlet communicating with said inlet port of said shell and an outlet communicating with said outlet port of said shell and a passageway connecting said inlet and outlet, there being sealing means between said insert structure and said shell in a position between said inlet port and said outlet port; pump elements in said passageway of said insert structure; and head means closing the ends of said shell and holding said inlet and outlet sections in sealing engagement with said sealing means. v

4. In a high-pressure hot-fluid rotary pump of the character described, the combination of :A a massive cylindrical shell providing substantially vertical radial inlet and outlet ports therethrough near the respective inlet and outlet ends thereof at the upper side of the cylindrical shell; two sets of supporting means, each set including supporting means disposed on opposite sides of said shell, one set of supporting means being substantially laterally aligned with said inlet port and the other set of supporting means being substantially laterally aligned with said outthrough the connection of piping to said ports will be transmitted laterally through the wall of said shell to said supporting means without producing substantial forces tending 'to bend said shell between said sets of supporting means; head means closing the opposite ends of said shell; and a pump structure within said shell for pumping a hot uid therethrough.

5. In combination in a hot-fluid rotary pump adapted to pump fluidsat high temperatures: a massive cylindrical shell yproviding a port extending therethrough tocommunicate with a cylindrical zone defined by said shell; head means closing the ends of said massive cylindrical shell; an end member within said cylindrical zone and providing a cylindrical Wall of substantially constant thickness at al1-peripheral portions, the outer portion of said cylindrical wall being only slight/ly smaller than said cylindrical zone, said cylindrical wall providing an opening adjacent said port but otherwise extending completely around the inner periphery of said shell in close proximity thereto and to said head means to ydefine a circular chamber whereby a hot uid entering said circular chamber will equally heat all portions of said cylindrical Wall and the adjacent portions of said cylindrical shell; and rotary pump means for moving a hot fluid through said port and through said circular chamber.

6. In combination in a hot-fluid rotary pump adapted to pump fluids at high temperatures: a massive cylindrical shell providing an inlet port extending therethrough near the inlet end of said shell to communicate with a cylindrical space dened by said shell; head means closing said inlet end of said shell; an inlet end member within said cylindrical space and providing a cylindrical wall of substantially constant thickeness and which is only slightly smaller in outer diameter than said cylindrical space, said cylindrical wall providing an opening adjacent saidA inlet port but otherwise extending completely around the inner periphery of said cylindrical space, said inlet member providing an inward- `extending wall adjacent said head means at a position adjacent one side of said inlet port and another inward-extending wall providing an opening and positioned adjacent 'the other side of said inlet port, said inward-extending walls and said cylindrical wall forming a circular chamber coaxial with the axis of said shell whereby a hot fluid entering through said inlet port will equally heat all portions of said cylindrical wall and the adjacent portions of said cylindrical shell; rotary' means communicating with said opening of said inward-extending wall for moving a hot uid through said inlet port and said circular chamber; and means for discharging said hot fluid from said cylindrical shell. v

'7. In combination in a hot-fluid rotary pum adapted to pump fluids at high temperatures: a massive cylindrical shell providing inlet and outlet ports extending therethrough to communicate respectively with a cylindrical `space and a cylindrical cavity formed by said shell,` said shell providing an inward-extending annular shoulder at the junction of said cylindrical space and said cylindricalv cavity, said annular shoulder being disposed between said inlet and outlet ports; a pump element in said cylindrical cavity and providing an annular surface mating with said annular shoulder; an inlet end member opposite said inlet port and providing a cylindrical wall of substantially uniform thicknessvat all peripheral portions thereof and defining a circular chamber positioned on the inlet side of said annular shoulder and communicating with said pump element whereby a hot fluid entering said circular chamber will equally heat all peripheral portions of said cylindrical wall and all adjacent peripheral portions of said cylindrical shell, said cylindrical wall providing an opening through which said inlet port communicates with said circular chamber; an outlet end member disposed adjacent said outlet port and providing an outer cylindrical wall of substantially uniform thickness at all peripheral portions, said cylindrical wall providing an opening communicating between said out'let port and a circular lchamber bounded by said cylindrical wall Whereby the hot fluid moving through this circular chamber will equally heat all peripheral portions of said cylindrical wall and all adjacent peripheral portions of said cylindrical shell, this circular chamber being on the sameside of said annular shoulder as said pump element; means for retaining said annular surface of said pump element in pressural mating Contact with said annular shoulder; and means for moving a hot fluid through said inlet port, the adjacent circular chamber, said pump element, and through the other circular chamber and said outlet port,

8. In combination in a hot-fluid rotary pump adapted to pump fluids at high temperatures: a massive cylindrical shell providing a cylindrical space and a port extending outward through said shell to communicate therewith; head means for closing the adjacent end of said cylindrical shell and providing an opening coaxial with the axis of said shell; a' shaft of considerably smaller diameter than said opening and extending therethrough to define an annular space; an annular member detachably connected to said head means and extending through said annular space and providing an end surface disposed in said cylindrical space; an end member disposed in said cylindrical space and providing an inwardextending wall with an opening therein of suflcient diameter to receive the end of said annular member, said inward-extending wall providing a surface terminating at said opening thereof in a zone immediately adjacent said end surface of 'said annular member to cooperate therewith in defining a fluid-guiding wall means bounding an internal passage, said passage communicating with said port; and means for moving a hot fluid through said internal passage along said fluidguiding wall means.

9. In combination in a hot-fluid rotary pump adapted to pump fluids at high temperatures: an enclosing structure including a massive one-piece cylindrical shell and head means detachably connected to opposite ends thereof, said massive cylindrical shell including inlet and outlet ports communicating with the interior of said shell, the interior of this shell providing a cavity closed at its outer end by one of said head means and terminating at its inner end at a shoulder extending inward from. said shell adjacent said inlet port on the side thereof toward the outlet port and extending completely around the inner periphery of said shell, said shoulder providing an opening of smaller diameter than said cavity; an inlet end member disposed within said shell adjacent said inlet port and including a cylindrical wall of substantially uniform thickness at all peripheral portions thereof, the outer surface of said cylindrical wall being substantially equally spaced from said cylindrical shell whereby a hot uid entering said inlet end member will equally heat the adjacent peripheral portions of said shell, said cylindrical wall providing an opening therein communicating between said inlet port and the interior of said inlet end member; an outlet end member adjacent said outlet port and providing a cylindrical wall of substantially uniform thickness at all peripheral portions, the outer portion of said cylindrical wall being substantially equally spaced from said cylindrical shell whereby a hot fluid flowing through said outlet end member will equally heat the adjacent peripheral portions of said shell, this cylindrical wall providing an opening therein communicating between said outlet port and the interior of said outlet end member; a plurality of abutting pump elements disposed in said cylindrical shell between said shoulder and said outlet end member, that pump element of said plurality of pump elements which is adjacent said annular shoulder providing an annular surface mating with said shoulder; a shaft extending through said heads; impeller means secured to said shaft for moving a hot fluid from said inlet port through `said inlet end member, through said pump elements, through said outlet end member, and through said outlet port; outboard bearings secured to said removable heads and positioned therebeyond for journalling said shaft; supporting means extending outward from. said cylindrical shell on opposite sides thereof near` the horizontal axis of said shell; and pedestal means for supporting said cylindrical shell through said supporting means.

10. In combination, in a hot fluid rotary pump adapted to pump fluids at high temperatures: an enclosing structure including a massive onepiece cylindrical shell and head means at opposite ends thereof and detachably connected to at least one of said ends, said massive cylindrical shell including inlet and outlet ports communieating with the interior of said shell, the interior of said shell providing a cavity closed at its outer end by one of said head means and terminating at its inner end at a shoulder extending inward from said shell adjacent said inlet port on the side thereof toward the outlet port and extending completely around the inner periphery of said shell, said shoulder providing an opening of smaller diameter than said cavity; a plurality of abutting stationary pump elements disposed in said cavity between said inlet and outlet ports and including a fluid passage communicating with said ports, one of said ystationary pump elements providing an annular surface mating with said shoulder, said massive cylindrical shell being of substantially uniform thickness between said ports, and said pump elements being so formed that all peripheral portions thereof in any plane perpendicular to the axis of said shellare of substantially uniform thickness whereby to equalize heat and expansion at all peripheral portions of said shell and said pump elements and thereby prevent warping of said shoulder to maintain said annular surface in mating relationship with said shoulder; an outlet end member providing a passage communicating between the outlet port and one of said pump elements; a ring of gasket character disposed near the outer periphery of said outlet end memberbetween said member and the head means at the outlet end of said shell to compensate for excess expansion of said insert structure and maintain said annular surface in mating relationship with said shoulder; and meansinsidesaid insert structure for forcing -hot fluid through said fluid passage. Y

11. In combination, in a hot fluid rotary pump adapted to pump fluids at high temperatures: an enclosing structure including a massive cylindrical shell and head means closing the ends of said shell, the interior of said shell providing a cylindrical cavity; a plurality of pump elements providing lower annular portions of substantially the same radius as the radius of said cylindrical cavity and resting on the lower portion of said cylindrical shell, the upper portion of each pump element being formed on a somewhat smaller radius to provide a relieved portion extending more than half way around the upper portion of each pump element to define a small space between the upper portion of each pump element and said cylindrical shell, each pump element providing a groove at the upper' end thereof; a removable rod extending through the grooves of said pump elements and being of such size as to engage the upper portion of said cylin.- drical cavity to lock the pump elements in position; means'at the outlet end of said pump elementsproviding an annular wall of a diameter substantially equal to that of said cylindrical a cylindrical shell defining a cylindrical cavity and providing inlet and outlet ports, said shell further providing an inwardly projecting annular shoulder in said cylindrical cavity between said inlet and outlet ports; head means closing the ends of said cylindrical shell; an insert structure in said cylindrical cavity and including an end member on the inlet-port-side of said shoulder positioned in alignment with said inlet port, said end member providing a cylindrical wall of substantially constant thickness at all peripheral portions, the outer portion of said cylindrical wall being only slightly smaller than said cylindrical cavity, said cylindrical wall having an opening adjacent said inlet port but otherwise extending completely around the inner periphery of said cylindrical shell in close proximity thereto and to said head means to define a circular chamber whereby a hot uid entering said circular chamber willequally heat all portions of said cylindrical wall and the the adjacent portions of said cylindrical shell, said insert structure also including a portion extending from said outlet port to the outlet-port-side of said shoulder and mating with said shoulder and resting upon the lower inner portion of said cylindrical shell with a small space between its upper peripheral portion and the upper inner portion of said shell, that portion of said insert structure which is proximate to said outlet port being in communication with said l outlet port and providing an annular wall of a diameter substantially equal to that of said cylln drical cavity to restrict entrance of hot fiuid into the aforesaid small space and thereby prevent free circulation therethrough; means permitting longitudinal expansion of said insert structure on the outlet-port-side of said shoulder relative to said cylindrical shell to compensate for ex= cess expansion of said insert structure and to maintain pressural contact of said mating surface of said insert structure with said shoulder; and means for moving hot fluid from said inlet port through said insert structure and thence through said outlet port.

13. In alhigh-pressure hot-iluid rotary pump of the character described, the combination of: a

providing an inward-extending ring in a plane perpendicular to the axis of said shell and lying between said ports and near said inlet port, said shell having supporting means disposed on opposite sides thereof and substantially laterally aligned with said inlet and outlet ports, whereby forces applied to said shell through the connection of inlet and outlet pipes to said ports will be transmitted directly through the wall of said shell in lateral direction to said supportingl lmeans; an insert structure in said cylindrical said insert structure; a head closing the inlet end y f said shell and forcing said inlet section into sealing engagement with said ring; and a head secured to the outlet end of said shell, said lastnamed head engaging said outlet section of the insert structure and forcing the same against said.

ring.

14. In a high pressure hot fluid rotary pump of the character described, the combination of: a massive cylindrical shell having substantially vertical radial inlet" and outlet ports extending means closing the opposite ends of said shell, at least one of said head means being detachable; supporting means extending from said shell on opposite sides in substantially lateral valignment; with said inlet and outlet ports, whereby forces or loads applied to said shell through the connection of pipingv to said ports will be transmitted laterally through the wall of said shell to said supporting means without producing substantial forces or loads tending to distort said shell; and a pump structure within said shell for pumping a hot uid therethrough.

l5. A combination as defined in claim 11 inwhich the cylindrical shell has an outlet port and in Awhich said rotary pump means includes an insert structure providing a plurality of pump elements and a second end member, said second end member being within said cylindrical zone in communication with said outlet port, said pump elements resting upon said cylindrical shell with a small space between their upperperip'heral portions and said cylindrical shell, that portion of said insert structure which is proximate to said outlet port providing an annular wall of a diameter substantially equal to that of said cylindrical zone toV restrict entrance of hot fluid into the aforesaid small space and thereby prevent free circulation therethrough.

GEORGE E. BIGELOW.l ARTHUR R. WEIS.

40` through the wall thereof between its ends; head CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 2,161,695. June 6,l 1959.

GEORGE E. BIcELow, ET AL.

It is hereby certified-that error appears in the printed specification ofthe above lnumbered patent requiring correction as foilows: Page 2, sec?"-v ond column, line-5, for the word "screws" read screw; .page LL, first column, line 7l, for "la-ce" read place; page 6, first column, line 8, for "member 1MB" read member 1&0; and second column,vv line 62, claim 1, strike out the word sealing"v and insert the same after the semicolon and before means in line 6h., same claim; and that the said.v Letters Patent shouldbe read with this' correction therein .that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 11th day of July, A. D. -1959.v

Henry Van Arsdale- (Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.

Patent No. 2,161,695. Y June 6, 1959.

GEORGE E. BIGELow, `ET AL.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 9, second' column, line 5h., claim 15, for the claim reference numeral "ll'' read 5; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent' Office.

Signed and sealed this 12th day of September, A. D. 1959.

(Seal) Henry Van Arsdale,

Acting Commissioner of Patents.

US222526A 1938-08-01 1938-08-01 Rotary pump for hot fluids Expired - Lifetime US2161695A (en)

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2678606A (en) * 1950-03-18 1954-05-18 Worthington Corp Centrifugal pump or compressor
US2753807A (en) * 1952-01-21 1956-07-10 Tait Mfg Co The Centrifugal pump and method of manufacture therefor
US3153383A (en) * 1961-08-11 1964-10-20 Laval Turbine Means and method of assembling a pump, compressor, turbine or the like
US3154019A (en) * 1962-11-13 1964-10-27 Crane Co Shaftless submersible pump
WO1989003938A1 (en) * 1987-10-29 1989-05-05 Warren Pumps Inc. Pump
DE4227249A1 (en) * 1992-08-18 1994-02-24 Klaus Union Armaturen Pot pump for fluids - has pump housing comprising cast suction connection, cast pressure connection, and intervening welded pipe section, the two connections having feet, to which the pump housing is fixed on a
DE4310467A1 (en) * 1993-03-31 1994-10-06 Klein Schanzlin & Becker Ag Pot housing pump
US5702240A (en) * 1995-05-05 1997-12-30 Tuthill Corporation Rotary positive displacement blower having a diverging outlet part
US20100322765A1 (en) * 2008-03-10 2010-12-23 Man Diesel & Turbo Se Turbo engine with improved compensating piston gasket
WO2011021483A1 (en) * 2009-08-19 2011-02-24 三菱重工コンプレッサ株式会社 Radial gas expander

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2678606A (en) * 1950-03-18 1954-05-18 Worthington Corp Centrifugal pump or compressor
US2753807A (en) * 1952-01-21 1956-07-10 Tait Mfg Co The Centrifugal pump and method of manufacture therefor
US3153383A (en) * 1961-08-11 1964-10-20 Laval Turbine Means and method of assembling a pump, compressor, turbine or the like
US3154019A (en) * 1962-11-13 1964-10-27 Crane Co Shaftless submersible pump
WO1989003938A1 (en) * 1987-10-29 1989-05-05 Warren Pumps Inc. Pump
DE4227249A1 (en) * 1992-08-18 1994-02-24 Klaus Union Armaturen Pot pump for fluids - has pump housing comprising cast suction connection, cast pressure connection, and intervening welded pipe section, the two connections having feet, to which the pump housing is fixed on a
DE4310467A1 (en) * 1993-03-31 1994-10-06 Klein Schanzlin & Becker Ag Pot housing pump
US5522701A (en) * 1993-03-31 1996-06-04 Ksb Aktiengesellschaft Vertical barrel pump
US5702240A (en) * 1995-05-05 1997-12-30 Tuthill Corporation Rotary positive displacement blower having a diverging outlet part
US20100322765A1 (en) * 2008-03-10 2010-12-23 Man Diesel & Turbo Se Turbo engine with improved compensating piston gasket
US9494165B2 (en) * 2008-03-10 2016-11-15 Man Diesel & Turbo Se Turbo engine with improved compensating piston gasket
JP2011043070A (en) * 2009-08-19 2011-03-03 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Compressor Corp Radial gas expander
CN102421991A (en) * 2009-08-19 2012-04-18 三菱重工压缩机有限公司 Radial gas expander
US8985945B2 (en) 2009-08-19 2015-03-24 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Compressor Corporation Radial gas expander
RU2548998C2 (en) * 2009-08-19 2015-04-20 Мицубиси Хэви Индастриз Компрессор Корпорейшн Radial expander
CN102421991B (en) * 2009-08-19 2015-11-25 三菱重工压缩机有限公司 radial gas expander
WO2011021483A1 (en) * 2009-08-19 2011-02-24 三菱重工コンプレッサ株式会社 Radial gas expander

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