US2146731A - Steam radiator valve - Google Patents

Steam radiator valve Download PDF

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Publication number
US2146731A
US2146731A US52496A US5249635A US2146731A US 2146731 A US2146731 A US 2146731A US 52496 A US52496 A US 52496A US 5249635 A US5249635 A US 5249635A US 2146731 A US2146731 A US 2146731A
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Prior art keywords
valve
casing
disc
float
opening
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US52496A
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Harold R Goodale
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Harold R Goodale
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24DDOMESTIC- OR SPACE-HEATING SYSTEMS, e.g. CENTRAL HEATING SYSTEMS; DOMESTIC HOT-WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS; ELEMENTS OR COMPONENTS THEREFOR
    • F24D19/00Details
    • F24D19/08Arrangements for drainage, venting or aerating
    • F24D19/081Arrangements for drainage, venting or aerating for steam heating systems
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/2931Diverse fluid containing pressure systems
    • Y10T137/3003Fluid separating traps or vents
    • Y10T137/3084Discriminating outlet for gas
    • Y10T137/309Fluid sensing valve
    • Y10T137/3093With vaporized liquid stop

Description

Feb. M, 1.939. H. R. GOODALE STEAM RADIATOR VALVE 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Dec. 2, 1935 E. m y www O p, @Q0 DN. 7 www O my w H@ Feb. 14, 1939. H. R. GOODALE STEAM RADIATOR VALVE Filed Dec. 2, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Feb. 14, 1939 l UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 14 Claims.
This invention relates to steam radiator valves and comprises all of the features of novelty herein disclosed. An object of the invention is to provide an improved air valve for steam radiators to vent air, retain steam and Water, and to hold a vacuum. Another object is to provide a valve of simple construction and low cost and one that will be reliable in operation. Another object is to provide a vacuum Valve having improved means to vent air and to insure the building up and .holding of a vacuum when the radiator cools. vAnother object is to provide an air valve having 'improved means to control the rate of venting.
To these ends and also to improve generally upon devices of this character, the invention consists in the various matters hereinafter described and claimed. In its broader aspects, the invention is not necessarily limited to the specific constructions selected for illustrative purposes in the accompanying drawings in which Fig. 1 is a central vertical section of a radiator Valve in its venting condition.
Fig( 2 is a similar view of a portion of the valve with certain parts in the position assumed when steam is admitted.
Fig. 2A is a view similar to Fig. 2 with the parts in the vacuum-holding position,
Fig.V 3 is a sectional View on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1.
Fig. 4 is a central vertical section of a modification.
Fig. 5 is a bottom view, enlarged, of a portion of Fig. 4, a nut being omitted.
t Fig, 6 is a central vertical section of a modifica- Fig. 7 is a perspective View of a support.
Fig. 8 is a sectional View of a portion of the valve of Fig. 6 with certain parts in a dierent position.
Fig. 9 is a vertical sectional View of a vent regulator applicable to the preceding valves.
Fig. 10 is a perspective view of the cap of Fig. 9.
Fig. 11 is a plan view ofV a shutter.
Fig. 12 is a vertical sectional view of a modified valve.
The improved Valve comprises a casing having a base portion I6 and an upper portion I2 which are soldered together. The base portion has an annular ledge or shoulder I4 on which rests a supporting washer I 6 for other mechanism hereinafter referred to, and the casing portion I2 rests on the washer and within an annular flange I8 which surrounds the ledge I4. The base portion has the usual threaded nipple for attaching the valve to a steam radiator. Projecting into the opening is the bent and attened end of a drain pipe 22, this preferably being semi-cylindrical in cross section as indicated in Fig-4, so that the pipe can slide in the opening without 5 tilting as when attaching the valve to a radiator. To prevent the drain pipe coming loose, a bit of solder 23 or other projection isv attached to it at the casing end before the base portions I Il and upper portion I2 are soldered together.
'I'he upper casing portion I2 has a top wall 24 with an opening vdei-med by an annular ange 26 which is internally threaded to adjustably receive a threaded seat-forming member 28. The member 28 is perforated, there `being a circular l5 recess 30 communicating with a tapered hole 32 converging upwardly along a hollow stem 34. The small end of the hole 32 serves to centerthe stem although there is a little clearance. 'I'he tapered space provides a capillary recess tending 2o to suck moisture up and away from a venting port 36 leading laterally from near the lower and Wider portion of the tapered hole 32. The port 36 leads to an annular space 38 which is in communioation with the external atmosphere by 25.
means of perforations 40 and 4I, the former being in a flange 44 of the member 28 and the latter being in a guard or cap 42'which surrounds the flange. 'Ihe cap is soldered to the wall 24 after the seat-forming member is adjusted in the 30 ange 26.`
On the stem 34 is a Valve 46 having its upper end formed as a segment of a sphere thus making the valve self-centering when'it is urged upwardly to engage the circular seat defined by the lower end of the tapered `hole'32. The hollow stem 34 passes through a hole 'in a flexible wafer or disc 48 and is soldered to a little iange 50 pressed from the center of the disc, the valve 46 having a tapered recess to make room for the ange and to help hold the latter'on the stem. Between the disc 48 and a similar wafer or disc 52 is housed a bimetallic disc or snap member 54. The disc 48 has inherent tendency to be convexdown and the disc 52 has inherent tendency to 45 assume a convex-up position so that these inherent tendencies balance one another although each disc is of very thin metal to ex easily. The member 54 is composed of two thicknesses of metal of dissimilar expansive qualities such that it will snap over at a given temperature from a convex-downward position to a convex-upward position. The disc 52 has a flange 56 surrounding the 4side wall of a oat 58 and the disc 48 has a longer flange surrounding the flange 56, 55
both flanges being soldered together and to the float. The discs 48 and 52 form a chamber completely protecting the snap member from the heating medium in the valve casing. They have surface contact with the entire area of the snap member and form a carrier which mounts or connects the snap member to the float and the valve. The oat 58 rests on fingers 62 extending radially from the inner periphery of the washer I8, lugs 64 bent upwardly from the lingers holding the float centered. Between the fingers 62, (Fig. 3) slots 66 provide communication between the bottom of the casing and the annular space outside `of the iloat.
In operation, assume the valve casing is attached to a cold, steam radiator, the` valve being open and the valve casing being full of air. As the heat rises in the system, the Vsteam or hot vapor easily forces the air out of the casing through the recess 30, the tapered hole 32, the venting port 36, the recess 38, and the holes 40 and 4|. When the predetermined heat of say 185 reaches the bimetallic member 54, it snaps upwardly at the center lifting the center of the disc 48 as indicated in Fig. 2 and causing the valve 46 to tightly engage its seat, thus preventing escape of steam. The disc 52 follows the bimetallic disc 54 because of the above mentioned inherent tendency for the former to take a convex-up position. Assuming the heat later dies down, steam condenses in the casing and hence a partial vacuum forms. Since atmospheric pressure always has access through the hollow valve stem 34 to the lower surface of the flexible disc 48, the pressure differential will hold the disc 48 exed upwardly and hold the valve closed even when the bimetallic member 54 snaps back to its original position because of the lessening heat which accompanies the forming of vacuum.
'See Fig. 2A.
The bimetallic member is preferably selected to snap upwardly at say 185 F. and to snap back again at say 165. The snap is sudden past a dead center position but there is a slow movement or lag as the discs approach this dead center and this is of Value in holding the valve closed through a range of dropping temperature while vacuum is building up. Without this lag', the valve might open before the temperature dropped enough to condense vapor and cause sufficient vacuum for the disc 48 to be held up by atmospheric pressure supplied through `the valve stem. When once closed, the valve stays closed to maintain a partial vacuum in the heating system, thus facilitating future admission of steam to the radiator when heat comes up again. The valve will also prevent water from leaking out of the valve into the room if too much water is initially admitted to the heating system, because the float always contains some air and will be lifted by the water and close the valve.
In the modification of Fig. 4, the float 58A is connected to the valve in the same manner as in Fig. 1 but the lower portion of the float is closed and contains a few drops of alcohol or similar' fluid which'will vaporize at a temperature of about 185 F. The float has a little flange 12 soldered to a post '|4 which is seated in a recess of an adjusting screw v1li which is threaded through a hollow boss 18 on the base I0. The screw is locked in adjusted position by a washer 8U and 'a nut 82, the washer being soldered to the base. In order to give many locking positions, the screw is slotted at the end to receive a cross pin 84 which also extends into selected locking recesses 86 in the washer 80. Removal of the nut and cross pin gives easy access to the screw slot for adjustment so that the different valves in a heating system can be given the best individual setting to insure all of the radiators getting their share of heat. In this form of the invention, the alcohol will preferably vaporize at about the sam-e temperature selected for the bimetallic disc to snap over and upward flexing of the wafer or disc 52 by the alcohol vapor will give an additional safeguard to closing of the valve in the presence of heat. The valve otherwise operates in a manner similar to that of Fig.
1 except of course the bottom disc 52 will not remain flexed down when the bimetallic disc is flexed upwardly unless the bimetallic member is selected to snap up at a lower temperature than the disc 52 which is controlled by the expanding alcohol. The bimetallic disc has the same advantages in its lag when vacuum starts to build up because it will hold the valve closed although the alcohol may liquefy at the first little drop in temperature and tend to open the valve.
In the modification of Fig. 6, the valve 46 is secured at 90 directly to the upper portion of a bellows 92, the bottom of the bellows being soldered to a shelf 94 of a float 96. The oat has a deep drawn portion 98 extending up inside the bellows to form a stop to limit excessive collapse of the bellows. The float is centered in the casing by lugs |00 which are struck out from its side wall, openings |02 thus being formed also to equalize pressures inside and outside the float. The bottom of the float comprises a wafer or disc |04, a bimetallic member |06 and a wafer or disc 08, the discs |04 and |08 housing and protecting the bimetallic member from corrosion and having flanges ||0 solderedto the float. v The discs, oat and valve are vertically adjustable by a screw 2 mounted in the same manner as the screw 16 of Fig. 4. To give greater area of support, a, table ||4 convexed'to fit the disc |08 may be used, the table having curved legs ||6 fitting the casing wall.. The legs are spaced a little above the bottom of the casing to allow downward adjustment 'of the Valve by the screw |2 but preventing a wide open adjustment such that the valve might fail to close.
In operation, the valve, when'cold, will freely vent air through the ports as in Fig. 1. When the selected heat is reached, the bimetallic disc |06 will snap over as indicated in Fig. 8 and act through the bellows 92 and stop 98 to close the valve, the post or screw ||2 taking the reaction on the bottom of the casing. The portion 98 of the iloat will engage the valve and prevent its opening if the bellows tends to collapse because of high vapor pressure in the casing. Such vapor pressure has access through the holes |02 to the top of the disc |04 to balance the pressure below the disc |08. Both the top disc |04 and the bottom disc |08 have inherent tendency to become convex towards one another and thus'each will follow the snap of the bimetallic disc. Upon cooling of the radiator, a partial vacuum forms inthe valve casing but atmospheric pressure remains inside the bellows so that the bellows stays expanded to keep the valve closed even when the bimetallic disc snaps back to its original position. The latter has the above mentioned lag in action which keeps the valve closed as vacuum starts to build up. l
In Figs. 9, 10 and i1 there is shown a simple means to provide for varying the venting capacity of any of the preceding valves from the top of the valve casing. 'I'he port 40 registers with a circumferentially tapered opening |44 in a shutter or disc |46 which is adapted to be turned by a linger piece |48 which projects through a slot |49 in a cap 42A. The disc |46 is centered by the cap and has a central opening bounded by a circular iiange |54 which surrounds but clears the hollow stem 34. 'Ihe iiange centers a coil spring |52 which holds the disc down, the upper end of the spring being centered and confined by an extension |54 of the cap. Obviously, venting through the ports 36, 44, |44 and slot |49 will be fast or easy when the wide end of the opening |44 is over the port 40 and venting will be slow or restricted when a narrow portion of the opening |44 is over the port 4|). The opening |44 might be replaced by a series of holes of varying sizes or by a slot inclined to approach the center of the shutter. The spring holds the disc down but permits turning it.
In the modication of Fig. 12, a float 53B contains thermal fluid such as alcohol and is connected to and supported by a post 14A which rests in a flared centering recess of a boss 2| 8 on the base i8. At the top of the float is a wafer or disc 22! next to a similar wafer or disc 222, both discs being flanged and soldered to the float. The hollow valve stem 34 affords access of atmospheric air to the adjacent surfaces between the discs. The valve 46 is arranged to engage a seat-forming member 23B which has a hole 224 clearing the valve stem and ending in a tapered drain surface 226. Fitting closely around but clearing the valve stem is a disc 228 having a iiange 23B resting on the seat-forming member 28B. The disk 228 preferably has a small pin hole 232 so that air will vent at the least pressure above atmospheric. At an increasing pressure, the disc 228 will be lifted. The disc is a check valve as it insures against the entry of any considerable amount of air if the valve should open as vacuum is building up. A slight amount of air will enter through the pin hole 232 but not enough to interfere with forming a vacuum and the pin hole insures venting at the least pressure to thereby facilitate heating. The disc 228 is centered by a side wall 234 on a cap soldered to the casing, the cap having a portion 236 overlying the disc 228 to keep the latter from lifting off of the valve stem. Holes 238 in the cap let air in or out. 'Ihe check valve is optional since atmospheric air between the wafers 220 and 222 will ordinarily suice to keep the valve seated when vacuum forms in the casing. The pin hole could be made in the member 28B at any point above the seat engaged by the valve 46.
I claim:-
1. In a device of the character described, a casing having a vent opening, a valve adapted to close the opening, a flexible wafer having operative connection with the valve, a second flexible wafer spaced from the first and forming a chamber therewith, a thermostatic vsnap member housed in the chamber, the wafers protecting the snap member from corrosion and acting as a carrier for connecting the snap member'to the valve, and means in the casing for supporting the wafers.
` 2. In a device of the character described, a casing having a vent opening, a valve adapted to close the opening, a flexible wafer having operative connection with the valve, a second flexible wafer spaced from the rst and forming a chamber therewith, a bimetallic snap member housed in the chamber, each wafer having inherent tendencT to become convex towards the bimetallic member to follow the snap thereof,A and means in the casing for supporting the wafers.
3. In a device of the character described, a casing having a vent opening, a valve adapted to close the opening, a flexible wafer having operative connection with the valve, a second iiexible wafer spaced from the first and forming a chamber therewith, the valve being hollow to admit atmospheric air to the chamber, a bimetallic snap member housed in the chamber, and means in the casing for supporting the wafers.
4, In a device of the character described, a casing having a vent opening, a valve adapted t close the opening, a flexible wafer having operative connection with the valve, a second iiexible wafer spaced from the rst and forming a chamber therewith, a bimetallic snap member housed in the chamber, the wafers forming a centering carrier for the snap member and engaging the opposite sides thereof and a floatforming wall secured to at least one of the wafers and supported in the casing.
5. In a device of the character described, a casing having a vent opening, a valve adapted to close the opening, a flexible wafer connected to the valve, a second iiexible wafer spaced from the first and forming a chamber therewith, means for admitting .atmospheric air to the chamber from the outside of the casing, a float member connected to one vof the wafers and supported in the casing, and means sensitive to heat for causing flexing of the wafers and closing movement of thev valve.
6. In a device of the character described, a casing having a vent opening, a valve adapted to close the opening, a float member supporting the valve and having an opening to equalize pressure within and without,a thermostatic snap member, a pair of spaced-apart flexible wafers enclosing the snap member and connected to one another at their peripheries and to the iioat, the wafers being adapted for surface contact with opposite sides of the snap member and forming a protecting housing therefor, and supporting means in the casing whereby the snap action of the snap member is transmitted therefrom to the valve.
'7. In a device of the character described, a casing having a vent opening, a valve adapted to close the opening, a wafer connected to the valve, a second wafer forming a chamber with the iirst, the chamber communicating with the atmosphere, and a float connected to the second wafer and containing thermostatic uid.
8. In a device of the character described, a valve casing, a seat-forming member attached to the casing and having a tapering opening, a valve stem extending through the opening and centered by the smaller end thereof, a port extending through the seat-forming member from the larger portion or said tapering opening, and the valve stem and the tapered opening forming a capillary recess tending to suck moisture away from the port; substantially as described.
9. In a vacuum air valve, a valve casing having an outlet passage, a check-valve resting by gravity on the valve casing over the outlet passage to restrict the entry of air, the check-valve having a vent hole which is always in communication with the outlet passage to vent air therefrom at the least pressure, and the hole being of such small size and the check-valve so light that the checkvalve will be lifted upon material increase in the pressure of the air escaping from the valve casing.
10. In a vacuum air valve, a valve casing having an outlet passage, a main valve in the casing and adapted to open and close the outlet passage at the inside of the casing, a light-Weight check valve resting by gravity over the outer end of the outlet passage, and means comprising a pin-hole by-pass which always provides communication between the outlet passage and the atmosphere to provide for venting air at the least pressure when the main valve is open, said hole being too small to let in air fast enough to prevent a partial vacuum being formed in the casing.
11. In a device of the character described, a valve casing having an inlet and an outlet, a valve to close the outlet, a flexible wafer connected to the valve, a float supporting the wafer and having an end wall forming a separate chamber therewith, means for admitting atmospheric air to the chamber, and a bimetallic member reacting on the float to close the valve in the presence of heat.
12. In a device of the character described, a valve casing forming a single chamber having an inlet and an outlet, a valve to close the outlet, a exible wafer connected to the valve, a float having an end wall connected to the wafer and forming a separate chamber therewith, means for admitting atmospheric air to the chamber, and a bimetallic member reacting against said end wall of the float for causing the valve to close the said outlet in the presence of heat; substantially as described.
13. In a device of the character described, a valve casing forming a single chamber having an inlet and an outlet, a valve to close the outlet, a flexible member connected to the valve, an openbottom float having its upper end wall connected to the flexible member and forming an air chamber therewith, means for admitting atmospheric air to the chamber to cause the valve to close the outlet when a vacuum exists in the valve casing, and heat sensitive means acting on said upper end of the float to cause the valve to close the same outlet in the presence of heat; substantially as described.
14. In a device of the character described, a casing having a vent opening, a valve adapted to close the opening, a pair of flexible wafers and a float member, one of the last mentioned members being connected to the valve, the wafers being closely adjacent to one another and one of them forming the end Wall of the float, means for always admitting atmospheric air between the wafers from the outside of the casing, and means within the i'ioat and sensitive to heat for flexing the wafers in the same direction to cause HAROLD R. GOODALE.
US52496A 1935-12-02 1935-12-02 Steam radiator valve Expired - Lifetime US2146731A (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2471240A (en) * 1945-02-03 1949-05-24 Automatic Sprinkler Co Heat actuated device
US2487946A (en) * 1945-06-14 1949-11-15 Jurg A Senn Thermal responsive device and mounting therefor
US2838936A (en) * 1953-07-13 1958-06-17 Alonzo C Goodrich Thermal responsive unit
US20070137706A1 (en) * 2005-12-16 2007-06-21 Stamatakis E M Condensate removal device
WO2007015718A3 (en) * 2005-02-17 2009-04-30 Steam Tech Inc Condensate removal device
US10006642B2 (en) 2014-05-09 2018-06-26 Jerritt L. Gluck Systems and methods for controlling conditioned fluid systems in a built environment

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2471240A (en) * 1945-02-03 1949-05-24 Automatic Sprinkler Co Heat actuated device
US2487946A (en) * 1945-06-14 1949-11-15 Jurg A Senn Thermal responsive device and mounting therefor
US2838936A (en) * 1953-07-13 1958-06-17 Alonzo C Goodrich Thermal responsive unit
WO2007015718A3 (en) * 2005-02-17 2009-04-30 Steam Tech Inc Condensate removal device
US20070137706A1 (en) * 2005-12-16 2007-06-21 Stamatakis E M Condensate removal device
US7571739B2 (en) 2005-12-16 2009-08-11 Steam Tech, Inc. Condensate removal device
US10006642B2 (en) 2014-05-09 2018-06-26 Jerritt L. Gluck Systems and methods for controlling conditioned fluid systems in a built environment

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