US2116873A - Self-contained air-conditioning unit - Google Patents

Self-contained air-conditioning unit Download PDF

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US2116873A
US2116873A US2116873DA US2116873A US 2116873 A US2116873 A US 2116873A US 2116873D A US2116873D A US 2116873DA US 2116873 A US2116873 A US 2116873A
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unit
cabinet
floor
air conditioning
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F13/00Details common to, or for air-conditioning, air-humidification, ventilation or use of air currents for screening
    • F24F13/20Casings or covers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F13/00Details common to, or for air-conditioning, air-humidification, ventilation or use of air currents for screening
    • F24F13/20Casings or covers
    • F24F2013/202Mounting a compressor unit therein

Description

B. s. WILLIAMS 2,116,873

SELFCONTAINED AIR CONDITIONING UNIT Filed Feb. 18 1938 7 Sheets-Sheet l w 4%? wk v N w j" v'v/ qr i] &

Y &\\\\\\ VENTOR. BURDCL .h/ILL/AMS ATTORNEY.

y 3- B. s. WILLIAMS 2,116,$i'3

I SELF'CONTAINED AIR CONDITIONING UNIT I Filed Feb. 18, 1938 7 Shets-Sheet 4 IN VENTOR aureozu. 5. ma mMs A TTORNEY May 10, 1938. u B. s. WILLIAMS 2,116,873 $ELF CONTAINED AIR CONDITIONING UNIT Filed Feb. 18 1938 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 h A TTORNEY E I INVENTOR May 10, 1938. YB. s..nLLmMs 2,116,873

SELF-CONTAINED AIR CONDITIONING U NIT Filed Feb. 18, 1958 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 IN VENTOR BURDELL S. Mum 4s A TTORNE Y Patented May 10, 1938 SELF-CONTAINED AIR-OONDITION ING UNIT Burdell S. Williams, Greenwich, Conn., assignor to Airtemp, Incorporated, Dayton, Ohio, a cornotation of New York Application February s, 1933, Serial a... 191,304

- 1': Claims. to]. 152-129) My present invention relates to air conditioning. The particular invention comprises a self-' contained air conditioning unit of novel construction and arrangement. The principal object of my invention is to devise a unitary mechanism for air conditioning purposes which can be manufactured by modern quantity production methods at a central factory and shipped in assembled form to the ultimate user, thereby eliminating a great deal of the calculating, fitting, assembling, and other mechanical and mental operations which in the past have characterized air conditioning installations for residences, office buildings, stores, factories and other enclosures. 1 4

,A second object of my invention is to devise an air conditioning unit having the foregoing characteristics, which is free from the ordinary sources of trouble and which conditions the air 20 for enclosures in a novel and highly satisfactory manner. A further object of my invention is to design air conditioning mechanism of the self-contained package type whichcan be installed with as little alteration to the building as possible, my invention requiring only the connecting oi condenser cooling water pipes and a drain pipe, and the electrical conduits. H

A further object of my invention is to devise an air conditioning mechanism which is capable of being used in accordance with the foregoing advantageous principles, but which is likewise capable of being easily separated into two component parts comprising a condensing section enclosing the compressor and condenser, and an evaporating section containing the filter, evaporating coil, air circulating mechanism, and any other conditioning means which can be located in an enclosure separate from the enclosure containing the condensing section whereby to minimize noise and 'to reduce as far as possible some of the hazards of air conditioning mechanisms.

Other and further objects and-advantages of of the. mechanism contained therein; Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the air conditioning unit; Fig. 4 is a. rear elevation of the air conditioning unit; Fig. 5 is a cross section through the air conditioning unit taken along line 55 of Fig. 3 5 looking in the direction of the arrows; Fig. 6- is a cross section in elevation of the condensing portion of the unit taken along line ii-t of Fig. 5 looking in the direction of the arrows; Fig. 7 is'an enlarged detail section taken along line l-l of Fig. 6; Fig. 8 is-a perspective view of the evaporating portion of the unit with parts broken away in order to show the evaporating coil and blower; Fig. 9 is/an enlarged sectional view taken of Fig. 8 and illustrating a dedistributing means; Fig. 10 is similar to Fig. 9 the section being taken along line ill-it of Fig. 8; Fig. 11 isa perspective view of one of a plural snot directional grilles shown in Fig. 8; Fig. 12 is a schematic view representing the use of .my invention in two separate parts, one part comprising a condensing unit to be located in a basement, anteroom or other chamber, and the other part to be used as an air conditioning unit located in the enclosure to be conditioned; and Fig. 13 illustrates the possibility of using one or more or the condensing portions oi my present invention in any convenient manner with a large air conditioning system located in an enclosure relatively remote from the chamber in which the condensing units are placed.

Fig. 1 illustrates a room which may comprise a portion of a dwelling, store, beauty parlor, or other type of business or residential enclosure, the same having walls ill and ii, a floor 22 and ceiling 23. An air conditioning unit iii built according to my present invention can be conveniently located in the enclosure, preferably adjacent one of the walls. The unit comprises a lower section 25 within which is housed the compressor arid condenser, and which is preferably provided with a removable front panel 21. The upper portion 28 forms the air conditioning section of the unit and is provided with an inlet grille 29 and an outlet grille 30. The principal objects of my invention are illustrated in Fig. 1, it being apparent from perusal of this figure that the air is drawn from the enclosure into the inlet grille 29 at a height above the floor level such as to prevent the accumulation of dust, and other obstructing material upon the.grille br filter, and also to be above the level of ordinary obstructions, such as tables, filing cabinets,

desks and the like, so as to make all of the floor space available for ordinary use.- It is likewise 66 considerable height above the floor so as to be above the heads of people moving about within the enclosure near the conditioning unit. In this manner the coldest air isv projected overhead into the enclosure at a relatively high velocity, the same gradually spreading vertically so as to distribute a gently moving layer of cool air throughout the upper portion of the enclosure, which will intermingle with the warmer air within the enclosure so as to be evenly tempered for human comfort before reaching the level of human occupancy. The general movement of air is away from the conditioner in the upper layer of room air and toward the conditioner in the middle and lower regions. The unit therefore accomplishes all of the purposes of a good air conditioning installation without the necessity for rebuilding or remodeling the enclosure; likewise the owners investment in air conditioning is protected since the unit is of a class of equipment regarded as movables rather than fixtures, and it may be moved from building to building at the owner's desire.

Fig. 2 shows the condensing portion 26 as enclosing a. self-contained hermetically sealed compressing unit 35 and a water cooled condenser 36, the water for which is supplied and ejected through an inlet pipe 37 and an outlet pipe 38 which may be conveniently connected to the building plumbing in any suitable manner. Refrigerant compressed by the compressor is passed into the condenser 36 where it is cooled and liquefled, and thence passes through a liquid line 39 leading into the lower portion of the air conditioning section 28. An expansion valve 40 regulates the passage of refrigerant into the evaporator 4| where the refrigerant is expanded in order to cool and dehumidify the air being drawn therethrough by a suitable blower 42. The air is drawn into the air conditioning section through the inlet grille 29 and a suitable filter 45, thence through the coils of the evaporator 4i and into the eye. of the blower 42 which projects the cooled, filtered and dehumidifled air vertically upward into a soundproof plenum chamber 46 of substantiallysmall vertical dimensions, but preferably occupying the entire cross-section of the unit. The velocity of the air is thereby converted into static pressure, and noises due to the blower are reflected and absorbed so as to minimizenoise production. The air is thus forced out of the plenum chamber ina horizontal and lateral direction through the outlet grille II in the manner previously described and illustrated. An access door 41 is preferably provided between the two grilles in order to permit servicing of the blower motor. Asseen in Figs. 3 and 4, taken in connection with Figs. 1 and 2, the air conditioning sectionispreferably provided with a removable rear panel W of the same size as the inlet grille 29, so that the inlet grille and filter may be removed from the front of the unit and attached to the back of the unit and the rear panel shifted to the front, thereby to provide means whereby air may be drawn into the unit at either the front or rear. This is desirable for obvious reasons as well as for the more obscure reason that the unit may be provided to condition fresh air only, or a mixture of fresh and return air, in which case the removable panel 50 provides means for the connection of fresh air ducts to the unit; likewise,'the unit is preferably provided with a removable rea u let panel of the same size and dimensions as the outlet grille 30, whereby the conditioned air may be emitted from the front or the rear, or from both sides. The outlet grille may likewise be removed and the unit connected to distributing ducts if desired. The unit is likewise provided with a removable top cover 52 which provides means for connecting the unit with a vertically or laterally extending duct or ducts leading to other rooms, or to the ceiling of the enclosure in which the unit is placed. Various combinations of ducts may be used as outlined above, but it must be appreciated that the greatest utility of the unit lies in the fact that no ducts are necessary for most installations and I have therefore provided an air conditioning unit meeting the principal ob- .iects of my invention.

An inspection of Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 4 likewise illustrates a further object of my invention in that the unit supplies all of the functions of air conditioning in a package occupying a very small amount of floor space. This is very important in enclosures demanding high rental or in which space is otherwise at a premium. By way of example, a 3-ton unit built in accordance with my invention occupies a floor space of approximately 20" x33", or'about 4 /2 square feet. This unit is approximately 7 feet tall and discharges conditioned air through a. grille 30 whose lower edge is approximately 6 from the floor.

A further object of my invention is illustrated in Figs. 1 to 7 inclusive. It is to be noted that the unit is divided approximately at the midpoint by the upturned flange SI of a condensate drain pan 80, the flange 6| extending slightly beyond the wall of the upper portion 28. The lower edge of the wall of the upper portion 28 is preferably bent inward to form a stiffening and bracing flange 62 which is conveniently fastened to the drain .pan by means of bolts 83. Likewise, the upper edge of the wall of the lower portion 26 is preferably turned inward to form a stiffening and bracing flange 64 through which the bolts 63 pass to fasten the upper and lower sections together with the drain pan therebetween. Rubber washers 65 are interposed between the drain pan and 'the flange 82 in order to prevent. leakage of water through the holes drilled for the bolts 63, in order to space flange 62 from pan 80, and also to minimize the transmission of vibration from one section of the unit to the other. The liquid line 39 passes througha suitably protected opening in the pan 80 which is preferably further protected against leakage b." a rubber sleeve or othermemher 6, and the gas which has been expanded in the evaporator returns to the'compressing unit through a suction pipe 61, passing through a suitably protected opening in the drain pan 80, which is likewise further protected against leakage by a rubber cup or other member 88 similar to member '8. Moisture which condenses on the convo lutions. and flns of the evaporator ll collects in the drain pan 60; likewise, any moisture which may condense on the outer surface of the upper portion 28 is'collected by'the projecting lip of the drain pan 60 so as not to run down onto the floor of the enclosure. All of this accumulated 8 0 and passes through a nipple H into a threeway union 1! depending from the drain pan 60. The condensing section 28 is likewise provided with a. supplementary drain pan I! which collects any leakage from the condenser water cooling system, if such leakage should occur. This condensate collects in a sump 10 in the drain pan drain pan is provided with anipple 18 through 76 which the water is led into an elbow H which may be turned in any. suitable direction so that a drain pipe 18 connected thereto may lead outward in any desired direction through a suitable opening in the wall of the section 26. The condensate which is collected in union '12 is prefer- Ill ably passed downward through a drain pipe 19 which is preferably provided with a trap 80 which prevents the withdrawal of heated air from the lower section. When this system of moisture dis- .posal is used the other outlets of union I2 are closed as by means of plugs 81. However, it may be impossible in some buildings (sometimes made necessary by building codes) to remove the condensate at the level of the ordinary drain pipe 78, in which case the lower outlet of union if may be plugged and a suitable drain provided to extend in anydesired lateral direction.

Fig. 6 illustrates another feature of adaptability of my unit in that the same is preferably provided with means to connect the water system at either side of the unit. By way of example, the inlet pipe 3'1 is preferably welded to the wall of section 28 and extends but a short distance therethrough into a union 85 to which the condenser tank water inlet is attached. A pipe 86 extends laterally across the back of section 28 from the union 85 through an opening in the opposite wall of the section 26. Either of the pipes 31 or 86 may be connected to the water supply inlet, in which event the other would be closed by a suitable plug 89; likewise, pipe 38 may be fastened to a union 8! from which a pipe 88 may extend through the opposite wall of section 26. As seen in Figs. 3 and 4, a removable panel 90 is preferably provided in the rear wall of section 26 so as to permit ready access to the union I2, and suit-. able holes are preferably provided in the walls of section 26, the same being preferably closed by separable disks 9| painted to blend at the factory, which may be readily removed in the field soas to provide immediate means for adapting the unit to existing conditions. Likewise, the unit is preferably provided with an electrical outlet box 92 in proximity to the pipes 31 and 38,but is also provided with openings so that the outlet box may be located at the opposite side of the unit if desired or necessary.

Figs. 8 to 11 inclusive, taken in connection with the foregoing figures, illustrate a further adaptable feature of my invention, the same comprising an outlet grille 30 consisting of a, rectangular frame I preferably of such dimensions that the length thereof is a multiple of its width. The

frame I00 is adapted to be suitably attached to the wall of the upper section 28 so that the outlet grille may be removed as a unit if desired. The frame is preferably provided with an inwardly extending flange IOI which carries a suitable number of projections I02. A plurality of individual directing grilles I03 are fitted into the frame I00, each of the directing grilles comprising a rectangular (preferably square) frame I04. Each wall of the frame I04 is provided with indentations or openings I which engage the projections I02 when the directing grilles are in position. The resiliency of the fiange IOI permits the directing grilles to be slid into place and held by the engagement of the projections I02 with the openings or depressions I05. Each frame I04 supports a plurality of parallel vanes IIO, the

. vanes of at least some of the grilles I03 extending removing each of the directional grilles and positioning the same in any desired manner, practically any desired air movement may be achieved so that the unit is made further adaptable by permitting the same to be placed in any convenient location from the standpoint/of space occupied while directing the air into the desired cality. By way of example, all of the vanes may extend vertically with those on one side facing toward the right and those on the opposite side facing toward the left so as to distribute the air to both sides over as widea space as possible; whereas if the unit is placed in a corner it may be desirable to have all of the vanes facing in one direction so as to distribute the air in one direction across the enclosure. Likewise as seen in Fig. 8, certain ones of the directional grilles may be positioned with the vanes vertical and others with the vanes horizontal so as-to permit the creation of two or more substantially independent streams of air whereby to reach all sections of the enclosure.

Fig. 12 shows an elementary arrangement of the unit when separated into a condensing sec-- tion anda remotely located conditioning section, in which case the lower section 26 would preferably be provided with a cover 52', which would be substantially a duplicate of the cover 52, and the liquid line 39, the suction pipe 61, and the drain pipe I9 (directlybehind the suction pipe 61) would be extended. It is to be appreciated that a great deal of field fabrication and engineering calculations are thus eliminated'by the use of two balanced sections, factory produced and engineered, which may be so easily connected in this fashion. Likewise, Fig. 13 shows the relatively simple manner in which two remotely located condensing units may be fastened sideby side in a relatively small enclosure to supply a plurality of evaporating coils in a conditioning chamber of any suitable type. As illustrated, each condensing unit supplies an independent evaporating coil, but many systems are known whereby two or more condensing units may be connected in series with a single coil, or otherwise used. 1

It is to be appreciated that the details of the compressor, condenser, evaporator and other portions of the unit not herein claimed may be the inventions of others. By way of example, reference may be made to the co-pending applications of Charles R. Neeson,Serial No. 145,585, filed May 29, 1937; Serial No. 145,586, filed May 29, 1937; Serial No. 145,587, filed May 29, 1937; Serial No. 145,589, filed May 29, 1937; Serial No. 148,974, filed June 18, 1937; Serial No. 166,682, filed Sept. 29, 1937; and Serial No. 180,099, filed Dec. '16, 1937, all of which are assigned to applicant's assignee. It is likewise to be appreciated that my invention relates to the primary construction of a unit which may comprise other types of conditioning systems. For example, other types of compressing units may be used, other types of condensers may be used, other types of evaporators may be used, and, for that matter, other types of refrigerating systems such as absorption systems may be used, without departing from the spirit of my invention as set forth in the appended claims. My invention is capable of numerous such modifications in detail and arrangements of details which will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and all such that come within the scope of the following claims are considered as being embraced by such claims.

I claim:

1. A self-contained air conditioning unit adapted .to be placed on the floor of an enclosure and comprising a plurality of elements, said elements including a cabinet having substantially straight walls of such height as to extend from the floor of an enclosure to a level above the zone occupied by normal, adult humans standing on said floor, atleast one wall of said cabinet having an air inlet opening therein and at least one wall of said cabinet having an air outlet opening therein near the top of the cabinet, a plenum chamber adjacent the top of said cabinet communicating with said outlet opening, a refrigerating system housed within said cabinet and comprising a compressor and condenser arranged in refrigerant flow relationship within the lower part of said cabinet and an evaporator within the upper part of said cabinet arranged in refrigerant flowrelationship with said compressor and condenser, and a blower arranged within the upper part of said cabinet and adapted to cause a flow of air into said cabinet by way of said inlet opening, into heat-transferring relationship with said evaporator and into said plenum chamber, the relationship and relative sizes of said elements being socorrelated that said blower when in operation draws air into said cabinet without appreciably stirring up dust from the floor or nearby articles and causes the discharge of air from said plenum chamber in a lateral direction through said outlet opening in a stream which initially flows above the top of the above-mentioned zone.

2. The structure set forth in claim 1, in whichsaid openings are of relatively large size and extend substantially across the walls of the cabinet in which they are located, and in which the elements of, said unit include a replaceable filter positioned across substantially the entire area of said inlet opening.

3. The structure set forth in claim 1, in which I said inlet opening is of relatively large size and t is located within said zone and at a substantial near the top of the cabinet, a'plenum chamber adjacent the top of said cabinet communicating with said outlet opening, a refrigerating system housed within said cabinet and comprising means housed within the lower part of said cabinet adapted .to prepare a refrigerant for cooling and cooling coils housed within the upper part of said cabinet and'arranged in refrigerant flow relationship with said means, and a blowerarrangedwithin the upper part of said cabinet and adapted to cause a flow of air into said cabinet by way of said inlet opening, into heat-transferring relationship with'said cooling coils and into said plenum chamber, the relationship and relative sizes of said elements being so correlated that said blower-when in operation draws air into said cabinet without appreciably stirring up dust from the floor or nearby articles and causes the discharge of air from said plenum chamber in a said'inlet opening is of relatively large size and is located within said zone andat a substantial distance above the floor on which the unit is placed.

7. A self contained air conditioning unit adapt-- ed to be placed on the floor of an enclosure and comprising a plurality of elements, said elements including a cabinet having substantially straight walls of such height as to extend from the floor of an enclosure to a level above the zone occupied by normal adult humans standing on said floor and of such width in relationship to height that the floor area occupied by the cabinet is comparatively small with regard to the volume of space enclosed by the cabinet, at least one wall 7 of said cabinet having an air inlet opening therein and at least one wall of said cabinet having an air outlet opening therein near the top of the cabinet, 9. refrigerating system housed within said cabinet and comprising a compressor and condenser arrangedin. refrigerant flow relationship within the lower part of said cabinet and an evaporator within the upper part of said cabinet arranged rirefrlgerant fiow relationship with said com ressor and condenser, a blower arranged within the upper part of said cabinet and adapted towel-la flow of air into said cabinet by way of sai et opening, into heat-transferring relationship with said evaporator and out of said cabinet by way of said outlet opening in a stream which initially'flows above the top of the above-mentioned zone, and a rigid, sound-absorbing top cover against which the air impinges before leaving the cabinet, the relationship and relative sizes of said elements being so correlated that said blower when in operation draws air into said cabinet without appreciably stirring up dust from the floor or nearby articles and causes the air to flow through said unit in a direction substantially normal to said top cover before leaving the cabinet through said outlet opening in order that blower noises may be substantially absorbed within the cabinet.

8. The structure set forth in claim 7, in which said openings are of relatively large size and extend substantially across the walls of the cabinet in which they are located, and in which the elements of said unit include .a replaceable filter positioned across substantially the entire area of said inlet opening.

9. The structure set forth ill claim '1, in which said inlet opening is of relatively large size and is located within said zone and at a substantial distance above the floor on which the unit is placed.

.10. A self-contained air conditioning unit adapted to be placed on the floor of an enclosure and comprising a plurality of elements, said elements including a cabinet having substantially straight walls of such height as to extend from the floor of an enclosure to a level above the zone occupied by normal, adult humans standing on said floor and of such width in relationship to heilht that the floor area occupied by the cabinet is comparatively small with regard to the volume of space occupied by the cabinet, at least one wall oi said cabinet having an air inlet opening therein and at least one wall of said cabinet having an air outlet opening therein near the top of thecabinet, a refrigerating system. housed within said cabinet and comprising means housed within the lower part of said cabinet adapted to prepare a refrigerant for cooling and cooling coils housed within the upper part of said cabinet andarranged in refrigerant flow relationship with said means, a blower arranged within the upper part of said cabinet and adapted to cause a flow of air into said cabinet by way of said inlet opening, into heat-transferring relationship with saidv cooling coils and out of said cabinet by way oi said outlet opening in a stream which initiallyfiows above the top of the above-mentioned zone,

and a rigid, sound-absorbing top cover against which the air impinges before leaving the cabinet, the relationship and relative sizes of said elements being so correlated that said blower when in operation draws air into said cabinet without appreciably stirring up dust from the floor or ,nearby articles and causes the air to flow through said unit in' a direction substantially normal to said top cover before leaving the cabinet through said outlet opening in order that blower noises may be'substantially absorbed within the cabinet.

11. The structure set forth in claim 10, in which said openings are of, relatively large size and extend substantially across the walls oi the cabinet in which they are located, and in which the elements of said unit include a replaceable filter positioned across substantially the entire area of said inlet opening. I

12. The structure set forth in claim 10, in which-said inlet opening is of relatively large size and is located within said zone and at a substantial distance above the iioor' on which the unit is placed.

13. A self-contained air conditioning unit comprising a unitary structure occupying a relatively small floor space and extending a substantial distance vertically, the structure comprising a lower condensing section and an upper conditioning section, a condensate drain'pan interposed between two sections and a supplementary drain pan in the lower portion of the condensing section, a drain pipe extending from the condensate drain pan to proximity with the supplementary drain pan whereby condensedmoisture may be drained from said upper conditioning section and deposited in said supplementary drain pan, a

trap at the lower end of said drain pipe wherebyto prevent the withdrawal of heated air' from the condensing section'into the conditioning section, and a drain connection leading from said supplementary drain pan.

14. A self-contained air conditioning unit comprising a unitary walled structure occupying a relatively small floor space and extending a substantial distance vertically, the structure comprising a lower condensing section and an upp r conditioning section, and a condensate drain pan interposed between the two sections, said drain pan being provided with a flanged lip extending beyond the outer surfaces of the walls of the conditioning section whereby to accumulate any moisture condensing on said surfaces.

15. A self-contained air conditioning unit comprising a unitary structure occupying a relatively small floor space and extending a substantial distance vertically, the structure comprising a lower condensing section and an upper conditioning section, the'conditioning section comprising a plenum chamber at the top of the conditioning section and above ordinary head height, said plenum chamber being provided with a plurality of substantially identical oppositely disposed lateral openings, an outlet grille positioned across one of said openings, and a panel positioned across the other of said openings, said outlet grille and panel being removable and interchangeable.

16. A self-contained air conditioning unit comprising a unitary structure occupying a relatively small floor space and extending a substantial distance vertically, the structure comprising a lower condensing section and an upper conditioning section, the conditioning section comprising a plurality of inlet openings adjacent the top of the condensing section, a filter positioned across one of said openings, and a panel positioned acrossv the other of said openings, said filter and panel being removable and interchangeable. 17. A self-contained air conditioning unit comprising a. cabinet divided into an upper and alower section of approximately'equal height but whose combined height is greater than that of the ordinary human being, an evaporator and a blower arranged to cause a flow of air thereover in said upper section, a compressor and condenser in said lowersection and in refrigerant flow relationship with said evaporator, a suction air inlet in said upper section adjacent the bottom thereof, a plenum chamber at the top of said upper section above said inlet, evaporator and blower, an

air discharge opening in said plenum chamber arranged to discharge laterally, said blower being adapted to draw airin said inlet and to discharge it into said plenum chamber for lateral discharge through said opening.

BURDEIL S. WILLIAMS.

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US2420939A (en) * 1944-10-25 1947-05-20 Westinghouse Electric Corp Air conditioning apparatus
US2467309A (en) * 1946-01-08 1949-04-12 Philco Corp Grille assembly
US2472748A (en) * 1946-03-08 1949-06-07 Trane Co Air register
US2550754A (en) * 1946-05-14 1951-05-01 Augustus L Baker Heating apparatus
US2565836A (en) * 1947-12-10 1951-08-28 Carrier Corp Grille for self-contained air conditioning units
US2580535A (en) * 1946-10-16 1952-01-01 Feinberg Emanuel Air-conditioning apparatus
US2592396A (en) * 1948-01-23 1952-04-08 Perfection Stove Co Hot-air furnace, particularly of the forced-draft type
US2686406A (en) * 1954-08-17 Air conditioner
US2690654A (en) * 1952-07-26 1954-10-05 Gen Motors Corp Self-contained air conditioning unit
US2702459A (en) * 1952-02-09 1955-02-22 Arthur M Thompson Filter for air cooling systems of refrigerators
US2704971A (en) * 1949-01-05 1955-03-29 Carrier Corp Diffuser arrangment for selfcontained air conditioning unit
US2743908A (en) * 1953-08-10 1956-05-01 Tanner Talman Horace Hide away air conditioner
US2786407A (en) * 1955-06-10 1957-03-26 Whirlpool Seeger Corp Adjustable air exhaust grille assembly
US2792985A (en) * 1955-10-20 1957-05-21 Sidney J Heiman Fan having adjustable directional air controls
US2813474A (en) * 1953-08-04 1957-11-19 Anemostat Corp America High velocity air distribution apparatus
US2865277A (en) * 1956-10-01 1958-12-23 Carrier Corp Air distribution assembly
US2881689A (en) * 1957-02-01 1959-04-14 Carrier Corp Air distribution means
US2909112A (en) * 1956-08-07 1959-10-20 Hrant H Yousoufian Air diffuser
US2937588A (en) * 1957-02-27 1960-05-24 Carrier Corp Air conditioning unit
US2947237A (en) * 1957-03-04 1960-08-02 Cortland N O'day Air diffusers
US2982197A (en) * 1958-09-12 1961-05-02 James A Roberts Modular air diffuser
US3012493A (en) * 1957-01-22 1961-12-12 Nl Airconditioning Mij Gebr Va Air-box with grille
US3065685A (en) * 1959-12-03 1962-11-27 Carnes Corp Modular air diffuser
US3097506A (en) * 1961-08-14 1963-07-16 Sr George R Blakesley Air conditioner apparatus
US3111075A (en) * 1961-10-16 1963-11-19 Carrier Corp Air distributing apparatus
US3111013A (en) * 1962-10-03 1963-11-19 Walter D Ammons Air conditioning apparatus for yachts and the like
US3190209A (en) * 1963-03-12 1965-06-22 Gateway Building Products Comp Register for delivery of air
US3274989A (en) * 1963-12-31 1966-09-27 Preway Inc Air heater
US3662668A (en) * 1970-08-24 1972-05-16 Randall W Johnson Bezel inner guide frame
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JPS4863552U (en) * 1971-11-16 1973-08-13
JPS4874631U (en) * 1971-12-20 1973-09-17
JPS5075750U (en) * 1973-11-14 1975-07-02
US4617805A (en) * 1984-11-13 1986-10-21 Yoshida Kogyo K. K. Air conditioner system for building
US20120205077A1 (en) * 2011-02-15 2012-08-16 Trane International Inc. HVAC System with Multipurpose Cabinet for Auxiliary Heat Transfer Components
JP2016044835A (en) * 2014-08-20 2016-04-04 株式会社富士通ゼネラル Air conditioner

Cited By (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2686406A (en) * 1954-08-17 Air conditioner
US2420939A (en) * 1944-10-25 1947-05-20 Westinghouse Electric Corp Air conditioning apparatus
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