US2088813A - Apparatus for preparing gypsum slabs - Google Patents

Apparatus for preparing gypsum slabs Download PDF

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US2088813A
US2088813A US623735A US62373532A US2088813A US 2088813 A US2088813 A US 2088813A US 623735 A US623735 A US 623735A US 62373532 A US62373532 A US 62373532A US 2088813 A US2088813 A US 2088813A
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slurry
gypsum
mixer
belt
mixers
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US623735A
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Carlisle K Roos
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United States Gypsum Co
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United States Gypsum Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B28WORKING CEMENT, CLAY, OR STONE
    • B28BSHAPING CLAY OR OTHER CERAMIC COMPOSITIONS; SHAPING SLAG; SHAPING MIXTURES CONTAINING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIAL, e.g. PLASTER
    • B28B1/00Producing shaped prefabricated articles from the material
    • B28B1/52Producing shaped prefabricated articles from the material specially adapted for producing articles from mixtures containing fibres, e.g. asbestos cement
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B28WORKING CEMENT, CLAY, OR STONE
    • B28BSHAPING CLAY OR OTHER CERAMIC COMPOSITIONS; SHAPING SLAG; SHAPING MIXTURES CONTAINING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIAL, e.g. PLASTER
    • B28B13/00Feeding the unshaped material to moulds or apparatus for producing shaped articles; Discharging shaped articles from such moulds or apparatus
    • B28B13/02Feeding the unshaped material to moulds or apparatus for producing shaped articles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B28WORKING CEMENT, CLAY, OR STONE
    • B28CPREPARING CLAY; PRODUCING MIXTURES CONTAINING CLAY OR CEMENTITIOUS MATERIAL, e.g. PLASTER
    • B28C9/00General arrangement or layout of plant
    • B28C9/02General arrangement or layout of plant for producing mixtures of clay or cement with other materials

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  • This invention relates to gypsum slabs, and to an apparatus for preparing gypsum mixes for molding and casting purposes, such as for the manufacture of gypsum plaster boards and blOCkS.
  • any of these methods of continuous wetting and soaking produce variable results.
  • the usual system of soaking which comprises spraying the surface and passing the mass through a water bath, requires about two to three minutes for completion after which it passes through the slow speed. mechanical, finger-mixing operation which requires about one more minute.
  • the calcined gypsum slurry is then continuously discharged in front of the forming roll.
  • the resultant slurry mix is at times lumpy and usually non-uniform in consistency. This condition is usually due to the fact that the calcined gypsum is never wetted uniformly. It either floats in clumps which are dry inside and wet on the outside, or'it stays on the belt conveyor at the bottom of the water bath, in which event it is partially wet through with a more or less dry layer left at the bottom. Under these conditions the slurry is composed of particles which have been subjected to varying soaking periods.
  • Another object of the invention is to produce a gypsum slab of superior strength in which both foam and vegetable fibers are used in their production.
  • a further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus for carrying out the method, which is practical for the high speed production of gypsum casts; also to improve gypsum slabs and apparatus in other respects hereinafter specified and claimed.
  • FIG. 1 is a plan view of the mixing apparatus
  • Fig. 2 is an elevation of'the mixing apparatus with parts broken away to disclose the construction.
  • the gypsum stucco or plaster of Paris is continuously conveyed from a storage bin, not shown, by a screw conveyor l which is preferably of the ribbon type so that a combined mixing and conveying action is obtained.
  • a screw conveyor l which is preferably of the ribbon type so that a combined mixing and conveying action is obtained.
  • the cover II of the screw conveyor housing is provided with an inlet duct l2, which is connected with a wood fiber hopper l3, the latter being used to contain wood fiber, hair or other types of animal, vegetable or mineral fibers desired to introduce into the plastic mixture.
  • a rotary brush 16 operates upon the rakes l5 adjacent the rear wall of the hopper l3 so as to prevent fiber from packing into the spaces between the rakes l5.
  • the ribbon conveyor intimately mixes the dry plaster of Paris with the fiber and delivers same through a duct l1 into a mixer 40 housing l8.
  • This mixer consists of a circular plate l9 extending in a horizontal plane and having teeth 20 formed on its upper surface in annular rows which operate between annular rows of teeth 2
  • a shaft 22 supporting the plate l9 extends downwardly through the mixer housing and is rotatably received in bearings 23 and 24.
  • the shaft 22 is rotated at a high speed by means of a pulley 25 connected by a belt 26 to a source 55 of power not shown, such as an electric motor.
  • the housing H has a tangential discharge spout 21 and a water inlet pipe 21a connected near the center of rotation of the disc IS.
  • the duct 11 is also located near the center of rotation so that the water and stucco-fiber mixture is thrown outwardly at a high speed between the mixing fingers 20 and 2 I, being discharged as a thin slurry from the spout 21 onto a soaking belt 28, which is preferably constructed of rubber composition or other suitable material.
  • the upper reach of the belt 28 is preferably carried on rollers 29 which form said belt into a trough shape to retain the slurry for a soaking period during the hydration and gel stage where the water completely hydrates 70 the stucco.
  • a driving pulley 30 supports the belt 28 adjacent the mixer housing I8, said pulley being driven by a belt 3
  • the pulley 30 is carried on a shaft 32 and a chain 33 con- 75 nects a sprocket wheel 34 on shaft 32, to asprocket wheel 35 on a shaft 30.
  • a roll 31 having annular flutes or corrugations 38, is carried on the shaft 36 and rotates above the upper reach of the belt 28 so as to spread the slurry out over the belt.
  • I preferably introduce a light weight foam into the slurry at a. point near an idler delivery roller 39 which supports the soaking belt 28.
  • This foam is produced by a foam cell 40 which is mounted above the belt 28 on a frame work 4
  • This foam cell consists of a cylindrical casing upon which is mounted a motor 4la which serves to rapidly rotate beaters inside of the housing 40.
  • a foam solution which may consist of a solution of soapbark and water, is introduced into the housing 40 through an inlet pipe 42, and compressed air may also be introduced into the housing through an inlet pipe 43.
  • the foam produced is delivered from the foam cell 40 through a duct 44 which is provided with a rotary feeder 45 and control slides 46. The foam is deposited in a uniform manner by the feeder 45 onto the top of the slurry carried by the belt 28.
  • the plastic mixture 41 above described is delivered from the belt 28 into a mixer 48, which may be of any desired type. However, I prefer to use the type of mixer disclosed in the patent to Gough, McNeil and Pfeifer No. 1,767,791.
  • This mixer consists of a housing in cylindrical form arranged with its axis vertical.
  • a shaft 48a extends upwardly through the cover 49 of the mixer and is operated by a suitable driving shaft 50 through a.bevel gear 5
  • An opening is provided in the cover 49 to permit the slurry from belt 28 to flow into the mixer.
  • One or more balls 54 are also preferably/contained in the housing to aid in the mixing operation.
  • Outlet spouts 55 formed in the mixer housing discharge the thoroughly mixed plastic material 56 to any desired discharge point, such as on top of a moving sheet of paper 51 which forms one of the paper cover sheets of a plasterboard in a manner well known to the art.
  • the spout 55 may also discharge the plastic mixture into the molds of a block forming machine if desired.
  • wood fiber from hopper I3 is delivered to duct l2 into conveyor housing l0 and thoroughly mixed with dry gypsum stucco bythe ribbon conveyor.
  • Foam is delivered from foam cell 40 through duct 44- and feeder 45 onto the top of the slurry on the belt 28, and the mixture 41 is then delivered into a mixer 48 which completes the mixing operation and delivers the plastic mixture 56 onto a moving sheet of paper 51, the molds of a block molding machine, or other desired discharge point.
  • the use of vegetable fibers in conjunction with the foam and my improved mixing process is especially advantageous in producing gypsum boards having high flexibility, toughness, strength and ability to withstand cracking when nailed near theedges to .a supporting stud.
  • Wood fibers are preferred, but other vegetable fibers such as oat hulls, or animal fibers such as hair, may be used with fair results.
  • Fine wood fibers are preferred having a maximum length of The use of these fibers in con;- junction with the foam in the gypsum mix, increases the strength across the grain of the resulting board by about 22% and lengthwise of the grain, the strength is increased about 32%. At the same time, the weight of the board is decreased by about 10% .over that obtained through the use of foam alone.
  • a foaming agent may be added to the dry stucco, either as a solution or in powder form to the first mixer, or in a dry or solution form to the slurry on the soak belt.
  • dry foaming agents or gas entrainers, soapbark, saponin or blood albumen are suitable.
  • Foam;- ing agents which may be introduced as solutions are glue,'saponin, resin soap, or a floatation oil, such as pine oil.
  • a mechanical mixer means for introducing powdered, calcined gypsum and water into said mixer, a soak belt of substantial length arranged to receive the slurry discharged from said mixer, means for depositing foam onto said belt, and a second mechanical mixer arranged to receive the slurry and foam from said belt and deliver mixed slurry to a discharge point.
  • a pairof mechanical mixers in spaced relation, .a soak belt connecting said mixers, means for introducing calcined gypsum, fiber and water into one of said mixers, said belt being arranged to receive slurry from said first mixer and deliver slurry into said second mixer, and means for depositing foam onto said belt.
  • a continuously moving soaking conveyor between said mixers, means for introducing water and calcined gypsum into one of said mixers, said conveyor being arranged to cause the soaking of the slurry-produced by said first mixer for a substantial period during the travel of said slurry to the second of said mixers, and means for depositing foam on the slurry carried by said conveyor.
  • An apparatus for preparing gypsum slurry comprising spaced mixers, a conveyor disposed therebetween, and means for introducing powdered calcined gypsum and water into one of said mixers wherefrom the resultant slurry is discharged upon said conveyor, the latter being of considerable length so as to require suflicient time to transport the slurry to another of said mixers in order to allow the water to hydrate the gypsum while being conveyed to said second mixer to which the slurry is then delivered.
  • An apparatus for preparing a gypsum slurry comprising spaced mixers, a substantially horizontal conveyor disposed therebetween, and
  • An apparatus for preparing gypsum mixes which comprises a plurality of mixers that are spaced a considerable distance apart, means for v introducing powdered calcined gypsum, water, and fibers into one of said mixers, and a horizontally disposed soak belt subtending said mixers and upon which the resultant slurry. is delivered from said first mixer, said soak belt being of considerable length so as to require sufficient time to transport the slurry to another of said spaced mixers in order to allow the gypsum to become hydrated, said second mixer being arranged to receive the slurry discharged from said soak belt after hydrationof the gypsum.

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  • Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Chemical & Material Sciences (AREA)
  • Manufacturing & Machinery (AREA)
  • Ceramic Engineering (AREA)
  • Mechanical Engineering (AREA)
  • Dispersion Chemistry (AREA)
  • Preparation Of Clay, And Manufacture Of Mixtures Containing Clay Or Cement (AREA)

Description

c. K, ROOS Aug. 3, 1937.
' APPARATUS FOR PREPARING GYPSUM SLABS Original Filed Jan. 29, 1952 w s w. m R Y 0R E T N NK R v .T m M 1 we R. I I m l HY mm. fl B 3 mm D Qww m v Q I mm WW 8 m 1 w w 8 om NW 1.0M. m v z n. ww mw Patented Aug. 3, 1937 UNl'FED STATES time PATENT OFFlCE.
Carlisle K. Roos, Wheaton, Ill., assignor to United States Gypsum Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Original application January 29, 1932, Serial No.
Divided and this application July 21,
1932, Serial No. 623,735. In Canada March 23,
8 Claims.
This invention relates to gypsum slabs, and to an apparatus for preparing gypsum mixes for molding and casting purposes, such as for the manufacture of gypsum plaster boards and blOCkS.
Heretofore it has been customary to pass a layer of dry calcined gypsum, one or more'inches in height, through a water bath in a continuous manner for the purpose of wetting the mass. Another system of soaking the calcined gypsum in acontinuous manner on an endless .rubber belt, consists in applying a water spray to the top surface of the dry calcined gypsum either with or without subsequently passing it through a water bath.
Any of these methods of continuous wetting and soaking produce variable results. For example, in the preparation of a calcined gypsum slurry for the formation of gypsu p as r the usual system of soaking which comprises spraying the surface and passing the mass through a water bath, requires about two to three minutes for completion after which it passes through the slow speed. mechanical, finger-mixing operation which requires about one more minute. The calcined gypsum slurry is then continuously discharged in front of the forming roll.
The resultant slurry mix is at times lumpy and usually non-uniform in consistency. This condition is usually due to the fact that the calcined gypsum is never wetted uniformly. It either floats in clumps which are dry inside and wet on the outside, or'it stays on the belt conveyor at the bottom of the water bath, in which event it is partially wet through with a more or less dry layer left at the bottom. Under these conditions the slurry is composed of particles which have been subjected to varying soaking periods. Consequently, the degree of-hydration and character vide gypsum slabs and an appartus for preparing gypsum mixes consisting of a combination of apparatus which will produce a molding slurry which is smooth and free from lumps and is also of uniform consistency resulting in casts having a uniform density, high' strength and uniform hydration and crystallization.
Another object of the invention is to produce a gypsum slab of superior strength in which both foam and vegetable fibers are used in their production.
A further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus for carrying out the method, which is practical for the high speed production of gypsum casts; also to improve gypsum slabs and apparatus in other respects hereinafter specified and claimed. v
Reference is to be had to theaccompanying drawing forming apart of this specification, in which 20 Fig. 1 is a plan view of the mixing apparatus,
and Fig. 2 is an elevation of'the mixing apparatus with parts broken away to disclose the construction.
This application is a division of my application Serial No. 589,591, filed January 29, 1932 entitled Gypsum slabs I and method of manufacturing same.
I have found that by thoroughly and uniformlywetting calcined gypsum almost instantaneously and then allowing it to remain quiescent for two to five 'minutes during the hydration and gel stage, several advantages are obtained, particularly if the slurry is then treated with a high speed mixing operation for a period of fifteen to forty seconds. There are no non-balanced stresses set up in the cast due to delayed or nonuniform crystallization, or uneven density to cause warping of the finished cast which occurs in operations where un-uniform hydration and crystallization are present. Furthermore, the fluidity of the slurry stream is uniform and free from lumps. As a result higher tensile and compressional value are obtained consistently.
I have also found that relatively high speed agitation of the mass after soaking increases the strength of the gypsum cast as compared to the strength obtained from gypsum slurries prepared by the finger mixer and other types of slow agitation means. The following table shows the effect of speed of agitation on the strength of but agitated at various speeds:
Tensile strength lbs. per inch Compressive strength Method of mixing lbs. per inch 10 Pounds No mixing Hand mixing Agitation at 164 R. P. M Agitation at 1,000 R. P. M
Pounds The effect of high speed agitation is apparently one of producing a more homogeneous mix and intimate contact of crystal edges in the hardened cast.
In carrying out the method, the gypsum stucco or plaster of Paris is continuously conveyed from a storage bin, not shown, by a screw conveyor l which is preferably of the ribbon type so that a combined mixing and conveying action is obtained. At one position, the cover II of the screw conveyor housing is provided with an inlet duct l2, which is connected with a wood fiber hopper l3, the latter being used to contain wood fiber, hair or other types of animal, vegetable or mineral fibers desired to introduce into the plastic mixture. An endless conveyor l4, having rakes I5,fpasses through the fiber hopper l3 and delivers 'a continuous stream of fiber through the chute 12 into the screw conveyor housing. A rotary brush 16 operates upon the rakes l5 adjacent the rear wall of the hopper l3 so as to prevent fiber from packing into the spaces between the rakes l5. The ribbon conveyor intimately mixes the dry plaster of Paris with the fiber and delivers same through a duct l1 into a mixer 40 housing l8.
- Various types of mixing devices may be used for intimately mixing this fiber-stucco mixture with water, but I prefer the type of mixer disclosed in the patent to Pfeffer and Trotter No. 1,758,200.
,5 This mixer consists of a circular plate l9 extending in a horizontal plane and having teeth 20 formed on its upper surface in annular rows which operate between annular rows of teeth 2| rigidly formed to the bottom face of the housing.
50 cover 18. A shaft 22 supporting the plate l9 extends downwardly through the mixer housing and is rotatably received in bearings 23 and 24. The shaft 22 is rotated at a high speed by means of a pulley 25 connected by a belt 26 to a source 55 of power not shown, such as an electric motor. The housing H has a tangential discharge spout 21 and a water inlet pipe 21a connected near the center of rotation of the disc IS. The duct 11 is also located near the center of rotation so that the water and stucco-fiber mixture is thrown outwardly at a high speed between the mixing fingers 20 and 2 I, being discharged as a thin slurry from the spout 21 onto a soaking belt 28, which is preferably constructed of rubber composition or other suitable material. The upper reach of the belt 28 is preferably carried on rollers 29 which form said belt into a trough shape to retain the slurry for a soaking period during the hydration and gel stage where the water completely hydrates 70 the stucco. A driving pulley 30 supports the belt 28 adjacent the mixer housing I8, said pulley being driven by a belt 3| leading from a source of power, such as an electric motor. The pulley 30 is carried on a shaft 32 and a chain 33 con- 75 nects a sprocket wheel 34 on shaft 32, to asprocket wheel 35 on a shaft 30. A roll 31 having annular flutes or corrugations 38, is carried on the shaft 36 and rotates above the upper reach of the belt 28 so as to spread the slurry out over the belt.
In order to lower the density of the resulting cast, I preferably introduce a light weight foam into the slurry at a. point near an idler delivery roller 39 which supports the soaking belt 28.
This foam is produced by a foam cell 40 which is mounted above the belt 28 on a frame work 4|. This foam cell consists of a cylindrical casing upon which is mounted a motor 4la which serves to rapidly rotate beaters inside of the housing 40. A foam solution, which may consist of a solution of soapbark and water, is introduced into the housing 40 through an inlet pipe 42, and compressed air may also be introduced into the housing through an inlet pipe 43. The foam produced is delivered from the foam cell 40 through a duct 44 which is provided with a rotary feeder 45 and control slides 46. The foam is deposited in a uniform manner by the feeder 45 onto the top of the slurry carried by the belt 28.
The plastic mixture 41 above described, is delivered from the belt 28 into a mixer 48, which may be of any desired type. However, I prefer to use the type of mixer disclosed in the patent to Gough, McNeil and Pfeifer No. 1,767,791. This mixer consists of a housing in cylindrical form arranged with its axis vertical. A shaft 48a extends upwardly through the cover 49 of the mixer and is operated by a suitable driving shaft 50 through a.bevel gear 5| and bevel pinion 52, so as to operate mixing elements 53 contained within the housing of the mixer. An opening is provided in the cover 49 to permit the slurry from belt 28 to flow into the mixer. One or more balls 54 are also preferably/contained in the housing to aid in the mixing operation. Outlet spouts 55 formed in the mixer housing discharge the thoroughly mixed plastic material 56 to any desired discharge point, such as on top of a moving sheet of paper 51 which forms one of the paper cover sheets of a plasterboard in a manner well known to the art. The spout 55 may also discharge the plastic mixture into the molds of a block forming machine if desired.
In the operation of the apparatus, wood fiber from hopper I3 is delivered to duct l2 into conveyor housing l0 and thoroughly mixed with dry gypsum stucco bythe ribbon conveyor. The
mixture is delivered by duct l1 into the mixerhousing I8 near the center of rotation of disc 19,- and water is also introduced into said housing through pipe 21a. The materials are thrown outwardly at a high speed between teeth 20 and 2| to accomplish a. preliminary mixing, and the resulting slurry is delivered by spout. 21 onto the soaking belt 28, being spread evenly over the belt by the corrugated roll 31. The thin slurry is carried forwardly on soaking belt 28 where the water thoroughly hydrates the plaster of Paris in the mixture. Foam is delivered from foam cell 40 through duct 44- and feeder 45 onto the top of the slurry on the belt 28, and the mixture 41 is then delivered into a mixer 48 which completes the mixing operation and delivers the plastic mixture 56 onto a moving sheet of paper 51, the molds of a block molding machine, or other desired discharge point.
The use of vegetable fibers in conjunction with the foam and my improved mixing process is especially advantageous in producing gypsum boards having high flexibility, toughness, strength and ability to withstand cracking when nailed near theedges to .a supporting stud. In practice, I prefer to use about 25 lbs. of fibers per 1000 sq. ft. of board but this proportion can be varied between 10 and '75 lbs. with 'good results. Wood fibers are preferred, but other vegetable fibers such as oat hulls, or animal fibers such as hair, may be used with fair results. Fine wood fibers are preferred having a maximum length of The use of these fibers in con;- junction with the foam in the gypsum mix, increases the strength across the grain of the resulting board by about 22% and lengthwise of the grain, the strength is increased about 32%. At the same time, the weight of the board is decreased by about 10% .over that obtained through the use of foam alone.
Instead of adding foam to the gypsum water mixture, a foaming agent may be added to the dry stucco, either as a solution or in powder form to the first mixer, or in a dry or solution form to the slurry on the soak belt. As dry foaming agents, or gas entrainers, soapbark, saponin or blood albumen are suitable. Foam;- ing agents which may be introduced as solutions are glue,'saponin, resin soap, or a floatation oil, such as pine oil.
I would state in conclusion that while the illustrated examples constitute practical embodiments of my invention, I do not wish to limit myself precisely to these details, since manifestly,
the same may be considerably varied without departing from the spirit of the invention as definedin the appended claims. Having thus described my invention, I claim 7 as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent:----- a pair of mechanical mixers in spaced relation,
1. In an apparatus for preparing gypsum mixes, a mechanical mixer, means for introducing powdered, calcined gypsum and water into said mixer, a soak belt of substantial length arranged to receive the slurry discharged from said mixer, means for depositing foam onto said belt, and a second mechanical mixer arranged to receive the slurry and foam from said belt and deliver mixed slurry to a discharge point.
2. In an apparatus for preparing gypsum mixes, a pairof mechanical mixers in spaced relation, .a soak belt connecting said mixers, means for introducing calcined gypsum, fiber and water into one of said mixers, said belt being arranged to receive slurry from said first mixer and deliver slurry into said second mixer, and means for depositing foam onto said belt.
'3. In an apparatus for preparing gypsum mixes,
a continuously moving soaking conveyor between said mixers, means for introducing water and calcined gypsum into one of said mixers, said conveyor being arranged to cause the soaking of the slurry-produced by said first mixer for a substantial period during the travel of said slurry to the second of said mixers, and means for depositing foam on the slurry carried by said conveyor.
4. An apparatus for preparing gypsum slurry comprising spaced mixers, a conveyor disposed therebetween, and means for introducing powdered calcined gypsum and water into one of said mixers wherefrom the resultant slurry is discharged upon said conveyor, the latter being of considerable length so as to require suflicient time to transport the slurry to another of said mixers in order to allow the water to hydrate the gypsum while being conveyed to said second mixer to which the slurry is then delivered.
5. An apparatus for preparing a gypsum slurry comprising spaced mixers, a substantially horizontal conveyor disposed therebetween, and
means for introducing powdered calcined gypsum and water into one of said mixers wherefrom the resultant slurry is discharged upon said conveyor, the latter being of considerable length so as to allow the slurry to repose in a quiescent state for a suflicient time to transport it to another of said mixers thereby permitting the gypsum to be hydrated while being conveyed to said second mixer to which the slurry is then delivered, said second mixer discharging the 'treate slurry to a discharge point.
6. An apparatus for preparing gypsum mixes which comprises a plurality of mixers that are spaced a considerable distance apart, means for v introducing powdered calcined gypsum, water, and fibers into one of said mixers, and a horizontally disposed soak belt subtending said mixers and upon which the resultant slurry. is delivered from said first mixer, said soak belt being of considerable length so as to require sufficient time to transport the slurry to another of said spaced mixers in order to allow the gypsum to become hydrated, said second mixer being arranged to receive the slurry discharged from said soak belt after hydrationof the gypsum.
7. The combination with a plasterboard ma chine, of means for preparing the gypsum core material, said means comprising a plurality of mixers that are spaced a considerable distance apart, means for introducing calcined gypsum and water into one of said mixers, and a horizontally disposed soak belt subtending said mixers and upon which the resultant slurry-is delivered from said first .mixer said soak belt being of considerable length so as. to require sufficient time to transport the slurry to another of said spaced mixers in order to allow the gypsum to become hydrated, said second mixer being arranged to receivethe slurry discharged from said soak belt after hydration of the gypsum and to deliver the same after mixing to said plasterboard machine.
8; The combination with a plasterboard machine, of means for preparing the gypsum core material, said means comprising mixers spaced a considerable distance from each other, a substantially horizontal conveyor disposed between the mixers, means for introducing powdered calcined gypsum and water into one of said mixers at one end of said conveyor, the resultant slurry being discharged from said first mixer upon said conveyor and the latter being of considerable length so as to require sufficient time to transport the slurry to another of said mixers which is disposed at the discharge end of said conveyor whereby the water is allowed to hydrate the gypsum while the slurry is being conveyed to said second mixer, means for depositing a tenacious foam upon said conveyor whereupon the foam and the slurry, after the gypsum therein contained has been hydrated, is then delivered to said second mixer, and means for delivering the mixture to the plasterboard machine.
. CARLISIE K. ROOS..
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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2940505A (en) * 1952-10-16 1960-06-14 British Plaster Board Ltd Production of plaster board
US3231438A (en) * 1963-04-03 1966-01-25 Plastitect Ets Method of and apparatus for producing laminated elements
US3459620A (en) * 1965-10-11 1969-08-05 United States Gypsum Co Apparatus for producing cast gypsum articles
US4117070A (en) * 1977-03-14 1978-09-26 United States Gypsum Company Process for preparing calcined gypsum
US4257710A (en) * 1978-02-08 1981-03-24 Saint Gobain Industries Continuous process mixing of pulverized solids and liquids and mixing apparatus
US20080101151A1 (en) * 2006-11-01 2008-05-01 United States Gypsum Company Apparatus and method for wet mixing cementitious slurry for fiber-reinforced structural cement panels
US20080099171A1 (en) * 2006-11-01 2008-05-01 United States Gypsum Company Process and apparatus for feeding cementitious slurry for fiber-reinforced structural cement panels
US20080099133A1 (en) * 2006-11-01 2008-05-01 United States Gypsum Company Panel smoothing process and apparatus for forming a smooth continuous surface on fiber-reinforced structural cement panels
US20080223258A1 (en) * 2007-03-12 2008-09-18 Robert Bruce Method and System for Manufacturing Lightweight, High-Strength Gypsum Products
US7524386B2 (en) 2006-11-01 2009-04-28 United States Gypsum Company Method for wet mixing cementitious slurry for fiber-reinforced structural cement panels
EP3912779A4 (en) * 2019-04-15 2022-03-16 Yoshino Gypsum Co., Ltd. Pretreatment mixing stirrer, gypsum slurry manufacturing device, construction surface material manufacturing device, pretreatment calcined gypsum manufacturing method, gypsum slurry manufacturing method, construction surface material manufacturing method

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2940505A (en) * 1952-10-16 1960-06-14 British Plaster Board Ltd Production of plaster board
US3231438A (en) * 1963-04-03 1966-01-25 Plastitect Ets Method of and apparatus for producing laminated elements
US3459620A (en) * 1965-10-11 1969-08-05 United States Gypsum Co Apparatus for producing cast gypsum articles
US4117070A (en) * 1977-03-14 1978-09-26 United States Gypsum Company Process for preparing calcined gypsum
US4257710A (en) * 1978-02-08 1981-03-24 Saint Gobain Industries Continuous process mixing of pulverized solids and liquids and mixing apparatus
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