US2073107A - Well testing method and apparatus therefor - Google Patents

Well testing method and apparatus therefor Download PDF

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US2073107A
US2073107A US726583A US72658334A US2073107A US 2073107 A US2073107 A US 2073107A US 726583 A US726583 A US 726583A US 72658334 A US72658334 A US 72658334A US 2073107 A US2073107 A US 2073107A
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valve
packer
string
fluid
tubing
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US726583A
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Mordica O Johnston
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Mordica O Johnston
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B49/00Testing the nature of borehole walls; Formation testing; Methods or apparatus for obtaining samples of soil or well fluids, specially adapted to earth drilling or wells
    • E21B49/08Obtaining fluid samples or testing fluids, in boreholes or wells
    • E21B49/081Obtaining fluid samples or testing fluids, in boreholes or wells with down-hole means for trapping a fluid sample

Description

March 9, 1937.

M. O. JOHNSTON WELL TESTING METHOD AND APPARATUS THEREFOR Filed May 19; 1934 3 Sheets-Iiiheet l M INVENTOR.

1702mm 0. Jbfi/VSTON I BY ATTORNEY.

i W W .12 d w Ill- I. 1 VI\/ u I z 6 0 1 F 7 87 95 w sa w ww W 0M5 a 224 W, A 54/22 2 Z /Z A v Iii 2 I 6 3 V 7 4 a m ov F 1 March 9, 1937. JQHNSTON 2,073,107-

WELL TESTING METHOD AND APPARATUS THEREFOR Filed May 19, 1934 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fig 4 If? 5' Z Z Z4 r1 7? 67 we 68 W? M-6? 6? INVENTOR.

' 170120104 0. fOH/VSTON ATTORNEY.

March 9, 1937. M, o, JOHNSTON 2,073,107

WELL TESTING METHOD AND APPARATUS THEREFOR Filed May 19, 1934 v 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 r 6. r' 7,

INVENTOR.

229 L Wu 2/. M v ATTORNEY.

Patented Mar. 9, 1937 Mordica o. Johnston, Glendale, Calif.

Application May 19, 1934, Serial No. 728,583

9Claims.

This invention relates to-a method and means for testing oil wells.

In the drilling and production of oil wells and in operations incident to the testing of well casing for fluid shoe leaks. or for the productivity of the formation being penetratedit is desirable to provide means which may be readily introduced into the well through the drilling mud contained therein without necessitating the removal' of the mud and which means may be manipulated to form a fluid seal above the formation or shoe to be tested by setting a packer in the rat hole, or setting the packer against the wall in an open hole, and which, in the case of testing for shoe leaks, involves the setting of the packer in the casing whereby the fluid occurring within the hole above the packer will be excluded from the area from which fluid is withdrawn for making the particular test. In such a device it is also desirable to provide valve means for excluding drilling fluid from the inside of the container designed to receive the sample of testing fluid until the testing tool with its packer has been properly seated after which the valve may be manipulated to admit and then entrap a sample fluid within the tool, which sample is then withdrawn with the tool. In lowering a testing tool containing a packer through the drilling fluid within the hole considerable difliculty is often experienced in forcing the tool downwardly through the fluid since the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid within the hole and the fluid consistency has a tendency to expand the packer and resist its downward movement, making it desirable to provide means for bypassing the fluid through the packer until the packer registers with the area at which it is to be set. In deep wells the pressure exerted by the hydrostatic head of drilling fluid within the hole has also a. tendency to produce collapsing of the tubing string by which the tool is carried and it is desirable to provide means controllable by the operator above ground by which resistance to said collapsing force may be maintained and controlled.

It is the principal object of the present invention therefore to provide a testing tool for oil wells and the like, and a method of manipulating the same whereby the tool may be readily lowered into the well bore without difilculty even against the pressure of the mud fluid therein and while maintaining a desired resistance to the external pressure of the mud fluid upon the tubing spring, and to thereafter set the packer carried thereby and control and manipulate the tool and its valves so that a sample of the fluid from beneath the packed off area may be en trapped in the tool and its tubing string and may then be removed from the hole.

The present invention contemplates the provision of a tubing string at the lower end of which a testing tool is mounted, said testing tool being characterized as comprising a packer formed with means for permitting a bypass of fluid therethrough, valve means for establishing or interrupting said bypass, a valve structure for admitting a sample of fluid to the drill string, and valve means for entrapping a sample of fluid within the string to be withdrawn therewith.

The invention is illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawings in'which:

Figure 1 is a view in vertical section and elevation with parts broken away showing a form of my invention with the parts in the relationship they assume while the tool is lowered into a well,

Fig. 2 is a view in vertical section and eleva-' tion showing the form of the invention disclosed in Fig. 1 with the packer seated on or in the rat hole with the valve parts of the packer bypass closed and further disclosing the main valve open and the trip valve for admitting the sample in the drill string as tripped.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view in section showing parts of the device disclosed in Figs. 1 and 2, with portions broken away to show the manipulation of the main valve as it stands in a closed position to entrap the sample.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary view in section and elevation showing the application of a hook wall packer to the testing device to adapt the structure for use in making casing shoe tests and with parts broken away to more particularly disclose the bypass arrangement through the packer.

Fig. 5 is a view in vertical section showing parts disclosed in Fig. 4 with the hook wall packer set in the casing and the bypass valve closed.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary view in central vertical section showing the construction of the trip valve with the valve closed. Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 6 showing the construction of the trip valve with the valve...

Fig. 8 is a horizontal setcional view taken 'n the line 0-8 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 9 is a horizontal sectional 'viewtaken'on the line 9-9 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 10 is a horizontal sectional view taken "on I the line |0l0 of Fig. 1, I

Fig. 11 is an enlarged detail view of the central sectioned portion of Fig. 3 illustrating the construction of the main valve and the associated 1 parts. I

Fig. 12 is an enlarged detail view of the lower sectioned portion of Fig. 3 illustrating the construction of the lower reciprocating mandrel and the by-pass valve.

Referring more particularly to the drawings,

l0 indicates a well bore. In Figs. 1 to 3, inclusive the bore is shown as an open hole while in Figs.

4 and 5 the bore i0 is shown as fitted with a well casing H. In open hole tests it is usually desirable to effect a seal-off of the drilling fluid at the rat hole as indicated at I2 in Fig. 2 of the drawings. This is accomplished by the use of a conically shaped rat hole packer l9 which substantially conforms to the tapered face of the rat hole shoulder. The packer I3 is here shown as mounted on a tubular member I4 which is threaded into a cap l5 at its lower end. The cap carries a perforated nipple I5. The upper end of the tubular packing element I4 receives a collar I! into which the member I4 is threaded. This collar has a central tubular opening receiving a bottom sub l8 which is threaded into the opening of the collar and is formed with a central passageway I 9 therethrough. A tubular sleeve 20 is threaded on to the upper end of the sub I8 and is formed with a central bore divided at a point intermediate its ends by an annular valve shoulder 2|. The bore thus includes a lower portion 22 and an upper portion 23. Extending downwardly through the tubular sleeve 20 and into the lower bore 22 is a tubular mandrel 24. This mandrel reciprocates within the sleeve 29 and is formed at its lower end with an enlarged head 25 which moves from a lower position abutting against the upper face of sub 18 to an upper position defined by the valve shoulder 2|. A packing nut 25 is threaded into the upper end of the tubular member 20 and is formed with an annular recess opening into the central bore and in its upper face with ducts 25' communicating with the annular recess, for a purpose to be hereinafter described, and serves to hold packing 21 in position around the man drel 24 and within the packing gland 23. The upper end of the tubular mandrel 24 is fitted with a bottom collar 28 having a central compartment 29 therein. This compartment provides a passageway in continuation of the tube 24 and also serves as a housing for a main valve 30. This valve is formed with a central passageway 3| normally closed by a ball circulating valve 32 held on its seat by spring 33 which is enclosed within a valve cage 34. An adjusting screw 35 is threaded into the end of the valve cage 34 and acts at the lower end of the spring to provide adjustable compression of this spring. The circulating valve structure is provided as an emergency when it becomes necessary to produce drilling fluid circulation under some circumstances. The main valve member 30 is formed with a tapered shoulder adapted to normally abut against a removable valve seat 36. This seat is held in place at the lower end of a packing sleeve 38 through which a tubular mandrel 39 extends. The tubular mandrel is threaded on to a cylindrical extension of the main valve 30 and moves therewith.

Directly above the valve shoulder 49 of the main valve 30 is formed a plurality of ducts 4|. These ducts are normally closed by the main valve when on its seat and they communicate with the central passageway 3| leading from the compartment 29 into the interior of the tubular mandrel 39. These ducts as shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings are normally closed so that there is no communication between the compartment 29 and the interior of the mandrel 39. An ex pansion spring 42 mounted on the mandrel 39 and interposed between an adjustable threaded collar 43 and the end face of a trip valve sleeve 44 tends to hold the main valve shoulder 49 on its seat. The adjustable cap 43 may be manipulated to vary the tension of the spring. The

tubular mandrel 39 s limited in its downward movement by a key 45 mounted in the tubular mandrel 39 at a point intermediate its ends and operating in a key way 45. The sleeve 44 which is threaded on to the upper end of the tubular mandrel 39 may be directly connected to the lower end of a trip valve housing 46' or to a pipe coupling 41 by which a desired length of'drill pipe 48 may be interposed between the sleeve 44 and the main length of drill pipe which is secured by its lower end to the upper end of the trip valve housing 48' by a coupling 49.

The length of the drill string generally indicated in Figs. 1 to 3, inclusive, by the numeral 48 may be as desired in order to provide a space into which an amount of drilling fluid may be accumulated for the purpose of preventing a collapse of the drill string when inserted into a relatively deep well at which time the hydrostatic pressure of the drill fluid in the hole might tend to collapse the string. When such conditions are anticipated the length of the drill string 48 between the sleeve 44 and the check valve housing 46' is filled with drilling fluid. Due to the expansive action of the spring 42 this fluid is maintained in this section of drill string until a trip valve ball 59 is released from its seat 5| at the lower end of the trip valve housing 45'. This valve is normally held on its seat by a valve body 52 which is locked in position by retaining balls 53. These balls are positioned in openings 54 through the tubular side walls of the valve body 52 and are normally held in their outermost position by a cylindrical plunger 55 which is slidably mounted and set within the tubular extending portion of the valve body 52. In this position the valve body will be prevented from moving upwardly since the balls 53 engage a lower end shoulder of retaining sleeve 55. A spring collar 51 is disposed in an annular recess around the tubular extension of the valve body and provides a lock which will be hereinafter described. The plunger 55 is formed with an enlarged head 58 at its upper end. This head has ducts 59 in it which lead downwardly and communicate with a central duct 60 of the plunger so that under certain conditions the fluid in the testing device can pass upwardly through the ducts 50 and 59 and into the drill string, such as would be the case in taking a sample within the tool.

At a point intermediate the ends of the plunger 55 is a recess 6i. This recess circumscribes the plunger and when the plunger is depressed moves to a position where the balls 53 may move inwardly on the inclined faces of their seat at the bottom of the retaining sleeve 56 and thus permit the valve body and the plunger with the balls locked in place to move upwardly under the expansive action of spring 52 at which time the spring collar 51 will move clear of the end of the retaining sleeve 55 and will lock the trip valve structure in its opened position so that the valve will not be closed again even though the circulating pumps are set in operation. The lower end of the plunger reciprocates within the tubular recess of the valve body 52 and since this body is formed with a plurality of ducts 53 which communicate with the interior of the valve body a fiow of fluid may be established through the valve seat 5| and within the valve housing 45, and thence upwardly through the ducts of the drawings, the sub I8 is indicated as being fitted with the top collar H. In this particular instance, however, a packer of the hooked wall type is provided so that the devicemay be used in connection with the tests of well casing, such as casing II. The member I1 is formed at its lower end with an enlarged shoulder forming a valve member 64. This is preferably tapered and as shown in Fig. 5 of the drawings, may be brought to rest against a seat 65 carried at the upper end of a packer structure 66. This packer structure is here shown as being of the multiple ring type in which a plurality of rings are mounted upon a tubular core 61 through which the tubular mandrel 24 extends and reciprocates. The valve seat 65 is threaded on to the upper end of the tubular core 67. The lower end of this core carries an expanding cone 68 for slips 69. These slips are secured by slip reins T0 to a slip collar H mounted upon a tubular sleeve 12. The sleeve is formed with a bayonet slot 73 and a bayonet pin 14 by which the sleeve is temporarily locked in an inoperative position. This sleeve receives the lower end of bow anchor springs 15, the upper ends of which are secured to a collar 16 mounted on the sleeve 12. The mandrel 24 with its pins 14 may be rotated from the top of the well by rotation of the drill string and the various parts of the tool since the tubular mandrel 24 is keyed to the sleeve 20. by a key as shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings, and as further disclosed in a transverse section through the mandrel, as seen.

in Fig. 8 of the drawings. y

In operation of the form of the device shown in Figs. 1 to 3 of the drawings, the structure is aswithout undue resistance from the fluid therein and without possibility that the packer will disturb the formation of the wall. If the hydrostatic head within the hole does not justify the precaution of resisting the collapsing action of the drill. string due to fluid pressure within the hole the trip valve housing 46 may be connected directly to the sub 41; If, however, the hole is a relatively deep one and there is danger of damage from excessive external pressure against the drill string within the hole a string of pipe as generally indicated at 48 may be connected to the sub.4'| and extended upwardly into the hole to any desired and required distance, after which the length of drill string 48 may be filled with fluid mud which will be retained in the length of drill string 48 by the closed valve 30. This distance is carefully measured and noted so that the amount of drilling fluid above the sample will be known. It is to be understood that the amount of drilling fluid can be first drawn off since the sample of cognate fluid will not form any substantial mixture with the drilling fluid. It is also to be understood that in the event the trip valve housing 46 is directly connected to the sub 41 it is desirable to fill the space within the testing tool above the valve with drill fluid so that when the flow of liquid is admitted into the testing tool .and up the string the pressure of the formation will not create an impact upon the air which would be otherwise entrapped between the trip valve and the main valve. By this arrangement the action in filling the tool and taking a sample will be more gradual than would otherwise be the case and will not impart an undesirable shock or jarring action within the device, or an excessive internal pressure.

After the drill string section 48 or the upper portion of the test tool has been thus supplied with drilling fluid the trip valve 50 with its housing is set in position with the valve closed and additional stands of pipe are successively attached until the tool has been lowered to the formation into which the test is to be made. In the form of the device shown in Figs. 1 to 3of the drawings the tool will be lowered until the packer I3 is seated firmly on the tapered shoulder of the rat hole I2. As the tool is being lowered into the hole the weight of the packer, the sub !8, and the sleeve 20 will be such as to cause the sleeve 20 to assume the lowermost position on the mandrel 24 so that the ducts'24' will communicate with the ducts 26 through the packing nut 26. Thus it will be evident that there will be a flow of fluid upwardly through the perforated nipple 16, the tube l4, the tube collar I I, the sub l8, and the tubular mandrel 24 and into the well bore above the packer. This will form a continuous bypass for the fluid until the packer is securely pressed onto its seat at which time the mandrel 24 will move downwardly-within the sleeve 20 from the position shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings to the position shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings. This will insure that the ducts will then be sealed by the collar 2| by which they are covered. Circulation through the packer bypass valve will thus be completely interrupted preparatory to making a test. At this time the main valve 30 is held in its seated position by the spring 42. It is not always necessary to maintain the main valve 30 closed until a sample is to be taken, as the trip valve will prevent upward passage of the drilling fluid into the string or tool above the said trip valve until the latter is tripped. Assuming, however, that the spring 42 has held the valve closed, additional weight of the drill string imposed upon thevalve structure and upon the-packer l3 will tend to compress the spring 42 opening the valve 30 by moving it from its seat 36. This will allow fluid from the formation to pass upwardly through the packer and enter against the fluid which has been previously placed within the tool and the string 48, and held in its entrapped position by the closed valve 30. The operation of this main valve, however, willnot permit a sample to be taken until the trip valve 50 is operated.

When it is determined to take the test, a godevil, such for example as a bar of metal, is dropped downwardly through the drill string and encounters the head 58 of the trip plunger 55. This will cause the plunger to move downwardly within the valve body 52 until the annular recess 6| around the plunger acts to register with the balls 53. At this time the spring 62 will force the valve body 52 upwardly since the retaining balls 53 have moved inwardly to nonlocking positions. As the spring forces the valve body upwardly the ball 50 will be relieved from its seat and the fluid within the string of pipe 48 and the tool beneath the trip valve will be forced upwardly through the ducts 4| of the valve 30 into the mandrel 39 and thence through the members 44, 41, and 48 to the trip valve housing 46, after which the fluid will pass upwardly through the ducts 63 into the valve body and thence through ducts and 59 into the is.to be taken the sample may be interrupted by lifting the drill string which will relieve pressure on the spring 42 and cause the main valve 30 to be drawn against its seat 38. This will entrap the sample. Further lifting action will cause the packer bypass valve to open again so that the withdrawal of the packer will be facilitated, and allowing drilling fluid to again kill the well, It will therefore be evident that three valve actions are involved in the operation as described in the foregoing, one concerned with the bypass of fluid through the packer until it it seated as controlled by the relative movement of sleeve 20 and the mandrel 24, one is the opening of the valve 30 which action may in some cases be eliminated, the third is the opening of the trip valve to admit the sample, and the fourth operation is the closing of the valve 30 to entrap the sample.

In the operation of the form of the invention shown in Figs. 4 and 5 of the drawings the structure will be assembled as previously explained. The rat hole packer i3 is substituted by the packer 86 which may be set within the well casing II. In placing the testing tool equipped with the packer 68 within the well casing the valves are arranged and operated as previously described. It will be evident that as the tool goes into the hole in the position shown in Fig. 4 that the lock pin 14 will be latched with relation to the bayonet slot 13 and will positively hold the valve member 64 out of register with the 'valve seat 65. Thus it will be possible for the fluid to pass upwardly through the passageway 11 of the expanding cone 68 and then through the sleeve 81 of the packer. During the downward movement of the testing tool the bow springs 15 will frictionally engage the side walls of the casing H with suflicient force to make it possible for the drill stem to be manipulated by rotation of the member 24 with relation to the member 20 to which it is keyed at 20 so that as the bow springs 15 and associated parts are frictionally held against movement both longitudinally and rotationally the pin I4 may be moved out of its locking position at the end of the bayonet slot 13 and moved to a position where the pin will be aligned with the longitudinal portion of the bayonet slot. After this has been accomplished the weight of the drill string may be imposed upon the member 24 so that it will be moveddownwardly to permit the valve member 64 to rest upon the seat 65. This will cause the flow of fluid through the packing and the valve seat 65 to be interrupted and as the weight is maintained on the valve seat 65 the packer will tend to move downwardly forcing the expanding cone 68 with it.

" The expanding cone will force the slips 69 outwardly to cause them to engage the side wall of the casing to lock themselves against further downward movement so that additional weight applied to the valve member 64 will expand the packing 66 and seal the portion of the hole below the packing from the portion of the hole above the packing in which the mud fluid is contained. After this operation has been completed further downward movement of the drill string will force the valve member 30 from its seat 36 and allow the pressure of such fluid which is contained within the portion of the casing below the packing to force its way upwardly in the test section of drill string and below the trip valve 50. The test may then be complete by dropping the go-devil into the drill string so that it will fall and strike the head 58 oi the plunger 85 so that the trip valve 50 will be released from its seat by the spring 62.

It will thus be seen that the well testing apparatus here disclosed provides means for readily introducing a testing tool into a well bore or casing and thereafter setting the same with the packer, whereby the drilling fluid may be excluded from the area of the well bore to be tested, after which the valves in the tool may be manipulated to take a sample and may afterwards be operated to entrap the sample of fluid upon which the test is based.

While I have shown the preferred form of my invention as now known to me, various changes may be made in construction of the apparatus and mode of operation by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention as claimed.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A well testing device comprising a string of tubing, a packer adjacent the lower end thereof, a passageway through the packer and communicating with the string of tubing, a valve adjacent the packer and adapted to be manipulated by the string of tubing, a trip valve above the flrst named valve within the string of tubing, said valve being designed to be opened independently of the first named valve and independently of the movement of the string of tubing, whereby said valve when tripped will admit fluid to pass upwardly through the packer into the string of tubing and said fluid may thereafter be entrapped within the string of tubing by closing the first named valve by manipulation of the tubing string.

2. A well testing device comprising a string of tubing, a packer carried by said string and adapted to be expanded by manipulation of the string to seal oil an area of a well bore, said packer having a passageway therethrough to?- establish communication with the tubing string, a valve interposed between the said passageway and the drill string for opening and closing the same, said valve being actuated by vertical movement of the tubing string, and a second valve disposed above the first named valve and being initially held in a closed position, said second valve being opened by the action of a go-devil dropped through the string of tubing.

3. An oil well testing tool comprising a string of tubing, a packer disposed at the lower end thereof and associated with the tubing in a manner to cause the packer to be set in the hole by manipulation of said tubing, a passageway formed through the packer and communicating with the string of tubing, a valve disposed in said passageway and adapted to be opened and closed by vertical movement of the string of tubing, a trip valve disposed in the string of tubing at a predetermined distance above the first named valve and being initially closed whereby a quantity of fluid may be maintained within the string of tubing and between the valves when the lowermost one of said valves is closed, and whereby the opening of the lower valve will impose the enclosed column of fluid contained within the drill string upon the column of cognate fluid passing upwardly through the packer, and trip means associated with said uppermost valve whereby the opening of said valve will permit the column of fluid within the string of tubing and beneath the trip valve to rise within the string of tubing to be thereafter entrapped by closing the lower valve.

4. An oil well testing tool comprising a string of tubing, a packer disposed at the lower end thereof and associated with the tubing in a manner to cause the packer to be set in the hole by manipulation of said tubing, a passageway formed through the packer and communicating with the string of tubing, a valve disposed in said passageway and adapted to be opened and closed by vertical movement of the string of tubing, a trip valve disposed in the string of tubing at a predetermined distance above the flrst named valve and normally closed whereby a quantity of fluid may be maintained within the string of tubing and between the valves when the lowermost one of said valves is closed, and whereby the opening of the lower valve will impose the enclosed column of fluid contained within the drill string upon the column of cognate fluid passing upwardly through the packer, and trip means associated with said uppermost valve whereby the opening of said valve will permit the column of fluid within the string of tubing and beneath the trip valve to rise within the string of tubing to be thereafter entrapped by closing the lower valve, and means for maintaining the trip valve in its opened position.

5. An oil well testing tool comprising a string of tubing, 9, packer disposed at the lower end thereof and associated with the tubing in a manner to cause the packer to be set in the hole by manipulation of said tubing, apassagewayformed through the packer and communicating with the string of tubing, a valve disposed in said passageway and adapted to be opened and closed'by vertical movement of the string of tubing, a trip valve disposed in the string of tubing at a predetermined distance above the first named valve and normally closed whereby a quantity of fluid may be maintained within the string of tubing and between the valves when the lowermost one of said valves is closed, and whereby the opening of the lower valve will impose the enclosed column of fluid contained within the drill string upon the column of cognate fluid passing upwardly through the packer, and trip means associated with said uppermost valve whereby the opening of said valve will permit the column of fluid within the string of tubing and beneath the trip valve,

to rise within the string of tubing to be thereafter entrapped by closing the lower valve, a bypass passageway through the packer to permit fluid to flow through the packer, and a valve adapted to be manipulated by the string of tubing to close the bypass passageway when the packer is disposed in a seated position within the well bore.

6. An oil well testing device comprising 'a single string of tubing, a trip valve disposed in the lower end thereof and normally closing the same, means associated with said trip valve for holding the valve in an opened position after it has been tripped by the action of a go-devil striking the same, a testing tool connected to said trip valve and disposed therebeneath, said tool including a tubular member opened at its lower end, a packer mounted upon said tubular member, a

valve interposed at a point in the length or said tube, a spring normally holding said valve closed tointerrupt the flow of fluid through the valve, means whereby the valve may be opened and closed by vertical movement of the string or tubing and whereby upward lifting of the string of tubing will consecutively close said valve and then withdraw the packer from its seat.

7. A well testing device comprising a string of tubing, a packer adjacent the lower end thereof, a passageway through the packer to establish communication with the tubing string, a by-pass valve for establishing and interrupting the flow of fluid from the section of well bore below the packing to the section above the packing, a valve valve, and a trip valve located within the string of tubing above the said valves and designed to be opened independently of the flow valve and independently of the movement of the string of tubing.

8. A testing tool of the character described including a tubular member, a packer carried thereby, asecond tubular member telescoping into the tubular member upon which the packer is mounted and communicating therewith, valve means associated with the two tubular members whereby movement of the first tubular member to its lowermost position with relation to the second tubular member will cause a flow of fluid to be established through the first tubular memher and outwardly above the packer into a well bore, and alternate movement of said members with relation to each other will cause said flow to be interrupted and the fluid to be directed consecutively through the two tubular members, and a trip valve within the string of tubing above the said valve designed to be opened independently of the first-mentioned valve and independently of the movement of the string of tubing.

9. A testing tool of the character described including a tubular member, a packer carried thereby, a second tubular member telescoping into the tubular member upon which the packer is mounted and communicating therewith, valve means associated with the two tubular members whereby movement of the first tubular member will cause a flow of fluid to be established through the first tubular member and outwardly above the packer into a well bore, and alternate movement of said members with relation to each other will cause said flow to be interrupted and the fluid to be directed consecutively through the two tubular members, a'tubular continuation of said .second tubular member secured to a string of

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Cited By (20)

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US2621743A (en) * 1947-07-12 1952-12-16 Johnston Testers Inc Side wall tester
US2661802A (en) * 1950-03-09 1953-12-08 Johnston Testers Inc Combined shut-in and back circulation tool
US2674314A (en) * 1948-11-27 1954-04-06 Baker Oil Tools Inc Device for rendering subsurface well apparatus inoperable
US2676661A (en) * 1951-01-04 1954-04-27 Jr Harry H Crooke Pressure releasing valve for test pipes
US2690226A (en) * 1950-12-22 1954-09-28 Leslie H Comstock Equalizing and control valve
US2690227A (en) * 1951-08-10 1954-09-28 Johnston Testers Inc Bottom hole sampler
US2713911A (en) * 1950-09-01 1955-07-26 Johnston Testers Inc Formation testing apparatus for deep wells
US2717646A (en) * 1951-07-05 1955-09-13 Johnston Testers Inc Back circulator apparatus
US2719588A (en) * 1950-04-03 1955-10-04 Johnston Testers Inc Well testing method and apparatus
US2736383A (en) * 1951-03-31 1956-02-28 Sterling P Bedingfield Oil well testing tool
US2737246A (en) * 1953-02-03 1956-03-06 Johnston Testers Inc Hydraulic valve device
US2741314A (en) * 1951-09-11 1956-04-10 Johnston Testers Inc Well testing valve
US2760582A (en) * 1954-07-12 1956-08-28 Johnston Testers Inc Formation testing tool
US2806539A (en) * 1956-02-13 1957-09-17 Halliburton Oil Well Cementing Well tester
US2850097A (en) * 1957-03-11 1958-09-02 Aircushion Patents Corp Method of sampling well fluids
US2856009A (en) * 1956-03-01 1958-10-14 Joe T Foster Well testing apparatus
US3051245A (en) * 1958-08-19 1962-08-28 Johnston Testers Inc Well tools for subsurface flow control
US3152639A (en) * 1960-04-27 1964-10-13 Hailiburton Company Methods and apparatus for testing wells
US3207223A (en) * 1963-04-23 1965-09-21 Hugel Helmut Sample taker of liquids under pressure for formation testing devices
US20040261538A1 (en) * 2001-11-03 2004-12-30 Arthur Arscott Acoustic flow meter in the form of a valve key

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2621743A (en) * 1947-07-12 1952-12-16 Johnston Testers Inc Side wall tester
US2674314A (en) * 1948-11-27 1954-04-06 Baker Oil Tools Inc Device for rendering subsurface well apparatus inoperable
US2661802A (en) * 1950-03-09 1953-12-08 Johnston Testers Inc Combined shut-in and back circulation tool
US2719588A (en) * 1950-04-03 1955-10-04 Johnston Testers Inc Well testing method and apparatus
US2713911A (en) * 1950-09-01 1955-07-26 Johnston Testers Inc Formation testing apparatus for deep wells
US2690226A (en) * 1950-12-22 1954-09-28 Leslie H Comstock Equalizing and control valve
US2676661A (en) * 1951-01-04 1954-04-27 Jr Harry H Crooke Pressure releasing valve for test pipes
US2736383A (en) * 1951-03-31 1956-02-28 Sterling P Bedingfield Oil well testing tool
US2717646A (en) * 1951-07-05 1955-09-13 Johnston Testers Inc Back circulator apparatus
US2690227A (en) * 1951-08-10 1954-09-28 Johnston Testers Inc Bottom hole sampler
US2741314A (en) * 1951-09-11 1956-04-10 Johnston Testers Inc Well testing valve
US2737246A (en) * 1953-02-03 1956-03-06 Johnston Testers Inc Hydraulic valve device
US2760582A (en) * 1954-07-12 1956-08-28 Johnston Testers Inc Formation testing tool
US2806539A (en) * 1956-02-13 1957-09-17 Halliburton Oil Well Cementing Well tester
US2856009A (en) * 1956-03-01 1958-10-14 Joe T Foster Well testing apparatus
US2850097A (en) * 1957-03-11 1958-09-02 Aircushion Patents Corp Method of sampling well fluids
US3051245A (en) * 1958-08-19 1962-08-28 Johnston Testers Inc Well tools for subsurface flow control
US3152639A (en) * 1960-04-27 1964-10-13 Hailiburton Company Methods and apparatus for testing wells
US3207223A (en) * 1963-04-23 1965-09-21 Hugel Helmut Sample taker of liquids under pressure for formation testing devices
US20040261538A1 (en) * 2001-11-03 2004-12-30 Arthur Arscott Acoustic flow meter in the form of a valve key
US6938497B2 (en) * 2001-11-03 2005-09-06 Rps Water Services Limited Acoustic flow meter in the form of a valve key

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