US2063935A - Siding material - Google Patents

Siding material Download PDF

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Publication number
US2063935A
US2063935A US581336A US58133631A US2063935A US 2063935 A US2063935 A US 2063935A US 581336 A US581336 A US 581336A US 58133631 A US58133631 A US 58133631A US 2063935 A US2063935 A US 2063935A
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Prior art keywords
panel
areas
sheet
panels
coating
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Expired - Lifetime
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US581336A
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Kirschbraun Lester
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Patent and Licensing Corp
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Patent and Licensing Corp
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F13/00Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings
    • E04F13/07Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor
    • E04F13/08Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements
    • E04F13/14Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements stone or stone-like materials, e.g. ceramics concrete; of glass or with an outer layer of stone or stone-like materials or glass
    • E04F13/147Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements stone or stone-like materials, e.g. ceramics concrete; of glass or with an outer layer of stone or stone-like materials or glass with an outer layer imitating natural stone, brick work or the like

Description

Dec. '15, 1936.

L. KIRSCHBRAUN SIDING MATERIAL Filed Dec. 16, 1931 ,5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVEN 0R.

ATTORNEY? 1936- L. KIRSCHBRAUN 2,063,935

SIDING MATERIAL Filed Dec. 16, 1931 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 BY (AW,

ATTORNEYS Dec. 15, 1936. L, KIR HBM N 2,063,935

S IDING MATERIAL Filed Dec. 16, 1931 s Sheets-Sheet 3 IN V EN TOR. ki'nrezaw BY Unlw, 3mm,

A TTORNEYJ Patented Dec. 15, 1936 new smmc mrnamr.

Lester Kirschbraun, Leonia, N. J., assignor to The Patent and Idcensingllorporation, Boston, Mass., a corporation of Massachusetts Application December 16, 1931, Serial No. 581,336

7 Claims.

with wear-resisting material similar to the wellknown asphalt roofing strips. These strips are applied in a series of overlapping courses to sim- 15 ulate brick or other siding constructions.

large amount of overlapping necessitates the use V of approximately twice as much material as the area to be covered. Moreover, because of the flimsiness and flexibility of the strips, the appli- 20 cation of the strips to the sub-structure is awkward and requires a, considerable amount of time and skill in order to properly align them and obtain a reasonably acceptable appearance.

In accordance with my invention the panels 2 are preferably composed of a base of thermoplastic composition board which has considerable mechanical strength, yet is light and rigid. Because of the nature of the base, the panels can be made comparatively large in size whereby a 30 plurality of staggered rows of brick or other simulating surfaces can be embossed thereon. The panels thus produced are waterproof and fire-resistant and will satisfactorily resist exposure to the weather. They are easy to handle 35 on account of their stiffness and light weight and can be applied more rapidly than ordinary strips. Since each unit is of considerable size, the amount of overlapping is substantially reduced thereby effecting a large saving of ma- 40 terial. -The panels made in accordance with my invention are embossed and cut in such manner as to create a highly artistic appearance when laid in place. Furthermore, the panels are self-align- 45 ing and can be applied with facility and speed. The composition boardwhich forms the base material of my novel product may be prepared from a stock comprising a mixture of an aqueous dispersion of thermoplastic waterproofing material with aqueous fibrous pulp together with suitable fillers, substantially as disclosed in Pat- ,ent No. 1,536,399, granted to Lester Kirschbraun May 5, 1925, or in the Patent No. 1,785,357 granted to Levin December 16, 1930; or the board 55 .may be made from any equivalent waterproof The the panel before and after the embossed areas and weather-resistant stock which is capable of being formed into the configuration required for the brick-simulating sheets.

The stock may be sheeted on a wet machine into a web which is then carried by blankets from 5 the fo ing cylinder to the make-up roll where a sheet of desired caliper may be built up. When the web has attained the desired caliper, it is stripped from the make-up roll and dried. The

peripheral dimensions of the make-up roll are preferably such that the sheet stripped therefrom will be of substantially the size of the desired panel or a multiple thereof.

The sheet may then be passed through hot calender rolls, or otherwise treated so as to heat the same to a temperature suficient to cause the particles of waterproofing material to coalesce and. fuse on the fibers, and form a hard, rigid and thermoplastic board-like structure preferably of a thickness ranging from .050" to .080". The board is then .placed between heated male and female dies and subjected to an embossing and cutting operation whereby the board is formed into a panel of the desired shape, size and design. The resulting panel is of substantially uniform thickness throughout.

Similarly useful sheets may be produced on multi-cylinder machines from stocks designed to produce rigid as well as mouldable properties. When the production of more highly fireres'istant products is desired, asbestos fiber is emplayed as the sheet-forming stock.

In order to more clearly comprehend the nature of my invention, reference is made to the following description in conjunction with the 8.0- companying drawings, of which:--

Figure 1 is a plan view of a siding panel made in accordance with my invention.

Figure 2 is a cross-section taken on the line 22 of Figurel.

Figure 3' is a cross-section taken on the line 3-3 of Figure l.

Figure 4 is "a cross sectlon taken 4-4 of Figure 1.

Figure 5 is a perspective view of a panel made in accordance with my invention, a portion being broken away.

Figures 6 and 7 are fragmentary plan views of on the line have been surfaced.

Figures 8 and 9 are fragmentary front face views illustrating the manner in which the panels are placed on a wall.

Figure 10 is a fragmentary rear face view lllustrating the manner in which the panels are placed on a wall.

Figure 11 is a fragmentary view illustrating the appearance of the panels when laid in place.

Figure 12 is a cross-section taken on the line I2--I2 of Figure 11.

Figure 13 is a cross-section taken on the line |3-l3 of Figure 11.

Figure 14 is a fragmentary plan view of a slightly different embodiment of the invention.

Referring to the drawings and particularly to Figures 1-7,- the numeral l indicates a panel embodying the invention, this panel having a gen- 1 erally rectangular shape. Embossed or raised areas shaped to simulate common brick are represented by the numeral 2. The raised areas are spaced by areas 3 and 4 in what may be termed the original plane of the panel and which simulate mortar joints. The size of the brick-simulating areas 2 preferably corresponds to that of ordinary brick and the grooves corresponding in width to that of ordinary mortar joints. The marginal areas 5 and 6 along the right hand side and top edge are crimped or depressed along lines 1 and 8 so that they lie in a lower plane than the original plane of the panel, that is, the plane of the areas 3 and 4. The depth of the crimp corresponds substantially to the thickness of the board. Along the left hand side of the panel are lateral projections 9 spaced by recesses or cut-outs Ill. The projections represent the half-brick areas in alternate courses extending beyond the nearest mortar joints in the intervening courses when the bricks are stagger-laid in customary fashion. The projections 9 are preferably edged by narrow marginal areas I I which are on a level with the areas 3 and l and also represent mortar joints. Along the right hand side of the panel, raised areas [4 project laterally in alternating courses, a distance of half a brick-length beyond the crimp line I, but not to the edge of the sheet. These raised areas H are bounded on three sides by portions of the depressed area 5, the latter being adapted to be overlapped by the projections 9 of a similar panel laid adjacent thereto in the same course.

After the panel has been embossed and cut to the desired shape and size, it is given a prime coating of weather-proofing substance on its upper face. The coating is preferably applied by spraying onto the face of the panel an aqueous bituminous emulsion; but molten bitumen, such as hot asphalt, may be used in place of the emulsion. This coat serves to increase the weatherproofing properties of the panel especially along the mortar-simulating joints. While the coating is still adhesive, the panel may, if desired, be surfaced with finely divided solid material such as sand or fine slate, particularly in the regions of the grooves or mortar-simulating joints. If surfacing is not applied to the prime coating, the coating is allowed to dry before the panel is subjected to further treatment. The panel is then covered with a stencil, which exposes only the brick-simulating surfaces, and is again coated preferably with a layer of bituminous emulsion. The portions which have received a second coating are then surfaced with granular material to simulate brick of any desired color, such color preferably contrasting with the color of the mortar-simulating joints.

As an alternative method of application, the bituminous material, particularly the second coat, is applied to the elevated portion of the sheet by means of a coating roll. By passing the sheet with the elevated portions downward, these surfaces only are covered with the coating material. The application of grit adheres to the freshly coated section leaving the mortar lines free from the grit covering.

Both the primary coating and the secondary coating operations are preferably effected with an aqueous bituminous dispersion of the type which gives a non-flowing film. The resistance to fiow is of great importance in the case of fire since the intense heat encountered causes ordinary asphalt to flow readily thereby destroying the entire wall sheathing. Advantage is also derived from the greatly improved weather-resisting properties of the film resulting from the application and use of this type of dispersed asphalt.

The resulting panel presents a series of staggered rows of brick-simulating surfaces spaced with mortar joints. The panel may vary in size but a convenient size for handling is approximately 25"x 30".

In Figures 8-13, I have shown the manner in which the panels are laid on a side wall. The extensions 9 fit between the embossed areas H of the adjacent panel and overlap the marginal area 5 which has been crimped below the level of the grooves 3 and 4. The outermost edges l6 of the extensions abut the crimp shoulder l. The upper and lower edges of the panels in each course are respectively aligned. The panels in the superjacent course are laid in the same manner but are staggered in relation to the subjacent course in order to carryout the design scheme. Staggering also avoids having all vertical joints in the same line and hence avoids the likelihood of leaks. The marginal portion I! along the lower edge of the panel, which is in the same plane and of substantially the same width as the grooves 3 and 4, overlaps the crimped marginal portions 6 of panels in the course below, the lower edge l8 of the panel abutting the shoulder at the crimp line 8. The portions l2 and I3 are cut out of each panel in order to provide a smooth lap in overlapping relation. The removal of these portions enables all of the brick-simulating areas to lie substantially in one plane, and all the mortar joint-simulating areas to lie in another plane.

It is apparent from the drawings that the joints between adjacent panels always occur along the simulatedmortar joints. This method of joining effectively masks the joints so that the completed siding construction appears to be integral.

The panels are self-aligning since the extensions 9 along one edge of the panel fit accurately between the embossed areas ll of the adjacent panel in the same course and the lower edge l8 of each panel fits against the crimp line 8 of the subjacent panel.

Figure 14 shows a slightly different embodiment of the invention wherein the mortar-simulating marginal portions at the left and lower edges of the panel are trimmed away, the depressed areas 5 and 6 being widened so that the amount of overlap along the top and sides of each panel is undiminished. When such panels are laid side by side in a course, the edge l9 of each panel abuts the side edge of the depressed portion 5, 6 of the panel next to the left in the same course. This properly spaces the panels.

In addition to acting as a waterproof surface, H

more, the siding is considerably more fire-resistant than that made from asphalt saturated and coated felted fibrous material.

Because of their rigidity and lightness the panels can be made in comparatively large sizes.

and hence can be laid with greater speed and accuracy than is possible with ordinary types of siding construction.

The panels may be embossed with other suitable designs to simulate clapboard, rough stone and other building materials without departing from thescope'of the invention. When coated with suitable paints and enamels the product may also be used for interior decoration such as tile-simulating walls or design ceilings.

l. A panel comprising an embossed sheet of waterproof fibrous material of substantially uniform thickness, the weather face of said sheet having raised areas spaced by intervening depressed areas, a continuous coating of waterproofing material over the entire weather face of said panel, and a discontinuous coating of I waterproofing material on said continuous coating covering and limited to said raised areas.

2. An embossed siding panel having areas in the original plane and other areas raised above the original plane, extensions along one side edge of said panel at spaced intervals, the opposite side edge having the marginal portion depressed below said original plane.

3. An embossed siding panel having areas in the original plane and other areas raised above the original plane, the marginal area along the bottom and one side of said panel being in the original plane, the marginal area along the top and other side edge .being depressed below, said original plane.

4. A bituminous composition siding panel em bossed to represent brick-work with areas in the original plane simulating mortar joints and areas raised above the original plane to represent bricks, said panel having spaced extensions along one side edge and areas along the opposite side edge depressed below said original plane to be overlaid by extensions on an adjacent panel.

5. A panel comprising a thin rigid sheet of uniform thickness composed of pulp fiber and waterproofing material, said sheet being embossed to form a pattern of several courses of brick-work, a continuous coating of waterproofing material covering the weather face of said panel, and a discontinuous additional coating upon said continuous coating covering and limited to the raised areas.

6. A panel comprising a sheet of bitumen-saturated felt of substantially uniform thickness, saidsheet being embossed so that portions thereof are elevated above the level of other portions thereof in such a manner as to form on the weather face of the sheet a plurality of vertically-spaced courses raised areas, said raised areas being vertically and horizontally spaced by lower areas of said sheet, and a waterproof coating of substantial thickness covering and limited to said spaced raised areas to augment the elevation thereof.

7. A panel comprising a sheet of bitumen-saturated felt of substantially uniform thickness, said sheet being embossed so that portions thereof are elevated above the level of other portions in such a manner as to form on the weather face of the sheet a plurality of vertically-spaced courses of horizontally-spaced raised areas, said raised areas being vertically and horizontally spaced by lower areas of said sheet, a waterproof coating of substantial thickness covering and limited to said spacedraised areas to augment the elevation thereof, and granular matter covering said areas of coating material.

LESTER KIRSCI-IBRAUN.

of horizontally-spaced

US581336A 1931-12-16 1931-12-16 Siding material Expired - Lifetime US2063935A (en)

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3177279A (en) * 1961-10-19 1965-04-06 Cavrok Mfg Company Method of molding a decorative building panel
US3518799A (en) * 1967-01-09 1970-07-07 Majestic Tile Co Simulated brick construction
US3524790A (en) * 1967-01-03 1970-08-18 Nat Distillers Chem Corp Simulated masonry facing panel
JPS527655B1 (en) * 1971-03-04 1977-03-03
US5755068A (en) * 1995-11-17 1998-05-26 Ormiston; Fred I. Veneer panels and method of making
US6119423A (en) * 1998-09-14 2000-09-19 Costantino; John Apparatus and method for installing hardwood floors
US20040144051A1 (en) * 1999-11-05 2004-07-29 Garcia Eugenio Cruz Direct laminated floor
US20060123729A1 (en) * 2004-11-09 2006-06-15 Myers Jeffrey D System, methods and compositions for attaching paneling to a building surface
US20090249719A1 (en) * 2008-04-04 2009-10-08 Joshua Michael Broehl Cheater panel
US7836648B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2010-11-23 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US7836649B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2010-11-23 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having microbevels
US8112958B2 (en) * 2002-05-03 2012-02-14 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US8181407B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-05-22 Faus Group Flooring system having sub-panels
US8201377B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2012-06-19 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having multiple alignment points
US8209928B2 (en) 1999-12-13 2012-07-03 Faus Group Embossed-in-registration flooring system
USD754370S1 (en) 2014-08-01 2016-04-19 J. Sonic Services Inc. Tile pattern
USD778466S1 (en) 2014-08-21 2017-02-07 J. Sonic Services Inc. Tile pattern

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3177279A (en) * 1961-10-19 1965-04-06 Cavrok Mfg Company Method of molding a decorative building panel
US3524790A (en) * 1967-01-03 1970-08-18 Nat Distillers Chem Corp Simulated masonry facing panel
US3518799A (en) * 1967-01-09 1970-07-07 Majestic Tile Co Simulated brick construction
JPS527655B1 (en) * 1971-03-04 1977-03-03
US5755068A (en) * 1995-11-17 1998-05-26 Ormiston; Fred I. Veneer panels and method of making
US6119423A (en) * 1998-09-14 2000-09-19 Costantino; John Apparatus and method for installing hardwood floors
US20040144051A1 (en) * 1999-11-05 2004-07-29 Garcia Eugenio Cruz Direct laminated floor
US8875460B2 (en) 1999-11-05 2014-11-04 Faus Group, Inc. Direct laminated floor
US8209928B2 (en) 1999-12-13 2012-07-03 Faus Group Embossed-in-registration flooring system
US8112958B2 (en) * 2002-05-03 2012-02-14 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US8181407B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-05-22 Faus Group Flooring system having sub-panels
US8448400B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2013-05-28 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US7836649B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2010-11-23 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having microbevels
US8099919B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-01-24 Faus Group Flooring system having microbevels
US7836648B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2010-11-23 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US8201377B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2012-06-19 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having multiple alignment points
US20100269438A1 (en) * 2004-11-09 2010-10-28 Composite Foam Material Technology, Llc System, methods, and compositions for attaching paneling to a building surface
US8205403B2 (en) 2004-11-09 2012-06-26 Composite Foam Material Technology, Llc System, methods, and compositions for attaching paneling to a building surface
US7748183B2 (en) * 2004-11-09 2010-07-06 Composite Foam Material Technology, Llc System, methods and compositions for attaching paneling to a building surface
US20060123729A1 (en) * 2004-11-09 2006-06-15 Myers Jeffrey D System, methods and compositions for attaching paneling to a building surface
US20090249719A1 (en) * 2008-04-04 2009-10-08 Joshua Michael Broehl Cheater panel
USD754370S1 (en) 2014-08-01 2016-04-19 J. Sonic Services Inc. Tile pattern
USD778466S1 (en) 2014-08-21 2017-02-07 J. Sonic Services Inc. Tile pattern

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