US2050377A - Machine for shaping uppers over lasts - Google Patents

Machine for shaping uppers over lasts Download PDF

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US2050377A
US2050377A US7435A US743535A US2050377A US 2050377 A US2050377 A US 2050377A US 7435 A US7435 A US 7435A US 743535 A US743535 A US 743535A US 2050377 A US2050377 A US 2050377A
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last
apron
overlaying
insole
shoe
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US7435A
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Arthur F Pym
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/12Lasting machines with lasting clamps, shoe-shaped clamps, pincers, wipers, stretching straps or the like for forming the toe or heel parts of the last

Description

Aug. 11, 1936. Q pYM MACHINE FOR SHAPING UPPERS OVER LASTS Filed Feb. 20, 1935 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Aug. 11, 1936. pYM 2,050,377
MACHINE FOR SHAPING UPPERS OVER LASTS Filed Feb. 20, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fig.2.
Aug. 1 1, 1936. c pY MACHINE FOR SHAPING UPPERS OVER LASTS 4 Sheets-Shet 5 Filed Feb. 20, 1955 Aug. 11,- 1936.
MACHINE FOR SHAPING UPPERS OVER LASTS Filed Feb. 20, 1935 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 30 B2 4 31 24 22 kid Patented Aug. 11, 1936 NH'E'ED- STATES 2&50377 PATENT QEFEQE Mass, by Arthur F. Pym, executor, Swampscott, Mass, assignor to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Paterson, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application February 20, 1935, Serial No; 7,435
42 Claims.
This invention relates to machines for shaping uppers over lasts and more particularly to means for lasting the opposite sides of shoes between their toe and heel-end portions. The in- 5 vention is herein illustrated as embodied in a machine for operating upon shoes in the manufacture of which the upper materials at the opposite sides are secured in lasted position by cement, although it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to side-lasting means,
nor limited to the use of cement as upper-fastening means.
In the illustrated machine there is provided, in accordance with a feature of the invention, a
5 novel organization of means for shaping uppers over lasts comprising flexible elastic lasting means, herein shown as a rubber apron, which by engagement with the upper from its toe-end portion to its heel-end portion draws the upper 20, tightly over the last, and overlaying means variably conformable to shoes of different shapes for laying the marginal portion of the upper through the apron inwardly over the insole into lasted position. As herein shown the overlaying 25 means comprises a plurality of overlaying members at each side of the shoe extending in a series lengthwise of the shoe substantially from the toe to the heel-end portion of the shoe, the overlaying members at each side of the shoe being relatively 30 movable heightwise of the shoe. In the construction shown, the flexible apron is supported by carriers in position to receive and support a last and shoe which are depressed within the apron by means which is arranged also to determine 35 the correct relative positions of the overlaying members in operating upon the shoe. As illustrated, this means comprises a plurality of presser members positioned side by side lengthwise of the shoe and arranged to engage the bottom 40 face of the shoe between its toe and heel-end portions and substantially midway between the opposite side edges of the insole. The presser members are movable as a unit toward the shoe and are relatively movable to positions deter- 45 mined by the lengthwise contour of the shoe bottom. Extending between the presser members and the above-mentioned overlaying members when the presser members are in engagement with the shoe are plungers slidingly mounted in 50 the above-mentioned carriers. As the presser members are moved into engagement with the shoe they act through the plungers to move the overlaying members, against the resistance of spring means, into predetermined heightwise re- 55 lation to the bottom face of the insole and also to move them relatively to one another to conform them substantially to the lengthwise curvature of the bottom face of the shoe. Thereafter the presser members are moved as a unit in a direction heightwise of the shoe to depress the 5 last and shoe within the apron, the plungers moving with the pressor members and thus maintaining the overlaying members in adjusted positions. As herein shown also the carriers for the apron are moved, inwardly as the last and shoe 10 are depressed within the apron to render the apron more effective by frictional contact with the upper to work it heightwise of the last.
It is a further very desirable characteristics of the machine herein shown that the overlaying 15 means is movable inwardly to press the upper through the apron close'to the edge of the insole to facilitate the application of cement to the lasting margin of the upper materials before laying the upper over the insole. In the machine illustrated, there is provided operator-controlled means for moving the overlaying members inwardly including spring means for permitting the overlaying members to move relatively to one another as they are moved inwardly into positions to hold the upper through the apron along the sides of the shoe near the edge of the insole, the overlaying members thus conforming substantially to the widthwise curvatures of the opposite side edges of the insole. With the overlaying members positioned as above described, the presser mem bers are moved upwardly away from the shoe bottom to permit the operator to apply cement to the marginal portions of the upper materials and in order that the overlaying members will thus hold the upper with the shoe and last depressed within the apron there is provided clamping means on the carriers for holding the plungers and the overlaying members against upward movement. This means, as herein shown, comprises nippinglevers mounted on the carriers, one for each of the plungers, the nipping-levers being arranged to lock the plungers against upward movement relatively to the carriers while permitting them to move downwardly with the pressers.
While the machine herein shown, as above described, comprises flexible elastic lasting means for working an upper heightwise of a last in combination with other means for laying the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over an insole on the last, it will be recognized that in some of its novel aspects the invention is not limited to such a combination nor to an organization having flexible elastic lasting means for conforming an upper to the shape of a last.
The above and further features of the invention, including various novel details of construction and combinations of parts, will now be more particularly described by reference to the accompanying drawings and pointed out in the claims.
In the drawings,
Fig. 1 is a view in front elevation of a machine in which the invention is embodied, showing the positions of the parts with the shoe under pressure at the completion of the lasting operation;
Fig. 2 is a view in right-hand side elevation of the machine shown in Fig. 1, with parts broken away;
Fig. 3 is a view on an enlarged scale, partly in side elevation and partly in section, showing more clearly the overlaying means, with parts in the same positions as in Fig. 1;
Fig. 4 is a detail view illustrating the relative positions of the overlaying members and the shoe during the overlaying operation;
Fig. 5 is a view, partly in front elevation and partly in section, illustrating the relative positions of the presser members after they have been moved into engagement with the bottom face of the shoe; and
Fig. 6 is a section on the line VI-VT of Fig. 5, but showing the positions of the parts when the upper materials are held ready for cement to be applied thereto.
For lasting the opposite sides of shoes the machine herein shown is provided with a flexible elastic apron 20 preferably consisting of a sheet of vulcanized rubber formed and arranged to present initially more or less of a hollow in which to receive and support a last presented bottom upward with an upperand an insole thereon. The apron is thus arranged to extend across the top face of the upper and last beneath the same and as illustrated is of such length as to extend from the toe-end portion to the heel-end portion of the upper and to overlap more or less these different end portions which preferably, although not necessarily, will have been lasted before the shoe is presented to the machine. The apron is supported in position to receive the shoe by carriers 22 which extend lengthwise of the shoe, one at each side of the shoe, and to which the apron is secured by clamps 24 and screws 26. To assist in supporting the last and shoe there is provided a block 28 of rigid material, preferably of light metal such as aluminum, which is fastened to the apron and is arranged to underlie and serve as a support for the top of the heel end of the last, and a toe rest 33 which acts through the apron to support the forepart of the shoe. The toe rest 33, which is preferably shaped to conform substantially to the contour of the top of the forepart of the last just rearwardly of the toe end, is mounted on a support 3| which is vertically movable in bearings in the frame 25 of the machine. Surrounding the support 3| between a shoulder 33 on the support and a shoulder 35 on the frame is a spring 31 which acts normally to elevate the toe rest, a nut 39 on the lower reduced end portion of the support acting to limit upward movement of the toe rest by engagement with a portion of the frame (Fig. l). The block 28 and the apron 2B are fastened together by a resilient U-shaped metal clamp 32 and a screw 34 (Figs. 3 and 5). Slidingly mounted in a guideway 35 in the block 28 for movements in directions lengthwise of the last is a slide 33 having fast thereon a spindle 4Q arranged to project into the spindle hole in the last. It
will be understood that the slide 38 may be moved toward or from the toe rest 30 to position shoes of different sizes in proper relation to the lasting means, the movement of the slide away from the toe rest being limited by a pin 42 in the block 23 (Fig. 5).
In the course of the operation of the machine the last and shoe supported as above described are depressed within the flexible elastic apron 20 by a holddown 45 comprising a group of vertically movable shoe engaging members or pressers 44, herein shown as sixteen in number, which are arranged side by side lengthwise of the shoe with their lower end faces directed toward the shoe and adapted to engage the bottom face of the shoe, from its toe end to its heel-end portion, substantially midway between the opposite sides of the shoe. Threaded into each presser 44 (Figs. 1 and 3) is an upwardly extending rod 41 which is slidingly mounted in a bracket 46, and surin holding the pressers in assembled relation against tipping movements relatively to a horizontal plane while permitting them to move relatively to one another heightwise of the shoe. As shown particularly in Fig. 5, each bolt 59 has formed on one end a head 6| between which and a washer and nut 63 on the other end of the bolt, the pressers 44 are held loosely in assembled relation. The bracket 46 is mounted to swing in a vertical plane about short axially alined horizontal shafts 48 fast on brackets 50 (Figs. 1 and 2). The bracket 46 may thus be swung by the operator toward or from the shoe to carry the pressers 44 into and out of operative position, so as to permit a shoe to be readily presented to the machine and removed therefrom and also to facilitate the application of cement to the marginal portion of the upper materials, as hereinafter described. The swinging movement of the bracket 46 in a direction to carry the pressers 44 toward the shoe is limited by abutmerits 52 on the brackets 59, these abutments determining the proper positions of the bracket 46 and the pressers 44 in operating on a shoe. For locking the brackets 46 and 50 together after the bracket 45 has been swung into operative position there are provided slides 54 (Fig. 1) which are mounted in horizontal guideways in the bracket 46 for movements into and out of engagement with opposing abutments 56 on the brackets 58. Each slide 54 is held in its guideway in the bracket 4-5 by a plate 51 in which there is formed a slot 58 into which extends a pin 60 carried by the slide 54. Each pin 60 projects also into a slot 62 in the lower end of one arm of a lever 64 pivotally connected to the bracket 46 at 66. Each lever 64 has an upwardly extending arm 68 to which there is pivotally connected a link Hi the opposite end of which is pivotally connected to a slide '52 movable in a vertical guideway 14 in the bracket 46. The slide 12 is provided with a handle 15 by means of which it may be moved in its guideway to impart to the levers 64 swinging movements in directions to move the slides 54 into and out of engagement with the abutments 55. It will be understood that after a shoe and Each presser has a pair of last have been presented to the machine the bracket 46 is swung forwardly and downwardly until it rests on the abutments 52, after which the operator moves the slide I2 upwardly to swing the levers 64 in directions to move the slides 54 into engagement with the abutments 56,'thus locking the bracket 46 and the pressers 44 in operative positions, and that after the shoe has been operated upon the slide '52 is moved downwardly by the operator to cause the levers 64 to be swung in directions to withdraw the slides 54 and thus to permit the bracket 46 to be swung upwardly and rearwardly into an inopertive position. For locking the bracket 46 in inoperative position there is pivotally connected to the right-hand bracket 50 (Figs. 1 and 2) a rearwardly extending arm 78 having formed at its outermost end a recess 86. A spring 82 connected at one end to the arm and at the other end to the bracket 56 acts to swing the arm relatively to a pin 84 carried by the bracket 46 in a direction to engage the pin in the recess 88 when the bracket 46 has been swung upwardly and rearwardly far enough to move the members 44 as a unit into an out-of-the-way position. A handle 86 extending upwardly from the arm 18 is provided for swinging the arm relatively to the pin 84 against the resistance of the spring 82, to unlock the bracket 45. The brackets 50 are fast on a pair of rods 88 vertically movable in bearings in the frame 25 of the machine and are moved upwardly by springs 92 mounted on these rods. For moving the brackets 58 downwardly to carry the members 4 into engagement with the bottom face of the shoe and then to depress the last and shoe within the apron 28 there is provided a treadl-e M which is mounted on a rod 95, journaled in the frame 25 and is connected by a link 98 to a crosshead IilIl connected to the lower ends of the rods 88.
As the last and shoe are depressed within the apron 2d the carriers 22, to which the apron is fastened, are moved inwardly under control of means hereinafter described to render the apron effective by frictional contact with the upper to work the upper heightwise of the last. Each carrier is supported by pairs of parallel links I62 and Itd of substantially equal lengths, the carriers being connected at their outer ends to the links 562 and near their inner ends to the links I04 (Fig. 2). Ihe links Hi2 and IE4 are pivotally mounted respectively on rods I66 and IE3 which extend lengthwise of the shoe and are mounted in suitable bearings in the frame 25. Each pair of links E02 are connected together by a bar i it and these links are urged in directions to move the carriers 22 inwardly toward each other by springs H2 which extend between the links )2, at the right-hand side of the machine, and pins i M projecting from the frame 25. For limiting the swinging movements of the links 82 and 964 in directions to move the carriers 22 toward each other, each link )4 has an inwardly projecting arm Hi5 carrying an adjustable stop, herein illustrated as a screw I91, arranged to engage the frame 25. It will be understood that by adjusting the screws I6! the movements of the carriers 22 toward each other may be varied as is necessary or desirable in operating upon shoes of different widths, lock nuts I09 being provided for holding the screws in adjusted positions. It will also be understood that the carriers 22 are moved inwardly by the links I02 and I514 without any tipping movement being imparted to the carriers relatively to a horizontal plane.
In the machine shown the overlaying means comprises a group of members H6 at each side of the shoe corresponding in number to the pressers 44. These members are positioned side by side between the links I62 and W4 with their inner end faces extending in a series lengthwise of the shoe substantially from the toe end to heel end of the shoe. After the shoe has been depressed within the apron 29 by downward movement of the holddown, the members H6 are moved inwardly into positions to act through the apron to hold the upper close to the edge of the insole while cement is applied to the marginal portion of the upper materials (Fig. 6), after which they are moved farther inwardly to lay the marginal portion of the upper through the apron inwardly over the bottom face of the insole and to press it upon the insole. As shown, particularly in Fig. 3, the end portions II5 of the members H6 are mounted to rotate about axes extending laterally of the shoe to permit the overlaying members to conform closely to the opposite edge curvatures of the insole, a spring II'i being provided for holding each portion H5 against endwise movement and against the resistance of which the end portions may turn as the overlaying members are moved inwardly over the edge of the shoe bottom. Each member H6 (Figs. 2 and 3) is pivotally connected to the upper end of an arm H8 and is urged upwardly by a spring I20 which is connected at one end to a pin I22 carried by the arm I I8 and at the other end to a pin I24 projecting from the member i it, n
an adjustable screw I25 carried by the member H6 and arranged to engage the arm H8 being provided for limiting movement of the member Ht relatively to the arm II8 under the influence of thespring I220. The arms H8 at each side of the shoe are pivctally mounted upon a rod E28 carried by the upwardly extending arms I353 of a bell-crank 'lever I 32 mounted on the rod we between the links-lfil. Projecting from each arm H8 is a pin I34 to which there is connected a spring I36, the other end of which is connected to a pin 33 carried by the bell-crank lever 32. The springs I36 tend to swing the arms M8 in directions to move the overlaying members inwardly toward the shoe, this movement of each arm being limited by the engagement of a stop shoulder I 39 on each arm with a stop shoulder I42 on the bell-crank lever I22. Each bell-crank lever I32 has a downwardly extending arm I M (Figs. -1 and 2) the lower end of which is forked to receive ablock I46 which is connected to the arms of the fork by trunnions hi8 extending into slots I49 in the arms. For moving the blocks Mt toward or away from each other to impart swinging movements to the levers E32 there is provided a rod i523 connecting the blocks together and having rightand left-hand threads thereon and'a. hand wheel E52 fast to its front end for turning it. The rod 5553 is mounted to turn in a bearing E54 sup-ported by the frame 25, and fast on the rod, one on each side of the'bearing, are collars I56 for holding .the rod against lengthwise movement relatively to the bearing. It will be understood that as the blocks I46 are moved away from each other the arms II8 are swung in directions to move the overlaying members H6 inwardly toward the last and that as the blocks are moved toward each other. the arms IIB are swung in directions to move the overlaying members away from the last by engagement of the stop shoulders I42 on the bell-crank levers I32 with the stop shoulders 40 on the arms II8. Preferably the bell-crank levers I32 are swung far enough in the movements of the blocks toward each other to cause the links E82 and I04 to be moved about their pivots W8 and I88 from the positions shown in Fig. 2 into substantially vertical positions by engagement of the arms H8 with the bars I 58 connecting the links I82. The carriers 22 are thus moved outwardly to open the apron 28 far enough to permit a last and shoe readily to be mounted on the spindle 40 with the forepart of the shoe supported by the toe rest 30.
As the holddown 45 is moved downwardly, by depression of the treadle 84, each spring 5| yields, when the presser 44 controlled by that spring engages the bottom face of the insole, until all of the pressers have been moved into engagement with the insole, after which during continued depression of the treadle the springs 5| as a whole, act through the pressers to depress the shoe and last within the apron 20. To assist the toe rest 38 in supporting the shoe and in pressing its bottom face upwardly against the apron 20 in the overlaying operation there is provided a plunger I80 which is vertically movable in bearings in the frame and is normally elevated by a spring I62 which surrounds a reduced end portion of the plunger and bears at one end against a shoulder I 64 on the plunger and at the other end against a shoulder I66 on the frame. A nut and lock nut E68 threaded on the reduced end portion of the plunger I limits upward movement of the plunger by engagement with a portion of the frame (Fig. 1). The plunger I60 is arranged underneath the block 28 and that portion of the apron 28 to which this block is fastened and is depressed against the resistance of the spring I62 by the action of this block thereon during the downward movement of the last and shoe. Supported on this plunger is mechanism arranged to cooperate with the block 28 to prevent lateral tipping of the block and shoe in the lasting operation so as to insure that the opposite side edges of the insole will be presented in proper relation to the overlaying members I I0. This mechanism comprises a pair of clamp arms I10 pivotally mounted on pins I12 on the head I14 of the plunger 68 and arranged to engage the U-shaped clamp 32 whereby the apron 20 is fastened to the block 28 (Fig. 2). These clamp arms are controlled by toggle links I16 pivotally connected to their lower ends, these two links being connected a pin 518 which is movable in a slot in the head I'M and is carried by a small plunger I80 in this head. The plunger I80 is normally elevated by a spring I 82 in the plunger I60 as illustrated in Fig. 2. The upper end of the plunger I80 is engaged by the U-shaped clamp 32 and at the beginning of the downward movement of the is depressed against the resistance of the spring I 82 and acts through the toggle links I18 to swing the clamp arms I10 inwardly against the clamp 32 so that these arms maintain the block 28 in an upright position during the lasting operation. Thereafter the clamping means is moved farther downwardly with the plunger I60.
In order to prevent distortion of the heelend portion of the upper by the upward pull of the apron 20 on the portions of the upper located forwardly of the heel end, the machine is provided with means for clamping the opposite sides of the heel end of the upper against the last.
This means comprises clamp members I84 (Figs. 3 and preferably of rubber or leather arranged to engage the sides of the heel-end portion of the upper near the top edge of the upper, these members being mounted on the opposite ends of a thin resilient plate 588 which is fastened to the block 28 and is so formed as to hold the clamp members initially in widely spaced relation. It will be observed that the clamp members I84 and the ends of the plate I86 are between the apron 28 and the shoe. As the clamp arms I are swung inwardly they act to swing the outwardly flaring arms of the clamp 32 inwardly and through the apron to press the resilient plate 86 against the opposite sides of the block 28 and to spring its upper ends inwardly to press the clamps I84 against the upper.
As previously pointed out, the overlaying means is arranged to act through the apron 20 to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole and to press it upon the insole after the upper has been worked heightwise of the last by the relative movement of the apron and the last. For relatively adjusting the overlaying means and the last heightwise of the last prior to the overlaying operation, there is provided means controlled by the holddown for moving the overlaying members IIB into predetermined heightwise relation to the bottom face of the insole and for also relatively adjusting the members M6 to vary their relation to one another. For this purpose there are slidingly mounted in vertical guideways in each carrier 22 a group of plungers I88, one for each overlaying member. The plungers E88 extend above the carriers 22 and as the holddown is moved downwardly toward the shoe, by depression of the treadle, the upper end faces of the plungers are engaged by the laterally projecting ears 55 of the pressers 44. Thereafter, during continued depression of the treadle, as the pressers 44 move relatively to one another, by reason of the yielding of the springs 56, to conform to the contour of the bottom face of the shoe substantially from its toe end to its heel-end portion, they act through the plungers 588 to swing the overlaying members I I6 relatively to one another, against the resistance of the springs 520, about their pivotal connections to the arms H0. The overlaying members are thus relatively adjusted heightwise of the shoe to conform substantially to the heightwise curvature of the bottom face of the shoe in the machine. Preferably, as herein shown, the lengths of the plungers E88 are such that as the overlaying members are thus adjusted relatively to one another they are located in such heightwise relation to the bottom face of the insole that they will act on the upper, through the apron 20, to lay its marginal portion inwardly over the insole in position to adhere thereto during their subsequent inward movements. It will be understood that as the holddown 45 is moved downwardly to depress the last within the apron, it acts also to move the overlaying members downwardly. To hold the overlaying members in adjusted positions against upward movement each carrier 22 has pivotally connected thereto, one for each of the plungers I88, a clamp member 588 (Fig. 3) herein shown as a nipping-lever arranged to press the plunger I88 against the opposite side of the guideway in the carrier to hold the plunger against upward movement relatively to the carrier while permitting it to move downwardly with the pressers 44. Each nipping-lever is swung in a direction to look its associated plunger against upward movement by a spring I92 which is connected at one end toa pin I94 in the carrier and at the other end to the outwardlyextending tail portion I96 on the nipping-lever.
For swinging the nipping-levers in directions to.
release the plungers for upward movement each carrier 22 has pivotally connected thereto arms I98 connected by a rod 288 which extends lengthwise of the machine beneath the tail portions I96 of the nipping-levers, one of these arms being provided with a handle 202 (Fig. 1) by means of which the arms may be swung in directions to move the rods 2B0 upwardly and thus to swing the nipping levers out of engagement with the plungers I88. I
In the operation of the machine, briefly summarized, the operator mounts a last and shoe on the spindle 40 and by moving it lengthwise with the spindle presents it in proper relation to the toe rest 38, the apron 2D and the overlaying members I I6. As thus mounted, the shoe is supported by the flexible lasting apron 28, the clamp plate 32 by which the apron is fastened to the shoe support block 28 resting substantially in engagement with the upper end of the small plunger I88 and the toe rest 30 being upheld by the spring 37 substantially in engagement with the apron 20 beneath the forepart of the shoe. With the shoe mounted as above described, the operator swings the arm I8 upwardly to unlock the bracket 46 and then swings the bracket 46 forwardly and downwardly into engagement with the abutments 52, after which the slide i2 is moved upwardly to lock the bracket ii; to the brackets 58 with the holddown 45 in operative position. With the parts in these positions, the operator depresses the treadle 94 far enough to move the holddown 45 into engagement with the bottom face of the shoe, the pressers 44 moving relatively to one another until their end faces engage the bottom face of the shoe substantially from the toe end to the heel-end portion of the shoe. As the holddown is thus conformed substantially to the heightwise curvatures of the shoe bottom the overlaying members Hi5, through the plungers E83, are moved downwardly into predetermined heightwise relation to the bottom face of the insole and are also moved relatively to one another to conform substantially to the lengthwise curvatures of the shoe bottom. Thereafter the shoe and last are depressed within the apron by further downward movement of the treadle 94, and the levers I32 are swung, by rotation of the hand wheel 52, in directions to move the arms H8 relatively to the bars Hi] to permit the springs H2 to act on the links m2 and its to move the carriers 22 inwardly. The apron 2c is thus carried inwardly to render it more effective by frictional contact with the upper to work it heightwise of the last, the apron being stretched more or less by the downward movement of the shoe to assist in working and pressing the upper tightly into conformity to the contour of the last. As the shoe and last are depressed within the apron 28, the plunger ISG is depressed to swing the clamp arms IIil inwardly against the clamp 32 so as to maintain the shoe-supporting block 28 in an upright position and to spring the upper ends of th resilient plate i86 inwardly to press the clamps I84 on these upper ends against the upper.
As the shoe continues to move downwardly after the clamp arms Ill? are swung inwardly the plunger I58 and the toe rest 39 are depressed against the action of the springs 31 and I52. It
will be understood that the movements of the carriers 22 toward each other are limited by engagement of the adjustable stops fill with the frame and that these stops are preferably so adjusted that with the carriers in their innermost positions the portions of the apron above the bottom face of the shoe will be inclined more or less toward each other as the shoe and last are depressed within the apron. Near the end of the downward movement of the shoe and last within the apron the levers I32 are again swung about l r pivots in the same direction to move the ove laying nembers H6 through the arms H8 and springs toward the last, the movements of the parts being such that as the holddown completes its downward movement to depress the last and shoe the upper will be held tightly conformed to the contour of the last and in close relation to the edge of the insole by the overlaying members, the springs I36 connecting the arms I18 and the levers I32 permitting the overlaying members to move relatively to one another widthwise of the shoe to positions determined by the widthwise curvatures of the opposite side edges of the insole. With the overlaying members I I6 in the positions shown in Fig. 6 the treadle 94 is released by the operator to permit the springs 92 to move the holddown d5 upwardly out of engagement with the bottom face of the shoe. Preferably at this time the bracket 46 is unlocked from the brackets 52! by downward movement of the slide I2 and the bracket 4% and holddown 45 are swung upwardly and rearwardly into inoperative positions where they are held by engagement of the arm i8 with the pin 82 in the recess Bil. It will be understood that the nipping levers I98 act to hold the plungers I88 and the overlaying members i I6 against upward movement at this time so that the shoe and last are held depressed within the apron by the overlaying members H6 with the lasting margin of the upper materials, 1. e., that portion of the materials that is to be laid over the bottom face of the insole, projecting beyond the edge of the insole. The operator is thus enabled to apply cement to the lasting margin of the upper materials after which further swinging movements are imparted to the levers I32 to cause the springs 36 to move the overlaying members Hi5 toward each other. As the overlaying members I it move toward each other they act through the apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper materials inwardly over the insole. It will be seen (Fig. 4) that as the overlaying members move inwardly over the edge of the shoe bottom their end portions H5 may turn more or less, against the resistance of the springs I ll, about their axes, thus permitting the wiping edges of the overlaying members to conform more closely to the lengthwise curvature of the bottom face of the insole, the springs 31 and I62 yielding somewhat to permit these members to move inwardly over the insole. As the overlaying members move inwardly they act to force the apron 28 inwardly over the insole while further stretching the apron. The upper is thus drawn tightly inward over the edge of the insole and is laid upon the bottom face of the insole. After the overlaying members having completed their inward movements, the machine is permitted to remain at rest, as illustrated in Fig. 2, until the cement has set sufiiciently to hold the upper in lasted position. Thereafter the bracket 46 and the holddown 45 are swung into operative position, the bracket 46 locked to the brackets 58, and the hold down 45 lowered into engagement with the bottom face of the shoe by depression of the treadle 94. The operator then swings the arms I98 upwardly by means of the handles 232 to release the plungers I88, thereby permitting the springs 120 to swing the overlaying members i F6 upwardly .away from the shoe, and rotates the hand wheel 52 in a direction to swing the arms l l 8 outwardly to move the overlaying members and the carriers 22 to starting positions. With the carriers 22 and the overlaying members H6 in initial positions, the treadle 94 is released to permit the springs 92 to move the holddown upwardly. The spring I82 then acts to move the plunger 86 upwardly, thereby swinging the clamp arm l'IEi outwardly, and the springs i62 and 31 act, respectively, to return the plunger IE2 and the toe rest 30 to initial positions. In order to facilitate the removal of the shoe from the machine and the mounting of another shoe therein the bracket 46 may be unlocked from the brackets 56 and then swung upwardly and rearwardly, with the holddown 45, into inoperative position where it is again locked to one of the brackets by the arm 1'8.
The invention having thus been described, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:
1. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, flexible elastic lasting means arranged to act on an upper at opposite sides of a last between its toe and heel-end portions, overlaying means at opposite sides of the last adjustable heightwise of the last and arranged to act through said flexible lasting means to lay the marginal portion of the 1 upper inwardly over an insole on the last, and
mechanism for effecting relative movement of said lasting means and the last heightwise of the last to cause said lasting means by frictional contact with the upper to draw it tightly about the last and for also adjusting said overlaying means heightwise of the last prior to the overlaying operation.
2. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, flexible elastic lasting means arranged to act on an upper at opposite sides of a last between its toe and heel-end portions, overlaying means at opposite sides of the last adjustable heightwise of the last and arranged to act through said flexible lasting means to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over an insole on the last, and
mechanism for moving the overlaying means into predetermined heightwise relation to the bottom face of the insole and while holding the overlaying means and the last in such adjusted relation moving the last heightwise relatively to the flexible elastic lasting means to cause said lasting means to work the upper over the last prior to the overlaying operation.
3. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, flexible elastic lasting means arranged to act on an upper at opposite sides of a last between its toe and heel-end portions, overlaying means arranged to act through said flexible lasting means at opposite sides of the last to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over an insole on the last, said overlaying means being adjustable heightwise of the last, and means arranged by engagement with the bottom face of the insole to determine the relative heightwise positions of the overlaying means and the last and for thereafter moving the overlaying means and the last heightwise of the last relatively to the flexible elastic lasting means to cause said lasting means by frictional contact with the upper to work it tightly over the last prior to the overlaying operation.
4. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, flexible elastic lasting means arranged to extend lengthwise of a last substantially from its toe-end portion to its heel-end portion, overlaying means arranged to act through said flexible elastic lasting means to lay the marginal portion of an upper at the sides of the last inwardly over an insole on the last, said overlaying means being adjustable heightwise of the last, means for depressing the last relatively to said lasting means by engagement with the insole to cause said lasting means by frictional contact with the upper to draw the upper tightly about the last, and mechanism controlled by said last-named means for adjusting the overlaying means heightwise of the last prior to the overlaying operation.
5. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, flexible elastic lasting means arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper .and an insole thereon and. to act on the upper at opposite sides of the last between its toe and heel-end portions, overlaying means arranged to act on the upper at the sides of the last through said flexible elastic lasting means to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, said overlaying means being adjustable heightwise of the last, mechanism for adjusting the overlaying means heightwise of the last and for thereafter moving the overlaying means and the last together relatively to said lasting means in a direction heightwise of the last to cause said lasting means by frictional contact with the upper to work it tightly over the last, and means for moving the overlaying means inwardly over the insole.
6. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to engage an upper at the opposite sides of a last between its toe and heel-end portions, overlaying means arranged to act through said apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over an insole on the last, said means being adjustable heightwise of the last, and mechanism arranged by engagement with the bottom face of the insole to determine the relative heightwise positions of the overlaying means and the last and for also effecting relative movement of the apron and the last in a direction heightwise of the last to cause the apron to conform the upper tightly to the contour of the last.
7. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to engage an upper at the opposite sides of a last between its toe and heel-end portions, a holddown for depressing the last within the apron by engagement with the bottom face of the insole to cause the apron by frictional contact with the upper to work it heightwise of the last, overlaying devices adjustable heightwise of the last and movable inwardly over the bottom of the last for laying the marginal portion of the upper through said apron inwardly over the insole, and means controlled by the holddown when in engagement with the insole for determining the relative positions of the overlaying devices and the last heightwise of the last during their overlaying movements.
8. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, a holddown for depressing the last within the apron by engagement with the bottom face of the insole to cause the apron by frictional contact with the upper to draw it tightly over the last, overlaying devices arranged to act through said apron at opposite sides of the last to lay the marginal por tion of the upper inwardly over the insole, said devices being adjustable heightwise of the last, and means controlled by said holddown for adjusting the overlaying devices heightwise of the last.
9. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, flexible elastic lasting means arranged to engage an upper mounted on a last and to work the upper by frictional contact therewith heightwise of the last in response to relative movement of the lasting means and the last, overlaying means arranged to act through said lasting means to lay the marginal portion of the upper at the sides of the last inwardly over the insole, said overlaying means being adjustable heightwise of the last, and means for adjusting the overlaying means relatively to the last heightwise of the last prior to the overlaying operation.
10. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, flexible elastic lasting means arranged to engage an upper mounted on a last and to work the upper by frictional contact therewith heightwise of the last in response to relative movement of the lasting means and the last, overlaying means arranged to act through said lasting means to lay the marginal portion of the upper at the sides of the last inwardly over the insole, said overlaying means being adjustable heightwise of the last, and mechanism arranged by engagement with the bottom face of the insole to eifect a heightwise movement of adjustment of the overlaying means prior to the overlaying operation.
11. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, a holddown movable into engagement with the bottom face of the insole for depressing the last within the apron to cause the apron by frictionalcontact with the upper to work it tightly over the last, overlaying devices adjustable heightwise of the last and arranged to act through the apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper at the sides of the last inwardly over the insole, and means for adjusting the overlaying devices heightwise of the last in response to movement of the holddown into engagement with the insole.
12. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, a holddown for depressing the last within the apron by engagement with the insole to cause the apron by frictional contact with the upper to work it tightly over the last, overlaying devices adjustable heightwise of the last and arranged to act through said apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper at the sides of the last inwardly over the insole, and members movable with the holddown for determining the positions of the overlaying devices heightwise of the last relatively to the bottom face of the insole.
13. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, means for depressing the last within the apron,
devices at opposite sides of the last for supporting the apron and movable inwardly to render the apron effective by frictional contact with the upper to work it heightwise of the last, and separate devices arranged to act through said apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole.
14. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron for engaging an upper at the opposite sidesof a last between its toe and heelend portions, means for stretching the apron heightwise of the last to cause it by frictional contact with the upper to work it tightly over the last, and overlaying devices at the opposite sides of the last adjustable to conform substantially to the. lengthwise curvature of the shoe bottom for laying the marginal portion of the upper through said apron inwardly over an insole on the last.
15. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible elastic apron arranged to engage an upper at the opposite sides of a last between its toe and heel-end portions, devices for supporting the apron at the opposite sides of the last, means for depressing the last within the apron to cause the apron b frictional contact with the upper to draw it tightly over the last, and separate devices arranged to act on the upper through said apron along the opposite sides of the last tolay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over an insole on the last.
16. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, the combination witha flexible apron for engaging an upper at the opposite sides of a last between its toe and heel-end portions, of means for supporting the apron at the opposite sides of the last, a device for moving the last relatively to the said last-named means in a direction heightwise of the last to cause the apron by frictional contact with the upper to tension the upper over the last,- and separate devices arranged to act on the upper through said apron to lay its marginal portion along the opposite sides of the last inwardly over an insole on the last.
17. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to engage an upper at the opposite sides of a last between itstoe and heel-end portions, a holddown for depressing the last within the apron, carriers at opposite sides of the last for supporting the apron to render it effective by frictional contact with the upper to draw it tightly over the last, and overlaying devices extending lengthwise of the last at the opposite sides thereof for laying the marginal portion of the upper through said apron inwardly over the insole, said devices being variably conformable to shoes of different shapes.
18. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, means for depressing the last within the apron, carriers for supporting the apron at the opposite sides of the last and movable inwardly to render the apron effective by frictional contact with the upper to work it heightwise of the last, and overlaying devices at the sides of the last movable inwardly toward the last beneath said carriers and arranged to act through said apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper over the insole.
19. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible elastic apron arranged to extend across the top face of a last with an upper and an insole thereon and substantially from the tooend portion of the last to its heel-end portion, a holddown for forcing said last into said apron by engagement with the insole, carriers at the opposite sides of the last for supporting the apron to cause it to stretch in response to movement of the last and thereby to draw the upper tightly over the last, overlaying devices at the sides of the last and movable with said holddown heightwise of the last into positions to act on the upper through said apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole into lasted position, and means for imparting to said overlaying devices their overlaying movements.
20. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, a holddown movable into engagement with the insole for depressing the last within the apron, carriers for supporting the apron at the opposite sides of the last and movable inwardly to render the apron effective by frictional contact with the upper to draw it tightly over the last, overlaying devices movable inwardly toward the last and arranged to act on the upper through said apron to lay its marginal portion inwardly over the insole, said devices being adjustable heightwise of the last, and means on the carriers for efiecting such adjustment of the overlaying devices in response to movement of the holddown into engagement with the insole.
21. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, a holddown for depressing the last within the apron, carriers at opposite sides of the last movable inwardly to render the apron effective by frictional contact with the upper to draw it tightly over the last, overlaying devices mounted for movements inwardly toward the last beneath the carriers and arranged to act through the apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, said devices being adjustable heightwise of the last, and members mounted on the carriers for movements with the holddown heightwise of the last and arranged by engagement with the overlaying devices to determine their positions heightwise of the last relatively to the bottom face of the insole.
22. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe. and heel-end portions, 2, holddown for depressing the last within the apron by engagement with'the insole, carriers at opposite sides of the last for supporting the apron and movable inwardly to render the apron effective by frictional contact with the upper to draw it tightly over the last, overlaying devices extending lengthwise of the last at the opposite sides thereof between its toe and heel-end portions, said devices being adjustable to conform substantially to the lengthwise curvature of the shoe bottom, and means for moving said overlaying devices toward each other to cause the apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole.
23. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last pressented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, 2; holddown movable into engagement with the insole for depressing the last within the apron, carriers for supporting the apron at the opposite sides of the last and movable inwardly to render the apron efiective by frictional contact with the upper to work it heightwise of the last, overlaying devices at the opposite sides of the last movable toward each other to lay the marginal portion of the upper through the apron inwardly over the insole, said devices being adjustable heightwiseof the last, spring means tending to move said overlaying devices upwardly, and plungers slidingly mounted on the carriers and arranged to extend between the overlaying devices. and the holddown when the holddown is in engagement with the insole for determining the adjusted positions of the overlaying devices heightwise of the last.
24. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, 20 a flexible elastic apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, a holddown movable into engagement with 25 the bottom face of the insole depressing the last within the apron, carriers for supporting the apron at the sides of the last and movable inwardly to render the apron effective by frictional contact with the upper to work it heightwise of the last, overlaying devices at the sides of the last beneath said carriers and arranged to act on the upper through said apron to lay its marginal portion inwardly over the insole, said overlaying devices being movable heightwise of the last, spring means tending to move said overlaying devices upward away from the last, and plungers slidingly mounted on said carriers and arranged to move said overlaying devices against the resistance of said spring means toward the last and to position them in predetermined heightwise relation to the last in response to movement of the holddown into engagement with the insole.
25. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible elastic apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, a holddown movable from position above the last into engagement with the bottom face of the insole for depressing the last Within the apron, carriers for supporting the apron at the sides of the last and movable inwardly to render the apron effective by frictional contact with the upper to draw it tightly over the last, overlaying devices at the sides of the last arranged to act through said apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, said devices being movable heightwise of the last, plungers slidingly mounted on said carriers and movable with the holddown for moving said overlaying devices into predetermined heightwise relation to the bottom face of the insole, spring means against the resistance of which the overlaying devices thus movable, and means on the carriers for holding said plungers against upward movement while permitting them to move downwardly with the holddown.
26. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last pre- 70 sented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to act on the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, overlaying means arranged to act on the upper through said apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, said overlaying means comprising a plurality of members at each side of the last relatively adjustable heightwise of the last to conform substantially to the heightwise curvature of the bottom face of the insole, and means movable into engagement with the bottom face of the insole for effecting adjustment of said members.
27. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, mechanism for effecting relative movement of the apron and the last in a direction heightwise of the last to cause the apron to conform the upper tightly to the contour of the last, overlaying means arranged to act through said apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, said overlaying means comprising a plurality of overlaying members at each side of the last relatively adjustable heightwise of the last into substantial conformity to the contour of its bottom face, and means for relatively adjusting said overlaying members and for holding them in adjusted relation during their overlaying movements.
28. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, a holddown for moving the last relatively to the apron in a direction heightwise of the last by engagement with the insole to cause the apron by frictional contact with the upper to draw it tightly over the last, overlaying devices at the opposite sides of the shoe arranged to act on the upper through said apron to lay its marginal portion inwardly over the insole, each of said devices being adjustable to conform substantially to the lengthwise curvature of the shoe bottom, and mechanism controlled by said holddown for adjusting said overlaying devices.
29. In a lasting machine, overlaying devices at opposite sides of a shoe mounted for movements inwardly over the shoe bottom for laying the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, each of said devices comprising a plurality of overlaying members independently mounted for swinging movements heightwise and widthwise of the shoe, mechanism for relatively swinging said members heightwise of the shoe to conform them to the contour of its bottom face and for holding them in adjusted relation during their inward movements while permitting them to move relatively to one another widthwise of the shoe in operating on the shoe, and means for imparting to said overlaying members their overlaying movements.
30. In a lasting machine, overlaying devices at opposite sides of a shoe mounted for bodily movements widthwise of the shoe for laying the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, each of said devices comprising a plurality of overlaying members mounted for relative swinging movements in directions heightwise and widthwise of the shoe, means for swinging said overlaying members relatively to one another heightwise of the shoe to conform them substantially to the lengthwise curvature of the shoe bottom in the course of the operation of the machine, and means for moving said overlaying members inwardly over the insole.
'31. In a lasting machine, overlaying devices at opposite sides of a shoe, said overlaying devices each comprising a plurality of overlaying members mounted for relative swinging movements in directions heightwise of the shoe, pivoted arms for moving said overlaying members inwardly over the bottom of the shoe to lay the marginal portion of theupper over the insole, means for holding said overlaying members against relative swinging movements, and a device arranged to engage the bottom of the shoe and to impart to said overlaying members through said last-named means swinging movements relatively to one another prior to their inward movements to conform them substantially to the lengthwise curvature of the shoe bottom.
32. In a lasting machine, overlaying devices at opposite sides of a shoe, said devices each comprising a plurality of members movable bodily widthwise of the shoe to lay the marginalportion of the upper inwardly over the insole, said members being mounted for relative swinging movements in directions heightwise of the shoe, and means movable into engagement with the insole and conformable thereby to the lengthwise curvature of its bottom face for determining the correct relative positions of the overlaying members in operating upon the shoe.
33. In a lasting machine, overlaying devices at opposite sides of a shoe mounted for movements inwardly over the bottom of the shoe to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, said devices each comprising a plurality of overlaying members arranged in a series ex tending along the side of the shoe, said members being relatively adjustable heightwise of the shoe, and means for relatively adjusting said overlaying members to conform them substantially to the lengthwise curvatures of the bottom face of the shoe, said means comprising a plurality of pressers arranged side by side lengthwise of'the shoe the bottom of the shoe to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, each of said devices comprising a plurality of members 5 relatively adjustable heightwise of the shoe, means movable into engagement with the bottom face of the shoe to determine the correct relative positions of said overlaying members in operating upon the shoe, said meansv comprising a plurality of pressers relatively movable to posi tions determined by the lengthwise contour of the shoe bottom, and means for relatively adjusting the overlaying members in response to the relative movement of the pressers.
35. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, carriers for supporting the apron at the opposite sides of the last, overlaying means arranged to act through said apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, said overlaying .means comprising a plurality of members at each side of the last extending in a series lengthwise of the last, said members being relatively movable heightwise of the last, a holddown for depressing the last within the apron to cause the apron by frictional contact with the upper to work it heightwise of the last, said holddown comprising a plurality of presser members mounted to move relatively to one another into engagement with the bottom face of the insole substantially from its toe end to its heel-end portion, and plungers slidingly mounted in said carriers and arranged to extend between each of said pressers and an overlaying member for relatively moving the overlaying members in response to relative movement of the pressers to conform the overlaying members substantially to the lengthwise curvature of the bottom face of the insole.
36. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented'by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, carriers for'supporting the apron at the opposite sides ofthe last, overlaying means arranged to act through said apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, said overlaying means comprising a plurality of members at each side of the last extending in a series .lengthwise of the last, said members being relatively movable'heightwise of the last, and means for depressing the last within the apron to conform the upper tightly to the contour of the last and for also moving said overlaying members relatively to one another to conform them substantially to the heightwise curvature of the bottom face of the insole, said means comprising a plurality of pressers arranged side by side lengthwise of the last andlrelativelymovable heightwise of the last into engagement with the bottom face of the insole substantially from itstoe end to its heel-end portion, a plurality of plungers independently mounted on the carriers for movements heightwise of the last with the pressers, each of said plungersbeing arranged to engage one of the overlaying members, and spring means for holding the overlaying members in engagement with the plungers.
37. In a machine for lastingthe opposite sides of shoes with cement, a flexible apron for conforming anupperto-thecontourpf alast, overlayingmeans arrangedtoact through said apron to lay the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over an insole on the last, said overlaying means comprising a plurality of members at each side of the last extending in a series lengthwise of the last, said membersbeing relatively movable heightwise of the last into substantial conformity to the lengthwise curvature of its bottom face, and spring means for forcing said members independently-toward the last to hold the upper near .the edge of the insole prior to the overlaying operation to permit cement to be appliedfto the marginal portion of the upper materials.
38. In a machine for lasting the opposite sides of shoes with cement, a flexible apron for working an upper into conformity to the contour of a last between its toe and heel-end portions, devices at opposite sides of the last arranged to act through said apron to press the upper close to the edge of .the insole with its lasting margin projecting beyond said edge, each device comprising a plurality of members extending in a series lengthwise of the last, said members being relatively adjustable heightwise of the last, means for determining the correct relative positions of said members heightwise of the last, and means for moving said members inwardly toward the last including spring means arranged to permit said members to movev relatively to one another widthwise of the last to positions determined by the widthwise curvatures of the opposite side edges of the insole.
39. In a machine for lasting the opposite sides of shoes with cement, a flexible elastic apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, mechanism for 1 eflecting relative movement of said apron and the last heightwise of the last to cause the apron by frictional contact with the upper to work it heightwise of the last, overlaying means arranged to act through said apron to lay the mar- 1 ginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole,tsaid overlaying means comprising a plurality of overlaying members at each side of the last extending in a series lengthwise of the last, and means for moving the overlaying members 2 at the opposite sides of the last inwardly into positions to hold the upper close to the opposite side edges of the insole prior to the overlaying operation to permit cement to be applied to the marginal portion of the upper materials. 2
40. In a machine for lasting the opposite sides of shoes with cement, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and 3 heel-end portions, means for effecting relative movementof the apron and the last in a direc: tion heightwise of the last to cause the apron by frictional contact with the upper to work it heightwise of the last, overlaying means ar- 3 ranged to act through said apron to lay the marginalportion of the upper inwardly over the insole, said means comprising a plurality of overlaying members at each side of the last extending in a series lengthwise of the last, and
a single means for moving said overlaying members at the opposite sides of the last simultaneously inward into positions to hold the upper close to the side edges of the insole to permit cement to be applied to the marginal portions of the upper materials.
41. In a machine for lasting the opposite sides of shoes with cement, a flexible apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bottom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to act on the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, means for depressing the last within the apron to cause the apron by frictional contact with the upper to work it tightly over the last, devices at opposite sides of the last movable inwardly toward the last to press the upper through said apron close to the edge of the insole with its lasting margin projecting beyond said edge, said devices each comprising a plurality of members extending in a series 6 lengthwise of the last, said members being relatively movable heightwise of the last, means for moving said members inwardly into positions to hold the upper through the apron, and means for moving said members relatively to (3 one another heightwise of the last to conform them substantially to the heightwise curvature of the shoe bottom and for holding said members in those positions with the last and shoe depressed within the apron to permit cement to 7 be applied to the lasting margin of the upper materials.
42. In a machine for lasting the opposite sides of shoes with cement, a rubber apron arranged to support a last presented by the operator bot- 7 tom upward with an upper and an insole thereon and to engage the upper between its toe and heel-end portions, a holddown for depressing the last within the apron by engagement with the bottom face of the insole to cause the apron by frictional contact with the upper to work it tightly over the last, devices at opposite sides of the last arranged to act through said apron to press the upper close to the edge of the insole with its lasting margin projecting beyond said edge, each device comprising a plurality of members extending in a series lengthwise of the last, said members being relatively movable both widthwise and heightwise of the last, means for moving said members inwardly toward the last including spring means for permitting relative movement of said members widthwise of the last, means controlled by said holddown for relatively moving said members heightwise of the last to conform them substantially to the lengthwise curvature of the shoe bottom, said means being arranged to hold said members in adjusted positions against upward movements with the last and shoe depressed within the apron to permit the holddown to be moved upwardly out of engagement with the bottom face of the insole while cement is being applied to the lasting margin of the upper materials.
ARTHUR F. PYM,
Executor of the Will of Charles F. Pym, Deceased. 15
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2727257A (en) * 1953-06-01 1955-12-20 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for operating on shoes
US3418449A (en) * 1966-06-07 1968-12-24 United Shoe Machinery Corp Adhesive activating apparatus
US4558478A (en) * 1983-03-31 1985-12-17 Usm Corporation Device for tensioning a shoe upper on a last and for laying its lasting margin over in the ball and shank region

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2727257A (en) * 1953-06-01 1955-12-20 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for operating on shoes
US3418449A (en) * 1966-06-07 1968-12-24 United Shoe Machinery Corp Adhesive activating apparatus
US4558478A (en) * 1983-03-31 1985-12-17 Usm Corporation Device for tensioning a shoe upper on a last and for laying its lasting margin over in the ball and shank region

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