US2050210A - Shoe sole construction - Google Patents

Shoe sole construction Download PDF

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Publication number
US2050210A
US2050210A US41916A US4191635A US2050210A US 2050210 A US2050210 A US 2050210A US 41916 A US41916 A US 41916A US 4191635 A US4191635 A US 4191635A US 2050210 A US2050210 A US 2050210A
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United States
Prior art keywords
shoe
pad
foot
insole
sole
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Expired - Lifetime
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US41916A
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Griffin Norval Burris
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SELBY SHOE Co
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SELBY SHOE Co
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Priority to US41916A priority Critical patent/US2050210A/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/1445Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the midfoot, i.e. the metatarsal
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts

Description

Aug, 4, 1936. N, B GR|FF|N 2,050,210

VSHOE SOLE CONSTRUCTION Filed Sept. 24, 1935 INVENTOR.

Wwf/@m .Bu WM* ATTORNEYS.

Patented Aug. 4, 1936 SHOE SOLE CONSTRUCTION Nerval Burris Griffin, Portsmouth, Ohio, assigner 'to The Selby Shoe'Company, a corporation oi'` Ohio Application september 24, 1935, sex-mno. 41,916.

2 Claims.

This invention relates to womens shoes, and is particularly directed to a shoe incorporating an improved sole structure. More specifically, the improvement resides in the structure of the 5 sole corresponding to that plantar portion of the foot posterior tothe distal ends of the` metatarsal bones. y

Heeled shoes, particularly the higher heeled type, tip the foot forward on the distal heads of the metatarsal bones and the toes, creating a space between the'foot and thev shoe sole at the juncture of the shank and the forepart Vof the shoe. The higher the heel the greater the, space.l It is necessary for the foot to bridge this 15. space and the foot is therefore without proper support.

The absence of contact and adequate supportV as above pointed out frequently' causes pain in the plantar surface of thefoot. This pain is o broughtl about by strain on Athe plantar ligament and tendons. The metatarsal bones extend from the tarsal bones, commonly called the instep, to

the base of the toes. They have rounded heads at their forward ends, which heads are disposed in a transverse row and in highheeled shoes 'are called upon to support more than their share of the weightof the body. Lack of support or impoSt at the section directly back of these rounded heads sometimes results in displacement of the metatarsal bones and causes a great deal of pain.

/There isV abnormal distribution of weight, too much falling 'on ythe heads of these metatarsal bones due to the lack of support for the area of the footv just to the rear of the ball of the foot. This spot, and the result at times is a very painful callous. The results of displaced metatarsal bones are far-reaching, since it is obvious if the bones are misplaced, so vare"the muscles and tendons, and the foot action is greatly impaired. Accordingly, it is necessary that the shoe be of a construction 'which adequately supports not only the forward Vends of these metatarsal bones in normal position but' also the area just back of the ball of the foot before the foot action can be pro'per. y

It is, therefore, the object of the present inventionto provide a shoe sole construction, particularly for higher heeled shoes, which provides a full length tread base or continuous support for the foot throughout the length of the shoe from the heel to the toe, particularly at theregion posterior'tothe distal ends of the metatarsal bones. Accordingly, the invention may be accauses a concentration or focus of pressure at one curately .recitedas residing'in the provision of an impost pad perfectly located and formed within the sole structure of the shoe. This pad relieves the strain on the plantar lligament and tendons, and properly distributes the weight t0 the heads of the metatarsals, thus maintaining 5 their proper anatomical relation. 'Ihe improvement tends to avoid displacement of the metatarsal bones and partially corrects conditions Where these bones have fallen from their normal positions or the positions where they support `1o the weight of the body as intended.

It is a further object to provide a sole structure c incorporating an impost pad whichis of a shape particularly carefully fitted transversely of the foot. In otherewords, these metatarsal bones l5 providing their rounded forward supporting ends have a definite. position injrelationto the tread surface. If this position is' not maintained. foot trouble ensues. The pad herein incorporated has a carefully developed transverse shape formaintaining a more comfortable position of the bones. In constructing a shoe incorporating the present improvement, the manufacturer builds his pad in accordance with the height of the heel; In other words. as the heel height is increased the pad 25 structure must be altered as to any cross section.

Other objects and further advantages will be ,more fully apparent from a. description of the accompanying drawing, in\ which:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of a shoe incor- 30 porating the improvement, portions of the upper and liner being removed for fully illustrating the improved sole structure. K

,'Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on line 2 2, Fig. 1, the view being partially fragmentary 35 and broken-away for more fully illustrating the sole structure toward the ballot the toot. l

Figure 3 is a general view taken on line 3 3, Fig. 2. further detailing the solestructure.

Figure 4 is a perspective view of the impost 40 pad removed from the shoe and looking generallyl toward the top thereof. i Figure 5 is a bottom plan view of the pad. v

Referring to the drawing, the pad has been illustrated incorporated within the shoe and sep- 45 arateiy. 'Ihe shoe illustrated includes the usual structure. The upper of th'e shoe is` indicated at I Il; the outsole at Il; the insole at l2; heel'at I3; and the sock lining at Il. ,l

Any sort of shank stift'ener or arch support 50 (not shown) may be incorporated along the instep of the shoe. The impost pad herein concerned is illustrated at I5. This pad is located in the shoe at what may be called the juncture ofthe instep or shank and the forepart.A The u to feather edges I1. Its contour may be described as follows:

In longitudinal section (see Figure 2) its curvature is such as to i-lt snugly to the curvature of the insole. Its upper surface I8 is slightly convexed and gradually merges with the forepart or horizontally disposed portion 2li of the sole structure. Thus, as a space is created by the provision of a high heel, the pad iills out this space and provides the necessary support by continuanceof the tread. The pad is specicially designed to ll f out the space occurrlng'between the pad and the insole. 1

In transverse cross section (see -Figure 3) the pad is of a contour fitting the curvature of the insole and the curvature of the upper so that it lies snugly against these parts. Its upper surface-is slightly convexed fitting. the natural transverse curvature of the sole of the foot posterior to the distal vends of the metatarsal bones. It has been determined that in Jorder to t this shape so that the foot closely and snugly contacts the pad the pad should be of greater height or thickness toward the inner side-of the foot as at 2|, that is, on the inside of the longitudinal axis thereof.

Also, in order to provide full support for the foot not only longitudinally but transversely the pad overhangs or extends beyond theinner edge margin 22 of the insole as at 23 (see Figure l). This portion of the pad lies snugly against-the upper. The highest point and the thickest portion 2| of the pad is substantially over the inner -edge margin of the insole or very slightly to the inside thereof.. With the transverse contour as stated, the transversely aligned ,forwardends of the metatarsal bones are maintained in a more comfortable position or the position where they best support the weight of the body.

The results of displaced metatarsal bones are well known.' A great deal of pain is attendant the displacement since the tendons or muscles overlying and surrounding the bones are badly stretched or pushed out of position and strained and there may be some impingement on nerves near the metatarsals. Not only is there resultant pain from the muscular or tendon conditionfor'v pressure on nerves, but the localized pressure resulting.- therefrom causes a painful callous. The present sole construction provides an impost pad supporting the forward end of the arch of the foot, which pad is sufficiently solid to support the weight, but at the same time is resilient enough to take up or absorb shock.

Having-described my invention, I claim:

1. In a high-heeled shoe, a sole construction embodying an insole having a portion of narrowest width at the juncture of the shank and the forepart of the shoe and curving outwardly forwardlyof this point along the inner edge. an impost pad adapted to support the forward end of the metatarsal arch of the foot and filling the space normally occurring between the foot and theshoe sole at the region posterior of the distal ends of the metatarsal bones at the juncture of the shank and the forepart of the shoe. which space occurs due to the increased heel height. the longitudinal cross section of the pad being varied in thickness so as to form an uninterrupted continuation of the curvature of the shoe sole and the transverse section being such as to provide a portion of greatest thickness disposed at the inner side of the central line ofthe shoe, and the inner margin of the pad overlying the shoe upper adjacent the narrowest portion of the insole and forwardly and adjacent to substantially the enltire outwardly forwardly curved inner edge thereof.

2. In a high-heeled shoe, a sole construction I embodying an insole having a portion of narrowest width at the juncture of the shankand the forepart of the shoe and curving outwardly forwardly of this point along both the inner and outer .'edge, an impost pad adapted to support the forward end of the metatarsal arch of the foot and filling the space normally occurring be- Atween the foot and the shoe sole at the region posterior of the distal ends of` the metatarsal bones at the juncture of the shank and the forepart of the shoe, which space occurs due to the increased heel height, the longitudinal cross seotion of the pad being varied in thickness so as to forman uninterrupted continuation of the curvature of the shoe sole and the transverse section being such as to provide a portion of greatest thickness disposed at the inner s ide of the central line ofthe shoe. and both the inner and .louter '-margins of thepad overlying the shoe upper adjacent the narrowest portion of the insole and tire outwardly forwardly curved inner and outer edges thereof.

` NORVAL BURR-IS GRJFFDI.

DISOLAI ER Patentr dated Au assigne, The Sel y Shoe C0. Hereig 'l 2,050 ,210.-Norvdl Burris Portsmouth, OhioprSHoE SoL'E CoNs'inno'rIoN. st 4, 1936. Disclaimer -1ed` January` 27,l 1938,by the enters this disclaimer'to clai-'m 1.

Gazette February 22, 1938.]

vforwardly and adjacent to substantially the 'ento feather edges I1. Its contour may be described as follows:

In longitudinal section (see Figure 2) its curvature is such as to i-lt snugly to the curvature of the insole. Its upper surface I8 is slightly convexed and gradually merges with the forepart or horizontally disposed portion 2li of the sole structure. Thus, as a space is created by the provision of a high heel, the pad iills out this space and provides the necessary support by continuanceof the tread. The pad is specicially designed to ll f out the space occurrlng'between the pad and the insole. 1

In transverse cross section (see -Figure 3) the pad is of a contour fitting the curvature of the insole and the curvature of the upper so that it lies snugly against these parts. Its upper surface-is slightly convexed fitting. the natural transverse curvature of the sole of the foot posterior to the distal vends of the metatarsal bones. It has been determined that in Jorder to t this shape so that the foot closely and snugly contacts the pad the pad should be of greater height or thickness toward the inner side-of the foot as at 2|, that is, on the inside of the longitudinal axis thereof.

Also, in order to provide full support for the foot not only longitudinally but transversely the pad overhangs or extends beyond theinner edge margin 22 of the insole as at 23 (see Figure l). This portion of the pad lies snugly against-the upper. The highest point and the thickest portion 2| of the pad is substantially over the inner -edge margin of the insole or very slightly to the inside thereof.. With the transverse contour as stated, the transversely aligned ,forwardends of the metatarsal bones are maintained in a more comfortable position or the position where they best support the weight of the body.

The results of displaced metatarsal bones are well known.' A great deal of pain is attendant the displacement since the tendons or muscles overlying and surrounding the bones are badly stretched or pushed out of position and strained and there may be some impingement on nerves near the metatarsals. Not only is there resultant pain from the muscular or tendon conditionfor'v pressure on nerves, but the localized pressure resulting.- therefrom causes a painful callous. The present sole construction provides an impost pad supporting the forward end of the arch of the foot, which pad is sufficiently solid to support the weight, but at the same time is resilient enough to take up or absorb shock.

Having-described my invention, I claim:

1. In a high-heeled shoe, a sole construction embodying an insole having a portion of narrowest width at the juncture of the shank and the forepart of the shoe and curving outwardly forwardlyof this point along the inner edge. an impost pad adapted to support the forward end of the metatarsal arch of the foot and filling the space normally occurring between the foot and theshoe sole at the region posterior of the distal ends of the metatarsal bones at the juncture of the shank and the forepart of the shoe. which space occurs due to the increased heel height. the longitudinal cross section of the pad being varied in thickness so as to form an uninterrupted continuation of the curvature of the shoe sole and the transverse section being such as to provide a portion of greatest thickness disposed at the inner side of the central line ofthe shoe, and the inner margin of the pad overlying the shoe upper adjacent the narrowest portion of the insole and forwardly and adjacent to substantially the enltire outwardly forwardly curved inner edge thereof.

2. In a high-heeled shoe, a sole construction I embodying an insole having a portion of narrowest width at the juncture of the shankand the forepart of the shoe and curving outwardly forwardly of this point along both the inner and outer .'edge, an impost pad adapted to support the forward end of the metatarsal arch of the foot and filling the space normally occurring be- Atween the foot and the shoe sole at the region posterior of the distal ends of` the metatarsal bones at the juncture of the shank and the forepart of the shoe, which space occurs due to the increased heel height, the longitudinal cross seotion of the pad being varied in thickness so as to forman uninterrupted continuation of the curvature of the shoe sole and the transverse section being such as to provide a portion of greatest thickness disposed at the inner s ide of the central line ofthe shoe. and both the inner and .louter '-margins of thepad overlying the shoe upper adjacent the narrowest portion of the insole and tire outwardly forwardly curved inner and outer edges thereof.

` NORVAL BURR-IS GRJFFDI.

DISOLAI ER Patentr dated Au assigne, The Sel y Shoe C0. Hereig 'l 2,050 ,210.-Norvdl Burris Portsmouth, OhioprSHoE SoL'E CoNs'inno'rIoN. st 4, 1936. Disclaimer -1ed` January` 27,l 1938,by the enters this disclaimer'to clai-'m 1.

Gazette February 22, 1938.]

vforwardly and adjacent to substantially the 'en-

US41916A 1935-09-24 1935-09-24 Shoe sole construction Expired - Lifetime US2050210A (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2531579A (en) * 1948-09-02 1950-11-28 Molas Philip Orthopedic bar
US20100180467A1 (en) * 2007-09-28 2010-07-22 Angela Singleton Insole Support System For Footwear
US20100263231A1 (en) * 2009-04-15 2010-10-21 Marie Smirman Forefoot wedge insert for footwear
US8479405B2 (en) 2010-09-30 2013-07-09 Marie Smirman Measurement system for varus/valgus angles in feet
USD790825S1 (en) * 2015-12-09 2017-07-04 Dr.'s Own, Inc. Pad
USD874115S1 (en) * 2019-05-16 2020-02-04 Melvyn Cheskin Metatarsal pad

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2531579A (en) * 1948-09-02 1950-11-28 Molas Philip Orthopedic bar
US20100180467A1 (en) * 2007-09-28 2010-07-22 Angela Singleton Insole Support System For Footwear
US20100263231A1 (en) * 2009-04-15 2010-10-21 Marie Smirman Forefoot wedge insert for footwear
US20100263232A1 (en) * 2009-04-15 2010-10-21 Marie Smirman Moldable arch support for footwear
US20100263230A1 (en) * 2009-04-15 2010-10-21 Marie Smirman Insert for rockered foot bed of footwear
US8523194B2 (en) 2009-04-15 2013-09-03 Marie Smirman Forefoot wedge insert for footwear
US8479405B2 (en) 2010-09-30 2013-07-09 Marie Smirman Measurement system for varus/valgus angles in feet
USD790825S1 (en) * 2015-12-09 2017-07-04 Dr.'s Own, Inc. Pad
USD874115S1 (en) * 2019-05-16 2020-02-04 Melvyn Cheskin Metatarsal pad

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