US2043789A - Multiple record phonograph - Google Patents

Multiple record phonograph Download PDF

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US2043789A
US2043789A US22349A US2234935A US2043789A US 2043789 A US2043789 A US 2043789A US 22349 A US22349 A US 22349A US 2234935 A US2234935 A US 2234935A US 2043789 A US2043789 A US 2043789A
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record
shaft
arm
records
sleeve
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US22349A
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Arthur C Ansley
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Arthur C Ansley
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11BINFORMATION STORAGE BASED ON RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN RECORD CARRIER AND TRANSDUCER
    • G11B17/00Guiding record carriers not specifically of filamentary or web form, or of supports therefor
    • G11B17/08Guiding record carriers not specifically of filamentary or web form, or of supports therefor from consecutive-access magazine of disc records
    • G11B17/12Guiding record carriers not specifically of filamentary or web form, or of supports therefor from consecutive-access magazine of disc records with axial transfer to the turntable from a stack with a vertical axis
    • G11B17/16Guiding record carriers not specifically of filamentary or web form, or of supports therefor from consecutive-access magazine of disc records with axial transfer to the turntable from a stack with a vertical axis by mechanism in stationary centre post, e.g. with stepped post, using fingers on post

Description

June 9, 1936. A, Q ANSLEY 2,043,789
MULTIPLE RECORD PHONOGRAPH Filed May 2o, 1935 8 sheets-sheet 2 57' lNvENToR ATTORN EY e sheeis-s'heet 3 Filed May 2o, 1955 IgE/.94
INVENTOR Herm/R HWJZEY.
-`ATTORNEY June9, 1936.v A. c. -ANsLEY 2,043,789
MULTIPLE RECORD PHONGRAPH Filed vMay 2o, 1935 8 sheets-sharm 4 INVENTOR HRT/m@ C. ,7A/.niv
June 9;'1936; A C, ANSLEY .2,043,789`
5 MULTIPLE REGORDPHONOGRAPH Filed May 2o, 1935 e sheets-sheet 5 65 f mvEN't-on HRM/we CI F/wzfy ATToNEY June 9,1936. 1 A. c. ANSLEY Y A2,043,789
MULTIPLE RECORD' PHONOGRAPH Filled May 2o, 1935 @sheets-sheet e INVENTOR v ATTO R N EYv Patented June 9, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 7 Claims.
This invention relates to phonographs adapted to play automatically both sides of a plurality of records successively.
Oneof the objects of the invention is to provide a device of this sort in which records of different diameters such as a standard ten or twelve inch record may be successively played on both sides without turning the record over.
A feature of the invention resides in the provision of means forsupporting a record in two playing positions and providing one stylus for operating on the under side of one record while suported in .one position and another stylus for playing the other side of the samev record when supported in a second position.
Further features of the invention relate to the means for determining the position of the active stylus for playing either a ten inch record or a twelve inch record together with means for withdrawing the active stylus to permit the record which has been played on one side -to be positioned to be played on the other side without turning the record over.
The invention may be embodied in Various forms and the accompanying drawings are illustrative of one form by which the objects may be attained but the particular mechanism shown and hereinafter described may be varied without departing from the principle of the invention.
In the drawings, Figure 1 is an elevation showing the enclosing casing in section.
Figure 2 is a view partly in elevation and partly in section as viewed along the line 2---2V of Figure 1.
Figure 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of Figure 2.
Figure 4 is a section on the line of Figure l.
Figure 5 is a section on the line 5-5 of Figures l and 7.
Figure 6 is a section on the line 6-6 of Figure 5.
Figure 7 is a section on the line 'l-l of Figure 2.
Figure 8 is a section on the line 8-8 of Figure 7.
Figure` 9 is a section on the line 9 9 of Figures 1 and 7.
Figure 10 is a section Figure 2.
Figure 1l is a section on the line iI-II o1' Figure 10.
Figure 12 is a section on the line |2--I2 of Figure 1.
Figure 13 is an enlarged detailed elevation of on the line Illl0 of the manually settable knobs for controlling the proper playing of the records and the automatic throwing out of the record changing mechanism when the last record has been played.
Figure 14 is a section on the line Ill-I4 of Figures 4 and 13.
Figure 15 is a detail View of the escapement mechanism for lowering a lower record supporting turn table and is taken on the line |5-l5 of Figure 1.
Figure 16 is a section on the line lB-IS of Figure 15. l
Figure 1'7 is a detail showing the escapement dogs of Figure 15 in a different operative position.
Figures 18 and 19 are enlarged detailed views showing the means for permitting one record at a time to drop from the upper position to the lower position, these views being taken on the line I8-i8 of Figure 1 and showing the parts in diierent operative positions.
Figure 20 is a similar view showing the position of the parts when ready for reloading.
Figure 2l is a detailed section on the line 2|-2I of Figure 18.
Figure'22 is/a section on the line 22--22 of Figure 18.
Figure 23 isa, more or less diagrammatic representation of the mechanism particularly in reference to the electrical circuits and their means of control; and
Figure 24 is a diagrammatic view illustrating the action of the Various cams.
For the purpose of giving a general idea of the functions performed in the automatic playing of a plurality of records and before describing the various mechanisms in detail, it may be stated that the records to be played are manually assembled and are held in the position shown in Figure 1, it being understood, of course, that the assembly is to be made in the order in which the records are desired to be played. A switch is then manually closed which starts a motor, the latter controlling all of the automatic parts of the device. The motor turns the record supporting means and a shaft to be designated the cam shaft. The cam shaft during of its movement, operates to determine rst the position of the tone arm for a record of larger or smaller diameter. This is done by means of a feeler and the position which the feeler takes determines the amount of movement given to the tone arm. The stylus and tone arm are then moved into playing position and after playing a record, means are brought into operation under control of the same cam shaft for withdrawing the stylus from contact with the record, moving the tone arm out. of playing position and causing the record which has just been played to be dropped to a lower supporting means.
A lower tone arm is then brought into operation and the same movements are repeated. In addition to the record supporting means, the tone arm supporting shaft and the cam shaft, a fourth shaft which will be designated as a control shaft, is provided. This shaft is operated intermittently to control the proper changein the electric circuits.
As each record is played in its lower position, the turn table supporting the record is moved down the thickness of one record so that the tone arm always moves in and out of playing position in the same plane. When the last record has been played or when the turn table reaches a position determined bythe setting of the left-hand knob shown in Figure 13, the circuit operating the cam shaft and the control shaft is broken. The circuit through the motor, however, is not interrupted automatically, the motor being stopped by manipulation of a switch.
Referring to Figures l and 7, the casing represented generally by the numeral 2 is provided with a hinged portion 3, (Figure l.) permitting the upper part of the casing to be turned back in order to enable the records to be loaded on to the record shaft 4. This shaft, as shown in- Figure 7, is divided at the point where the casing is designed to be separated. The lower portion of the shaft is provided with a depression into which fits a centering pin 5 carried by the upper portion of the shaft. The upper and lower portions of the shaft t are driven in opposite directions by the motor 6.
Drive for the record rotating means Referring to Figure l the shaft 4 carries a bevelled gear 'l engaging a. similar bevelled gear 8 on a shaft 9, the left hand end of which carries a bevelled gear I0 meshing with a similar gear II on a vertical shaft I2. This shaft I2 passes through a bracket I3 projecting from the side frame, the bracket being provided with an aperture through which the shaft I2 passes with ample clearance. Supported by the bracket I3 is a guiding sleeve I4 which acts as a bearing for the upper portion of the shaft I2, the end of the shaft being provided with a collar I5 carrying a pin I6 projecting from its upper surface. The hinged portion of the casing carries a shaft II supported by an upper bracket I8 and a lower bracket I9. The lower end of the shaft I1 is provided with a collar 2li similar to the collar I5 and a pin 2| projects from the underside of this collar and is adapted to be engaged by the pin I6 so that the shaft I2 and shaft I1 are driven as one shaft when the casing is closed. The upper portion of the shaft I1 is provided with a bevelled gear 22 engaging with a lightly larger bevelled gear 23 on the shaft 24. e shaft 24 is supported by the bracket I8 and by a similar bracket 25 connected to the casing. The upper portion of the shaft 4 is also supported in the bracket 25 which carries a bevelled gear 26 meshing with a similar gear 21 on the shaft 24. By this train of gearing the lower and upper portions of the shaft 4 are driven in opposite directions as is necessary in order to play standard records.
Record feeding As shown in Figure 7 the upper portion of the shaft 4 is centrally bored and mounted within this f spring 49 moves the parts controlled thereby back bore is a plunger 28 having a knob 29 at its upper end whereby the plunger may be operated manually. The lower end ofthe plunger, as better shown in Figures 18, 19, and 20, is provided with a head 30 cooperating with a series of members 3i and a series of balls 32. (See also Figures 21 and 22.)
When the plunger is in the position shown in Figures 7 and 17, a cylindrical enlargement 4I thereof acts against the balls 32 and forces them to the position shown in these figures and also in Figure 22. In this position the balls 32 engage the under surface of the lowermost record and support all of the records above it. A presser plate 343 having a hub 35 loosely engaging the upper portion of the shaft 4, holds the records in place.
In the present embodiment of the invention ten records may be placed at one time under the presser plate 36 and these records may -be ten inch records or twelve inch records and may be loaded on the shaft 4 in any desired order. rI'he twelve inch records are indicated by the reference character 36 and the ten inch records by the character 38. In the position of the parts shown in Figure 17, the under side of the lowermost record is in playing position and after it has been played, mechanism is brought into operation automatically to move the plunger 28 from the position shown in Figure 18 to the position shown in Figure 19. When so moved its upper conical portion 39 acts on the members 3l which are at this time within the central opening of the record next above the lowermost record. When the plunger has reached the position shown in Figure 19, the central cylindrical portion of the head thereof is in engagement with the members 3l and wedges them against the edge of the aperture in the record second from the bottom and at the same time the Wider cylindrical portion 4I of the head releases the balls 32 and permits the lowermost record to drop by gravity onto the turn table 42, splined at 43 to the lower portion of the shaft 4. c
The members 3| have cylindrical portions 33 to maintain them in proper position within the central recess in a record.
The mechanism for moving the plunger from the position shown in Figure 18 to the position shown in Figure 19 consists of a lever pivoted at 44 in a bracket 45 (Figure '7) said lever having a horizontally extending arm 46, the left end of which engages a notch in a grooved collar 47 attached to the plunger 28. A vertical arm 48 of the lever 46 is engaged by a compression spring 49 and holds the arm 46 against a stop 50 having a handle 5I by which it may be moved manually to inoperative position when it is desired to reload the records.
The movement of the plunger is brought about by a solenoid 52 whose armature 53 is connected to the arm 46 as shown in Figures 1 to 7. The solenoid 52 is energized at the proper time by means to be hereinafter described and the arm 46 is pulled down until its movement is limited by a stop 54 connected to some stationary part of the cabinet. When the arm is thus positioned against the stop, the plunger is in the position shown in Figure 19.
During this movement of the plunger the lowermost record shown in Figure 18 drops by gravity onto the turn' table 42. The balls 32, at this time are free to take the position shown in Figure 19. When the solenoid is deenergized, the
flange of the collar 86 and the bracket.
notarse to the position shown in Figures 1 and 7. the balls 82 being again moved to the position shown in Figure 18, by the enlargement 4| on the plunger head. l
Reloading the records When it is desired to reload the machine, the knob 5| is moved to the right from the position shown in Figures 1 and 7, the casing being slotted to permit this movement and thehinged por tion of the casing is then swung back about 180. The knob 29 is then pressed up (the "position of the parts shown in Figure 1 being at this time reversed) and this movement of the knob causes the plunger head 80 to take the position`shown in Figure 20 releasing the members 8| and the balls 32. The records are then loaded on to the shaft 4 in the reverse order in which they are desired to be played. 'I'he casing is then closed and the machine is ready to begin its automatic action of the successive playing of the records. It may be mentioned that the collars I5 and 20 (Figure l) are for the purpose of permitting the connection between the shafts I2 and I1 to be broken during the loadingoperation and restored when the casing is again closed.
Circuits and control cams The automatic operation is started by moving a switch 56 from the position shown in Figure 1 to the position shown in Figure 23. This closes circuits which start the motor 6 and cause the cam shaft 51 to be rotated. 'I'he closing of the switch 56 establishes a circuit for starting the rotation of the cam shaft which circuit may be traced as follows: from the positive source of supply shown in Figure 23 along the wire 59 and through the closed contact at 60, to a bus bar 6I, thence along wire 62 to conducting segment forming part of a disc 64 carried by control .portion of the casing is in normal position shown in Figures l and '1. When this portion of the casing,l however, is swung back during the period of reloading, the contact at 60 is broken Ithereby breaking the motor circuit and at the same time breaking all other circuits which pass through the busbar 6|. 1
A circuit to the motor is established by means y of wire 59, contact 60, bus bar 6I, wire 15 to the motor in-lead 16, through the motor to the outlead 18, then along wire 80 to the bus bar 12 and wire 13 to the negative side of the circuit.
T'he cam shaft designated by `the reference character 51 is supported in an upper bearing 8| (Figures l and 7) and a lower bearing 82 (Figure 1). Immediately above the bearing 82 the shaft is provided with a collar 84 pinned thereto and provided with clutch teeth (see Figures 1 and 23). Surrounding the lower portion of the shaft 51 is a sleeve 65 (Figure 7) having fixed thereto a flanged collar 86. A bracket 81 forming part of the casing supports the sleeve, an anti-friction washer 88 being placed between the 'I'he bracket is apertured to permit the sleeve to revolve freely therein. At its lower end, as shown in Figure 1, the sleeve 6I carries a collar 99 having a'clutch face similar to the clutch face on the collar 94 (Figures 1 and 12). Between collars 94 and 90 there is provided a gear 92 having an elongated hub 98 carrying clutch faces adapted respectively to engage with the clutch face on the collar 88 or on the collar 84. The hub 88 and gear 92 are loosely mounted on the shaft 61 and normally neither of the clutches are engaged, the parte being in neutral position as shown in Figure 1. To maintain them in this position or to return them to this position when actuated, the hub 83 is provided with a groove adapted to be engaged by the forked end of a lever 94 pivoted at 85 and urged to neutral position by two arms 86 pivoted at 81. A spring 98 tends to movethese arms towards each other until limited by a stop 99. When both arms 96 make contact with the stop 99, the hub 93 is in its central or neutral position shown in Figure 1. When the circuit is established as above outlined through the solenoid 10. the hub 93 is moved to the position shown in Figures 13 and 23 with the clutch face on collar 84 active. 'I'his causes the cam shaft 51 to be rotated, the effected from the motor 6 through the medium drive being of a pinion |00 meshing with the gear 92. The
box |02 through the bevelled gear |03 in mesh 30 Vwith the 'bevelled gear 1 on the shaft 4..
Since the collar 84 is pinned to the shaft 51, it follows that the energization of the solenoid 10 with consequent movement of the parts to the position shown in Figures 12 and 23, results in 35 the rotation of the shaft 51. This shaft carries a, sleeve |06 pinned thereto at |01 (Figure 7) so that the sleeve |06 rotates whenever the shaft 51 rotates.
Since the present invention contemplates playing both sides of a record'by different tone arms, means must be provided for bringing the tone arms into operation at the proper time and retracting them to normal position after they have performed their function. In the present embodiment the sleeves 85 and |06 carry a series of identical cams which operate during 180 rotation of either sleeve, to move the proper tone arm to playing position after which the operative sleeve is temporarily stopped.
In the present embodiment also the several cams'are arranged on their respective sleeves in the order best adapting them to perform their function and not necessarily in the order in which the various functions performed by the respective cams take place. In the following description, therefore, the cams will be described in the order in which they function without regard to their position cn the sleeves 85 and |06.
` noid 10 is actuated and the sleeve |06 starts rotating, is to select that tone arm cam for operi ation which will move its tone arm to the proper initial position.
This selection is brought about by a feeler mechanism which determines whether the tone arm is to be initially positioned for playing one cam (Figures 5 and 7) which is circular through the greater portion of its periphery but is provided with a depressed portion |09 extending about of its circumference.
The various cams for controlling both the upper and lower tone arms are designated by the same reference character since they are alike in construction and function. The upper set of cams will be first described since in the normal operation of the device, it is the under side of the upper record that is first played.
The upper and lower tone arm shafts H0 are lsupported by brackets and H2 (Figure 7).
Loosely mounted on each shaft I0 is a feeler H3 (Figures 5 and 23). A spring H0 secured to a pin on the lower end of the feeler and anchored to the bracket tends to rotate the feeler about the shaft H0 in an anti-clockwise direction as viewed in Figure 5. A forked link H6 carrying a stud lle is connected to each feeler at H5, theforks of which link embrace the sleeves 35 and |06 thereby to guide each link ||6 in its movement as controlled by its cam |08 and spring lle. When the cam |08 has made about a 45 rotation, (see Figure 24) the depression |09 permits the spring H5 to act butvif the record which is in the same plane as the feeler, happens to be of a larger size, the feeler will merely contact with the periphery of the record and will be moved but a very slight amount, being held from movement by the record. If, however, a record of smaller size is in the plane of the feeler H3, the cam depression |09 will permit the feeler to move a greater distance under stress of its spring Ile and cause a circuit to be closed through the contacts ||8 (Figures 5 and 23). When a feeler H3 is in normal position, a non-conducting portion |20 is in engagement with the contacts as shown in Figure 5. y
Before describing the action of the cams which move the tone arm to diiferent positions, it will be desirable in the interest of clearness to refer to the construction of the tone arm.
Y The lower end of the upper shaft ||0 is forked at |2| (Figure 7) and the upper tone arm |22 is supported by gimbals |23 within these forks. Near the center of the upper shaft ||0 is a collar |24 secured to the shaft (shown also in Figure l0). The cams for controlling the movement of the shaft ||0 and hence the tone arm connected thereto are indicated at |25 and |26 (Figure 7). 'I'hese cams are box cams and are alike except that the cam |26 has a greater throw than the cam |25. Each cam is engaged by a roller |28 (Figure 8) carried by forked links |29 which are connected to arms |30 and |3| having hubs |32 and |33 which loosely engage the shaft i0. The hub |32 of the arm |3015 mounted below the ilxed collar |24 and the arm |3| and hub |33 are mounted above said fixed collar as shown in Figures 7 and 10.
The position of the feeler ||3 determines whether the fixed arm |24 is to be connected with the arm |30 or the arm |3|. Normally the fixed arm is connected to the arm |30 as shown in Figure l0. such connection being effected by a latch |35 pivoted to the fixed arm at |36 and, urged by a spring |31 to the position shown in `Figure 10, where it is engaged within a notch in the arm |30. Both arms |30 and |3| are moved when the cams |25 and |26 rotate but the vmovement of the arm |3| is an idle movement. The movement of the arm |30 on the other hand causes the fixed arm |26 to be moved with it and hence the shaft ||0 and the-tone arm |22. While the above description refers more particularly to the upper tone arm shaft, lit is equally applicable to the 5 lower tone arm shaft, the parts being duplicates of each other.
Th" contour of the cam |25 is such that the tone arm is moved from the inoperative dotted line position indicated at (a) Figure 8 to the dot- 10 ted line position indicated at (b) If on the other hand a ten inch record is in a position to be contacted by the feeler H3, the depression |09 in the cam |08 permits the feeler to be moved by its spring H5 to the position 15 shown in Figure 23. This causes the contacts ||8 to be bridged by the conducting portion of the ieeler and a circuit is closed through a solenoid |38 (Figures 10, 11, and 23). This circuit may be traced as follows: from the positive side of the 20 line through wire 59, contact 50, and bus bar 6| to Wire |50, contacts H8 to upper solenoid |38, wire ll to bus bar 12 and the wire 13 to the negative side of the circuit.
The action of the cams |25 and |26 is dia- 25 grammatically shown in Figure 24 and the relative time when these cams begin to operate and when such movement ceases. It will be noted that after the selection of the proper record has been brought about by the feeler H3, the cams 30 |25 or |26, according to which one is selected by the feeler, will begin to operate to position the tone arm in playing position. It will also be noted that the cams have a relatively steep drop to about the position indicated at (Figure 35 24) and from that position to the 180 position they are circular. At the position, however, there is a drop indicated at |42 which is provided for the purpose of permitting the tone arm to be further moved in the same direction as previously 40 moved by this cam, such further movement being under control of the sound groove in the record.
During the time that the cam |25 or |26 as the case may be, is moved along its circular portion and for that reason having no effect-on the position of the tone arm, the latter is rocked on its gimballed supports |23 to permit the upper stylus |134 to move into contact with the record groove.
A spring |65 (Figure 1) normally tends to move 50 this stylus into contact with the record groove but the action of this spring is resisted by a cam |05 (Figures 1, 5, and 7). 'Ihis cam acts on a roller |47 carried by a bell crank lever pivoted at |08 to an extended portion |49 of the bracket 55 The bell crank has an arm |50 which bears against a roller |5| on the tone arm and normally holds the stylus away from the record against the tendency of the spring |45 to move it into contact therewith. This applies only to 60 the' upper tone arm. The arm |50 of the bell crank controlling the lower tone arm operates to hold the tone armaway from the record against ord, provision must be made for stopping the ro- 75 tation of the sleeve |06 and its various cams while an upper recordv is being played.
For this purpose a disc |54 (Figures 1, 7, and 9) is secured to the sleeve |06, said `disc being provided with` two oppositely positioned notches shown in full in dotted lines in Figure 9. This disc |54 controls the operation of mechanism which moves the control shaft 65 (Figure 23) .one-twelfth of a rotation, the purpose of which is to break the circuit through the solenoid 10 thereby unclutching the sleeve |06 from the motor connections. This partial rotation of the shaft 65 is brought about through the medium of a link 55 (Figures 2, 8, and 9) one end of which is forked to engage the sleeve |||6 while the other end is `provided with an' elongated recess |56 which embraces the shaft 65, the link thus being guided for reciprocatory movement. A spring |51 secured at one end to the link |55 and at the other to an arm |58 projecting from the bracket I2 tends to move the link downwardly as viewed in Figures 8 and 9. The link is also provided with a roller |60 which rides on the circular surfaces of the disc 54 except when one or the other of the notches therein are pre sented to the roller. When this occurs, the spring |51 causes the link 55 to move down and also causes a pawl |6| carried by an arm |62 of the link to engage a ratchet |63 secured to the shaft 65. The movement of the link and the size of the ratchet are so proportioned that when the link moves to the position shown in Figure 9, the ratchet is moved a suiicient distance to cause one of the points of a star wheel |64 to move beyond the roller carried by the arm |66 and urged into contact with the star wheel by a spring |61 as shown in Figure 23. The spring is suiiiciently strong to cause the roller |65 to complete the movement of the shaft if the pawl- The result of this |6| does not quite do so. movement of the shaft 65 is to cause the conducting segment 63 of disc 64 to be moved out of contact with the ends of lthe wires 62 and 66 and to'v cause a non-conducting segment of the disc to be` presented to the contacts thereby breaking the circuit through the solenoid 1|). The spring 98 (Figure 12) immediately acts to move the hub 93 to a central position and the sleeve |06 stops. During this stoppage, the record supported by the balls |32 is played on its underside by the upper stylus |44.
' Retracting the upper tone arm and positioning the lower tcme arm from position (b) or (c) (Figure 8) to the position (d) shown in said gure, the roller |5| is always in'position to be under influence of the arm |50 to retract the stylus from the record when this becomes necessary.
The retraction of the stylus and the movement of the tone arm back to normal position is brought about by mechanism whose movement is initiated by the stylus arm reaching the end of the sound groove where it encounters an eccentric groove |10 (Figure 5). This eccentric groove causes the tone arm to vibrate and likewise the shaft to which the tone arm is secured. An arm |1| (see Figure 7) is also secured to the upper end of the shaft 0 and carries a pawl |12 (Figure 8) adapted at the time the tone arm is being vibrated by the eccenl i 5 tric groove to engage a ratchet wheel |13 secured to the control shaft 65. A pawl |14 also engages the ratchet |13 to prevent retrograde movement thereof. As soon as the pawl |12 has been vibrated suiiciently to cause the ratchet |13 to move approximately three teeth a point of the star wheel |64 (Figure 23) has been moved far enough to be under influence of the roller |65 andthe shaft 65 is then moved another onetwelfth of a rotation.
For convenience of description, the twelve segments of the disc 64 are numbered from 1 to 12, the conducting segment 12,being assumed to be in position to bridge the terminals of wires 62 and 63 when the operation is started. The first movement of the shaft 65 brought about under control of the disc |54, resulted innon-conducting segment number 1 being positioned under the terminals of wires 62 and 63 with the consequent breaking of the circuit through solenoid 10.
The vibration of the tone arm by the eccentric groove |10 causes the shaft 65 to rotate another twelfth after the first record has been played.
This movement of the shaft 65 causes conducting segment number 2 of the disc 64 to be brought into contact with the terminals of the wires 62 and 66 thereby again establishing 'a current through the solenoid 10, and the sleeve |06 is again rotated. The rotation of the sleeve |06 through the medium of the cam |46 causes the retraction of the stylus from the record and through the medium of the cam |25 or |26, according to which cam has been the operative one, effects retraction of the tone arm to normal position indicated by position (a) (Figure 8). the same time the disc |54 moves the link |55 from the position shown in Figure 9 to the position shown in Figure 8 thereby retracting the pawl |6| ready to again advance the ratchet wheel |63 when the disc |54 has reached the position shown in Figure 9. As soon as this happens the link again rotates the shaft 65 onetwelfth of a revolution which causes segment number 3 of disc 64 to break contact between the terminals of wires 62 and 63 and the circuit through the solenoid 10 is again broken.
The shaft 65 in addition to the disc 64, also carries a disc |16 and a disc |11. It will also be noted that so far the shaft 65 has been moved through three increments of movement, each movement beingone-twelfth of a rotation, therefore the segment 3 of disc |16, which is a conducting segment, is in a position to bridge the terminals of the wires |18 and |19., Likewise, the segment 3 of the disc |11, which is likewise a conducting segment, is in a position to bridge the terminals of the Wires |60 and |8|. The closing of the contact by the disc |16 causes a circuit to be established through a solenoid |82. 'I'he closing of the contacts of the disc ,|11 causes a circuit to be closed through asolenoid |84 and through the solenoid 52 already described, the latter two solenoids being in series. By reference to Figure 7, it will be noted that the solenoid 52 raises the plunger 28 and causes the undermost record supported by the balls |32 immediately to be released and dropped to the turn table 42. The
The closing of the circuit through the solenoid |82 operates the clutch hub 93 thereby establishing an operative connection with the sleeve 85.
' as previously described before the feeler is permitted to move. During this time the escapement mechanism for the turn table 82 has had time to operate. The operations of playing a record on the turn table 82 follow the same general order as previously described. 'Ihere are, however, some differences in the manner in which the shaft 65-controls the operation which need to be given further consideration. It will be recalled that at the time the circuit is closed through the solenoid |82, the segment 3 of the disc |16 bridges the contacts of the wires |18 and |18. The upper disc 84 does not further function to bridge the terminals of wires 62 and 68 until the shaft 65 has made three increments of movement. During these three increments the disc |16 exercises control.
After the lower feeler has operated to determine the extent of movement of the lower tone arm, and after this tone arm has been positioned and the stylus permitted to come into contact with the record, the sleeve is stopped by the lower link |55 moving to the position shown in Figure 9. This causes the shaft 65 to be moved to position the number 4 segment of the disc |16 across the terminals of the wires |18 and |18 thereby breaking the circuit through the solenoid |82. After the record has been played in its lower position the vibration of the tone arm by the eccentric groove in the record causes the shaft 85 to be again rotated one-twelfth of a revolution and again establishes current through the solenoid |82 by reason of the segment 5 of the disc |18 bridging the terminals of the wires |18 and I8. The stylus is then lifted from the record, the tone arm is retracted to normal position and the disc |58 operates as previously described to move the shaft 85 another increment, openingy the circuit through the solenoid |82 which results in stopping rotation of the sleeve 85. These successive movements of the shaft 65 have caused the segment 6 of the disc 88 to be again positioned to bridge the contacts between the wires 82 and' 63. The under side of the lowermost record of the upper series of records is then played by the upper stylus and the various operations previously described are repeated. At this time the non-conducting segment 6 of the disc |16 is positioned to break the Contact between the wires |16 and i8.
Tum table escapement mechanism It has previously been pointed out that the turn table 42 is lowered as the records are deposited thereon and in order to accomplish this an escapement mechanism is provided constructed as follows: Extending upwardly from the casing (Figure 1) is a supporting bracket |86 carrying a plate |81 which forms a support for the lower end of the shaft |2. Attached to this plate and to the bracket |86 is a second plate |88 which supports a fork member |88 suitably apertured to provide clearance for the shaft 8 (see Figure '7). The right portion |88 (Figure 4) of the member |88 is slotted at |8| and acts as a guide for a sleeve |82 which loosely encircles the shaft 4. This sleeve is provided with an arm |83 engaging the solt |8| (see also Figure 4). The left portion |84 of the member |88 is rectangular in cross f 2,049,759 `This sleeve 85 is similar'to the sleeve |88 and section as indicated in Figure 4 and the lower portion of the sleeve is in the form of a collar which is forked at'|88 and |88. Secured to the fork |85 is a member |81 having a handle |88 by which the sleeve |82 may be raised manually to 5 positions indicated by a scale |88 (Figure 13). The upper surface of the sleeve |82 provides a bearing for the turn table which turn table is raised or lowered as the sleeve is raised or lowered. The turn table and sleeve are connected by a plate 288 having a projection 28| which engages loosely in a circular groove 282 in a bearing sleeve 283 of the turn table (see Figure 7) The sleeve |82 is provided with ratchet teeth 288 p forming part of an escapement mechanism by which the turn table is automatically lowered step by step under control of the solenoid |88. The solenoid |88 is supported by a bracket |88. The to the sleeve |82 by screws 288 (Figures 15 and 16). The bracket 206 carries a bearing 288 into which is threaded a bearing pin 288. The armature 281 for the solenoid |86 pivots loosely on the pin 288. Carried by this amature 281 is a short shaft 2| 8 about which pivots a pawl 2||. The end of the armature 281 has its end remote from 25 the solenoid formed as a xed pawl 2 2. Normally the pawl 2|| supports the turn table by engaging the at under side of a ratchet tooth 284 as indicated in Figures 15 and 16. When the solenoid |88 is energized the pawls 2|| and 2|2 38 are rocked horizontally about the bearing pin 288 from the position shown in Figures 4 and 16 tothe position in which the pawl 2|2 is positioned beneath a ratchet tooth, pawl 2|| being withdrawn. At this point it may be stated that 35 the unit consisting of the armature 281, the pawls 2|| and 2|2 are urged to the position shown in Figures 4 and 16 by the spring 2|8 connected at one end of the pawl 2|2 and at its other end to a strap 2 5 which secures the solenoid to the bracket 286. When the pawl 2| is withdrawn as above described,'the .sleeve |82 of the turn table drops a distance substantially one tooth of the rack 288. The parts are then in the positionshown in Figure 17 and there is suiiicient clearance lto permit the pawl 2|| to again return to its position shown in Figure 16 underneath the next higher ratchet tooth 288 when the solenoid |88 is deenergized and the spring 2M acts.
In order that the turn table 82 may be raised to normal position after all of the records have been played, the pawl 2|| is pivoted for rotation about the shaft 2|8. A spring 2|6 (Figure 15) normally tends to hold the pawl against a stop 2|1.
yAfter the undermost record has been dropped on to the turn table 42 and the turn table lowered, the lower tone arm |22 is moved into playing position and the upper side of the record is played by this tone arm while the record is sup- 30 ported on the turn table 42. After therecord has been played, the sleeve 85 is given another rotation and the cams carried by said sleeve operate to withdraw the stylus from the record, return the tone arm to normal position, as has 65 already been described.
The machine is designed at its full capacity to play ten records and the machine is so designed that when the last record has been played and the turn table given its last increment of 70 movement, means are brought into action which breaks the circuit through the solenoid 18 and thereby prevents any further automatic movement of the tone arms. The breaking of this circuit is under control of the arm |81 which as 76 shown in Figures 1 and 23 carriesla pin 2I8 projecting from its side'. This pin is so positioned that when the turn table has moved its last step the pin 2 I8 contacts the member 2 I 9 of the switch 61 thereby breaking the circuit through the solenoid 18. As shown in Figures 1 and 14, the switch 61 is carried on a block 220 movable in a slot 22| of the casing. A knob 222 extending outside of the casing permits the block 220 to be positioned at different places along the slot as determined by the scale |99.
If it is desired to play five records for instance, instead of ten, the pointer 223 is positioned opposite the five on the scale |99 and therefore the circuit through the solenoid 10 will be broken after the fth record has been played.
What I claim is:
1. In a phonograph adapted to play both sides of a plurality of records successively, in combination, supporting means for one or more records, Aa second supporting means for one or more records, underneath and in vertical alignment with said first mentioned supporting means, stylus means for playing one side of a record While in one of its supported positions and for playing the other side of the same record in its second supported position and means for transferring a record without reversal from the first to the second supporting means.
2. In a phonograph, supporting means for a stack of records, means for successively playing the underside of each record of said stack, a second supporting means, means brought into action upon the completion of the playing of a record while in its rst supported position to cause it to be transferred to the second supporting means, and means for playing the upper side of the records as they are successivelyl transferred to said second `supporting means.
i 3. In a phonograph, a supporting means for a stack of records, a second supporting means, means for automatically transferring a record from said first supporting means to the second supporting means a stylus for playing the under side of a record while supported on said first mentioned supporting means, a second stylus for playing the opposite side of the same record while carried on said second supporting means, and means for rotating the said supporting means in opposite directions simultaneously.
4. In a phonograph, means for supporting a plurality of records so as to leave the playing 5 surface of the undermost record unobstructed, a second support for a plurality of records situated beneath the first mentioned support, means for playing the underside of the lowermost record while supported on said first mentioned support, means for dropping the played. record to the second support and for playing the upper side of said record after being so dropped.
5. In a phonograph, in combination, two record supporting means for a plurality of records, a 15 stylus for playing one side-of each record while supported on one said supporting means, a second stylus for playing the opposite side of each record while said record is carried on the second supported means, and means brought into action 20 upon completion of the playing of the record by the first mentioned stylus for causing the record played thereby to be transferred without reversal from said rst supporting means to the other.
6. In a phonograph, in combination, a plural- 25 ity of superposed supports for a plurality of records, a plurality of styli, means for bringing one stylus into position to play one side of a record while on the upper support, means for moving the stylus beyond the records on the upper sup- 30 port and for dropping a played record without reversal on to the lower support, and means for bringing the other stylus into position to play the opposite side of the same record while on the lower support.
7. In a phonograph, a supporting means for a. stack of records, a second supporting means, means for, automatically transferring a 'record without reversal from the first supporting means to the second supporting means, stylus means 40 for playing the under side of a record while supported on said iirst mentioned supporting means and for playing the opposite side of the same record while supported on said second mentioned supporting means, and means for rotating the said supporting means in opposite directions.
' ARTHUR C. ANSLEY.
US22349A 1935-05-20 1935-05-20 Multiple record phonograph Expired - Lifetime US2043789A (en)

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Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2507041A (en) * 1945-03-17 1950-05-09 Wayne J Morrill Record releasing mechanism
US2512121A (en) * 1946-03-13 1950-06-20 Thorens Hermann Sa Talking machine with record changer
US2515283A (en) * 1943-05-10 1950-07-18 Benjamin F Wissner Record changing device for phonographs
US2541826A (en) * 1945-12-20 1951-02-13 Morrison James L Donaldson Tone arm positioning mechanism
US2555895A (en) * 1944-10-21 1951-06-05 Paul F Wilber Method and machine for playing disk-type phonograph records
US2570040A (en) * 1945-04-04 1951-10-02 Thorens Hermann Sa Talking machine with record changer
US2592323A (en) * 1944-09-21 1952-04-08 Thorens Hermann Sa Automatic record changing talking machine
US2616708A (en) * 1943-01-27 1952-11-04 Hartford Nat Bank & Trust Co System for the reproduction of phonograph records of different diameters
US2622885A (en) * 1946-02-21 1952-12-23 Zenith Radio Corp Record changing apparatus
US2628843A (en) * 1946-10-09 1953-02-17 Alfred E Comstock Automatic phonograph
US2628844A (en) * 1947-01-21 1953-02-17 Alfred E Comstock Automatic phonograph
US2639155A (en) * 1947-03-27 1953-05-19 David M Groves Apparatus for supporting and manipulating phonograph records
US2643127A (en) * 1949-05-27 1953-06-23 Kenneth J Gregg Record player and changer
US2670211A (en) * 1947-01-08 1954-02-23 Magnavox Co Record changer
US2718400A (en) * 1948-04-23 1955-09-20 Jr Harry C Jones Record-handling devices
US2725235A (en) * 1951-02-05 1955-11-29 Wurlitzer Co Automatic phonograph
US2729455A (en) * 1949-06-09 1956-01-03 Herman H Mueller Automatic interlocking dual phonograph record player
US2777699A (en) * 1949-08-20 1957-01-15 Ben H Woodruff Automatic record player
US2837338A (en) * 1954-03-23 1958-06-03 Lloyd J Andres Continuous multiple record player
US3260529A (en) * 1949-06-13 1966-07-12 Brown Owen Multi-functional phonograph
US3709504A (en) * 1969-11-21 1973-01-09 Lorraine Ind Inc Phonograph apparatus

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2616708A (en) * 1943-01-27 1952-11-04 Hartford Nat Bank & Trust Co System for the reproduction of phonograph records of different diameters
US2515283A (en) * 1943-05-10 1950-07-18 Benjamin F Wissner Record changing device for phonographs
US2592323A (en) * 1944-09-21 1952-04-08 Thorens Hermann Sa Automatic record changing talking machine
US2555895A (en) * 1944-10-21 1951-06-05 Paul F Wilber Method and machine for playing disk-type phonograph records
US2507041A (en) * 1945-03-17 1950-05-09 Wayne J Morrill Record releasing mechanism
US2570040A (en) * 1945-04-04 1951-10-02 Thorens Hermann Sa Talking machine with record changer
US2541826A (en) * 1945-12-20 1951-02-13 Morrison James L Donaldson Tone arm positioning mechanism
US2622885A (en) * 1946-02-21 1952-12-23 Zenith Radio Corp Record changing apparatus
US2512121A (en) * 1946-03-13 1950-06-20 Thorens Hermann Sa Talking machine with record changer
US2628843A (en) * 1946-10-09 1953-02-17 Alfred E Comstock Automatic phonograph
US2670211A (en) * 1947-01-08 1954-02-23 Magnavox Co Record changer
US2628844A (en) * 1947-01-21 1953-02-17 Alfred E Comstock Automatic phonograph
US2639155A (en) * 1947-03-27 1953-05-19 David M Groves Apparatus for supporting and manipulating phonograph records
US2718400A (en) * 1948-04-23 1955-09-20 Jr Harry C Jones Record-handling devices
US2643127A (en) * 1949-05-27 1953-06-23 Kenneth J Gregg Record player and changer
US2729455A (en) * 1949-06-09 1956-01-03 Herman H Mueller Automatic interlocking dual phonograph record player
US3260529A (en) * 1949-06-13 1966-07-12 Brown Owen Multi-functional phonograph
US2777699A (en) * 1949-08-20 1957-01-15 Ben H Woodruff Automatic record player
US2725235A (en) * 1951-02-05 1955-11-29 Wurlitzer Co Automatic phonograph
US2837338A (en) * 1954-03-23 1958-06-03 Lloyd J Andres Continuous multiple record player
US3709504A (en) * 1969-11-21 1973-01-09 Lorraine Ind Inc Phonograph apparatus

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