US20170329614A1 - Notifications in multi application user interfaces - Google Patents

Notifications in multi application user interfaces Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20170329614A1
US20170329614A1 US15/591,995 US201715591995A US2017329614A1 US 20170329614 A1 US20170329614 A1 US 20170329614A1 US 201715591995 A US201715591995 A US 201715591995A US 2017329614 A1 US2017329614 A1 US 2017329614A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
display
notification
container
user
user interface
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US15/591,995
Inventor
Jamila SCHON
Marc Arno Ziegler
Kai Richter
Florian Jann
Michael Krenkler
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
SAP SE
Original Assignee
SAP SE
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201662335897P priority Critical
Priority to US201662335899P priority
Priority to US201662335888P priority
Priority to US201662335879P priority
Priority to US201662335883P priority
Priority to US201662335895P priority
Priority to US201662335875P priority
Priority to US201662335892P priority
Priority to US201662335887P priority
Priority to US201662335873P priority
Priority to US201662335886P priority
Application filed by SAP SE filed Critical SAP SE
Priority to US15/591,995 priority patent/US20170329614A1/en
Publication of US20170329614A1 publication Critical patent/US20170329614A1/en
Assigned to SAP SE reassignment SAP SE ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: JANN, FLORIAN, KRENKLER, MICHAEL, RICHTER, KAI, Schon, Jamila, ZIEGLER, MARC
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • G06F9/4443
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • G06F3/04812Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance interaction techniques based on cursor appearance or behaviour being affected by the presence of displayed objects, e.g. visual feedback during interaction with elements of a graphical user interface through change in cursor appearance, constraint movement or attraction/repulsion with respect to a displayed object
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F16/00Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor
    • G06F16/20Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor of structured data, e.g. relational data
    • G06F16/24Querying
    • G06F16/242Query formulation
    • G06F16/2428Query predicate definition using graphical user interfaces, including menus and forms
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F16/00Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor
    • G06F16/90Details of database functions independent of the retrieved data types
    • G06F16/95Retrieval from the web
    • G06F16/957Browsing optimisation, e.g. caching or content distillation
    • G06F16/9577Optimising the visualization of content, e.g. distillation of HTML documents
    • G06F17/212
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • G06F3/04817Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance using icons
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • G06F3/0482Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance interaction with lists of selectable items, e.g. menus
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/04845Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range for image manipulation, e.g. dragging, rotation
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/04847Interaction techniques to control parameter settings, e.g. interaction with sliders, dials
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/0485Scrolling or panning
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F40/00Handling natural language data
    • G06F40/10Text processing
    • G06F40/103Formatting, i.e. changing of presentation of documents
    • G06F40/106Display of layout of documents; Previewing
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F8/00Arrangements for software engineering
    • G06F8/30Creation or generation of source code
    • G06F8/38Creation or generation of source code for implementing user interfaces
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F9/00Arrangements for program control, e.g. control units
    • G06F9/06Arrangements for program control, e.g. control units using stored programs, i.e. using an internal store of processing equipment to receive or retain programs
    • G06F9/44Arrangements for executing specific programs
    • G06F9/451Execution arrangements for user interfaces
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/02Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications involving the use of web-based technology, e.g. hyper text transfer protocol [HTTP]
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F2203/00Indexing scheme relating to G06F3/00 - G06F3/048
    • G06F2203/048Indexing scheme relating to G06F3/048
    • G06F2203/04803Split screen, i.e. subdividing the display area or the window area into separate subareas
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/0486Drag-and-drop

Abstract

In one general aspect, a method and system are described for generating notifications in a user interface. The method may include detecting an availability of at least one notification available for display in the user interface, generating a container for the at least one notification, generating, for the container, additional selectable actions and appending the additional selectable actions to the at least one selectable action, determining which display device type of a plurality of display device types in which the user interface is being accessed, and generating, for display in the user interface, the container depicting the at least one selectable action and the additional selectable actions, the container being arranged for display according to the display device type.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims priority to and the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/335,888, filed May 13, 2016, U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/335,892, filed May 13, 2016, U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/335,895, filed May 13, 2016, U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/335,897, filed May 13, 2016, U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/335,899, filed May 13, 2016, U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/335,873, filed May 13, 2016, U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/335,875, filed May 13, 2016, U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/335,879, filed May 13, 2016, U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/335,883, filed May 13, 2016, U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/335,886, filed May 13, 2016, and U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/335,887, filed May 13, 2016, each of which provisional application is incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • This description generally relates to user interfaces and user experiences. The description, in particular, relates to systems and techniques for providing a user experience for accessing and viewing data and information related to multiple software applications on a computing device.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Users may utilize or interact with multiple software applications at the same time. The multiple applications may be hosted on the same or different types of computer platforms or systems and accessed from the users' client devices. In example implementations, the different types of computer platforms or systems may include, for example, SAP HANA, SAP ABAP, or other enterprise-type computer platforms or systems.
  • In example implementations, the suite of the multiple applications which an enterprise may deploy (and which users may need to use for their work) may be large. A sample of the large number of applications that may be deployed by an enterprise for its operations may, for example, include applications in the areas or domains of Finance, R&D, Engineering, Human Resources, Manufacturing, etc. Different subsets of these applications may be used in the work of enterprise personnel, who, for example, may have a variety of different roles. Each user may have a need to use a different respective subset of the multiple applications, based, for example, on the user's role in the enterprise.
  • Consideration is now given to a notification service for generating and providing a display of content and notifications in an expandable user interface.
  • SUMMARY
  • A system of one or more computers can be configured to perform particular operations or actions by virtue of having software, firmware, hardware, or a combination of them installed on the system that in operation causes or cause the system to perform the actions. One or more computer programs can be configured to perform particular operations or actions by virtue of including instructions that, when executed by data processing apparatus, cause the apparatus to perform the actions. One general aspect includes a computer-implemented method for generating notifications in a user interface. The method may include detecting, with a processor, an availability of at least one notification available for display in the user interface, generating, with the processor, a container for the at least one notification, the container being adapted to include the at least one notification and at least one selectable action, generating, with the processor and for the container, additional selectable actions and appending the additional selectable actions to the at least one selectable action, the additional selectable actions being generated based at least in part on a context determined to be associated with the at least one notification and at least one user accessing the user interface, determining, with the processor, a display device type in which the user interface is being accessed, and generating, for display in the user interface, the container depicting the at least one selectable action and the additional selectable actions. The container may be arranged for display according to the display device type. Other embodiments of this aspect include corresponding computer systems, apparatus, and computer programs recorded on one or more computer storage devices, each configured to perform the actions of the methods.
  • Implementations may include one or more of the following features. The computer-implemented method further including, displaying, in the user interface in a display location, the container, the display location determined based on the display device and a role associated with the at least one user. The computer-implemented method where the display location is predefined for the context determined to be associated with the at least one notification. The computer-implemented method further including in response to detecting one or more additional notifications, generating a container for each of the one or more additional notifications, and generating, for display in the user interface, the container for each of the one or more additional notifications, each container depicting a plurality of selectable action where each container is arranged for display according a display device providing the user interface. The computer-implemented method where the one or more additional notifications are provided from a plurality of source applications associated with at least one user accessing the user interface, the additional selectable actions providing access to a plurality applications hosted outside of the user interface. The computer-implemented method further including: merging each notification received in the user interface into a list, displaying the list in a viewport, and generating a plurality of actions that enable at least one bulk operation for the notifications in the list. The computer-implemented method where the additional actions are implemented upon selection within a respective notification. The computer-implemented method where each display device type is associated with a different set of notification rules, the display device type including a display on any one of a mobile phone device, a tablet device, a laptop device, and a desktop device. Implementations of the described techniques may include hardware, a method or process, or computer software on a computer-accessible medium.
  • In another general aspect, a system for generating a user interface is described. The system may include a shell container, executing in a web browser and providing a plurality of services for generating notifications in a user interface, an application container, executing in the web browser, the application container and at least one processor to programmed to, obtain at least one notification, provide, for display in a display device, the user interface depicting the at least one notification, detect, with a processor, an availability of at least one notification available for display in the user interface, generate, with the processor, a container for the at least one notification, the container being adapted to include the at least one notification and at least one selectable action, generate, with the processor and for the container, additional selectable actions and append the additional selectable actions to the at least one selectable action. The additional selectable actions may be generated based at least in part on a context determined to be associated with the at least one notification and at least one user accessing the user interface. The system may also determine, with the processor, a display device type in which the user interface is being accessed, and generate, for display in the user interface, the container depicting the at least one selectable action and the additional selectable actions, the container being arranged for display according to the display device type.
  • Implementations may include one or more of the following features. The system where the at least one processor is further programmed to display, in the user interface in a display location, the container, the display location determined based on the display device and a role associated with the at least one user. The system where the at least one processor is further programmed to in response to detecting one or more additional notifications, generating a container for each of the one or more additional notifications, generating, for display in the user interface, the container for each of the one or more additional notifications, each container depicting a plurality of selectable action, wherein each container is arranged for display according a display device providing the user interface.
  • The system where the at least one processor is further programmed to merge each notification received in the user interface into a list, displaying the list in a viewport and generating a plurality of actions that enable at least one bulk operation for the notifications in the list. The system where the additional actions are implemented upon selection within a respective notification. The system where each display device type is associated with a different set of notification rules, the display device type including a display on any one of a mobile phone device, a tablet device, a laptop device, and a desktop device.
  • Implementations of the described techniques may include hardware, a method or process, or computer software on a computer-accessible medium.
  • The details of one or more implementations are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Further features of the disclosed subject matter, its nature and various advantages will be more apparent from the accompanying drawings, the following detailed description, and the appended claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1A is a screen shot of an example personalized user interface (UI) display, in accordance with the principles of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 1B is an illustration showing an example login screen displayed in a shell main container.
  • FIG. 1C is an illustration showing an example launchpad displayed in a shell main container.
  • FIG. 1D is an illustration showing an example active application screen (an overview page) displayed in a shell main container.
  • FIG. 1E is an illustration showing an example object page displayed in a shell main container.
  • FIG. 1F is an illustration showing an example footer toolbar.
  • FIG. 1G is an illustration showing an example me area that can be displayed in a left container.
  • FIG. 1H is an illustration showing an example notification area that can be displayed in a right container.
  • FIG. 1I is an illustration showing an example copilot user interface.
  • FIG. 1J is an illustration of a timeline user interface that can display timeline entries.
  • FIG. 2 is a diagram of an example system that can implement the user interfaces and user experiences described herein.
  • FIG. 3 is a diagram of an example system that can implement the launchpad for the user interfaces and user experiences described herein.
  • FIGS. 4A-4C illustrate screenshots depicting examples of the viewport.
  • FIGS. 5A-5E illustrate screenshots of example user interfaces depicting viewports.
  • FIGS. 6A-6D illustrate screenshots of example user interfaces depicting notification aspects.
  • FIG. 7 is an example data model for a notification architecture.
  • FIG. 8 is an example block diagram depicting an integration of notification services.
  • FIG. 9 is an example swim lane diagram depicting provision of messages using a notification service described herein.
  • FIG. 10 is an example swim lane diagram depicting action processing on notifications.
  • FIG. 11 is an example swim lane diagram depicting a process for incrementing a badge counter
  • FIG. 12 is an example swim lane diagram depicting a process for resetting a badge counter.
  • FIG. 13 is an example of a notification list.
  • FIG. 14 is an illustration of an example process for generating and displaying notifications.
  • Like reference symbols in the various drawings indicate like elements.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The present disclosure relates to graphical user interfaces of software applications that display content, referred to herein as the “main content,” together with notifications, functions, and other information besides the main content, i.e., supplemental content. Such applications may include, among other things, standalone software programs with a built-in display module that generates notifications to be depicted in a graphical user interface (e.g., a viewport), as described in the example embodiments herein. Alternatively, display of notifications may be provided as separate functionality, e.g., as an add-on package, a plug-in or through a separate program that communicates with a main content providing program via an Application Program Interface (API). The main content providing program and/or the display program may be executed locally on a user device and/or remotely, as a Web application, for example.
  • Example embodiments are described in which a number of notifications are generated, configured, and sent to reach an end-user in any number of devices. For example, such notifications may be received as mobile notifications on mobile devices. The notifications provided herein can be integrated into the native notification infrastructure of a respective mobile platform (e.g. notification center in iOS, badge support, etc.). For example, an end-user can be navigated directly to a particular Fiori application from the notification. The application may contain further information to process the notification (i.e., also referred to as “deep linking”). If supported by the native mobile infrastructure exposing actions directly within the native notification center may execute (e.g. in iOS 8).
  • In another example, notifications may be provided by means of email. Email support can be integrated into each application. Integrations may not be necessarily replaced with a new mandatory infrastructure but should be integrated. In yet another example, exposure of notifications on an end-user's desktop may be provided via a launchpad configured to launch a plurality of applications on a client computing device. Additionally, native desktop notification centers can be leveraged if supported by a particular operating system (e.g. in OSX or WINDOWS 10).
  • The systems and methods described herein can function together to integrate a notification center. The user can access the notification center from everywhere within SAP Fiori, for example, on any device. The notifications can be extended by the notification center to include actions and operations. This provides the user an advantage of being able to perform key actions (such as approvals) directly from the notification, without having to open a separate application.
  • In some implementations, the systems and methods described herein can merge and display new and existing notifications in one list. Users can see the read/unread status and order and filter the list based on their preconfigured requirements. Display of such notifications can include banners, badges, and sounds to inform users when new notifications come in. Notifications of the same type may be grouped together. For faster interaction, users can perform bulk operations on all the notifications in a stack
  • In some implementations, settings can be provided to access notifications for all of a user's apps in one location. Here, the user can activate notifications, choose the delivery channel, or set the notification priority—all at a glance. The systems can provide an If This Then That dialog for setting up subscription based notifications. This enables users to receive notifications on specific KPIs or business object values that are not offered in a settings dialog. For easier handling, the system automatically helps the user to set up the notification by prefilling the dialog with content, conditions and triggers from the current screen.
  • In general, notifications can originate from a variety of providers, out of different systems, both Cloud and on premise and out of different technology stacks. Therefore, notifications are generally integrated in a standardized way using a central notification service for notification aggregating. When defining the corresponding contracts and APIs, open standards may be used to allow third party solutions to integrate their notifications into the harmonized Fiori user experience. From the end-user perspective notifications shall always be perceived as being pushed to the user. This may also occur when utilizing Fiori Launchpad (i.e., there is not a refresh button to manually pull new notifications). Native mobile push notifications and email can also be used to handle notifications.
  • In some implementations, notifications are provided in particular display areas in a viewport based upon a context or user setting or user role. For example, different styles and display areas may be provided to help users to understand a context of a notification provided in a viewport before reading the notification. To do so, an indication of the context may be location. For example, approval request notifications may be set to appear at a left center portion of a viewport in all open applications for a user. When such a notification arrives in the left center portion of the viewport, the user understands that she can ignore the notification until it is convenient to read and take action on the notification.
  • In one example, there are two types of notification providers (a) providers that are enabled to proactively push new notifications (b) providers that support reading notifications through an API, but that do not include a push notification process. Notification providers that are not push-enabled can still be integrated into consumption channels that rely on an end-user session such as the Fiori shell. In this case, the notifications can be pulled and subsequently short-polled for that given user.
  • As notifications are typically actionable, they may contain data to allow the end-user to decide on the appropriate action. In consequence, that means that the notifications potentially need to contain sensitive data. If notifications are exposed over unsecure channels such as email or mobile infrastructures not owned by SAP (e.g., APNS) they do not contain any sensitive data. In this case, the sensitive data is read by the receiver through an additional secured channel (e.g., from the mobile device). If that is not possible (e.g., typically for emails), the notification itself can be a trigger to let the user navigate to some UI which contains all of the secure information.
  • In addition, the question on how to deal with sensitive data is also relevant when storing or caching the notification content within the notification service. Depending on the type of notifications and regulations on the customer side, the data may not be persisted.
  • Referring to FIG. 1A, an example display of a viewport 100 with a launchpad 101, in accordance with the principles of the present disclosure. Launchpad 101 may be included in a center container 120 (e.g., “Work”) with content relevant to the user's work, domain, or role in the enterprise. A left side container 110 (e.g., “ME”) with content personal to the user may pertain to content in the launchpad 101 or may be independent of content in the launchpad 101. A right side container 130 (e.g., “Notifications”) may include notifications directed to the user that pertain to content in the launchpad or other content. In some implementations, these containers 110, 120, and 130 may be referred to collectively herein as viewports. In some implementations, the combined areas 110, 120 and 130 (or other screens) are referred to collectively herein as a viewport. In accordance with the principles of the present disclosure, the personalized web interface may be presented as a uniquely integrated, multifaceted user interface which may, in effect, transform a single-screen view on the client computer device into three multifunctional screen areas (e.g., Left/Center/Right “viewports”).
  • In some implementations, the viewport may function as an entry point to access software applications and associated content. The viewport may be configured to provide a single screen view that depicts three (or more) multifunctional screen areas. In one example, the three areas are displayed in parallel as a left panel, a center panel, and a right panel. The center panel may include a workspace area which can display a launchpad (e.g., home screen) or one or more active application areas (e.g., screens) that a user has launched from the launchpad (or tile/link in the launchpad). The left panel may include a Me Area that provides various generalized functionalities related to the user and operation and personalization of the environments described herein. The right panel may include a Notifications Area that displays a broad array of notification types (System Alerts, messages, reminders, tasks alerts, etc.) in a customizable listing format.
  • In an example embodiment, the functions and information described herein are assigned to at least one virtual extension of a viewport. That is, a portion of the display area can be displayed, while other portions are virtual extensions and only displayed as a user or algorithm scrolls to place one or more of the other portions into view. In one example, a virtual extension can include a first extension area to the left of the viewport and a second extension area to the right of the viewport. When the main content is selected, the extension area(s) are hidden from display.
  • In another example embodiment, the viewport is switched to display selected supplemental content by triggering a graphical icon inside a viewport. Alternatively, if the display is touch-sensitive, a viewport may be switched by a touch gesture such as a swiping motion towards or away from the corresponding extension area. A viewport may be switched back to the main content, e.g., by triggering a respective icon or using a gesture.
  • In another example embodiment, trigger icons indicate when new or unread information is available inside a respective extension area. The indication can be a numerical counter, a symbol, a special graphic or animation, etc. Thus, the user need not leave the current context, i.e., the main content, to be alerted to new information.
  • In an example embodiment, the supplemental content is displayed by moving the corresponding extension area over to the viewport. The movement may be animated in the manner of a camera pan. However, other movements such as instantaneous display or fading in and out are also possible.
  • In yet another example embodiment, at least part of the main content remains on display in the viewport when the extension area is displayed. The main content may be shifted away from a central portion of the viewport and reduced in size (e.g., scaled down to 75% of its original size) to direct the user's attention to the supplemental content. In this display state, the main content may be partially cut off by the border of the viewport.
  • As shown in FIG. 1A, a Work viewport 120 is located in the center of the display screen. The Work viewport 120 may, for example, display either the launchpad 101 or an active application screen that was previously selected or opened from the launchpad tile array. The left Me viewport 110 may, for example, provide various generalized functionalities related to the user and their operation and personalization. The right Notifications viewport 130 may, for example, display one or more of a broad array of notification types (System Alerts, messages, reminders, tasks alerts, etc.) in a customizable listing format.
  • The launchpad or home screen in the viewport, which may available at all times and in any application, may provide a clear screen orientation for accessing corresponding application information as well as generalized functionalities and navigations without ever disrupting a user's context of their current task. On a client computer device (e.g., a mobile device), which has a limited display screen area, a personalized UI display may be adapted to present fewer of the three multifunctional screen areas or viewports on the device's limited display screen area. For example, only the Center, Left/Center or Center/Right screen areas or viewports may be presented on a mobile device's display screen.
  • For convenience in description, the terms “Work viewport”, “center viewport”, “launchpad”, “home screen” and “home page” may be used interchangeably herein because each may persist as a user-configured starting point in which to access content.
  • A client computer device structure or framework provides a viewport for a web interface for access to, or interaction with, a suite of multiple and diverse applications (or data sources), in accordance with the principles of the present disclosure. The viewport can be used for the multiple and diverse applications and may, for example, provide services to a user for application-to-application navigation, personalization, search, and incident creation. The Viewport may be designed to provide a common, same, or unified user experience (UX) to the user when launching, accessing, or interacting with one or more of the multiple applications. In an example implementation, a backend or gateway computer system (which may be connected to multiple applications or hosts) may generate the viewport. The Viewport may be delivered or presented as a web page on the client computer device and serve as a single web-based entry point for multiple applications and analytics across platforms and devices.
  • As indicated above, the content of the viewport may be organized in one or more containers (e.g., main or center “shell” container, left container, right container) for display on a display screen of a client computer device. The main container may contain the launchpad (e.g., home page), which may act as the starting or focal location for initiating application-to-application navigation, personalization, search, and incident creation, just to name a few examples.
  • Each of the multiple applications may be represented by, or delivered via, content (e.g., a graphical user element (GUI), link, tile, factsheet, or other object) on the viewport (or within the launchpad). Further, the content of the launchpad may be customized or personalized to a user (e.g., based on user role, authorization level, user interests or needs, etc.) for access to, or interaction with, a selected subset of the multiple applications (or data sources). Each of the selected subset of multiple applications may be represented a specific object (e.g., a tile or link) on the viewport (or within the launchpad). The specific object (e.g., tile or link) may be identified or labelled by a name, title, or icon indicating the specific application which the specific object represents. The tile or link (e.g., by a single click) may be used as an application launcher on the viewport (e.g., web interface) to launch the application that the tile or link represents.
  • The tiles corresponding to the specific applications represented on the launchpad may be organized as a group or array of tiles in a “tiles area” of the UI hosting the launchpad. Similarly, links corresponding to specific applications represented on the launchpad may be organized as a list of links in a “links area.” A Design Time Tool (e.g., available, for example, in a menu or via a tile or link on the launchpad) may allow users or administrators to define which applications should be displayed as links or tiles on the launchpad. Users/Administrators may personalize the tiles area and the link list area to a user.
  • One or more containers of the viewport may have adjustable amounts of displayed content (e.g., number of tiles) (and correspondingly adjustable display size or display area) so that the same viewport can be adapted for display on different-sized display screens of different client device types (e.g., smartphone, smart watches, laptops, work station, tablet, desktop computer, etc.), and across all possible deployment options (e.g., on premise, cloud, as-a-service, etc.). Which ones of the one or more containers are displayed on the display screen at given moment may depend, for example, the status of tasks or activities of the user navigating the viewport, and also, for example, on the size of the display screen of the client computer device available for display.
  • In example implementations, a container (e.g., center container, launchpad) may be used to display main or core content for a user (e.g., application/tiles relevant to a user's work or role). The launchpad may serve as a shell container to access all content. Other containers may include different panels with different floorplans for different content corresponding user interests or activities (e.g. a “ME” panel displaying information or personal data about a user, a “notifications center” displaying notifications (e.g., e-mail, text messages, alerts, etc.) for the user, a panel displaying discussion threads or boards, an Overview Page, an Object Page (e.g., a floorplan to view, edit and create objects), a panel displaying context and ad-hoc workflows, a panel displaying dynamic sidebar information, a dynamic side content panel, etc. The dynamic side content is a layout control that allows additional content such as timeline, chat, additional information to be displayed in a way that flexibly adapts to different screen sizes. In some implementation, if no notifications are available, the launchpad may overtake space typically set aside for notifications. In some implementation, the launchpad may be placed with a visual effect, including sliding in from a top of a UI and bouncing into place in the UI.
  • In example implementations, the applications (which, for example, may be a set of applications implemented on HTML5/CSS/JS technology using SAPUI5 framework) delivered via launchpad 101 may adhere to a consistent, responsive design that allows users to seamlessly experience the applications across interaction channels—desktop, tablet, mobile, etc. Further, the applications delivered via the launchpad may include legacy applications implemented on traditional platforms using legacy UI technologies (e.g., FPM/WDA, SAPGUI for HTML, SAPGUI for Windows, etc.). Access to legacy applications may, for example, be provided via corresponding links in a links area of the personalized UI display.
  • In an example implementation of the personalized UI display, a start screen (e.g., main container, “launchpad” or home page) may present assigned applications as so-called “tiles” (e.g., tile 150, tile 151, tile 152, etc.). Tiles (which are user-activable UI elements) may only be used as application launchers for launching applications and presenting the applications on the launchpad. An App Descriptor defines Navigation Intent (=Semantic Object+Action) to launch the transaction, Title, Subtitle and Icon for the Application Launcher, i.e. the text of the tile; and Parameters, e.g. order number.
  • A user may use these tiles (e.g., tile 150, tile 151, tile 152, etc.) to launch or navigate to specific applications. Incorporated into the launchpad may be a launchpad Designer tool, which allows assignment of tiles to users and user groups for customization or personalization (e.g., based on user role) of launchpad 101. As a general rule, each of the multiple applications (for which launchpad 100 serves as an interface) may correspond to at least one tile. An exception to the general rule may be for factsheet applications, which need not be represented by tiles. However, factsheets may optionally still be saved as and represented by tiles on launchpad 101 if desired.
  • In accordance with the principles of the present disclosure, a tile that represents an application (e.g., on launchpad 101 or any other UI), apart from serving as a UI element or button for launching the application and displaying the application identifier, may be a container that displays different types of additional information or content. The additional information may include, for example, informative text, numbers, and charts. The displayed tile content may be static or dynamic. The displayed tile content may be dynamically updated and may include, for example, data (e.g., trends or key performance indicators (KPIs), and application status, etc.) supplied by the backend systems or applications to which the tile is represents.
  • The multiple applications described herein may be hosted on the same or different types of computer platforms or systems (possibly including some applications hosted on the client device itself). In example implementations, the different types of computer platforms or systems may include, for example, SAP HANA, SAP ABAP, or other enterprise-type computer platforms or systems.
  • In example implementations, the suite of the multiple applications which an enterprise may deploy for its operations (e.g., in the areas or domains of Finance, R&D, Engineering, Human Resources, Manufacturing, etc.) may be large. Different subsets of these applications may be used in the work of enterprise personnel who may have a variety of different roles. Each user may have a need to use a different respective subset of the multiple applications, based, for example, on the user's role in the enterprise.
  • In general, viewports (e.g., viewports 110, 120, and 130) may each represent a partial view of a larger surface. By opening up this surface beyond the borders of a window (i.e., beyond the borders of the actual screen) a user may prepare to use the architecture described herein to extend to larger screens and collaborative wall displays. For example, if a screen or window is too small, the user will only see the viewport that fits to the screen or window. On the other hand, if the virtual screen is wider (e.g., multi-screen displays), the systems and methods described herein can provide an advantage of allowing a widening of the viewport to offer a panoramic view of the surface. While maintaining the promise to responsively support small devices, the systems and methods described herein offer the possibility to also target larger displays.
  • The viewport also provides the advantage of a natural user experience compared to the classical off-canvas designs that are common in mobile applications. As shown in FIG. 1A, two off-screen areas are shown, the Me area (e.g., viewport 110) with user-specific information and a Notifications area (e.g., viewport 130) on the right. Each off-screen area is populated using system-driven information. Users can access these areas through actions in a shell bar on the top left and top right corners. The transition that is shown upon accessing such content depicts a smoothly animated lateral move that mimics the user's head turning to the left and to the right in a panoramic view. User interaction with the content can be mapped to mimic natural user (e.g., human) gestures or input controls. The surface generated by the view therefore removes any screen limitations. Such a surface offers additional space for user-specific and system-driven data.
  • The Me Area can be found to the left of an off-screen area. Because this area is located off-screen, it is not permanently visible to the user. In order for the Me Area to slide into view, the user can click on the profile image located on the top left corner of the screen—an action that mimics the user turning his or her head to the left. This action will also trigger the viewport to move to the left and the main content area to zoom out. As the Me Area slides into view, the user will be able access information relevant to both the user and his or her usage environment. This includes, for example, the user's profile picture and access to online state, settings and preferences, a catalog of available apps (App Finder), tools to personalize the current content in the main area, and objects and apps recently visited by the user.
  • The Me Area may be available from each screen in the main content area. On the background surface, the different areas co-exist and influence one another. While most actions in the Me Area are available independently of the current context, some of the actions will be directly tied to the content shown in the main content area. For example, settings will display the settings page for the specific app in the main content area (not yet available). Additionally, personalization options might only be available if the respective screen is visible in the main area. In some implementations, an option to allow users to view a list of their most recently visited items is provided. This is especially useful for those users who are used to working with a limited set of apps or objects as it significantly simplifies their navigation.
  • The right off-screen area is dedicated to providing system-driven information. This may include system-generated notifications of events to which a user has subscribed. The system may provide more live insights and actions, making a real-time push channel increasingly important.
  • A notification center can provide system-generated notifications from various sources such as the workflow inbox or chat notifications. Notifications can be prioritized and grouped into groups of similar items. Through these configurations, the user will be able to access more information about a notification and take immediate action.
  • Similar to the Me Area, the notification area is accessible from every app that is shown in the main content area. Here, too, the user can bring the notification area into focus through a virtual turn of the head—that is, by clicking on the notification icon on the top right corner of the screen.
  • The notification area exists independently of the application in the main content area. The big difference between this area and the notifications on the home page of the launchpad is that the launchpad home area displays notifications within the launch tiles. By separating the notifications from the tiles, our rationale is to guide the user and make him aware of critical and actionable issues immediately. Other types of information may be suitable for display in the notification area, such as progress indicators for long-running tasks (for example, for a build or deployment process).
  • With the design of the viewport, the systems and methods described herein can concurrently manage different screen areas without sacrificing simplicity and responsiveness. The viewport offers a partial view of a potentially infinite surface on which content and functionality can be placed either in a fixed layout with the three main areas, or in a more flexible layout of multiple areas.
  • In one example, the Me Area slides into view from the left to offer users access to various user-related information including personalization, profile, settings and interaction history. Similarly, the notification area slides into view from the right to offer users access to system-driven information that helps them to become aware of critical, real-time information. The notification area may also offer other system-driven content.
  • FIG. 1B is an illustration showing an example login screen 110 displayed in the shell main container 104. The login screen 110 provides a UI that allows a user to enter credentials in order to log into and begin a personalized and customized UX. In the example shown in FIG. 1B, the login screen 110 appears to drop into the shell main container 104 from a virtual extension area located along a top of a display area. In some implementations, the virtual extension area can be placed along the bottom of the display area. In some implementations, the virtual extension area can be placed to the left and/or the right of the display area.
  • FIG. 1C is an illustration showing an example launchpad 101 displayed in the shell main container 104. The launchpad 101 can be a web-based entry point (or homepage) for enterprise applications that can execute (run) across multiple platforms and computing devices. In the example shown in FIG. 1C, the launchpad 101 appears to drop into the shell main container 104 from the top of a display area. In some implementations, the virtual extension area can be placed along the bottom of the display area. In some implementations, the virtual extension area can be placed to the left and/or the right of the display area.
  • The launchpad 101 can serve as a bracket around (or a base for) a set (or group) of enterprise applications, providing a single point of entry for the set of enterprise applications. In the example shown in FIG. 1C, the launchpad 101 presents (displays on a screen of a computing device of a user) each application represented by a tile. A tile can be a container that represents the application. Each tile can display different types of content. A user can interact with each tile to navigate to the specific enterprise application associated with the tile. In addition, when designing a tile to represent a specific application, a programmer can assign a tile to a specific user or group of users. The launchpad 101 can provide one or more services. The one or more services can include, but are not limited to, application-to-application navigation, personalization, role-based application assignments, search, and incident creation.
  • The launchpad 101 can be a role based, personalized, real-time and contextual aggregation point for business applications and analytics. The launchpad 101 can run (execute) on multiple computing devices including, but not limited to, desktop computers and mobile computing devices such as laptop computers, tablet computers, notebook computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), smartphones, mobile phones, smart watches, etc.). In addition, the launchpad 101 can be deployed on multiple platforms (e.g., Linux, Windows, Windows Phone, MAC®, iOS®, OS X®, Android®, etc.).
  • The launchpad 101 includes tiles 114 a-h. Each tile can display different types of content. For example, tile 114 a can be a news and feeds tile that can enhance collaboration by providing a user with information about the enterprise. The tiles 114 a-h can be individually color-coded. A color can represent a particular role (e.g., finance, human resources, supply chain management (SCM), customer relationship management (CRM), etc.). The tiles 114 a-h can be associated with a group 116. Tile 114 f can be a key performance indicator (KPI) tile. Tile 114 b can be a basic launch tile. Tile 114 d can be a monitoring tile. Tile 114 g can display a comparison chart for specific content.
  • The launchpad 101 includes a link list area 118 that includes links 119 a-f. The link list area 118 is an area on the launchpad 101 that can provide links to enterprise applications represented by the tiles 114 a-h. For example, a user can select and drag a tile from the tile area on the launchpad 101 into the link list area 118 to create a link to the application associated with (represented by) the tile. In some implementations, the launchpad 101 can include a footer toolbar (e.g., footer toolbar 132 as shown in FIG. 1F). In some implementations, the footer toolbar can appear to float over the content displayed in the launchpad 101.
  • In some implementations, the shell toolbar 108 can display a search icon 111 and a copilot launch icon 113. A user can select (click on) the copilot launch icon 113 to launch a copilot UI. A copilot UI will be described in more detail with reference to FIG. 1I.
  • FIG. 1D is an illustration showing an example active application screen (overview page 120) displayed in the shell main container 104. The enterprise applications that can be accessed by a user by way of the launchpad 101 and then subsequently displayed in an active application screen (e.g., the overview page 120) can include, but are not limited to, transactional applications, analytical applications, and fact sheet applications (contextual navigation applications). Transactional applications can allow a user to create, change and/or approve processes with guided navigation. Analytical applications can provide a user with a visual overview of a dedicated topic for monitoring and tracking purposes to allow for further key performance indicator (KPI) related analysis. Fact sheet applications can allow a user to view essential information about an object and to allow navigation between related objects.
  • The overview page 120 can visualize all of the information a user may need for a specific business context (business domain) on a single page or screen. The information can be displayed in one or more variable content packages (VCPs) or cards 122 a-i. Each card can be a container of content for organizing large amounts of information on an equal plane within the overview page 120. In some implementations, a user can rearrange the position of the cards 122 a-i on the overview page 120. In some implementations, a user defines, adds, or deletes cards included in the overview page 120.
  • An overview page (e.g., the overview page 120) can be a selectable application (e.g., from the launchpad 101) providing an integrated gateway into enterprise applications and application content included in the launchpad 101. The UI of the overview page (e.g., the overview page 120) can provide a user with a visual summary of data, links, actions, and content that are relevant to a business domain of expertise of a user and relevant to a selected role of the user within the domain. The visual summary can be presented in one or more cards (e.g., the cards 122 a-i) that display live content to a user at-a-glance without the user having to open multiple applications and perform multiple drill downs through application content to find and present the content.
  • In some implementations, the overview page 120 can include a footer toolbar (e.g., footer toolbar 132 as shown in FIG. 1F). In some implementations, the footer toolbar can appear to float over the content displayed in the overview page 120.
  • In some implementations, an enterprise system can determine content displayed on an overview page (e.g., the overview page 120). In addition or in the alternative, a selection of one or more business domains and one or more roles of a user in the business or enterprise can determine content displayed on an overview page (e.g., the overview page 120). In some implementations, a user can make the selection using a settings UI included in a launchpad (e.g., the launchpad 101). In some implementations, a user can select one or more business domains and/or one or more roles of the user in the enterprise by way of an overview page (e.g., the overview page 120). Selecting one or more business domains and/or one or more roles of the user in the enterprise by way of the overview page can maintain absolute relevance to the individual user and the way in which the user works.
  • In some implementations, the user can personalize the layout and placement of one or more cards (e.g., the cards 122 a-i) included in a UI of an overview page (e.g., the overview page 120) and the display of content included in each card. The personalization can enhance the workplace productivity of the user.
  • FIG. 1E is an illustration showing an example object page (object page 124) displayed in the shell main container 104. An object page can be a floor-plan used to represent objects in a UI. An object page can be used to display, create, or edit an object. An object can represent a business entity (e.g., a customer, a sales order, a product, an account, etc.). Enterprise applications that reflect a specific scenario (e.g., a sales order, am account status) can be bundled using an object. The object page can include a header area 126, a navigation area 128, a content area 130, and, in some implementations, a footer toolbar (e.g., footer toolbar 132 as shown in FIG. 1F). In some implementations, the footer toolbar can appear to float over the content displayed in the object page 124. For example, referring to FIG. 1C, a user can select the tile 114 f and an object page can be displayed to the user.
  • FIG. 1F is an illustration showing an example a footer toolbar (e.g., footer toolbar 132). In some implementations, referring to FIG. 1A, the footer toolbar 132 can appear at the bottom of a screen displayed in the shell main container 104, the left container 102, and/or the right container 106. For example, as described herein with reference to FIGS. 1C-E, a footer toolbar (e.g., the footer toolbar 132) can be displayed at the bottom of the launchpad 101, the overview page 120, and the object page 124. The footer toolbar (e.g., the footer toolbar 132) can continue to appear at the bottom of the screen of the display area of the display device even as the displayed screen is scrolled. The footer toolbar (e.g., the footer toolbar 132) can appear to hover over or float over the content being displayed on the screen. The footer toolbar 132 can include buttons or controls 134 a-k. The controls 134 a-k can be selected by a user in order to perform one or more actions that can affect content included on the page being displayed on the screen. The controls 134 a-k are examples of controls that can be included in a footer toolbar. In some implementations, the controls can be different, fewer than, or more than the controls 134 a-k. The type and number of controls included in a footer toolbar can be based on the type of page being displayed and/or the content being displayed in the page.
  • FIG. 1G is an illustration showing an example me area (e.g., me area 136) that can be displayed in the left container 102. In some implementations, the me area 136 can be displayed in the right container 106. The me area 136 includes an upper section 138 and a lower section 140. The upper section 138 includes a user icon 142. Selecting (clicking on) the user icon 142 can provide a user profile. A dropdown indicator button 144 displays a status of the user and, if selected, a user can logout of an application. The upper section 138 includes navigation targets 146 a-e. Selection of (clicking on) a navigation target by a user triggers a corresponding functionality (e.g., an application) associated with a navigation target. The me area 136 can provide various generalized functionalities as they are related to a user.
  • The upper section 138 can include sort selections 146 a-b. A user can select (click on) a sort selection (e.g., one of the sort selections 146 a-b) to determine how the listing of the recent activities included in the lower section 140 will be sorted and displayed.
  • The lower section 140 of the me area 136 includes a list of recent activities 148 a-c. The recent activities 148 a-c can include links 156 a-c, respectively, that when selected (clicked on) by a user can navigate the user to back to the shell main container 104, opening an application (or function) that corresponds to the link in the shell main container 104. Recent activity items can include, but are not limited to, enterprise applications, triggered searches, co-pilot collections, and co-pilot drafts.
  • FIG. 1H is an illustration showing an example notification area (e.g., notification area 150) that can be displayed in the right container 106. In some implementations, the notification area 150 can be displayed in the left container 102. The notification area 150 includes notifications 152 a-c. A user interacting with the UI in the notification area 150 can take immediate action on a notification. A notification item (e.g., notifications 152 a-c) can have an indicator (e.g., notification indicators 154 a-c) that can indicate the status of the notification. For example, a notification indicator can be color coded to indicate a particular status of the notification.
  • A user can reject a notification by selecting (clicking on) a reject selection (e.g., a reject selection 156 a-b). For example, a user can reject the notification 152 a by selecting (clicking on) the reject selection 156 a. The rejection of the notification 152 a (the notification status) can be indicated by content included in (e.g., a color of) a notification indicator 154 a. A user can acknowledge a notification by selecting (clicking on) an acknowledge selection (e.g., a acknowledge selection 158 a-b). For example, a user can acknowledge the notification 152 b by selecting (clicking on) the acknowledge selection 158 b. The acknowledgement of the notification 152 b (the notification status) can be indicated by content included in (e.g., a color of) a notification indicator 154 b.
  • A user can drill down into a relevant application by selecting (clicking on) a more info selection (e.g., a more info selection 160 a-b). In some cases, a user may contact someone directly in response to a notification.
  • FIG. 1I is an illustration showing an example copilot UI (e.g., copilot UI 162). For example, referring to FIG. 1C, a copilot application can be launched from the launchpad 101 when a user selects (clicks on) the copilot launch icon 113. The copilot application can provide (generate and display) the copilot UI 162. In some cases, the copilot UI 162 can float over the UI included in the launchpad 101. As a floating UI control, the copilot UI 162 can be visually unobtrusive and flexible in its cross-functional omnipresent implementation across any device or application screen.
  • The example copilot UI 162 is an example copilot start page or start screen. The start screen (the copilot UI 162) can be an entry point for copilot functionality for an enterprise system.
  • The copilot UI 162 can provide shortcuts to different copilot features. For example, as shown in FIG. 1I, a collection can be represented by an entry in a collection list 164 that includes collection list entries 164 a-d. A copilot collection can be a cluster of items in relation to a specific topic. For example, an item can be a note, a screenshot, a chat message, a copilot message, an object, or a quick create. In some implementations, the items included in the collection can be homogeneous (e.g., all of the items are of the same type). In some implementations, the items included in a collection can be non-homogeneous (e.g., the items can be of different types). Each collection list entry 164 a-d can provide a representation of a collection that can include a title, a timestamp (e.g., last changed), a visual content summary, and a textual content preview. In some implementations, the collection list 164 can be searched and/or filtered.
  • For example, the selection of a copilot shortcut 166 a-d can allow a user to create and navigate to a new collection with a specified intention. The selection of a copilot create icon 168 located in a copilot footer toolbar 170 can create and navigate to a new plain collection. The selection of a copilot settings icon 172 located in the copilot footer toolbar 170 can allow a user access to copilot settings (e.g., display a copilot settings UI, open a copilot settings application, etc.).
  • Copilot entries can be living, gradually growing artifacts and software entities that can accompany a user from the identification of an issue to a solution for the issue, while providing support in the form of relevant context and actions. Copilot entries can serve as memory aides while the copilot entries can incrementally evolve into valuable transactional tasks and collaborations as they mature in meaningful ways that bridge a gap between predefined application functionality and processes based on personal ways of working for a user. Though the example shown in FIG. 1I describes launching the copilot application from the launchpad 101, referring to FIG. 1A, the copilot application can be launched from other screens displayed in (included in) the shell main container 104, the left container 102, and/or the right container 106.
  • Copilot entries can be made ready for users to use when communicating, collaborating, and creating actionable transactions in desktop or mobile scenarios. For example, copilot text entries can be analyzed for recognizing and identifying relevant text related objects. Copilot text entries can emphasize displayed text, and a copilot application can recommend contextual entities for use in a current task. The copilot application can understand user context and can intelligently propose selections, auto-entries, and user options.
  • A smart template can provide a framework for generating user interfaces at runtime for an enterprise application. For example, a smart template can be used to generate the UI for the overview page 120 as shown in FIG. 1D. In another example, a smart template can be used to generate the UI for the object page 124, as shown in FIG. 1E. A smart template can provide a framework for generating the user interfaces based on metadata annotations and predefined templates for the most used application patterns. The use of smart templates can ensure design consistency by providing centralized high quality code by using predefined templates and controllers. The use of smart templates can keep applications up to date with evolving design guidelines. The use of smart templates can reduce an amount of front-end code used in building enterprise applications. The term “smart” can refer to annotations that add semantics and structures to provided data. The term “smart” can also refer to the way in which the templates understand the semantics.
  • FIG. 1J is an illustration of a timeline UI (e.g., the timeline 174). A timeline UI (e.g., the timeline 174) can display timeline entries 176 a-e. For example, the entries can be events, objects, and/or posts listed and displayed in a chronological order. The timeline 174 includes nodes 178 a-d that correspond to respective timeline entries 176 a-d.
  • The timeline 174 can be used for collaborative communications. The timeline 174 can be configured in multiple different ways depending on use case implementations. For example, the timeline 174 can provide information about changes of an object or about events related to an object. The timeline 174 can provide information about generated entries (e.g., value XY changed from A to B) or about manual entries (e.g., comments from an individual). In some implementations, the latest entry is at the top of a list displayed by a timeline. In some implementations, the timeline 174 can be displayed along with a business object. In some cases, the timeline 174 can be displayed to the right of the business object.
  • Two example versions of a timeline can include a basic timeline and a social timeline. A basic timeline can be a read-only timeline. A social timeline can allow for interaction and collaboration among users.
  • FIG. 2 is a diagram of an example system 200 that can implement the user interfaces and user experiences described herein. The system 200 includes an enterprise computing system 202, a network 204, and client computing devices 206 a-e.
  • For example, computing device 206 a can be a mobile phone, a smartphone, a personal digital assistant, or other type of mobile computing device. The computing device 206 a includes a display device 220. For example, computing device 206 b can be a laptop or notebook computer. The computing device 206 b includes a display device 222. For example, computing device 206 c can be a tablet computer. The computing device 206 c includes a display device 224. For example, the computing device 206 d can be a wearable device such as a smartwatch. The computing device 206 d includes a display device 226. For example, the computing device 206 e can be a desktop computer. The computing device 206 e can include a display device 228. A user of the computing devices 206 a-e can use/interface with the display devices 220, 222, 224, 226, and 228, respectively, when interacting with the enterprise computing system 202. The computing devices 206 a-e can display on the display devices 220, 222, 224, 226, and 228 any of the screens and UIs described herein.
  • The enterprise computing system 202 can include one or more computing devices such as a web management server 214, a frontend server 230, a backend server 208, and a mobile device management server 210. The enterprise computing system 202 can also include a database management computing system 212 that includes a database management server 212 a and a database 212 b. Though not specifically shown in FIG. 2, each server (the web management server 214, the frontend server 230, the backend server 208, the mobile device management server 210, and the database management server 212 a) can include one or more processors and one or more memory devices. Each server can run (execute) a server operating system.
  • In some first implementations, the client computing devices 206 a-d (e.g., the mobile computing devices) can communicate with the enterprise computing system 202 (and the enterprise computing system 202 can communicate with the client computing devices 206 a-d) by way of the mobile device management server 210. The mobile device management server 210 includes one or more mobile device platform application(s) 216. By using the mobile device platform application(s) 216, the enterprise computing system 202 can deliver cross-platform, secure, and scalable applications to the computing devices 202 a-d, independent of the mobile computing device-type (e.g., laptop, notebook, smartwatch, mobile phone, PDA, etc.) and independent of the operating system running on the computing device 206 a-d. In these implementations, the mobile device management server 210 can then communicate with the web management server 214.
  • In some second implementations, the client computing devices 206 a-e (both the mobile computing devices (computing devices 206 a-d) and the desktop computing device 206 e) can communicate with the enterprise computing system 202 (and specifically with the web management server 214), and the enterprise computing system 202 (and specifically with the web management server 214) can communicate with each of the client computing devices 202 a-e) using the network 204. The web management server 214 includes a web dispatcher application 218. In both the first implementations and the second implementations, the web dispatcher application 218 can act as a “software web switch” accepting or rejecting connections to the enterprise computing system 202.
  • In some implementations, the network 204 can be a public communications network (e.g., the Internet, cellular data network, dialup modems over a telephone network) or a private communications network (e.g., private LAN, leased lines). In some implementations, the computing devices 206 a-e can communicate with the network 204 using one or more high-speed wired and/or wireless communications protocols (e.g., 802.11 variations, WiFi, Bluetooth, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), Ethernet, IEEE 802.3, etc.).
  • The frontend server 230 can include product specific UI Add-On Applications 232 and a UI infrastructure 234. The UI infrastructure 234 can include a design portion and a runtime portion. The frontend server 230 can decouple a lifecycle of a UI (e.g., design and runtime deployment) from the backend server 208. The decoupling can allow UI applications to interface with a plurality of different databases. The decoupling provides a single point of UI design, access, and maintenance allowing for theming, branding, configuring, and personalizing a UI without a need for development privileges to the backend server 208 (e.g., no need to have backend administrative rights). The decoupling can result in a more secure enterprise computing system. The decoupling can provide for rule-based dispatching of requests in a multi-system landscape (e.g., for approvals including aggregation).
  • The frontend server 230 includes a gateway 236. The gateway 236 can provide a way to connect devices, environments, and platforms to enterprise software based on market standards. The gateway 236 can enable the development of UIs for use in different environments (e.g., social and collaboration environments). The gateway 236 can enable the development of UIs for use on different types of client computing devices (e.g., client computing devices 206 a-e). The gateway 236 can enable the development of UIs for use in internet-based applications.
  • The backend server 208 can include a bundle (a set) of business applications (e.g., business suite 238). The business applications can be transactional applications. analytical applications, and fact sheet and contextual navigation applications. Transactional applications can allow task-based access to tasks that can include create and change. In addition or in the alternative, transactional applications can allow access to entire processes with guided navigation. Analytical applications can provide a user with a visual overview of complex tasks for monitoring and tracking purposes. Fact sheet applications and contextual navigation applications involve search and explore activities. Fact sheet applications and contextual navigation can allow a user to view essential information about an object and can allow contextual navigation between related objects.
  • The database management computing system 212 includes a database management server 212 a that can run (execute) applications that can manage a database 212 b. For example, the database 212 b can be an in-memory, column-oriented, relational database (e.g., SAP HANA®). The database management computing system 212 can include extended application services 240 that can embed a full featured application server, web server, and development environment within the database management computing system 212. The extended application services 240 can include application content 242 and reuse content 244 for use by the enterprise computing system 202 when providing a personalized, responsive, and simple UX across different types of computing devices and deployment options.
  • FIG. 3 is a diagram of an example system 300 that can implement the launchpad for the user interfaces and user experiences described herein. The launchpad acts as runtime shell environment for the apps described herein in which the personalized home page is one feature among many other services. The launchpad is based on a unified shell architecture. The guiding principle of the unified shell is to have a single, platform-independent, client-side runtime environment which can be hosted on different server platforms (e.g., SAP NetWeaver AS ABAP, SAP HANA XS, SAP HANA CloudPlatform).
  • In general, the framework described herein may support for modularizing comprehensive JavaScript applications. That means, instead of defining and loading one large bundle of JavaScript code, an application can be split into smaller parts which then can be loaded at runtime at the time when they are requested. These smaller individual files are called modules.
  • A module is a JavaScript file that can be loaded and executed in a browser. The module may include a name, a description, a dependency, and a declaration location. The content bundled in a module is up to the developer, but typically the content has a common topic, such as forming a JavaScript class or namespace or the contained functions address a specific topic, for example client to server communication or mathematical functions.
  • Modules have no predefined syntax or structure, but module developers can use the name, declaration, description, or dependency to identify such modules. The name identifies the module and is used with jQuery.sap.require to load the module. As human readers associate a module with the main JavaScript object declared in it, the module names by convention are a hierarchical sequence of dot-separated identifiers like sap.ui.core.Core. A developer can use all but the last identifier to group modules in a logical and/or organizational order, similar to packages in Java, and can use the last identifier to give the module a semantical name.
  • Modules can declare themselves and their location of content by calling the static jQuery.sap.declare function with their name. This helps SAPUI5 to check at runtime whether a loaded module contains the expected content by comparing the required name against the declared name. As a side effect, jQuery.sap.declare ensures that the parent namespace of the module name exists in the current global namespace (window). For modules without declaration, the framework assumes that the module has the expected content and declares it with the name that was used for loading. In some cases a module declaration is mandatory.
  • The description of a module is any JavaScript comment preceding the module's declaration statement and is intended to help to decide whether a module is useful for the intended purpose. The configuration UI displays the description next to the module name.
  • Modules can use the jQuery.sap.require method to load other modules they depend on. While jQuery.sap.require internally has the effect of a loadModule call, it can also be regarded as a dependency declaration. The dependency declarations can be evaluated at runtime, but can also be analyzed at built time or at runtime on the server.
  • In one example, the unified shell offers unified services with platform-independent interfaces (APIs) (e.g., services 301) to the hosted apps and shell components. The implementations of these services can utilize different service adapters for the respective platform to carry out platform-specific behavior. The unified shell can be enabled using a shell container 302, shell services 304, and a shell renderer 306. In some implementations, the shell container may be independent of shell services 304 by utilizing the shell renderer 306.
  • Applications (e.g., apps) 308 may be embedded in an application container 310. As this is an independent re-use component, the embedding aspect is decoupled from the renderer 306. The application container 310 can, for example, host SAPUI5 components, Web Dynpro ABAP applications and SAP GUI for HTML transactions.
  • The shell services 304 and renderers 306 are managed by the central shell container 302. The shell container 302 utilizes a runtime configuration 312, which defines the concrete implementations for services 314, adapters 316, and shell renderer 306, as well as global settings like theme, language, system and user data. The runtime configuration 312 is fed by a number of settings, including, but not limited to static configuration settings in the hosting HTML page, dynamic configuration data read from the front-end server during startup, and/or dynamic settings passed as query parameters in the URL
  • In some implementations, the JavaScript components shown in FIG. 300 are embedded into a single HTML page. The launchpad implementation of the SAP NetWeaver ABAP front-end server may contain a standard page called, for example, Fiorilaunchpad.html 318, or other URL directed to one or more viewports 320. Users may create custom start pages which utilize the shell with different static configurations.
  • The web browser can use http data and OData to access application backend systems 322 and UI front-end server 324 (e.g., service implementations 326 and UI contact 328) via web dispatcher 330.
  • Users can embed apps into the Launchpad. When embedding applications into the launchpad, the system 300 differentiates between applications based on SAP GUI for HTML or Web Dynpro ABAP can be embedded using an iFrame (i.e., inline frame). The system 300 differentiates between applications based on SAPUI5. As these have been implemented using the same UI technology, these can be embedded directly into the Launchpad using DOM injection. This approach also allows smooth, animated UI transitions and the reuse of shared components at runtime. Therefore, applications have to be implemented as self-contained SAPUI5 components, as described below.
  • In a specific example, users can embed SAPUI5 Applications into the launchpad using the application container 310 configured with the following parameters: the URL (root path) of the application and the name of the SAPUI5 component. The root path is a path where the component controller for the SAPUI5 app (e.g., the Component.js file) is located. The application container 310 registers the component namespace as module path for the application URL.
  • The SAPUI5 component is defined with a file structure having a file named Component.js, which should be located in the root folder of the application being embedded. The definition of an SAPUI5 component includes the component metadata. The component metadata includes a config object containing additional information. The launchpad-specific configuration is defined in this config object.
  • The launchpad evaluates the following properties of the component configuration:
  • ResourceBundle—Path to the resource bundle that holds the translated app title. Example: i18n/i18n.properties.
  • TitleResource—Key of the app title text in the resource bundle. The title is typically displayed in the browser tab.
  • FavIcon—Path to the “favicon” (*.ico) file for the app, which is typically displayed in the address bar or next to the window title or tab title.
  • HomeScreenIconPhone, homeScreenIconPhone@2, homeScreenIcon Tablet, and/or homeScreenIconTablet@2—Paths to icons with different resolutions that are used when users add the (launchpad page containing the) app to their mobile devices' home screens. The properties with an @2 suffix enable referral to special icons for high-resolution devices.
  • The launchpad uses URL hashes for its own navigation. Direct manipulation of the location hash would interfere with the launchpad navigation. For cross-app navigation, use the Cross-Application Navigation service. For inner-app navigation, use the SAPUI5 routing API. Ensure that all controls created by your component are destroyed when the component is destroyed. Avoid using sap.ui.localResources inside your Component.js file. sap.ui.localResources registers a path relative to the main page (Fiorilaunchpad.html).
  • FIG. 4A is an example screenshot 400 of a scrollable screen area. The scrollable screen area may provide one or more viewports that a user can scroll through. For example, the entire screen area may be a viewport that can be scrolled onto and off of a display screen. In another example, each region (e.g., container) within the screenshot 400 may be a viewport that can be scrolled between other viewports. As shown, the screenshot 400 includes a left container 402, a shell main container 404, a right container 406, and a shell toolbar 408. In general, it may be possible for a user to scroll (e.g., pan) left and right across different regions (e.g., container 402, container 404, container 406, and container 408) on a display device screen.
  • In one example, the shell toolbar 408 can be used to toggle between viewports. As shown in FIG. 4B, a screenshot 410 includes a representation 411 of the Shell Toolbar 408. The representation 411 may be provided when the Shell Toolbar 408 is off the screen. For example, if the user chooses to view other viewports that do not include the toolbar 408, then a representation 411 of the toolbar can be provided. The representation 411 includes a Toggle Me Area control 412 that can toggle between viewports (e.g., container 402, container 404, container 406, and container 408). The representation 411 also includes a Back to launchpad control 414 to enable the user to return to their launchpad viewport. A Toggle Notifications control 416 is shown to enable the user to toggle the Notifications in and out of a view of the screen.
  • As shown in FIG. 4C, a screenshot 420 depicts a number of Viewports 422, 424, and 428 viewable on a display screen of a computing device 428. The Viewports 422-426 may be selected by a user to show additional data associated with each respective Viewport. For example, if a user selects an item on the launchpad viewport 424, a scrollable overlay 430 can be presented in part within the screen of device 428. In one example, the overlay 430 may be a single viewport that is scrollable by the user. In another example, a number of Viewports can be represented by overlay 430. If the user selects a portion of the overlay, any Me area or notification area viewports may be hidden to display additional overlay data.
  • The architecture described herein can also enable a viewport that can be translated, faded, zoomed, and/or scaled on a display screen. As shown in FIG. 5A, a screenshot 500 includes a left container 502, a main container 504, and a right container 506. The left container 502 may include a Me area while the right container 506 includes a notification area. More or fewer containers can be shown and any of the containers may be presented in any position on the screen in one or more viewports (or virtually off of the screen). The viewports described herein can support parallax side-to-side scrolling. In one example, when scrolling content, the user can shrink and fade content (e.g., as shown at arrow 508) from the main container 502. In another example, the user can scale up content and move content to another container/viewport, as shown by arrow 512 in FIG. 5B. Users can also zoom into and out of a region on a container/viewport.
  • FIG. 5C illustrates a screenshot 520 of an example animation that can occur when a user interacts with a portion of a viewport. In particular, if the user is viewing a viewport (e.g., an open viewport), and selects a profile icon 522, the profile image is faded from a user profile picture into a cancel icon 524. The fade includes a gradual removal of the icon by scaling down (e.g., shrinking from larger to smaller) the profile image. When the user closes the viewport, the cancel icon 524 is faded into the profile icon. The fade in includes scaling the cancel icon 524 from smaller to larger. In one example, if the left container is open and the Main container or Notification container is clicked, the same procedure can occur as in when closing the left Viewport/container.
  • FIG. 5D illustrates a screenshot 530 that depicts a user moving content from a main container 504. Here, the user is moving a launchpad into left container 502 from main container 504. When the user begins to move the content, an animation is generated by the systems described herein to scale down (e.g., shrink) the launchpad element as the element is dragged to the left between containers/viewports 504 and 502.
  • FIG. 5E illustrates a screenshot 540 that depicts a user moving content from a notification container 506. Here, the user is moving notifications from right container 506 into main container 504. When the user begins to move the content, an animation is generated by the systems described herein to scale up (e.g., enlarge) the notification element as the element is dragged to the left between containers/viewports 506 and 504.
  • FIGS. 6A-6D illustrate screenshots of example user interfaces depicting notification aspects. As shown, in FIG. 6A, a screenshot 600 depicts a laptop display 602A in which a notification 604A is being provided. The notification 604A can be provided in a sliding right to left motion into the display 602A. For example, the notification can be provided from viewports outside of the display 602A and into a main viewable content area. Similarly, the notification 602B (or the same notification 602A) can slide left to right (or right to left) outward away from the viewable area on display 602B. For example, the notification 602A may be provided as an alert and upon a threshold amount of time, the notification 602A (or 602B) can slide out of the display and into a notification container in a right viewport (e.g., viewport 506), for example.
  • Referring to 6B, a screenshot 610 depicts a notification 612 indicating a number of different icons/links/actionable content that can be selected to carry out an action. For example, a first action area 614 in which a user can look into additional information in the notification, decline the notification, or acknowledge the notification. Looking into additional information may function to expand the notification, decline may remove the notification from view and in some examples, may delete the notification from a notification listing, trigger email receipts, or decline notices, etc. Acknowledging the notification may trigger email receipts, or additional notifications to other users. In some implementations, acknowledging a notification may place the notification onto an additional list of items to carry out with respect to the notification. In some implementations, a notification can provide one or more links and/or icons to enable a user to navigate 616 from the notification to an application, website, or other area pertaining to details in the notification.
  • Referring to FIG. 6C, a screenshot 620 depicts a notification 622 provided to a user in a viewport. The notification includes buttons in the notification that the user can select. Here, the buttons include transparent icons with textual description below each button.
  • Referring to FIG. 6D, a screenshot 630 depicts three notifications 632, 634, and 636. Each notification indicates a status using color. For example, the first notification 632 includes a red status indicating an urgent status. The second notification 634 includes a green status indicating a status with a non-urgent date. The third notification 636 includes a white status indicating a non-urgent and non-date specific status.
  • FIG. 7 is an example data model 700 for a notification architecture. The data model 700 includes an origin system block 702, a notification block 704, a sensitive content block 706, a notification type 708, a recipient block 710, a consumption channel block 712, a configuration block 714, a template block 716, and an action block 718.
  • The origin system block 702 defines where a particular notification originates. Existing messaging/notification frameworks can be used to store this information. The origin system is also responsible for deciding which notification is sent to which user and which recipient list.
  • The notification block 704 is the central data entity containing the content from the backend and all administrative data. It is identified by a compound key of ID, Notification Type, and Origin System. The sensitive content block 706 is stored separately, so that it can be managed separately for security and data-privacy reasons. In order to ease the processing (e.g., in case of asynchronous queues), the notification may have a processing status (e.g., created, delivered, erroneous, etc.).
  • The notification type 708 identifies the type of the notification (e.g., Purchase Order Approval, Leave Request . . . ). It may be used to identify the notification and also to manage the delivery configuration on a type specific level. It also defines the behavior of sensitive content cache with respect to security and data privacy (different types can behave differently). The templates and the mass texts for stacked notifications are notification type specific as well.
  • The recipient block 710 indicates one or more users in which the notification should be delivered to. A notification can have multiple recipients. The recipients are typically identified throughout all systems in order to deliver the notification to the correct user. The recipients are determined by the notification provider.
  • The consumption channel block 712 defines the technical way (email, native mobile push, Fiori launchpad, etc.) in which a notification is delivered to a recipient. A recipient can have multiple consumption channels assigned, to specify how the notification is delivered. The detailed delivery information is part of the configuration.
  • The configuration block 714 specifies the details about the notification delivery for a specific delivery channel and a specific user (e.g., display as banner or notification, do not disturb times, etc.).
  • The template block 716 specifies templates detailing the way a notification is compiled to a human readable message format. The template is originated from the system that also generates the notification. The template can be replicated during the configuration of the source system or later on by an administrator. Templates are specific to a notification type and a consumption channel.
  • The action block 718 specifies actions that represent a one click action, which can be performed on the notification without further user interaction involved (e.g. approve/reject). An action is channeled to the backend system for execution without further processing on the notification service.
  • In operation, an origin system 702 is defined and a notification 704 is generated. The notification includes a notification type 708 and may also include actions 718, sensitive content 706, and configuration details 714. The notification type 708 can be dictated by a template 716 that is also available to the origin system 702. The notification may include one or more recipients 710 and each recipient may be associated with a consumption channel 712.
  • FIG. 8 is an example block diagram 800 depicting an integration of notification services. A frontend server 802 retrieves and displays notifications to a user via backend server 804 using a notification API 806, for example. A launchpad notification center 808, a native mobile notification center 810, and an email client 812 may be integrated to utilize notification services provided by server 802. Such access can be provided by a reverse proxy 814, an SMP HCP block 816 (e.g., via push hub 818), and/or email gateway 820, respectively for 808, 810, and 812.
  • The frontend server 802 includes a notification service 822. The notification service 822 may be accessible as a central service to all notification providers and consumers. It may also be integrated seamlessly into the Fiori infrastructure (e.g., FIGS. 1-3). Therefore, the notification service 822 may be deployed to either the on premise Fiori Frontend Server 802 or/and as a central service on the HCP 816. The notification service 822 may serve as a central aggregation point as well as a runtime and configuration place.
  • The notification service 822 includes one or more notification processors 824, inbound adapters 826, notification APIs 806, callback adapters 828, outbound adapters 830, notification stores 832, templates in a template cache 834, sensitive content cache 836, cache configurations 838, and configurations 840.
  • The notification processor 824 is one component responsible for processing and sending notifications to the configured consumers including the template handling and processing. As such, the notification processor 824 includes a cache handler 842 to cache notifications and a template engine 844 to generate notifications using particular templates. The notification processor 824 can read (836) sensitive data from the notification provider when needed and handling the caching (838) of sensitive data handling the consumption lifecycle (e.g., read, snoozed, etc.), handling the action processing (e.g., approved, rejected, etc.) towards the notification provider, and handling the configuration.
  • Inbound adapters 826 may be configured to receive the push notifications from the notification providers and storing them in the notification store. There is typically one adapter per technical communication channel (e.g., RFC, OData). The channel specific data format is transformed into the internal storage format. Depending on the backend system type, there might also be a generic component.
  • Notification APIs 806 may be implemented on the system 800, which provides convenient functions for the notification provisioning developer. This component may not perform any implicit commits in order to not mess with the commit logic of the caller. The Notification API is also responsible for queuing the calls towards the notification service.
  • Callback adapters 828 may provide backend type specific implementations to synchronously trigger the notification related functionality in the backend (e.g., triggering actions, reading un-cached sensitive data, reading templates, etc.). The Inbound and Callback adapter are a logical couple for communicating with the backend systems.
  • Outbound adapters 830 may be responsible for transferring the push notification to the consumption channels. There may be one adapter per technical channel (e.g., mobile, email). The adapter implementation can enrich the internal notification service data with additional channel specific data (e.g., form-factor configurations from the frontend server 802 in the mobile scenario).
  • Notification stores 832 store notifications that were received from the notification providers. The store 832 also contains lifecycle information (e.g., read, snoozed, etc.). It contains the notification content, which can safely be sent to non-secure communication channels like email or mobile push channels.
  • Templates may include text templates for generating the notification message. Templates may be stored in a template cache 834. Together with the notification data from the backend, the template engine may generate the messages for the different consumption channels. The templates (i.e., the way, the text is generated) are originated from the backend system. During the configuration time of the connected backend system, the relevant templates are replicated from the backend and cached in the template cache. The update can be triggered manually at a later time. In some implementations, the notification service may also implement a template editor (e.g., for backend systems, where no access is available). In this case, the Template Cache is not solely a cache but a primary persistence. An administrator may invalidate the cache.
  • Sensitive content cache 836 stores information that is related to the notification store content. The sensitive content is decoupled from the non-sensitive content in order for the customer to be able to handle it differently (e.g., switching off caching for certain notification types or the lifetime of cached information). The content of the cache can be encrypted according to SEC97/106. The notification provider is responsible for classifying which parts of the notification have to be treated as sensitive and non-sensitive content. Cache configurations 838, and configurations 840 contain all relevant configurations for the notification service.
  • In order to enable an application as a service provider the developer implements an interface from the Notification API 806 in order to process the actions and deliver the notification types and sensitive texts. The developer may also register the implementation in the Notification API 806 for the specific provider and call a provided functionality from the Notification API 806. The notification provider also may deliver the intent for the intent based navigation on the consumption channel. Configurations done by an administrator may function to configure the landscape and the infrastructure including, but not limited to communication channels to/from the notification provider, service end point (notification service and Notification API), authentication, and protocol (e.g., inbound adapter 826/callback adapter 828).
  • The notification service may provide functions and features to allow administrators and the IT responsible to reliably operate the system. This includes (but is not limited to) for example monitoring for delivered and stuck notifications, logging and tracing, manual deletion of notifications, resending of notifications, and/or invalidating cache.
  • FIG. 9 is an example swim lane diagram 900 depicting provision of messages using a notification service described herein. The architecture 800 may carry out swim lane diagram 900. The components may include, but are not limited to, the launchpad 808, the mail/mobile 810/812, the notification service 822, the backend 804 and notification processor 824.
  • A new notification is created by a notification provider, processed and sent 902 to various consumption channels (from the backend server 804). The notification is received 904 by the inbound adapter (e.g., notification service 822) belonging to the technical communication channel, then parsed by the adapter and provided to the notification processor 824.
  • After the inbound handling, the notification processor further processes 906 the notification. The non-sensitive content and the administrative data are stored in the notification store. The sensitive content is stored in the sensitive content cache (via the cache handler). During this step, the template engine also processes the notification to create a non-sensitive version to be sent 908 to the non-secure channels (e.g., email or mobile).
  • If an active frontend session with the Fiori Launchpad (FLP) 808 exists for a user, the FLP is notified 910 about new notifications. This enables the FLP 808 to update the notification list, by calling back to the notification service for a notification delta. Since the FLP 808 is a secured channel, this information can contain sensitive content. Again, the template engine is used to create the notification content. In case there is no sensitive content cached on the notification service, the cache handler calls 912 the backend (via the callback adapter) to get the sensitive content.
  • FIG. 10 is an example swim lane diagram depicting action processing 1000 on notifications. To not force end-users to always navigate to the corresponding application, actions for processing 1002 the notification can directly be exposed in the notification center. Even though the diagram only shows the FLP as a trigger, it could be a mobile or email client as well. The processing trigger is received by the Notification Processor. The processor delegates the call to the backend system via to the callback adapter. After the action is processed 1004 in the backend, a (delete-) delta will be pushed 1006 to the notification service if processing the action results in the notification not being relevant any longer.
  • In order to improve the performance and avoid delays in updating the clients, a Delete on Action Flag may be introduced in the notification protocol. With that flag, the notification provider could inform 1008 the notification service, that the message can be deleted directly after the action was triggered.
  • In order to allow the customer to control the lifecycle of the sensitive content, it may be separated from the non-sensitive content and the administration data. With the separate handling of the sensitive data in a sensitive content cache, it is possible to provide notification type specific control over the caching.
  • The lifecycle of a notification is primarily controlled by the notification provider. That means for example, if a workflow item is deleted or unassigned, the notification provider has to send a subsequent delta notification to the notification service. For handling the lifecycle of notification type information, there may be two types of changes: incompatible changes and compatible changes. Incompatible changes may include for example, adding parameters to the notification text. In this case already delivered notifications do not have enough information stored on the notification service to completely assemble the notification text. Compatible changes may include, for example, correcting typos in the template text.
  • The template engine typically uses a template which harmonizes with the runtime information of a notification (i.e., number and type of parameters). Therefore, rather than just overwriting a notification type on the notification service, a new version may be created in case of incompatible changes. Thus, the old notifications can use proprietary templates and new notifications may be mapped to the latest version.
  • In case of compatible changes, the information just needs to be re-fetched from the backend and the active version needs to be updated from that information.
  • An invalidation will be triggered by an administrator via a report. That report typically supports (i.e., automatically determines), weather an incompatible or compatible change applies. This could be checked by calling back to the backend system and compare the notification type with the active one cached on the notification service based on a set of predefined rules.
  • The end user may have additional capabilities to control the presentation and the handling of a notification in the FLP. Even though, these operations could be perceived as lifecycle operations, the changes are not driven by business logic or actions (e.g., approve, reject). The effect of operations is handled between the consumer and the notification service (e.g., snooze, stack, mark read, etc.). The status is kept on the notification level in the notification service. The availability of operations can depend on the notification type or can be specified by the notification provider via attributes in the contract.
  • Stacking enables the user to perform mass actions on certain notification types. It may be identified by the backend if a notification type is stackable or not. If yes, the backend has to deliver the “stacked headline text” (e.g., “{x} new Leave Request to approve”) and the mass action texts (e.g., “Approve all”) in addition to the standard action texts (e.g., “Approve”).
  • The stacking itself (i.e., interaction, triggering of actions) is a frontend capability (like Fiori Launchpad). The notification service does not provide stacking specific operations. That means for example, that the mass actions will result in single batched action calls for each notification item, rather than executing a “special” stack wrapper on the notification service. The notification service hast to make sure, though, that enough meta information is delivered, so that the frontend can handle the stacking properly.
  • The end user may have the possibility to navigate to an appropriate Fiori application when clicking/tapping a notification. The navigation will be based on the intent based navigation concept, which will be used cross channel.
  • The status of a notification should be synchronized across all consumption channels of a user. If a user, for example, removes a notification from his list on the mobile device, this should be reflected in the notification center on the FLP.
  • The infrastructure described herein supports badges on the native mobile app as well as within the Fiori Launchpad 808 to inform the user about new notifications. The UX design also distinguishes between read/unread notifications on the one hand side and new notifications on the other hand. The read state of a notification as kept with a notification instance and is set to true, if one of the following events occur the user performed an action on a notification, the user clicked the notification and triggered an intent based navigation, or the user performed a “Mark all as read” action if supported by the respective notification center (e.g. in Launchpad or native mobile).
  • The new state is the basis for the badge counting. It is not tracked with a notification instance, since the user is only interested in the number of new notifications (which he has not viewed yet). The notification service keeps a separate new-counter per user instead. This counter is incremented by one, as soon as a new notification for the user arrives and is set to zero (all viewed), as soon as the notification center in the Launchpad is opened. This number is shown as a badge on the notification center icon in FLP as well as a badge on the native mobile application.
  • FIG. 11 is an example swim lane diagram depicting a process 1100 for incrementing a badge counter. The following sequence describes the high level logic of incrementing the badge counter. When a notification is received 1102, the new-counter for every recipient is incremented by one. If the notification is pushed to a mobile device, the current new-counter is delivered 1106 per user to the mobile infrastructure 1104. This can be used to show the badge number on the native mobile app. The online clients (like FLP) get notified (via a Web Socket based push) about the new notification and in addition to the delta list of notifications it has to read the current new-counter from the notification service via an OData request 1108.
  • In some implementations, particular rules can be established for notifications. An example rule may define when a counter is set to zero. For example, a counter may be set to zero when
  • The counter is set to zero when a user clicks on notification icon to access Notification Center, when a User is in the notification Center, new notification arrives, navigating back to FLP or clicking Notification Icon, when a User is inside an app, High Priority Banner is shown, User clicks banner, counter is set to zero or minus one, when a User is on a mobile device, native notification is shown, tap on native notification will set counter to zero or minus one.
  • Another example rule may define when a notification is displayed and viewed. For example, a notification may be considered viewed when a user clicks on notification icon to access Notification Center, when the User is in the notification Center, new notification arrives, when the User is inside an app, High Priority Banner is shown, User clicks banner, when the user is on a mobile device, native notification is shown, tap on native notification to navigate will set this item as viewed.
  • Another example rule may define when a notification is read when the user clicks on notification to navigate to app and/or when the user clicks High Priority Banner, and/or when a user clicks native banner/alert, etc.
  • FIG. 12 is an example swim lane diagram depicting a process 1200 for resetting a badge counter. Resetting the badge counter can include a resetCounter function being called 1202 on by the notification service, after the user opens 1204 the notification center (either on mobile or desktop). This may reset the new counter for the user triggering the request. The information to delete the badge on the native app is sent 1206 to the mobile device as well. In addition, a notification, that the new counter changed, is pushed 1208 to all online clients (like FLP, via a WebSocket based push). This triggers re-reading of the news counter from the notification service via a get request 1210. By this logic the reset of the badge is synced to all online clients.
  • The end-to-end notification experience may leverage the native notification infrastructure (e.g. APNS on iOS). For enabling notifications on mobile channels and abstracting the specifics of the different mobile platforms, the notification service uses SAP's mobile platform (on premise or in the cloud). In order to overcome the APNS “certificate issue”, the HCPms Push Hub will be used (see [HCPmsPushHub]). In case users request a non-cloud based solution for routing notifications to own custom-specific packaged apps, one could also imagine that the SMP itself provides a solution for dealing with APNS and custom-certificates in the future.
  • The SMP may be enabled to deliver a notification identified by the user name and intend based navigation target to the end user. The notification may be delivered, if the target application is installed on the user's device. In general, a notification delivered to a mobile device is technically bound to a native mobile app on that device.
  • Since the notification, pushed to a mobile device, is usually processed by servers outside of an SAP network, the mobile push channel is considered as not secure. Therefore, the push notification can only contain non-sensitive content. Therefore the notification can actively pull the sensitive content from the notification service as soon as the user accesses the notification in the native notification center if the platform supports it.
  • The integration of the backend with the notification service, as well as the integration of the frontend with the notification service should happen on the data level through services. That means, the notification provider does not provide any sort of UI snippets to be plugged into the notification center (FLP or native mobile). If further user interactions with the notification are requested, the user can navigate from the notification center to the registered Fiori app.
  • The Provider Interface covers the communication between a notification provider and the notification service in both directions: On the one hand side it allows the notification provider to push new notifications to the notification service. This can ensure that the notification can call back to the notification provider to get cross-notification-instance specific content (e.g. notification type specific templates, mass texts for stacked notifications) and to trigger the execution of actions (e.g. approve, reject).
  • The interface towards the consumer may provide pre-aggregated and processed notifications (e.g., language dependent, based on consumption channel specific templates). The interface may also contain links to operations and actions for the consumer to call back upon user interaction and should be prepared to support Web Socket based updates.
  • The consumer API may be consumed by the Fiori Launchpad, by mobile apps, and in the future potentially by non Fiori apps, email plugins, or by consumers provided by customers and partners. Therefore OData may be used as the protocol for the provisioning.
  • FIG. 13 is an example of a notification list view 1300. As shown, the notification list view 1300 can be arranged and/or organized by date 1302, by notification type 1304, or by priority 1306. Here, the by date 1302 option is selected. Each notification 1308, 1310, 1312, 1314 in the list 1300 are organized in date order. Each notification pertains to a different application available and provided within a computing device. In general, a list of notifications is associated with a user (or a user role).
  • In the example notification 1308, a travel request notification is awaiting approval by the user associated with the notification 1308. The user can select approve 1316 or decline 1318. Other actions are possible. For example, an action to forward to another user may be provided. An action to make a change request to the timing of the travel request may also be provided.
  • Items can be added to the list 1300 based on internal events within apps or systems. The list can display various types of notifications, which can all differ in terms of appearance, content, and functionality. In some implementations, the list is ordered by a timestamp (e.g., most recent notification first). The time stamp for a notification group may be based on the most recent notification within the group.
  • In some implementations, the notifications can include a priority indicator, a tap/click option to navigate to a particular relevant app or source associated with the notification, a read/unread status, an actionable notification item (e.g., perform tasks directly from the notification), scrolling, subscription based notification alerts (e.g., to KPIs or following a business object).
  • In some implementations, the notification list 1300 can be displayed and arranged by type 1304. When the type is chosen, items in the list may appear as grouped notifications. Bulk actions can be hidden by an administrator for critical approvals.
  • In some implementations, on initial display, all items may be collapsed. The priority indicator may be presented at the notification group level. The highest priority of a single item defines group priority. In some implementations, a single item can appear as well when only one notification is in the list.
  • In some implementations, a priority 1306 sorting may be selected. The priority sorting may sort by reverse chronological order of when the message is received. Notifications may include attributes including, but not limited to title, description image/icon, author/source, timestamp, object status/priority, read/unread, action, operation, trigger to expand/contract/truncate notification.
  • FIG. 14 is an illustration of an example process 1400 for generating and displaying notifications, such as notification 1300, for example. The notifications may be generated and displayed within any number of applications. At block 1402, the process 1400 may include detecting, with a processor, an availability of at least one notification available for display in the user interface. At block 1404, the process 1400 may include generating, with the processor, a container for the at least one notification, the container being adapted to include the at least one notification and at least one selectable action.
  • At block 1406, the process 1400 may include generating, with the processor and for the container, additional selectable actions and appending the additional selectable actions to the at least one selectable action. The additional selectable actions may be generated based at least in part on a context determined to be associated with the at least one notification and at least one user accessing the user interface. Example actions may include accept, reject, move, archive, respond, mark as low or high importance, elevate or de-elevate status, update document, etc.
  • At block 1408, the process 1400 may include determining, with the processor, which display device type of a plurality of display device types in which the user interface is being accessed. For example, a tablet, a laptop, a mobile phone, a desktop or other computing device may be configured to display particular applications and notifications according to the display size, type, and/or display features.
  • At block 1410, the process 1400 may include generating, for display in the user interface, the container depicting the at least one selectable action and the additional selectable actions. The container may be arranged for display according to the determined display device type.
  • In some implementations, the process 1400 also includes displaying, in the user interface in a display location, the container, the display location determined based on the determined display device and a role associated with the at least one user. For example, particular containers holding notifications may be displayed in one area of a device based on device size and based on the user role being associated with performing particular actions associated with similar notifications. In some implementations, the process 1400 also includes the display location being predefined for the context determined to be associated with the at least one notification.
  • In some implementations, the process 1400 also includes in response to detecting one or more additional notifications, generating a container for each of the one or more additional notifications, and generating, for display in the user interface, the container for each of the one or more additional notifications. Each container may depict a plurality of selectable action. Each container may be arranged for display according a determined display device providing the user interface.
  • In some implementations, the process 1400 also includes the one or more additional notifications being provided from a plurality of source applications associated with at least one user accessing the user interface. The additional selectable actions may provide access to a plurality applications hosted outside of the user interface.
  • In some implementations, the process 1400 also includes merging each notification received in the user interface into a list, displaying the list in a viewport and generating a plurality of actions that enable at least one bulk operation for the notifications in the list. In some implementations, the process 1400 also includes having the additional actions implemented upon selection within a respective notification.
  • In some implementations, the process 1400 also includes having each display device type be associated with a different set of notification rules. the display device type may include a display on any one of a mobile phone device, a tablet device, a laptop device, and a desktop device.
  • The various systems and techniques described herein may be implemented in digital electronic circuitry, or in computer hardware, firmware, software, or in combinations of them. The various techniques may implemented as a computer program product, i.e., a computer program tangibly embodied in an information carrier, e.g., in a machine readable non-transitory storage device, for execution by, or to control the operation of, data processing apparatus, e.g., a programmable processor, a computer, or multiple computers. A computer program, such as the computer program(s) described above, can be written in any form of programming language, including compiled or interpreted languages, and can be deployed in any form, including as a standalone program or as a module, component, subroutine, or other unit suitable for use in a computing environment. A computer program can be deployed to be executed on one computer or on multiple computers at one site or distributed across multiple sites and interconnected by a communication network.
  • Processors suitable for the execution of a computer program include, by way of example, both general and special purpose microprocessors, and any one or more processors of any kind of digital computer. Generally, a processor will receive instructions and data from a read only memory or a random access memory or both. Elements of a computer may include at least one processor for executing instructions and one or more memory devices for storing instructions and data. Generally, a computer also may include, or be operatively coupled to receive data from or transfer data to, or both, one or more mass storage devices for storing data, e.g., magnetic, magnetooptical disks, or optical disks. Information carriers suitable for embodying computer program instructions and data include all forms of nonvolatile memory, including by way of example semiconductor memory devices, e.g., EPROM, EEPROM, and flash memory devices; magnetic disks, e.g., internal hard disks or removable disks; magnetooptical disks; and CDROM and DVD-ROM disks. The processor and the memory may be supplemented by, or incorporated in special purpose logic circuitry.
  • Implementations may be implemented in a computing system that includes a backend component, e.g., as a data server, or that includes a middleware component, e.g., an application server, or that includes a frontend component, e.g., a client computer having a graphical user interface or a Web browser through which a user can interact with an implementation, or any combination of such backend, middleware, or frontend components. Components may be interconnected by any form or medium of digital data communication, e.g., a communication network. Examples of communication networks include a local area network (LAN) and a wide area network (WAN), e.g., the Internet.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1. A computer-implemented method for generating notifications in a user interface, the method comprising:
detecting, with a processor, an availability of at least one notification available for display in the user interface;
generating, with the processor, a container for the at least one notification, the container being adapted to include the at least one notification and at least one selectable action;
generating, with the processor and for the container, additional selectable actions and appending the additional selectable actions to the at least one selectable action, the additional selectable actions being generated based at least in part on a context determined to be associated with the at least one notification and at least one user accessing the user interface;
determining, with the processor, a display device type in which the user interface is being accessed; and
generating, for display in the user interface, the container depicting the at least one selectable action and the additional selectable actions, the container being arranged for display according to the display device type.
2. The computer-implemented method of claim 1, further comprising, displaying, in the user interface in a display location, the container, the display location determined based on the display device and a role associated with the at least one user.
3. The computer-implemented method of claim 2, wherein the display location is predefined for the context determined to be associated with the at least one notification.
4. The computer-implemented method of claim 1, further comprising:
in response to detecting one or more additional notifications,
generating a container for each of the one or more additional notifications; and
generating, for display in the user interface, the container for each of the one or more additional notifications, each container depicting a plurality of selectable action,
wherein each container is arranged for display according a display device providing the user interface.
5. The computer-implemented method of claim 4, wherein the one or more additional notifications are provided from a plurality of source applications associated with at least one user accessing the user interface, the additional selectable actions providing access to a plurality applications hosted outside of the user interface.
6. The computer-implemented method of claim 1, further comprising:
merging each notification received in the user interface into a list;
displaying the list in a viewport; and
generating a plurality of actions that enable at least one bulk operation for the notifications in the list.
7. The computer-implemented method of claim 1, wherein the additional actions are implemented upon selection within a respective notification.
8. The computer-implemented method of claim 1, wherein each display device type is associated with a different set of notification rules, the display device type including a display on any one of a mobile phone device, a tablet device, a laptop device, and a desktop device.
9. A system for generating a user interface, the system comprising:
a shell container, executing in a web browser and providing a plurality of services for generating notifications in a user interface;
an application container, executing in the web browser, the application container and
at least one processor to programmed to,
obtain at least one notification,
provide, for display in a display device, the user interface depicting the at least one notification,
detect, with a processor, an availability of at least one notification available for display in the user interface,
generate, with the processor, a container for the at least one notification, the container being adapted to include the at least one notification and at least one selectable action,
generate, with the processor and for the container, additional selectable actions and append the additional selectable actions to the at least one selectable action, the additional selectable actions being generated based at least in part on a context determined to be associated with the at least one notification and at least one user accessing the user interface,
determine, with the processor, a display device type in which the user interface is being accessed, and
generate, for display in the user interface, the container depicting the at least one selectable action and the additional selectable actions, the container being arranged for display according to the display device type.
10. The system of claim 9, wherein the at least one processor is further programmed to display, in the user interface in a display location, the container, the display location determined based on the display device and a role associated with the at least one user.
11. The system of claim 9, wherein the at least one processor is further programmed to:
in response to detecting one or more additional notifications,
generating a container for each of the one or more additional notifications; and
generating, for display in the user interface, the container for each of the one or more additional notifications, each container depicting a plurality of selectable action,
wherein each container is arranged for display according a display device providing the user interface.
12. The system of claim 9, wherein the at least one processor is further programmed to:
merge each notification received in the user interface into a list;
display the list in a viewport; and
generate a plurality of actions that enable at least one bulk operation for the notifications in the list.
13. The system of claim 9, wherein the additional actions are implemented upon selection within a respective notification.
14. The system of claim 9, wherein each display device type is associated with a different set of notification rules, the display device type including a display on any one of a mobile phone device, a tablet device, a laptop device, and a desktop device.
15. A computer program product for generating a plurality of notifications for display in a user interface, the computer program product being tangibly embodied on a non-transitory computer-readable storage medium and comprising instructions that, when executed by at least one computing device, are configured to cause the at least one computing device to:
obtain at least one notification;
provide, for display in a display device, the user interface depicting the at least one notification;
detect, with a processor, an availability of at least one notification available for display in the user interface;
generate, with the processor, a container for the at least one notification, the container being adapted to include the at least one notification and at least one selectable action;
generate, with the processor and for the container, additional selectable actions and append the additional selectable actions to the at least one selectable action, the additional selectable actions being generated based at least in part on a context determined to be associated with the at least one notification and at least one user accessing the user interface;
determine, with the processor, a display device type in which the user interface is being accessed; and
generate, for display in the user interface, the container depicting the at least one selectable action and the additional selectable actions, the container being arranged for display according to the display device type.
16. The computer program product of claim 15, wherein the instructions, when executed by the at least one computing device, are configured to cause the at least one computing device to:
display, in the user interface in a display location, the container, the display location determined based on the display device and a role associated with the at least one user.
17. The computer program product of claim 15, wherein the instructions, when executed by the at least one computing device, are configured to cause the at least one computing device to:
in response to detecting one or more additional notifications,
generate a container for each of the one or more additional notifications; and
generate, for display in the user interface, the container for each of the one or more additional notifications, each container depicting a plurality of selectable action,
wherein each container is arranged for display according a display device providing the user interface.
18. The computer program product of claim 15, wherein the instructions, when executed by the at least one computing device, are configured to cause the at least one computing device to:
merge each notification received in the user interface into a list;
displaying the list in a viewport; and
generating a plurality of actions that enable at least one bulk operation for the notifications in the list.
19. The computer program product of claim 15, wherein the additional actions are implemented upon selection within a respective notification.
20. The computer program product of claim 15, wherein each display device type is associated with a different set of notification rules, the display device type including a display on any one of a mobile phone device, a tablet device, a laptop device, and a desktop device.
US15/591,995 2016-05-13 2017-05-10 Notifications in multi application user interfaces Abandoned US20170329614A1 (en)

Priority Applications (12)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201662335899P true 2016-05-13 2016-05-13
US201662335888P true 2016-05-13 2016-05-13
US201662335879P true 2016-05-13 2016-05-13
US201662335883P true 2016-05-13 2016-05-13
US201662335895P true 2016-05-13 2016-05-13
US201662335875P true 2016-05-13 2016-05-13
US201662335892P true 2016-05-13 2016-05-13
US201662335887P true 2016-05-13 2016-05-13
US201662335873P true 2016-05-13 2016-05-13
US201662335886P true 2016-05-13 2016-05-13
US201662335897P true 2016-05-13 2016-05-13
US15/591,995 US20170329614A1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-05-10 Notifications in multi application user interfaces

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US15/591,995 US20170329614A1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-05-10 Notifications in multi application user interfaces

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20170329614A1 true US20170329614A1 (en) 2017-11-16

Family

ID=60294606

Family Applications (6)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15/461,330 Active US10353534B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-03-16 Overview page in multi application user interface
US15/462,072 Active 2037-11-03 US10649611B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-03-17 Object pages in multi application user interface
US15/462,084 Abandoned US20170329468A1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-03-17 Application finder on multi application user interface
US15/591,989 Abandoned US20170329483A1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-05-10 Viewport for multi application user interface
US15/591,999 Abandoned US20170344218A1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-05-10 Launchpad for multi application user interface
US15/591,995 Abandoned US20170329614A1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-05-10 Notifications in multi application user interfaces

Family Applications Before (5)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15/461,330 Active US10353534B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-03-16 Overview page in multi application user interface
US15/462,072 Active 2037-11-03 US10649611B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-03-17 Object pages in multi application user interface
US15/462,084 Abandoned US20170329468A1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-03-17 Application finder on multi application user interface
US15/591,989 Abandoned US20170329483A1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-05-10 Viewport for multi application user interface
US15/591,999 Abandoned US20170344218A1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-05-10 Launchpad for multi application user interface

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (6) US10353534B2 (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20180295227A1 (en) * 2013-02-07 2018-10-11 Tencent Technology (Shenzhen) Company Limited Method, device and storage medium for setting position of function setting key of mobile terminal
CN109697010A (en) * 2018-11-22 2019-04-30 努比亚技术有限公司 A kind of suspended window position control method, terminal and computer readable storage medium
US10318253B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2019-06-11 Sap Se Smart templates for use in multiple platforms
US10346184B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2019-07-09 Sap Se Open data protocol services in applications and interfaces across multiple platforms
US10353564B2 (en) 2015-12-21 2019-07-16 Sap Se Graphical user interface with virtual extension areas
US10353534B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2019-07-16 Sap Se Overview page in multi application user interface
US10528440B2 (en) * 2016-11-28 2020-01-07 Sap Se Metadata cataloging framework
US10579238B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2020-03-03 Sap Se Flexible screen layout across multiple platforms
US10915303B2 (en) 2017-01-26 2021-02-09 Sap Se Run time integrated development and modification system

Families Citing this family (45)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN105373381B (en) * 2015-10-20 2020-08-21 惠州Tcl移动通信有限公司 Manufacturing method and manufacturing system of desktop starter of mobile terminal
US9858063B2 (en) 2016-02-10 2018-01-02 Vignet Incorporated Publishing customized application modules
US10540661B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2020-01-21 Sap Se Integrated service support tool across multiple applications
USD846559S1 (en) * 2016-07-21 2019-04-23 Htc Corporation Display screen with graphical user interface
CN106899750A (en) * 2016-08-03 2017-06-27 阿里巴巴集团控股有限公司 Information displaying method based on card, information show the processing method and processing device of business
US20180060092A1 (en) * 2016-08-31 2018-03-01 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Group Data and Priority in an Individual Desktop
US10222776B2 (en) * 2016-09-12 2019-03-05 Linestream Technologies Wizard for configuring a motor
USD838278S1 (en) * 2016-09-29 2019-01-15 United Services Automobile Association (Usaa) Display screen or portion thereof with a payday forecast graphical user interface
US10372443B2 (en) * 2016-10-18 2019-08-06 Oracle International Corporation Multi-platform pattern-based user interfaces
MX2019004903A (en) * 2016-10-26 2019-08-05 New Pig Corp Spill risk assessment for liquid storage facilities.
JP6708110B2 (en) * 2016-12-13 2020-06-10 カシオ計算機株式会社 Information processing device and program
US10346004B2 (en) * 2017-01-18 2019-07-09 Michael E Murphy Systems and methods for intelligent layered interactive programmatic elements for fixed content
US20190034067A1 (en) * 2017-07-28 2019-01-31 Sap Se Seamless user-directed configuration of applications during runtime
USD834605S1 (en) * 2017-09-06 2018-11-27 Box, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface for display of open task drawer
USD833459S1 (en) * 2017-09-06 2018-11-13 Box, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface for display of content approval
USD833472S1 (en) * 2017-09-06 2018-11-13 Box, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface for display of profile page
CN108228046A (en) * 2017-11-29 2018-06-29 努比亚技术有限公司 Flexible flexible terminal display control method, terminal and computer storage media
EP3508970A1 (en) * 2018-01-05 2019-07-10 OCE Holding B.V. A dynamic user interface system and a method therefor
JP2019121245A (en) * 2018-01-09 2019-07-22 キヤノン株式会社 Image forming apparatus and control method thereof
US10785340B2 (en) 2018-01-25 2020-09-22 Operr Technologies, Inc. System and method for a convertible user application
USD896819S1 (en) * 2018-02-06 2020-09-22 Dynamic Trend, Inc. Display screen, or portion thereof, having a graphical user interface with an options trading visual aid
USD902219S1 (en) * 2018-02-06 2020-11-17 Dynamic Trend, Inc. Display screen, or portion thereof, having a graphical user interface with an options trading visual aid
US10409584B1 (en) 2018-02-09 2019-09-10 American Megatrends International, Llc Peripheral device firmware update using rest over IPMI interface firmware update module
US10649792B1 (en) 2018-02-09 2020-05-12 American Megatrends International, Llc Cloning of firmware configuration settings using rest over IPMI interface
US10776286B1 (en) 2018-02-09 2020-09-15 American Megatrends International, Llc Rest over IPMI interface for firmware to BMC communication
US10628176B1 (en) 2018-02-09 2020-04-21 American Megatrends International, Llc Firmware configuration using REST over IPMI interface
US10489142B1 (en) 2018-02-09 2019-11-26 American Megatrends International, Llc Secure firmware integrity monitoring using rest over IPMI interface
US10416988B1 (en) 2018-02-09 2019-09-17 American Megatrends International, Llc Peripheral device firmware update using rest over IPMI interface firmware shell utility
US10572242B1 (en) * 2018-02-09 2020-02-25 American Megatrends International, Llc Firmware update using rest over IPMI interface
US10956533B1 (en) 2018-03-20 2021-03-23 Amdocs Development Limited System, method, and computer program for real-time HTML rendering of windows applications
USD873842S1 (en) * 2018-03-23 2020-01-28 Martell Broadcasting Systems, Inc. Display screen with transitional search results user interface
US20190324776A1 (en) * 2018-04-18 2019-10-24 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Dynamic management of interface elements based on bound control flow
USD892829S1 (en) * 2018-04-20 2020-08-11 Adp, Llc Display screen or a portion thereof with an animated graphical user interface
USD892149S1 (en) * 2018-04-20 2020-08-04 Adp, Llc Display screen or a portion thereof with an animated graphical user interface
USD892148S1 (en) * 2018-04-20 2020-08-04 Adp, Llc Display screen or a portion thereof with an animated graphical user interface
EP3564812A1 (en) * 2018-04-30 2019-11-06 Mphasis Limited Method and system for automated creation of graphical user interfaces
US10761994B2 (en) * 2018-05-10 2020-09-01 Sap Se Storage of database column data in non-volatile memory
USD869491S1 (en) * 2018-06-03 2019-12-10 Apple Inc. Electronic device with graphical user interface
US10740121B2 (en) * 2018-06-22 2020-08-11 Sap Se User interface for navigating multiple applications
US10775974B2 (en) * 2018-08-10 2020-09-15 Vignet Incorporated User responsive dynamic architecture
USD896241S1 (en) * 2018-12-03 2020-09-15 Illumina, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
US10838744B2 (en) * 2018-12-04 2020-11-17 Sap Se Web component design and integration system
USD902946S1 (en) * 2019-01-31 2020-11-24 Salesforce.Com, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
CN109948102A (en) * 2019-03-27 2019-06-28 维沃移动通信有限公司 Content of pages edit methods and terminal
CN111399947B (en) * 2020-06-02 2020-09-04 平安国际智慧城市科技股份有限公司 Application program guide page optimization pushing method and device and computer equipment

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030154232A1 (en) * 2002-01-08 2003-08-14 Joerg Beringer Facilitating improved workflow
US6750885B1 (en) * 2000-01-31 2004-06-15 Journyx, Inc. Time keeping and expense tracking server that interfaces with a user based upon a user's atomic abilities
US20080163099A1 (en) * 2006-12-28 2008-07-03 Oracle International Corporation Drill down functionality in a dashboard application
US20090113310A1 (en) * 2007-10-26 2009-04-30 International Business Machines Corporation Role tailored portal solution integrating near real-time metrics, business logic, online collaboration, and web 2.0 content
US20120117507A1 (en) * 2008-01-30 2012-05-10 Google Inc. Notification of Mobile Device Events
US20130024760A1 (en) * 2011-07-21 2013-01-24 Sap Ag Personalized Dashboard Architecture
US20130067365A1 (en) * 2011-09-13 2013-03-14 Microsoft Corporation Role based user interface for limited display devices
US20140123072A1 (en) * 2012-09-28 2014-05-01 Oracle International Corporation System for navigation in a computer user interface
US20140351744A1 (en) * 2013-05-22 2014-11-27 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method of operating notification screen and electronic device supporting the same
US20170123397A1 (en) * 2015-10-30 2017-05-04 Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc. Automated creation of industrial dashboards and widgets
US9807145B2 (en) * 2013-05-10 2017-10-31 Successfactors, Inc. Adaptive tile framework

Family Cites Families (149)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5097533A (en) 1988-11-29 1992-03-17 International Business Machines Corporation System and method for interfacing computer application programs written in different languages to a software system
US5754174A (en) * 1992-08-27 1998-05-19 Starfish Software, Inc. User interface with individually configurable panel interfaces for use in a computer system
US5517663A (en) 1993-03-22 1996-05-14 Kahn; Kenneth M. Animated user interface for computer program creation, control and execution
AU1258195A (en) 1993-11-17 1995-06-06 Collegeview Method and apparatus for displaying three-dimensional animated characters upon a computer monitor's screen
US5682469A (en) 1994-07-08 1997-10-28 Microsoft Corporation Software platform having a real world interface with animated characters
US6393495B1 (en) 1995-11-21 2002-05-21 Diamond Multimedia Systems, Inc. Modular virtualizing device driver architecture
US5727950A (en) 1996-05-22 1998-03-17 Netsage Corporation Agent based instruction system and method
US6021403A (en) 1996-07-19 2000-02-01 Microsoft Corporation Intelligent user assistance facility
US5877759A (en) 1997-03-26 1999-03-02 Netscape Communications Corporation Interface for user/agent interaction
US6025841A (en) 1997-07-15 2000-02-15 Microsoft Corporation Method for managing simultaneous display of multiple windows in a graphical user interface
US6128603A (en) * 1997-09-09 2000-10-03 Dent; Warren T. Consumer-based system and method for managing and paying electronic billing statements
US6088731A (en) 1998-04-24 2000-07-11 Associative Computing, Inc. Intelligent assistant for use with a local computer and with the internet
US6085184A (en) 1998-12-22 2000-07-04 Ac Properties B.V. System, method and article of manufacture for a dynamic toolbar in a tutorial system
US6751606B1 (en) 1998-12-23 2004-06-15 Microsoft Corporation System for enhancing a query interface
US7275246B1 (en) 1999-01-28 2007-09-25 Ati International Srl Executing programs for a first computer architecture on a computer of a second architecture
US7028264B2 (en) * 1999-10-29 2006-04-11 Surfcast, Inc. System and method for simultaneous display of multiple information sources
US20020005865A1 (en) 1999-12-17 2002-01-17 Barbara Hayes-Roth System, method, and device for authoring content for interactive agents
JP4402797B2 (en) 2000-03-02 2010-01-20 株式会社ザナヴィ・インフォマティクス Information processing device
US20010054066A1 (en) 2000-06-13 2001-12-20 Louis Spitzer Apparatus and method for transmitting information from signage to portable computing device, and system utilizing same
JP2002024285A (en) 2000-06-30 2002-01-25 Sanyo Electric Co Ltd Method and device for user support
WO2002007091A2 (en) 2000-07-14 2002-01-24 Haltsymptoms.Com, Inc. Electronic navigation of information associated with parts of a living body
US6912719B2 (en) 2000-08-08 2005-06-28 International Business Machines Corporation Type descriptor metamodel
US7275079B2 (en) 2000-08-08 2007-09-25 International Business Machines Corporation Common application metamodel including C/C++ metamodel
US6915523B2 (en) 2000-08-08 2005-07-05 International Business Machines Corporation PL/I metamodel
JP2002082749A (en) 2000-09-07 2002-03-22 Sony Corp Information processor, application software executing method, and recording medium
JP2002091971A (en) 2000-09-11 2002-03-29 Sony Corp Agent system, method/device for providing information and data recording medium
US6788313B1 (en) 2000-09-28 2004-09-07 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for providing on line help for custom application interfaces
WO2002037471A2 (en) 2000-11-03 2002-05-10 Zoesis, Inc. Interactive character system
US20040056878A1 (en) 2001-01-30 2004-03-25 Lau Johnny Sya Chung Digital assistants
US20020149611A1 (en) 2001-04-11 2002-10-17 May Julian S. Emoticons
US20030028498A1 (en) 2001-06-07 2003-02-06 Barbara Hayes-Roth Customizable expert agent
US20030023752A1 (en) 2001-07-12 2003-01-30 International Business Machines Corporation Pluggable URL providers in a J2EE server
US7920682B2 (en) 2001-08-21 2011-04-05 Byrne William J Dynamic interactive voice interface
US20030093508A1 (en) 2001-10-18 2003-05-15 Seiko Epson Corporation System for installing and launching network applications
US7913183B2 (en) * 2002-10-08 2011-03-22 Microsoft Corporation System and method for managing software applications in a graphical user interface
US7024417B1 (en) 2002-11-14 2006-04-04 Hyperion Solutions Corporation Data mining framework using a signature associated with an algorithm
US7707544B2 (en) 2002-12-05 2010-04-27 Bea Systems, Inc. System and method for generating and reusing software application code with source definition files
US7849175B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2010-12-07 Sap Ag Control center pages
US20040133606A1 (en) 2003-01-02 2004-07-08 Z-Force Communications, Inc. Directory aggregation for files distributed over a plurality of servers in a switched file system
US9009595B2 (en) 2003-02-05 2015-04-14 Joseph P. Catanese User manipulation of video feed to computer screen regions
US7797146B2 (en) 2003-05-13 2010-09-14 Interactive Drama, Inc. Method and system for simulated interactive conversation
US7895234B2 (en) 2003-09-22 2011-02-22 Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc. Systems and methods for sharing portal configurations
US20070067373A1 (en) 2003-11-03 2007-03-22 Steven Higgins Methods and apparatuses to provide mobile applications
US7818742B2 (en) 2004-05-21 2010-10-19 Bea Systems, Inc. Portal federated applications and portal federated web applications
JP4459735B2 (en) 2004-06-30 2010-04-28 本田技研工業株式会社 Product explanation robot
US7739695B2 (en) 2004-07-19 2010-06-15 Sap Ag Computer implemented method and system for running a plurality of business processes
US20060041848A1 (en) 2004-08-23 2006-02-23 Luigi Lira Overlaid display of messages in the user interface of instant messaging and other digital communication services
US7769709B2 (en) 2004-09-09 2010-08-03 Microsoft Corporation Method, system, and apparatus for creating an archive routine for protecting data in a data protection system
US8145601B2 (en) 2004-09-09 2012-03-27 Microsoft Corporation Method, system, and apparatus for providing resilient data transfer in a data protection system
FR2876197B1 (en) 2004-10-01 2006-12-22 Bull Sa Sa METHOD FOR THE FLEXIBLE MANAGEMENT OF MULTIPLE ACTIVITIES EXECUTED ON PARTITIONABLE PLATFORMS OF A MULTI-PROCESSOR SYSTEM
US7797338B2 (en) 2004-12-09 2010-09-14 Aol Inc. System and method for facilitating personalization of applications based on anticipation of users' interests
US7827026B2 (en) 2004-12-21 2010-11-02 Xerox Corporation Bilingual authoring assistant for the “tip of the tongue” problem
US7933399B2 (en) 2005-03-22 2011-04-26 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. System and method for utilizing virtual agents in an interactive voice response application
US7603375B2 (en) 2005-03-30 2009-10-13 Siebel Systems, Inc. System and method for generating a custom application
GB0507801D0 (en) 2005-04-19 2005-05-25 Ibm A system for processing a request to a portlet
US20060253791A1 (en) 2005-05-03 2006-11-09 Kuiken David P Simplified interactive graphical user interfaces for sorting through a stack of overlapping windows on a display in order along the Z (depth) axis
US7546547B2 (en) 2005-05-26 2009-06-09 International Business Machines Corporation Method, apparatus and computer program product for implementing automatic reapportionment of graphical subwindows based upon sensed, dynamic changes
US20060271398A1 (en) 2005-05-26 2006-11-30 Jamie Belcastro Web-based pharmacist
US8225231B2 (en) * 2005-08-30 2012-07-17 Microsoft Corporation Aggregation of PC settings
US20070083821A1 (en) 2005-10-07 2007-04-12 International Business Machines Corporation Creating viewports from selected regions of windows
US7966269B2 (en) 2005-10-20 2011-06-21 Bauer James D Intelligent human-machine interface
US7930681B2 (en) 2005-12-30 2011-04-19 Sap Ag Service and application management in information technology systems
US7739310B1 (en) 2006-01-03 2010-06-15 Emc Corporation Extensible portlet templates
US20080155409A1 (en) 2006-06-19 2008-06-26 Andy Santana Internet search engine
US20080127220A1 (en) 2006-06-30 2008-05-29 Robert Paul Morris Methods, systems, and computer program products for creating an input-value-specific loadable instance of an application
US8869027B2 (en) * 2006-08-04 2014-10-21 Apple Inc. Management and generation of dashboards
US20080096533A1 (en) 2006-10-24 2008-04-24 Kallideas Spa Virtual Assistant With Real-Time Emotions
US8555176B2 (en) 2007-03-12 2013-10-08 Microsoft Corporation Third party menus for enabling collaboration
JP4692529B2 (en) 2007-08-07 2011-06-01 セイコーエプソン株式会社 Graphical user interface device
US7796022B2 (en) 2007-12-18 2010-09-14 Birtcher Brandon R Notification in a virtual receptionist method and system
US8037110B2 (en) 2007-12-27 2011-10-11 Microsoft Corporation Business data access client for online/offline client use
US9003059B2 (en) 2008-03-31 2015-04-07 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Running applications in an online or offline mode based on the availability of the connection to the remote web server
US20090327911A1 (en) 2008-06-27 2009-12-31 Sanjay Ningune Method and system for customizing access to a resource
US7862744B2 (en) * 2008-07-23 2011-01-04 Mamtek International Limited Methods and systems for preparing materials for sucralose production
US9202171B2 (en) 2008-11-11 2015-12-01 Digideal Corporation Virtual game assistant based on artificial intelligence
US9111007B2 (en) 2009-02-04 2015-08-18 Jataayu Software Limited Adaptive rendering of a webpage on an electronic display device
US9858925B2 (en) 2009-06-05 2018-01-02 Apple Inc. Using context information to facilitate processing of commands in a virtual assistant
US10241752B2 (en) 2011-09-30 2019-03-26 Apple Inc. Interface for a virtual digital assistant
US20130219333A1 (en) 2009-06-12 2013-08-22 Adobe Systems Incorporated Extensible Framework for Facilitating Interaction with Devices
CN102771102B (en) 2009-12-18 2016-05-18 法国电信 The network of distribute digital content and management method
US20110157322A1 (en) 2009-12-31 2011-06-30 Broadcom Corporation Controlling a pixel array to support an adaptable light manipulator
US8799765B1 (en) 2010-02-01 2014-08-05 Inkling Systems, Inc. Systems for sharing annotations and location references for same for displaying the annotations in context with an electronic document
US8856672B2 (en) 2010-05-11 2014-10-07 Microsoft Corporation Integrated user interface controls for web dialogs
US9552123B1 (en) 2010-05-27 2017-01-24 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Integrating applications in a portal
US8776097B2 (en) 2010-09-15 2014-07-08 Myspace, Llc Dynamic native binding for managed assemblies
US8635464B2 (en) 2010-12-03 2014-01-21 Yacov Yacobi Attribute-based access-controlled data-storage system
US20120158521A1 (en) 2010-12-15 2012-06-21 Mccullen Nicholas System and Method for Personalized Secure Website Portal
US9164776B2 (en) 2010-12-22 2015-10-20 Sap Ag Dynamic determination of navigation targets in a flexible user interface environment
EP2673723A4 (en) 2011-01-27 2014-08-20 Amplifier Marketing Pty Ltd Method and system for providing content
US9003297B2 (en) 2011-02-17 2015-04-07 Mworks Worldwide, Inc. Integrated enterprise software and social network system user interfaces utilizing cloud computing infrastructures and single secure portal access
US9760566B2 (en) 2011-03-31 2017-09-12 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Augmented conversational understanding agent to identify conversation context between two humans and taking an agent action thereof
US10642934B2 (en) 2011-03-31 2020-05-05 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Augmented conversational understanding architecture
US20130086473A1 (en) 2011-09-30 2013-04-04 Sap Ag Central access launch center for web based scenarios
US9158520B2 (en) 2011-12-07 2015-10-13 Yahoo! Inc. Development of platform independent applications
KR101408168B1 (en) 2011-12-09 2014-06-17 도시바삼성스토리지테크놀러지코리아 주식회사 Apparatus and method for providing graphic user interface
JP5792607B2 (en) 2011-12-09 2015-10-14 株式会社ソニー・コンピュータエンタテインメント Image processing apparatus and image processing method
US9836177B2 (en) 2011-12-30 2017-12-05 Next IT Innovation Labs, LLC Providing variable responses in a virtual-assistant environment
US20130204813A1 (en) 2012-01-20 2013-08-08 Fluential, Llc Self-learning, context aware virtual assistants, systems and methods
US9088634B1 (en) 2012-05-07 2015-07-21 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Dynamic media transcoding at network edge
US8781293B2 (en) 2012-08-20 2014-07-15 Gorilla Technology Inc. Correction method for object linking across video sequences in a multiple camera video surveillance system
US9449348B2 (en) 2012-08-28 2016-09-20 Facebook, Inc. Providing a locality viewport through a social networking system
US9430211B2 (en) 2012-08-31 2016-08-30 Jpmorgan Chase Bank, N.A. System and method for sharing information in a private ecosystem
US9576574B2 (en) 2012-09-10 2017-02-21 Apple Inc. Context-sensitive handling of interruptions by intelligent digital assistant
US9032045B1 (en) 2012-09-25 2015-05-12 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Systems and methods for using a uniform resource locator to call for different types of content
US9059974B2 (en) 2012-12-21 2015-06-16 Mobile Iron, Inc. Secure mobile app connection bus
US20150012399A1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2015-01-08 Bill.Com, Inc. System and Method for Enhanced Access and Control for Modification of Auto-Learned Conflict Resolution and Related Rule and Value Replacements
TWI547158B (en) 2013-01-29 2016-08-21 Acti Corp Integrate multiple images in a single summary window
KR20140108497A (en) 2013-02-28 2014-09-11 엘지전자 주식회사 Apparatus and method for processing a multimedia commerce service
JP5950282B2 (en) 2013-05-13 2016-07-13 インターナショナル・ビジネス・マシーンズ・コーポレーションInternational Business Machines Corporation Apparatus and method for generating a user interface
IN2013DE01423A (en) * 2013-05-14 2015-07-10 Sap Ag
US10481981B2 (en) 2013-06-19 2019-11-19 Virtual Forge GmbH System and method for automatic correction of a database configuration in case of quality defects
US9665270B2 (en) 2013-06-28 2017-05-30 Sap Se Layout algorithm for entity relation model diagram
US9483328B2 (en) 2013-07-19 2016-11-01 Twilio, Inc. System and method for delivering application content
US9116766B2 (en) * 2013-07-31 2015-08-25 Sap Se Extensible applications using a mobile application framework
US9176801B2 (en) 2013-09-06 2015-11-03 Sap Se Advanced data models containing declarative and programmatic constraints
US9225515B2 (en) 2013-09-13 2015-12-29 Sap Portals Israel Ltd Shared portal context session
US20150089403A1 (en) 2013-09-20 2015-03-26 Jin You ZHU Dynamic generation of user interface
US10095471B2 (en) 2013-09-20 2018-10-09 Oracle International Corporation Context aware voice interface for computing devices
US20150278868A1 (en) 2013-11-26 2015-10-01 Google Inc. Systems and methods for identifying and exposing content element density and congestion
US9870202B2 (en) 2013-12-05 2018-01-16 Sap Se Business object model layer interface
US8978010B1 (en) 2013-12-18 2015-03-10 Sap Ag Pruning compilation dependency graphs
US10445769B2 (en) 2013-12-24 2019-10-15 Google Llc Systems and methods for audience measurement
US10928976B2 (en) 2013-12-31 2021-02-23 Verint Americas Inc. Virtual assistant acquisitions and training
WO2015105994A1 (en) 2014-01-08 2015-07-16 Callminer, Inc. Real-time conversational analytics facility
US20150206169A1 (en) 2014-01-17 2015-07-23 Google Inc. Systems and methods for extracting and generating images for display content
US9483780B2 (en) 2014-03-27 2016-11-01 Google Inc. Providing content using integrated objects
KR102213190B1 (en) 2014-05-26 2021-02-05 삼성전자 주식회사 Method for arranging home screen and electronic device thereof
US9338493B2 (en) 2014-06-30 2016-05-10 Apple Inc. Intelligent automated assistant for TV user interactions
US9223549B1 (en) 2014-06-30 2015-12-29 Sap Ag User interface generation using a model layer
US9720889B1 (en) 2014-07-10 2017-08-01 Google Inc. Systems and methods for detecting auto-redirecting online content
US9740462B2 (en) 2014-08-27 2017-08-22 Sap Se Adaptive, context-aware, model-based suggestions
US20160070580A1 (en) 2014-09-09 2016-03-10 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Digital personal assistant remote invocation
US9917923B2 (en) 2014-09-26 2018-03-13 Oracle International Corporation Building message relationships for offline operation of an enterprise application
US20160092883A1 (en) 2014-09-30 2016-03-31 Jutta Weber Timeline-based visualization and handling of a customer
US20160337426A1 (en) 2015-05-14 2016-11-17 Hola Networks Ltd. System and Method for Streaming Content from Multiple Servers
US9578173B2 (en) 2015-06-05 2017-02-21 Apple Inc. Virtual assistant aided communication with 3rd party service in a communication session
US9933931B2 (en) 2015-06-23 2018-04-03 Microsoft Technology Licensing Llc Freeze pane with snap scrolling
US10628420B2 (en) 2015-12-18 2020-04-21 Ca, Inc. Dynamic virtual service
US10230812B1 (en) 2016-01-29 2019-03-12 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Dynamic allocation of subtitle packaging
US10523693B2 (en) 2016-04-14 2019-12-31 Radware, Ltd. System and method for real-time tuning of inference systems
US20170331915A1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-11-16 Sap Se Providing an offline mode for applications and interfaces across multiple platforms
US10579238B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2020-03-03 Sap Se Flexible screen layout across multiple platforms
US20170329466A1 (en) 2016-05-13 2017-11-16 Sap Se User interface application and digital assistant
US10346184B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2019-07-09 Sap Se Open data protocol services in applications and interfaces across multiple platforms
US10318253B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2019-06-11 Sap Se Smart templates for use in multiple platforms
US10353534B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2019-07-16 Sap Se Overview page in multi application user interface
US10007936B1 (en) 2016-12-27 2018-06-26 Valutrend Corporation Product review platform based on social connections
US10331425B2 (en) 2017-06-28 2019-06-25 Google Llc Automated source code adaption to inject features between platform versions
US20190057161A1 (en) 2017-08-21 2019-02-21 Urban Airship, Inc. Delivery of personalized platform-specific content using a single url

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6750885B1 (en) * 2000-01-31 2004-06-15 Journyx, Inc. Time keeping and expense tracking server that interfaces with a user based upon a user's atomic abilities
US20030154232A1 (en) * 2002-01-08 2003-08-14 Joerg Beringer Facilitating improved workflow
US20080163099A1 (en) * 2006-12-28 2008-07-03 Oracle International Corporation Drill down functionality in a dashboard application
US20090113310A1 (en) * 2007-10-26 2009-04-30 International Business Machines Corporation Role tailored portal solution integrating near real-time metrics, business logic, online collaboration, and web 2.0 content
US20120117507A1 (en) * 2008-01-30 2012-05-10 Google Inc. Notification of Mobile Device Events
US20130024760A1 (en) * 2011-07-21 2013-01-24 Sap Ag Personalized Dashboard Architecture
US20130067365A1 (en) * 2011-09-13 2013-03-14 Microsoft Corporation Role based user interface for limited display devices
US20140123072A1 (en) * 2012-09-28 2014-05-01 Oracle International Corporation System for navigation in a computer user interface
US9807145B2 (en) * 2013-05-10 2017-10-31 Successfactors, Inc. Adaptive tile framework
US20140351744A1 (en) * 2013-05-22 2014-11-27 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method of operating notification screen and electronic device supporting the same
US20170123397A1 (en) * 2015-10-30 2017-05-04 Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc. Automated creation of industrial dashboards and widgets

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20180295227A1 (en) * 2013-02-07 2018-10-11 Tencent Technology (Shenzhen) Company Limited Method, device and storage medium for setting position of function setting key of mobile terminal
US10447843B2 (en) * 2013-02-07 2019-10-15 Tencent Technology (Shenzhen) Company Limited Method, device and storage medium for setting position of function setting key of mobile terminal
US10353564B2 (en) 2015-12-21 2019-07-16 Sap Se Graphical user interface with virtual extension areas
US10318253B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2019-06-11 Sap Se Smart templates for use in multiple platforms
US10346184B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2019-07-09 Sap Se Open data protocol services in applications and interfaces across multiple platforms
US10353534B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2019-07-16 Sap Se Overview page in multi application user interface
US10579238B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2020-03-03 Sap Se Flexible screen layout across multiple platforms
US10649611B2 (en) 2016-05-13 2020-05-12 Sap Se Object pages in multi application user interface
US10528440B2 (en) * 2016-11-28 2020-01-07 Sap Se Metadata cataloging framework
US10915303B2 (en) 2017-01-26 2021-02-09 Sap Se Run time integrated development and modification system
CN109697010A (en) * 2018-11-22 2019-04-30 努比亚技术有限公司 A kind of suspended window position control method, terminal and computer readable storage medium

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20170344218A1 (en) 2017-11-30
US10353534B2 (en) 2019-07-16
US20170329500A1 (en) 2017-11-16
US20170329483A1 (en) 2017-11-16
US20170329479A1 (en) 2017-11-16
US20170329468A1 (en) 2017-11-16
US10649611B2 (en) 2020-05-12

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
EP3073673B1 (en) Content item-centric conversation aggregation in shared folder backed integrated workspaces
US20180082254A1 (en) Techniques to manage remote events
US10496275B2 (en) Multi-window keyboard
US9904437B2 (en) Dynamic minimized navigation bar for expanded communication service
JP6612312B2 (en) Align components in the user interface
US10353534B2 (en) Overview page in multi application user interface
US10033533B2 (en) Mobile solution for signing and retaining third-party documents
US10127115B2 (en) Generation and management of social graph
US10412131B2 (en) Systems and methods for gesture-based sharing of data between separate electronic devices
US10846153B2 (en) Bot creation with workflow development system
US9778920B2 (en) Mobile design patterns
US20190342369A1 (en) Systems and methods for notifying users of changes to files in cloud-based file-storage systems
US9823813B2 (en) Apparatus and methods for performing an action on a database record
US9654428B2 (en) Systems and methods for supporting social productivity using a history buffer
JP6774493B2 (en) User notification of interaction information
US10346184B2 (en) Open data protocol services in applications and interfaces across multiple platforms
US10761675B2 (en) Event listening integration in a collaborative electronic information system
US10062045B2 (en) Project workspace prioritization
KR102121991B1 (en) Image panning and zooming effect
US10534533B2 (en) Messaging sticker applications
JP6172537B2 (en) Method and system for federated remote application sharing and conferencing
US10762277B2 (en) Optimization schemes for controlling user interfaces through gesture or touch
US9904435B2 (en) System and method for actionable event generation for task delegation and management via a discussion forum in a web-based collaboration environment
US10963293B2 (en) Interactions with contextual and task-based computing environments
US9053462B2 (en) User interface for a system and process for providing dynamic communication access and information awareness in an interactive peripheral display

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STPP Information on status: patent application and granting procedure in general

Free format text: DOCKETED NEW CASE - READY FOR EXAMINATION

AS Assignment

Owner name: SAP SE, GERMANY

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:SCHON, JAMILA;KRENKLER, MICHAEL;JANN, FLORIAN;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20180530 TO 20180608;REEL/FRAME:046064/0313

STPP Information on status: patent application and granting procedure in general

Free format text: NON FINAL ACTION MAILED

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION