US20170138687A1 - Firearm safety device - Google Patents

Firearm safety device Download PDF

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Publication number
US20170138687A1
US20170138687A1 US15/233,091 US201615233091A US2017138687A1 US 20170138687 A1 US20170138687 A1 US 20170138687A1 US 201615233091 A US201615233091 A US 201615233091A US 2017138687 A1 US2017138687 A1 US 2017138687A1
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Prior art keywords
firearm
dummy
barrel
cord
bullet
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Abandoned
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US15/233,091
Inventor
Meir AZIZ
Gil MERY
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Meir AZIZ
Gil MERY
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Priority to US201562203410P priority Critical
Application filed by Meir AZIZ, Gil MERY filed Critical Meir AZIZ
Priority to US15/233,091 priority patent/US20170138687A1/en
Publication of US20170138687A1 publication Critical patent/US20170138687A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A17/00Safety arrangements, e.g. safeties
    • F41A17/44Safety plugs, e.g. for plugging-up cartridge chambers, barrels, magazine spaces

Abstract

The present invention is directed to a firearm safety device, comprising: a dummy (10) in a form of a bullet of the firearm; a cord (12) connected to the dummy, for standing out of the firearm when the dummy is inserted into a barrel (52) of the firearm, thereby indicating that the dummy is inserted into the barrel; a socket (16) in the dummy (10) for protecting the cord (12) from being cut when the dummy is disposed into the chamber of the firearm; a mechanism for preventing the slide (56) from reaching the barrel, thereby preventing the slide (56) from cutting the cord. Preferably, the mechanism for preventing the slide (56) from reaching the barrel comprises: an adaption of the form the element (22) of the dummy that corresponds to the projectile (34) of a bullet to block the dummy from reaching the barrel edge (59).

Description

  • The current application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent application No. 62/203,410, filed 11 Aug. 2015, incorporated herein by reference.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention relates generally to firearms, and more specifically, to firearm safety devices intended to prevent accidental firing and discharge.
  • BACKGROUND ART
  • A number of systems exist that increase firearm safety; the safety trigger, the trigger lock, and the bore lock are all attempts to preclude unintended firearm discharge, one dummy device being sold for instance as a ‘safety bullet’.
  • Examples of patents in the field include U.S. Pat. No. 5,491,918 which provides a ‘dummy’ type safety device comprising two parts, a dummy round and a second part. When locked in place the two parts fully occupy a firearm's barrel and chamber. The dummy round mates to the second part so that the two can be locked together. The second part attaches to a device for locking and unlocking the mechanism to allow for its removal.
  • Similarly, U.S. Pat. No. 7,886,472 B2 provides a chamber-disabling component constructed of a flexible material; the component is adapted to be inserted through an opening in the firearm into the firing chamber with partial retraction of the bolt, and prevents accidental discharge by physically blocking the chamber bore.
  • However, it will be appreciated by one skilled in the art that the speed with which such devices can be removed is a critical factor determining whether they can be practically used, and furthermore, that visual indication of whether the chamber is blocked or not may likewise be a crucial factor for usability. Finally, the prior art contains devices which generally are of use only when the firearm is uncocked. The prior art is lacking in these respects, and hence a device that can be immediately removed, provides indication of presence of a dummy into the firing chamber, and can be used with the weapon either cocked or not, fills a long-felt need.
  • It is an object of the present invention to provide a solution to the above-mentioned and other problems of the prior art.
  • Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the description proceeds.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to a firearm safety device, comprising: a dummy (10) in a form of a bullet of the firearm; a cord (12) connected to the dummy, for standing out of the firearm when the dummy is inserted into the barrel (52) of the firearm, thereby indicating that the dummy is inserted into the barrel; a socket (16) in the dummy (10) for protecting the cord (12) from being cut when the dummy is inserted into the chamber (54) of the firearm; a mechanism for preventing the slide (56) from reaching the barrel, thereby preventing the slide (56) from cutting the cord.
  • According to one embodiment of the invention, the mechanism for preventing the slide (56) from reaching the barrel comprises: an additional length to the element (22) of the dummy that corresponds to the shell of the bullet.
  • Preferably, the additional length allows cocking and uncoking the firearm.
  • According to an additional or alternative embodiment of the invention, the mechanism for preventing the slide (56) from reaching the barrel comprises: a ring (20) around the cylindrical body (22) of the dummy (that corresponds to the shell of the bullet), for stopping the dummy from entering into the barrel beyond the ring (20).
  • According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the mechanism for preventing the slide (56) from reaching the barrel comprises an adaption of the form an element (24) of the dummy that corresponds to the projectile (34) of a bullet in order to meet the shoulder (58) of the firearm barrel.
  • Preferably, the dummy (10) is made of anodized aviation aluminum.
  • Preferably, the cord is made of braided nylon fibers.
  • The firearm safety device may further comprise a hole (28) at the location that corresponds to the primer of the bullet, for preventing the firing pin of the firearm from hitting the dummy (10), thereby preventing damage to the firing pin.
  • According to one embodiment of the invention, the dummy further comprises a latitudinal bore, for anchoring the cord thereto.
  • Preferably, the latitudinal bore comprises: a first portion (14 a) and a second portion (14 b) having a smaller diameter than the diameter of the first portion, thereby allowing placing in the wider portion (14 a) a knot of the cord (12), and passing the rest of the cord through the smaller diameter portion (14 b).
  • According to a further embodiment of the invention, the firearm further comprises a flag, fabric, and the like, connected to the cord, for better standing out the indication that the dummy is inserted into the barrel.
  • The reference numbers have been used to point out elements in the embodiments described and illustrated herein, in order to facilitate the understanding of the invention. They are meant to be merely illustrative, and not limiting. Also, the foregoing embodiments of the invention have been described and illustrated in conjunction with systems and methods thereof, which are meant to be merely illustrative, and not limiting.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • Preferred embodiments, features, aspects and advantages of the present invention are described herein in conjunction with the following drawings:
  • FIG. 1 is a side view that schematically illustrates a 9 m bullet 30, according to the prior art.
  • FIG. 2 is a side view that schematically illustrates a dummy 10, according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 3 is a longitudinal cross-section that schematically illustrates the dummy 10 of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view that schematically illustrates the dummy 10 of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a firearm safety device, according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 6 is a side view of a bullet 30, according to the prior art.
  • FIG. 7 is a front view of a dummy 10, according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 8 is a side view of dummy 10 of FIG. 7,
  • FIG. 9 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52, according to the prior art.
  • FIG. 10 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52, in which is disposed a bullet 30, according to the prior art.
  • FIG. 11 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52, in which is disposed a dummy of firearm safety device, according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 12 schematically illustrates a firearm, wherein no security device is inserted into its barrel.
  • FIG. 13 schematically illustrates the firearm of FIG. 11 when cocked.
  • FIG. 14 schematically illustrates the firearm of FIG. 12 when uncocked.
  • FIG. 15 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52 in which is inserted a bullet, according to the prior art.
  • FIG. 16 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52 in which is inserted a dummy 10, according to according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 17 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52 in which is inserted a dummy 10, according to according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • It should be understood that the drawings are not necessarily drawn to scale.
  • DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS
  • The present invention will be understood from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments (“best mode”), which are meant to be descriptive and not limiting.
  • For the sake of brevity, some well-known features, methods, systems, procedures, components, circuits, and so on, are not described in detail.
  • The invention is a type of ‘dummy’ in the form of a device designed to fit into a chamber of a firearm, thereby preventing the entrance of a bullet into the chamber of a firearm and hence preventing the unintended discharge of the firearm. An indicator of a cord can be attached to the dummy. The cord may have a flag connected to its end. The device may be rapidly removed from the chamber bore simply by cocking the firearm.
  • The design of this particular dummy is such that any conventional firearm using the device may be fully cocked, for instance with the hammer down and the dummy then inserted. This allows users of the device to keep their weapons cocked or not at their discretion. Some security forces for instance have security procedures in place requiring one or the other state to be adopted in certain situations.
  • Due to the use of the cord as indicator, the firearm employing the firearm safety device may be carried in any conventional holster, such as a side holster, chest holster or the like.
  • The Structure of the Safety Device
  • FIG. 1 is a side view that schematically illustrates a 9 m bullet 30, according to the prior art.
  • FIG. 2 is a side view that schematically illustrates a dummy 10, according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 3 is a longitudinal cross-section that schematically illustrates the dummy 10 of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view that schematically illustrates the dummy 10 of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a firearm safety device, according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • Allegedly, the firearm safety device is a dummy in a form of a powderless bullet, to which is attached a cord 12. The cord is used as an indicator of presence of the dummy into firearm chamber 54 of the firearm 50. Thus, the cord has to outstand the firearm chamber 54 in order to indicate that dummy is inserted into the firearm chamber.
  • However, since the parts of a firearm match to each other such that only a freedom of hundredths of mm is left, when a user cocks the firearm by retracting the firearm's slide 56 and then releasing the slide, the edges of the ejection port cut the cord, i.e., remove the indicator.
  • Furthermore, if cord gets stuck into the firearm chamber 54, sometimes the only way to remove the dummy out of the chamber is dismantling the firearm. In this case the firearm is suspended for a period during which it may be needed.
  • As illustrated in FIG. 3, the safety device comprises a latitudinal bore 14 a, 14 b through which a cord 12 (the indicator) is to be connected. The larger-diameter part 14 a of the bore is used for anchoring therein a knot of the cord. The cord 12 is threaded through the smaller diameter bore 14 b.
  • As illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3, the cylindrical body 22 comprises a socket 16. The object of the socket is to allow the cord to pass through when the dummy is disposed into a firearm chamber, thereby preventing cutting the cord by the scissors generated by the edge of bore 14 b and the firearm chamber.
  • As illustrated in FIG. 3, the dummy comprises a hole 28 at the location that corresponds to the primer of the bullet. The object of the bore is to prevent the firing pin (not illustrated) of the firearm from hitting the dummy.
  • It should be noted that the dummy comprises a “shoulder” 26, corresponding to the shoulder 58 of the barrel (illustrated in FIG. 6). The object of the shoulder 58 of the barrel (seen in FIG. 9) is to prevent the shoulder 26 of the dummy from entering the firearm's barrel 52 beyond the limit generated by shoulder 58.
  • FIG. 6 is a side view of a bullet 30, according to the prior art.
  • FIG. 7 is a front view of a dummy 10, according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • As illustrated by the dashed line, cylindrical body 22 of the dummy is longer than the shell 32 of the corresponding bullet 30. As will be detailed hereinafter, the object of the additional portion is to prevent the slide 56 of a firearm 50 from contact with the barrel of the firearm.
  • FIG. 8 is a side view of dummy 10 of FIG. 7. In FIG. 8 the cord 12 is added. When the cord outstands of the firearm, it indicates that the firearm is neutralized, i.e., cannot fire.
  • The Use of the Safety Device
  • FIG. 9 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52, according to the prior art.
  • Reference numeral 54 denotes the firearm bullet chamber. The bullet chamber ends with a “shoulder” 58 which prevents the shell 32 of a bullet from passing into the barrel beyond this point.
  • Reference numeral 59 denotes the other end of the barrel 52.
  • FIG. 10 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52 of FIG. 9, in which is disposed a bullet 30, according to the prior art.
  • As illustrated, the “shoulder” 58 of the barrel prevents the bullet shell 32 from entering the barrel 52 beyond this point (shoulder 58).
  • FIG. 11 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52, in which is disposed a dummy 10 of the firearm safety device, according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • As mentioned, dummy 10 has a cylindrical body 22 which corresponds to a bullet shell 32, and a cone 24 which corresponds to a bullet projectile 34.
  • Preferably, the cylindrical body 22 and the cone 24 are made of the same chunk.
  • Especially, the dummy comprises a shoulder 26, which corresponds to the shoulder 58 of the firearm barrel. Accordingly, the dummy cannot be inserted into the barrel beyond the point where shoulder 26 of the dummy is blocked by shoulder 58 of the barrel.
  • An additional feature which is absent from a “standard” bullet is ring 20. The role of the ring is to prevent the dummy from entering the barrel beyond the ring limit. As mentioned, one block is shoulders 58 of the barrel. However, since the firearms' dimensions may differ from one brand to another, the ring 20 actually provides an additional or alternative block to the shoulder. Especially, if the shoulder 26 of the dummy gets broken, ring 20 performs the blocking. FIG. 17 illustrates a situation in which the object that blocks the dummy 10 from entering the barrel beyond is the ring 20.
  • A major difference between the dummy 10 and a bullet 30 is the length of the cylindrical body 22, which is “slightly” greater than the length of a bullet shell 32, such as about 0.15 mm in a gun. The role of the additional length is to generate a space between slide 56 and the end 59 of the barrel, thereby generating a gap between slide 56 and end 59 of the barrel. Thus, the cord 12 can pass through this gap, without being cuted, which diminishes the amortization of the safety device 100.
  • FIG. 12 schematically illustrates a firearm, in a situation where no security device is inserted into its barrel.
  • FIG. 13 schematically illustrates the firearm of FIG. 12 when cocked.
  • The cocking is carried out by pulling slide 56 back. In this situation, a user places the dummy 10 of the safety device into the barrel 52 of the firearm 50.
  • FIG. 14 schematically illustrates the firearm of FIG. 12 when uncocked.
  • In this situation, there is a gap 60 between the slide 56 and the edge of barrel 52. The gap is better seen in the zoomed view. The cord 12 passes through the gap, thereby preventing generating a scissors between the edge of barrel 52 and the slide. Since the generation of scissors is prevented, it prolongs the life of the cord tremendously.
  • FIG. 15 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52 in which is inserted a bullet, according to the prior art.
  • It illustrates a different form of bullet 30, which has a different type of shoulder 26. Nevertheless, a shoulder of this form can also block the entrance of a dummy of this form from entering beyond a
  • FIG. 16 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52 in which is inserted a dummy 10, according to according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • According to this embodiment of the invention, the object that prevents from the dummy 10 to enter beyond a certain limit is the cone 24.
  • FIG. 17 is a longitudinal cross-section of a firearm's barrel 52 in which is inserted a dummy 10, according to according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • According to this embodiment of the invention, the object that prevents from the dummy 10 to enter beyond a certain limit is the ring 20.
  • As will be clear to one skilled in the art, this provision allows for the firearm to be carried either cocked or uncocked (in both cases with dummy in place) in various security services, some of which require that firearms be carried cocked, and others of which require that firearms be carried uncocked.
  • This provision is in contrast to other dummy systems extant, which all allow only a partial cocking and/or do not allow for the firearm to be uncocked when the dummy is in place.
  • A noticeable object such as a flag can be added to the cord indicator. When attached, the flag allows the user to instantly see whether the dummy is in place or not.
  • As mentioned, the socket 16 of the dummy 10 which generates a channel through which the cord passes prevents the dummy from being stuck into the chamber of a firearm when the firearm is cocked, and allows it to be withdrawn from the firearm when the firearm is cocked.
  • Removing the dummy is carried out by pulling back the slide behind the shell extractor pin, which has the result of ejecting the dummy by means of the ejector, and simultaneously introducing a live bullet into the chamber.
  • The flag serves as a clear indicator that the firearm has the dummy in place and cannot be used. To prepare the firearm for use, one simply cocks the firearm.
  • The dummy allows the hammer and trigger of the firearm to be in their normal positions. The dummy also allows the safety device to be placed into any type of holster, both external and internal.
  • As will be appreciated by one skilled in the art, the autoloading mechanism (if present) will be ineffective in inserting a bullet into the chamber, since it is entirely blocked by the dummy 10, which cannot be dislodged by the autoloading mechanism.
  • When the user wishes to check the status of the firearm, it is necessary only to observe whether the indicator (the cord/flag) is present. If the user wishes to remove the dummy, this may be accomplished simply and effectively by means of cocking the firearm. This will have the effect of immediately ejecting the dummy, clearing the chamber and leaving it ready for manual or auto-loading and subsequent discharge, if desired.
  • The purpose of the device is to prevent the need for the owner of a firearm to unload, which is generally necessary due to the danger of unintended discharge; all this, while keeping the firearm ready for immediate action.
  • The dummy may be adapted to all types of firearms by changing its physical dimensions (such as its maximum diameter) to fit various weapons, such as hand firearms, rifles, pistols, and other firearms.
  • Due to the indicator connected to the dummy, there is no need to check whether the firearm is unloaded, as the presence of the dummy necessarily prevents the firearm from being loaded.
  • In the figures and/or description herein, the following reference numerals (Reference Signs List) have been mentioned:
      • numeral 100 denotes a firearm safety device, according to one embodiment of the invention;
      • numeral 10 denotes a dummy in a form of a bullet of a firearm;
      • numeral 12 denotes a cord used as an indicator for presence of the dummy 10 in the barrel of a firearm, i.e., in a safe situation;
      • numerals 14 a and 14 b denote two portions of a latitudinal bore in dummy 10, to which cord 12 is anchored;
      • numeral 16 denotes a socket in the dummy 10, for generating a channel in which the cord 12 is protected from cutting when being disposed into the barrel;
      • numeral 18 denotes a rim of dummy 10, corresponding to a rim 36 of a bullet;
      • numeral 20 denotes a ring around the cylindrical body 22 of the dummy that corresponds to the shell 32 of the bullet 30;
      • numeral 22 denotes a cylindrical body of the dummy, which corresponds to the shell of a bullet;
      • numeral 24 denotes a substantially conical element, corresponding to a bullet projectile 34;
      • numeral 26 denotes a “shoulder” of dummy 10, corresponding to the “shoulder” 58 of the barrel;
      • numeral 28 denotes a hole in the dummy at the location that corresponds to the primer of a bullet;
      • numeral 30 denotes a bullet according to the prior art;
      • numeral 32 denotes a shell of bullet 30;
      • numeral 34 denotes a projectile of bullet 30;
      • numeral 36 denotes a rim of bullet 30;
      • numeral 50 denotes a firearm;
      • numeral 52 denotes a barrel of firearm 50;
      • numeral 54 denotes a chamber of firearm 50;
      • numeral 56 denotes a slide of firearm 50;
      • numeral 58 denotes a shoulder of barrel 52; and
      • numeral 59 denotes an end of barrel 52; and
      • numeral 60 denotes a gap between slide 56 and the edge of barrel 52.
  • In the description herein, the following references have been mentioned:
  • (a) U.S. Pat. No. 5,491,918
  • (b) U.S. Pat. No. 7,886,472 B2
  • The foregoing description and illustrations of the embodiments of the invention has been presented for the purposes of illustration. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the above description in any form. Any term that has been defined above and used in the claims, should to be interpreted according to this definition. The reference numbers in the claims are not a part of the claims, but rather used for facilitating the reading thereof. These reference numbers should not be interpreted as limiting the claims in any form.

Claims (12)

1. A firearm safety device, comprising:
a dummy (10) in a form of a bullet of the firearm;
a cord (12) connected to the dummy, for standing out of the firearm when the dummy is inserted into the barrel (52) of the firearm, thereby indicating that the dummy is inserted into the barrel;
a socket (16) in the dummy (10) for protecting the cord (12) from being cut when the dummy is inserted into the chamber (54) of the firearm;
a mechanism for preventing the slide (56) from reaching the barrel, thereby preventing the slide (56) from cutting the cord.
2. A firearm safety device according to claim 1, wherein the mechanism for preventing the slide (56) from reaching the barrel comprises: an additional length to the element (22) of the dummy that corresponds to the shell of the bullet.
3. A firearm safety device according to claim 2, wherein the additional length is adapted to allow cocking and uncoking the firearm.
4. A firearm safety device according to claim 1, wherein the mechanism for preventing the slide (56) from reaching the barrel comprises: a ring (20) around the cylindrical body (22) of the dummy that corresponds to the shell of the bullet, for stopping the dummy from entering into the barrel beyond the ring (20).
5. A firearm safety device according to claim 1, wherein the mechanism for preventing the slide (56) from reaching the barrel comprises: an adaption of the form an element (24) of the dummy that corresponds to the projectile (34) of a bullet in order to meet the shoulder (58) of the firearm barrel.
6. A firearm safety device according to claim 5, wherein the length of the cylindrical body (22) of the firearm is shortened with reference to a shell of a bullet of the firearm, thereby allowing the adaption.
7. A firearm safety device according to claim 1, wherein the dummy (10) is made of anodized aviation aluminum.
8. A firearm safety device according to claim 1, wherein the cord is made of braided nylon fibers.
9. A firearm safety device according to claim 1, further comprising a hole (28) at the location that corresponds to the primer of the bullet, for preventing the firing pin of the firearm from hitting the dummy (10), thereby preventing damage to the firing pin.
10. A firearm safety device according to claim 1, wherein the dummy further comprises a latitudinal bore, for anchoring the cord thereto.
11. A firearm safety device according to claim 10, wherein the latitudinal bore comprises: a first portion (14 a) and a second portion (14 b) having a smaller diameter than the diameter of the first portion, thereby allowing placing in the wider portion (14 a) a knot of the cord (12), and passing the rest of the cord through the smaller diameter portion (14 b).
12. A firearm according to claim 1, further comprising a flag, fabric, and the like, connected to the cord, for better standing out the indication that the dummy is inserted into the barrel.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20170167815A1 (en) * 2015-12-14 2017-06-15 Blok Safety Systems, LLC. Magazine and Barrel Block

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