US20170055683A1 - Torso harness with bounce-minimizing pocket - Google Patents

Torso harness with bounce-minimizing pocket Download PDF

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Publication number
US20170055683A1
US20170055683A1 US15/249,070 US201615249070A US2017055683A1 US 20170055683 A1 US20170055683 A1 US 20170055683A1 US 201615249070 A US201615249070 A US 201615249070A US 2017055683 A1 US2017055683 A1 US 2017055683A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
pocket
panel
harness
attached
window
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US15/249,070
Inventor
Keith S. Willows
June A. Angus
Antonio Del Rosario
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Amphipod Inc
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Amphipod Inc
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Priority to US201562283316P priority Critical
Application filed by Amphipod Inc filed Critical Amphipod Inc
Priority to US15/249,070 priority patent/US20170055683A1/en
Assigned to AMPHIPOD, INC. reassignment AMPHIPOD, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ANGUS, JUNE A., DEL ROSARIO, ANTONIO, WILLOWS, KEITH S.
Publication of US20170055683A1 publication Critical patent/US20170055683A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F3/00Travelling or camp articles; Sacks or packs carried on the body
    • A45F3/14Carrying-straps; Pack-carrying harnesses
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D13/00Professional, industrial or sporting protective garments, e.g. surgeons' gowns or garments protecting against blows or punches
    • A41D13/01Professional, industrial or sporting protective garments, e.g. surgeons' gowns or garments protecting against blows or punches with reflective or luminous safety means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D27/00Details of garments or of their making
    • A41D27/08Trimmings; Ornaments
    • A41D27/085Luminous ornaments
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F3/00Travelling or camp articles; Sacks or packs carried on the body
    • A45F3/14Carrying-straps; Pack-carrying harnesses
    • A45F2003/144Pack-carrying waist or torso belts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F3/00Travelling or camp articles; Sacks or packs carried on the body
    • A45F3/14Carrying-straps; Pack-carrying harnesses
    • A45F2003/146Pack-carrying harnesses

Abstract

A harness includes a waist belt and a pair of straps connected to the belt and configured to extend over the shoulders of a user. A pocket is attached to the harness and includes a window for access to a device within the pocket. The pocket may be formed from a mix of materials that includes a resilient side gusset to minimize bounce of the pocket when in use. In some versions, the pocket is hingedly attached to the harness.

Description

    PRIORITY CLAIM
  • This application claims the benefit of prior provisional application Ser. No. 62/283,316, filed Aug. 26, 2015, the contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This application relates to harnesses, particularly including reflective harnesses, for use with activities such as running or walking.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Reflective harnesses have been available for some time, but have largely performed the singular task of providing a reflective surface for enhanced visibility when running or engaging in other activities at night or other low light conditions. Because of their limited surface area and perhaps because of their particular purpose, others have not developed a useful way of integrating a convenient and functional pocket into a reflective harness.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The “torso harness” shown in the accompanying figures is generally designed to be worn while the user participates in a variety of activities. One function for the preferred “harness” is to provide reflective surfaces to enhance visibility of the user in low light or other situations in which the user would want to be seen.
  • The preferred harness is easy to put on and take off and adjusts to fit a variety of body sizes and types, without tangling. The geometry of the preferred harness does not impede the user's mobility, while providing other benefits.
  • In accordance with a preferred version, the harness incorporates a pocket on the harness for carrying items such as glasses, cell phones, lights, keys, or other items.
  • The preferred construction of the pocket minimizes bouncing and jingling of the items being carried while allowing excellent accessibility to these items (while on the go) through an access opening that may be selectively sealed with a zipper or other closure.
  • In some versions, port holes are also provided to allow the user to route cables or to access buttons, or serve as a pass-through for a drink tube or another component.
  • A window area is preferably located on the pocket, such as on a front panel, to facilitate visible access to the interior of the pocket or to enable a light, camera, or other element within the pocket to pass through the window.
  • Most preferably, the harness can be constructed using inexpensive and easily obtained materials, assembled using conventional manufacturing equipment, produced easily and inexpensively.
  • A preferred version of the harness includes one or more straps extending over the torso, preferably from a location about the waist to a location about the shoulders when in use. A belt or similar component allows the straps to be held in place, preferably in the form of a waist belt that provides a connection point for the straps at a front and back of the user when in use. The pocket is preferably carried by the straps, either on the straps themselves or on an adjacent strap or panel positioned at some location on the torso of the user when the harness is in use.
  • In one example, the straps are preferably made from somewhat flexible material like stretchy webbing (commonly used in suspender straps or the like). Optional materials for the straps include nylon webbing, strips of neoprene, cotton, mesh, or others.
  • The straps are optionally made of a bright color to enhance visibility, and preferably have integrated light reflectivity. The reflectivity can take many forms, such as applied reflective strips (for example, 3M brand scotchlite material), screened-on reflective ink, or woven-in reflective elements. The straps may also be made from a wholly or partially reflective material.
  • A variety of different materials in combination could be used for the harness, such as nylon webbing for the shoulder straps in combination with stretch webbing for the waist belt. Stretch webbing may also be combined with nylon or other webbing to provide stretch in a localized area but not in other areas.
  • In some versions, the straps may be produced in sizes, shapes, or forms that differ from the preferred version, in which the straps are elongated and narrow, with straight edges. For example, the straps may have scalloped or undulating edges, substantially sinuous edges, or may bulge out or in to fit better with the user's body. The straps may also have a greater width or thickness in some versions.
  • Most preferably, a buckle or fastener is provided, in order to facilitate adjustment of the waist belt, to allow it to be removed, and/or to connect and disconnect the straps or the pocket from the belt. Likewise, most preferably the straps are adjustable and incorporate a buckle, fastener, or similar component for this purpose. The buckles or fastening elements can be made from commonly available off-the-shelf buckles and adjusters used for belts, backpacks, bags, suspenders, etc. In other versions, hook and loop closures, snaps, buttons, fabric loops, zippers, ties, eye-hooks, or other buckles or fasteners may be used.
  • In some versions, the harness does not include any fasteners or buckles, and instead is either made in a fixed size or relies on the stretchiness of the material to accommodate different sizes.
  • The central pocket area is preferably constructed of flexible light material, with a high-visibility surface which is preferably constructed of bright reflective material. In some versions, the pocket is backed with a soft breathable material. Holes may optionally be provided through a panel forming the pocket to let air more freely pass through or as a pass-through for cables, tubes, electronic components or other elements. The front reflective panel could be die cut, punched, cut from flat stock, or otherwise formed. It may alternatively be injection molded, or take the form of a reflector like those used on bicycles or street signs.
  • The preferred front or rear visibility panels can house lighting elements such as LED flashers with their associated power supply. The light may be integrated into a light transmissive material so entire panel is illuminated by the light. In some versions, these lighting elements can be integrated into the straps elements and/or the buckle or adjuster. A flexible, somewhat flexible, or somewhat rigid light panel element (or luminous panel or panels) can be incorporated into one or more of the visibility panels together with an associated power supply to produce light.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Preferred and alternative examples of the present invention are described in detail below with reference to the following drawings:
  • FIG. 1 shows a front perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the disclosed invention.
  • FIG. 2 shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, showing a smart phone positioned in a pocket such that video and flashlight functions can be utilized through a pocket window.
  • FIG. 3 shows a front view of an embodiment similar to the embodiment shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 4 shows a front view of an embodiment wherein adjustment loops are placed adjacent the pocket. A top portion of the harness is cut away for simplicity of the drawing. A smart phone is placed in the pocket.
  • FIG. 5 shows a front view of an embodiment wherein adjustment loops are placed adjacent the pocket. A top portion of the harness is cut away for simplicity of the drawing. A smart phone is placed in the pocket.
  • FIG. 6A shows a section view taken through section A-A of FIG. 1
  • FIG. 6B shows a section view taken through section C-C of FIG. 2
  • FIG. 7A shows a section view taken through section B-B of FIG. 1
  • FIG. 7B shows a section view taken through section D-D of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 7C shows a section view taken through section E-E of FIG. 10.
  • FIG. 7D shows a section view taken through section F-F of FIG. 14.
  • FIG. 8 shows a front view of an embodiment of a preferable front pocket with associated components. Shoulder straps are cut away for simplicity of the drawing.
  • FIG. 9 shows a back view of the embodiment of a preferable front pocket shown in FIG. 8 (shown with associated components).
  • FIG. 10 shows a front view of another embodiment of a preferable front pocket (shown with associated components).
  • FIG. 11 shows a back view of the embodiment of preferable front pocket shown in FIG. 10.
  • FIG. 12 shows a front view of another embodiment of a front pocket (shown with associated components).
  • FIG. 13 shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 12, illustrated with a front panel assembly folded down to show how a user might view a smart phone screen or the like (not shown) placed in the pocket, which would be visible through window 33.
  • FIG. 14 shows a front view of another embodiment of a preferable front pocket.
  • FIG. 15 shows a front view of another embodiment of a front pocket.
  • FIG. 16 shows a front view of another embodiment of a front pocket.
  • FIG. 17 shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 16 although front panel assembly is shown folded up to show how a user might more simply lift up to easily view a smart phone screen or the like placed in the pocket.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a perspective view of a preferred harness with an integrated pocket. The harness is formed with one or more straps 7, 8, which preferably include some reflective material on one or both of the straps. As illustrated, the straps are formed from elongated, narrow material, but the term “strap” should be understood to include other shapes and sizes of materials that can be used to form a body harness. The straps need not include specialized reflective material, and instead may be formed from material having a shiny surface or may have little or no reflectivity at all. Each strap has a first end and a second end, and the straps are adapted to form a harness in which a separate one of the straps is placed over the shoulder of a person when in use.
  • One end of each of the straps 7 and 8 is fed through, and attached to, one or more rings 15 (only one is visible in FIG. 1; the other is hidden behind strap 8). In one example, the rings or hoops are formed from plastic, metal or other materials. In a version in which adjustability is desired, the first end of each strap 7, 8 is attached to a separate adjuster element 9 which may be configured as a clip or a buckle. More particularly, the adjuster element is preferably a ring having a central bisecting rung, in which the first end of a strap is fed through the ring 15 and affixed to the central rung of the adjuster element using glue, stitching, heat bonding, or other means.
  • In one version, the first ends of the straps are attached in the manner described above to a rear torso panel 16, which optionally is formed as a reflective element. The straps may alternatively be attached directly to the rear torso panel, without using a ring 15 for attachment, such as by stitching, riveting, or other means. Likewise, in some versions the straps may be attached to a belt 26 without use of a rear torso panel.
  • The opposite second end of each strap 7, 8 is affixed (for example, by glue, stitching, or other means) to a front pocket 1. In one example, the second end of each strap is sewn into a seam located between a back panel 17 (see FIG. 6B) and a zipper 3 which combine to form a portion of a pocket positioned on the front panel.
  • The front pocket 1 is preferably formed with a neoprene back panel 17, a stretchy lycra spandex side gusset 6, and a front panel of a reflective sheet material 5 having a window 2. Preferably, the back panel, side gusset, and front panel are sewn together to form the pocket, as seen in the sectional views of FIG. 6A and FIG. 7. In one such example, a zipper 3 may form a top closure that is affixed, sewn, heat bonded, or integrally molded/formed, at the pocket's top edge so that it acts as a closure for the pocket.
  • One end of the rear torso panel 16 is affixed (such as by gluing, sewing, or heat bonding) to a belt or strap 26, preferably at a relatively central location along the belt. As illustrated in FIG. 1, a bottom end of the back panel is attached to the belt 26 while the top end of the back panel is affixed to the rings 15. The belt is optionally adjustable, and in one preferred example the belt is formed with a first end and a second end. Each of the first end and the second end of the belt is fed through a pass-through loop in a respective buckle or clasp 12, 14, each of which is configured to mate with a complementary clip 11, 13 respectively. The first and second ends of the belt 26 are each affixed to an inner rung of an adjuster 9 (which may be a tri-glide loop or the like, such as commonly found on most backpacks), which is fed onto the belt 26.
  • The top end of the front pocket 1 is affixed to the straps 7, 8. In the illustrated example the straps 7, 8 are stitched to the pocket, such as shown in FIG. 6B. In other versions, the straps may be attached using other means, such as rings of the type used with the back panel, rivets, or other means. In the illustrated version, the straps 7, 8 are shown attached directly to the pocket, but in other versions the straps may be attached to the pocket somewhat indirectly, such as by attachment to an additional panel or section of webbing which, in turn, is attached to the pocket. In either case, the straps are considered to be attached to the pocket, differing as to whether the attachment is direct or indirect.
  • One end of the front pocket 1 is affixed to each of the clips 11 and 13. Most preferably the bottom end of the front panel is attached to the clips, preferably by means of a pair of folded over and sewn mounting straps 19 such that the buckles 12, 14 are held captive to the front panel by the clips 11, 13 and can be used to remove the waist strap 26. In FIG. 8, for example, the waist belt is shown unbuckled from the front panel.
  • In the illustrated example, the mounting straps 19 and clips 11, 13 extend laterally away from either side of the pocket, generally perpendicularly to an axis extending from the bottom to the top of the pocket, so that the combined pocket, mounting straps 19 and clips 11, 13 resemble an upside-down “T” shape. It should be noted that there are many options for providing a releasable fastener for the belt 26, and there are many different ways to join the belt to the harness. For example, as shown in FIG. 5, the buckles may be eliminated such that the harness waist strap 26 would be still adjustable but could be donned and removed as with a t-shirt (having no buckles to undo the waist belt). The nomenclature above refers to a front pocket and back panel, in which the front is at the user's chest and the back is at the user's back when the harness is worn by the user. A user could, however, wear the harness in a reversed configuration with the pocket in the back, although generally it is more desirable to wear the pocket in the front.
  • FIG. 2 shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, but in this case an exemplary smart phone is contained in the pocket 1 and oriented such that video and flashlight functions can be utilized through the window 2. The window 2 is preferably made of flexible transparent vinyl, TPE, TPU, or the like and is sewn at its periphery to the pocket 1 such that it protects the contents carried therein but also allows a flexible preferably transparent window such that functions of the phone can be actuated. In some versions some or all of the phone or screen can be viewed and accessed or function through the window. FIGS. 13, 15 and 16 illustrate examples of embodiments in which a large area of the pocket allows through-window access to all or much of the phone or other item held in the pocket.
  • FIG. 3 shows a front view of an embodiment of a harness 20 similar to the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, including a harness having a belt 26 and straps 7, 8, 27 formed from flexible stretch webbing or other materials. A central front panel forms a pocket having window 2 a, a front reflective layer 5, and a stretchy gusset 6 a. A zipper pull 4 a is illustrated, allowing access to the pocket. Again in this version, buckles 12 a, 14 a and clips 11 a, 13 a are provided to releasably join the belt 26 to the front pocket. A section of strap material 27 is positioned to join the rear torso panel 16 a to the belt 26.
  • FIG. 4 shows a front view of an embodiment for a harness 30 wherein adjustment loops 15 are placed adjacent the front pocket 1, unlike the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 wherein the loops 15 are placed adjacent the rear torso panel 16. Adjustment of the shoulder straps 7 and 8 are accomplished in the same way as in FIG. 1 although loops are moved to a position more closely adjacent the front panel rather than adjacent the back panel. In some cases a user may desire the pocket 1 to face backward on the body when in use, wherein it may be desirable in this case to place loops adjacent the pocket. The top portion of the harness is cut away for simplicity of the drawing.
  • FIG. 5 shows a front view of an embodiment for a harness 40 wherein adjustment loops 15 are placed adjacent the pocket, as in the version of FIG. 4. In addition, in this version the waist belt buckles and clips (such as elements 11, 12, 13, and 14 in the version of FIG. 1) are eliminated such that the harness would be worn like a t-shirt, with adjustment of the belt or waist strap 26 provided using the strap adjuster 9. Again, the top portion of the harness is cut away for simplicity of the drawing.
  • FIG. 6A shows a section view taken through section A-A of FIG. 1, showing the assembly of the pocket. The preferred pocket assembly allows for expansion of the pocket such that different sized items can be carried in a bounce-minimized manner. The pocket 1 (as shown in a front perspective view in FIG. 1) is mainly comprised of a back panel 17, which is preferably formed from neoprene or similar materials. A gusset 6, preferably made from lycra spandex, stretch denim or similar materials, forms a sidewall at each side of the pocket, and also forms a portion of the bottom of the pocket. A front panel 5, preferably formed from a reflective flexible sheet material, forms the front side of the pocket, facing away from the user when in use. Most preferably, a clear vinyl window 2 is positioned at a portion of the front panel, while a zipper closure 3 is positioned along a top edge of the pocket.
  • An optional internal divider pocket 18 is shown, preferably formed from a stretchy mesh or other appropriate material for an internal pocket. An upper flap 91 of the internal pocket 18 can also be seen in FIGS. 6A and 6B. The internal pocket 18 is preferably formed by stitching the sides and bottom to back panel 17, leaving the top open such that it serves as a pocket held to back panel 17. Preferably, a section of webbing strap 19 connects to buckles labeled 11, 12, 13 and 14 shown in FIG. 1, so that the buckles are held captive to the pocket 1 to engage and disengage waist straps.
  • The pocket 1 is preferably formed by joining a first and a second sub-assembly together. The first sub-assembly is preferably comprised of the front panel 5 on which the window 2 is preferably sewn in place around the periphery of window 2 (see FIG. 8 which shows exemplary stitching around window 2 a), together with stretchy gusset 6 which is sewn in place together with the front layer 5. In the illustrated example, a zipper 3 is also attached along the top edge of this sub-assembly. The second sub-assembly is comprised of a back panel of neoprene or other materials, with the internal pocket 18 sewn in place and the section of mounting strap 19 also attached, preferably by stitching.
  • Sub-assembly one (front layer) and sub-assembly two (back layer) are then preferably placed face to face inside out wherein the zipper is left unzipped and the two sub-assemblies are then sewn together along their bottom and sides such that pocket 1 can now be inverted right side out wherein buckle components 11 and 13 can be assembled, sewn in place to the mounting strap 19. Ends of the straps 7 and 8 are then preferably sewn in a gap between the zipper 3 and the back panel 17 that is intentionally left unsewn, such that the straps 7 and 8 are sewn firmly in place to the pocket 1. The top of the pocket is sewn, attaching the zipper 3 to the back panel 17. As seen in FIG. 6B, an end of a strap 7 is sewn in a position trapped between the zipper 3 and the back panel 17. The other strap 7 is attached in the same manner.
  • FIG. 6B shows a section view taken through section C-C of FIG. 2. An example cell phone 90 is shown held in the pocket 1, as also seen through the window 2 in FIG. 2. The pocket 1 can be assembled by sewing a first sub-assembly of the front panel (preferably parts 6, 5, 2 and 3) to a second sub-assembly (preferably parts 17, 18 and 19) of the back panel such that the straps 7 and 8 are sewn trapped in between the zipper 3 and back panel 17.
  • FIG. 7 shows section view taken through section B-B of FIG. 1.
  • Preferably back panel 17 is neoprene (or the like) of an appropriate thickness, providing cushioning from items carried within the pocket 1, but also preferably also providing stiffness such that it resists bending somewhat more than the gusset 6 material (which is preferably lycra spandex, stretch denim or similar stretch material). Thus, in one version the gusset is formed from a different material than the material forming the back layer, and preferably the back layer is relatively more stiff than the gusset. Likewise, the gusset is formed from a material having a greater degree of elasticity than the material forming the back panel.
  • The gusset 6 is cut somewhat larger around its perimeter than the back panel 17. As seen in the sectional view of FIG. 7A, the gusset overlaps both the back panel 17 and a portion of the front panel 5, forming a portion of the front and back of the pocket in addition to the sidewall. Accordingly, the gusset 6 can stretch outwardly, allowing the pocket to expand to fit different size items carried within pocket 1. FIG. 7A shows the pocket in its empty state, while FIG. 7B shows the pocket carrying a smart phone or other object having a width (from left to right, in the illustration) that is greater than the pocket in a relaxed state. The pocket in FIG. 7B has expanded laterally to accommodate the larger item. This geometry and expansion provides a snug fit, minimizing bounce and movement of items within the pocket.
  • If it is desirable for the pocket 1 to be waterproof or have more water resistance, materials that have more resistance to water can be used for the gusset and back panel 17. Likewise, the seams can be sealed or the pocket 1 can be integrally formed or molded from flexible, stretchy material.
  • Lateral expansion is preferable for minimization of bounce, as described above. Accordingly, the front panel 5 is preferably formed from a somewhat stiff but flexible material like flexible vinyl or reflective material that is backed (by lamination, heat sealing, or otherwise) with vinyl or the like. Preferable materials for the front panel 5 include retro-reflective sheeting (such as used in reflective vests), thin flexible plastic, vinyl sheeting, polyurethane sheeting, or the like. Also other materials could be used with various degrees of success such as leather, ballistic nylon fabric, non-woven sheeting, or others. In each case, the front panel 5 is generally considered to be stiff and inelastic, in contrast to the elasticity of the side gusset.
  • FIG. 7C shows a section view taken through section E-E of FIG. 10, illustrating an alternate bottom construction of the pocket. As shown, it is preferably constructed in a manner similar to the side construction as shown in FIG. 7A. Alternatively, it may be constructed as shown in FIG. 6.
  • FIG. 7D shows section view taken through section F-F of FIG. 14, illustrating an alternate side construction of the pocket in a manner similar to the bottom construction shown in FIG. 6. In an alternative version, it may be constructed as shown in FIG. 7A.
  • FIG. 8 shows a front view of an embodiment of a harness with a front pocket, in which straps 7 and 8 are cut away for simplicity of the drawing and a waist belt is not shown. The version of FIG. 8 shows a preferable shape for the window 2 a and front panel 5 a. It also illustrates a zipper 3 a (having zipper pull 4 a), which provides top-access to the pocket. Stitching 28 is shown as an optional horizontal stitch at the bottom end of the pocket, through the front and rear panels, which is intended as an optional means of limiting the vertical space of the pocket.
  • FIG. 9 shows a back view of the front pocket shown in FIG. 8. Optional port holes 21 and 22 are formed as through-holes in the back panel 17 a to provide pass-through access for headphone cords and the like. In this case, the port holes are located both at the top and bottom of the pocket; in other versions it may be desirable to place pass-through holes in various other locations as desired.
  • FIG. 10 shows a front view of another embodiment having a front pocket.
  • In this version, port holes 23 are provided in a front panel of the pocket rather than (or in addition to) the back panel as illustrated in FIG. 9. The port holes can alternatively be achieved by incorporating additional panels or parts such as rubber molded parts that are sewn or adhered as desired. The version of FIG. 10 also illustrates an alternative window shape, which in this case is a narrower, longer wedge shape.
  • FIG. 11 shows a back view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 10. Optional port holes 24 and 25 are provided at a lower end of the pocket.
  • FIG. 12 shows a front view of another embodiment of a front pocket in which the front pocket is configured to fold downward along a location at the bottom of the pocket, forming a hinge. The pocket 60 shown in FIG. 12 includes a front panel 31 and a window 32 wherein panel 31 is preferably configured such as described in any of the above embodiments. In this version, also illustrated in FIG. 13, the front panel 31 is configured to fold along its bottom end 38. The lower edge of the front panel is preferably fastened to a chest panel 36, such as by stitching as illustrated. Thus, in FIG. 13 the pocket has been folded downward into an open or accessible position while in FIG. 12 the same pocket has been folded upward into a closed or stowed position. In the open position, a user can access the inside of the pocket assembly.
  • In the preferred version of this embodiment, a secondary inner panel window 33 and inner panel bezel 34 are joined to form the back panel of the pocket, though the back panel may alternatively be formed from a single layer not having a window. A section of Velcro or other hook and loop component 35 a is provided on the back panel of the pocket, while a mating component 35 b is attached to the chest panel 36, thereby enabling the pocket 60 to be fastened in the stowed position as shown in FIG. 12 and moved to the open position shown in FIG. 13. In this open position, a user can access a cell phone full or portion of the screen or the like through window 33.
  • The front panel 31 is preferably fastened to the back panel 34 around its periphery such that a pocket is formed, although the pocket may also be formed with a gusset as described above. An opening 37 is provided at the lower end of the pocket, preferably adjacent the hinge 38, to enable access to the pocket. In the version having an inner panel window as shown in FIG. 13, the user may access the screen of a stowed smart phone through the inner panel window 33. Likewise, the flashlight and video functions of the phone can be used through the window 32 such that a user can start a video or flashlight function on a cell phone by accessing the cell phone screen through the internal window 33 when the pocket 60 is in an open position as shown in FIG. 13. A user may then stow the pocket 60 by rotating the pocket 60 upward and joining the fasteners 35 a and 35 b together, enabling the video, camera, and flashlight functions of a cell phone to be used through the window 32.
  • In one version, the front panel 31 is formed from retro-reflective sheeting (commonly used in reflective vest), thin flexible plastic, vinyl sheeting, polyurethane sheeting, or others. Alternatively, it may be formed from leather, ballistic nylon fabric, non-woven sheeting, Velcro loop/hook material, Veltex, aerospace mesh, or yet other materials, preferably allowing the front panel to provide some structure and stiffness to hold items close to the body. Preferable materials for the back panel 34 include the same materials as for the front panel. In some cases it may be desirable for the back panel 34, the front panel 31 or both (in whole or in part) to be formed of stretchy material like lycra spandex or stretch denim or other resilient materials if some stretch is desired such that the pocket 60 can expand to fit different sized items.
  • The chest panel 36 preferably provides structure such that the pocket 60 can fasten in place in stowed position (shown in FIG. 12) by mating fasteners 35 a and 35 b. Preferred materials for the chest panel 36 include Veltex, aerospace mesh, neoprene, coolmax and other somewhat or substantially breathable materials that are comfortably worn next to the body. The chest panel 36 can be formed of one or more thicknesses of material and is of an appropriate size and shape to provide a stowing area for the pocket 60 wherein pocket 60 can be held firmly on the chest of a user. The shoulder straps are illustrated in cutaway view in FIGS. 12 and 13 for simplicity.
  • FIG. 14 shows a front view of another embodiment of front pocket 70. In this case, the mounting strap (or straps) 41 are positioned at a higher location on the pocket 70, moving the connection buckles 13 a and 11 a upward along the pocket 70, closer to the pocket's center of mass. In the illustrated example, the connection buckles are below the vertical midpoint (that is, the point mid-way between the top and the bottom of the pocket) of the pocket, and at a location approximately half-way between the bottom and the vertical midpoint. This raised position for the buckles can help to control the bounce of an item carried in pocket 70. As shown in FIG. 14, the mounting straps 41 (and thus buckle portions 11 a and 13 a) can also be angled slightly downward such that they can provide a potentially more ergonomic fit with a user. Shoulder straps are cut away for simplicity of the drawing.
  • FIG. 15 shows a front view of another embodiment of a front pocket 70. The pocket 70 shown in FIG. 15 includes a front panel 51 and a window 52. The pocket 70 of FIG. 15 may be constructed using any of the configurations of the previous embodiments, but in this case the window 52 on the front panel 51 is larger and occupies the majority of the front panel such that the front panel essentially forms a bezel about the window.
  • FIG. 16 shows a front view of another embodiment of front pocket 80, having a front panel 61 and a window 62. The same pocket is shown in FIG. 17 but in which the pocket is rotated upward into an open position, as opposed to the stowed or closed position of FIG. 16. In this embodiment, the front panel 61 (or, alternatively, the back panel 64) folds along a hinge line 68, positioned at a top end of the pocket when the pocket is in the stowed position. Fasteners such as complementary hook and loop sections 63 a, 63 b are provided to allow the pocket 80 to be fastened in the stowed position as shown in FIG. 16 and moved to the un-stowed position shown in FIG. 17. The front panel 61 is preferably fastened to the back panel 64 (see FIG. 17) around its periphery such that a pocket is formed. Access to the pocket is provided by a zipper or other closure 66. The window and upper hinge allows a cell phone or the like to be placed in the pocket 80 with access to the screen preferably through the window 62. A user may stow the pocket 80 (from the un-stowed position as shown in FIG. 17) by lowering pocket 80 and fastening fasteners 63 a and 63 b together such that pocket 80 is held fixed in place attached to the chest panel 65 as pictured in FIG. 16. The chest panel 65 is preferably sewn to shoulder straps on one end and buckle connectors on the other end. Shoulder straps are cut away for simplicity of the drawing.
  • While the preferred embodiment of the invention has been illustrated and described, as noted above, many changes can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, the scope of the invention is not limited by the disclosure of the preferred embodiment. Instead, the invention should be determined entirely by reference to the claims that follow.

Claims (20)

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:
1. A harness, comprising:
a belt configured to be worn about a user's waist;
a first shoulder strap having a first end and a second end;
a second shoulder strap having a first end and a second end;
a rear torso panel, the first end of the first shoulder strap and the first end of the second shoulder strap each being attached to the rear torso panel, the first shoulder strap and the second shoulder strap being configured to extend over the user's shoulders when in use, the rear torso panel being attached to the belt;
a pocket having an upper end and a lower end, the upper end of the pocket being attached to the second end of the first shoulder strap and to the second end of the second shoulder strap, the lower end of the pocket being attached to the belt;
the pocket further having a front panel and a rear panel, the front panel having a window formed from a transparent sheet material.
2. The harness of claim 1, wherein the pocket further comprises a rear panel, a front panel, and a side gusset, the window being positioned in the front panel.
3. The harness of claim 2, wherein the back panel is formed from a first material and the front panel is formed from a second material, wherein the front panel is relatively more stiff than the rear panel.
4. The harness of claim 3, wherein the side gusset is formed from a third material, wherein the side gusset is relatively more resilient than the front panel and the back panel.
5. The harness of claim 4, further comprising an internal pocket positioned within the pocket.
6. The harness of claim 4, further comprising at least one port extending through the pocket.
7. The harness of claim 3, wherein the side gusset is attached to the front panel and to the back panel, and further wherein the window is attached between the front panel and the side gusset.
8. The harness of claim 1, wherein the lower end of the pocket extends below the belt.
9. The harness of claim 1, further comprising a chest panel attached to the second end of the first strap and to the second end of the second strap, and further wherein the pocket is hingedly attached to the chest panel.
10. The harness of claim 9, wherein the pocket is hingedly attached to the chest panel at the lower end of the pocket.
11. The harness of claim 10, further comprising an inner pocket window attached to the back panel.
12. The harness of claim 11, wherein the inner pocket window overlies at least a portion of the window positioned on the front panel.
13. The harness of claim 11, further comprising a first fastener attached to the pocket and a mating second fastener attached to the chest panel, whereby the pocket is moveable between a stowed position in which the first fastener is joined to the second fastener, and an opened position in which the first fastener is separated from the second fastener.
14. The harness of claim 9, wherein the pocket is hingedly attached to the chest panel at the upper end of the pocket.
15. The harness of claim 10, further comprising an inner pocket window attached to the back panel.
16. The harness of claim 11, wherein the inner pocket window overlies at least a portion of the window positioned on the front panel.
17. The harness of claim 11, further comprising a first fastener attached to the pocket and a mating second fastener attached to the chest panel, whereby the pocket is moveable between a stowed position in which the first fastener is joined to the second fastener, and an opened position in which the first fastener is separated from the second fastener.
18. A harness, comprising:
a belt configured to be worn about a user's waist;
a rear torso panel;
a pocket having an upper end and a lower end, the lower end being attached to the belt, the pocket having a first connector configured for releasable attachment to mating connector attached to the belt;
a first shoulder strap extending from the rear torso panel to the pocket;
a second shoulder strap extending from the rear torso panel to the upper end of the pocket, the first shoulder strap and the second shoulder strap being configured to extend over the user's shoulders when in use;
the pocket further having a front panel joined to a rear panel and defining an interior space between the front panel and the rear panel, the front panel having a window formed from a transparent material, the window being attached to a cutout portion within the front panel, the window further being positioned at the upper end of the pocket.
19. The harness of claim 18, wherein the pocket further comprises a chest panel, the pocket being hingedly attached to the chest panel at an upper end of the pocket.
20. The harness of claim 18, wherein the pocket further comprises a chest panel, the pocket being hingedly attached to the chest panel at a lower end of the pocket.
US15/249,070 2015-08-26 2016-08-26 Torso harness with bounce-minimizing pocket Abandoned US20170055683A1 (en)

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US201562283316P true 2015-08-26 2015-08-26
US15/249,070 US20170055683A1 (en) 2015-08-26 2016-08-26 Torso harness with bounce-minimizing pocket

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US15/249,070 US20170055683A1 (en) 2015-08-26 2016-08-26 Torso harness with bounce-minimizing pocket

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US9923590B1 (en) * 2015-09-03 2018-03-20 UVu, LLC Pack assembly for a mobile device
US10182639B2 (en) * 2015-09-03 2019-01-22 UVu, LLC Pack assembly for a mobile device
WO2019183256A1 (en) * 2018-03-20 2019-09-26 UVu, LLC Pack assembly for a mobile device

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US6752305B2 (en) * 2002-03-22 2004-06-22 John Shattuck Identification holder system
US6766932B2 (en) * 2002-04-26 2004-07-27 Travel Caddy, Inc. Identification document and ticket carrier
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US4126168A (en) * 1977-10-31 1978-11-21 Sirco International Corporation Multi-purpose pocket-size carrying case
US6345751B1 (en) * 2000-08-04 2002-02-12 Robert Nolan Elliot Method and apparatus for carrying a portable electronic device
US6752305B2 (en) * 2002-03-22 2004-06-22 John Shattuck Identification holder system
US6766932B2 (en) * 2002-04-26 2004-07-27 Travel Caddy, Inc. Identification document and ticket carrier
US20040155084A1 (en) * 2002-11-18 2004-08-12 Worth Brown Wearable personal item carrier
US20120037675A1 (en) * 2010-08-10 2012-02-16 Shepherd Scott M Modular outdoor packing system

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9923590B1 (en) * 2015-09-03 2018-03-20 UVu, LLC Pack assembly for a mobile device
US10182639B2 (en) * 2015-09-03 2019-01-22 UVu, LLC Pack assembly for a mobile device
WO2019183256A1 (en) * 2018-03-20 2019-09-26 UVu, LLC Pack assembly for a mobile device

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