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US20170021259A1 - System and method of tracking and improving golf performance - Google Patents

System and method of tracking and improving golf performance Download PDF

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US20170021259A1
US20170021259A1 US14806023 US201514806023A US2017021259A1 US 20170021259 A1 US20170021259 A1 US 20170021259A1 US 14806023 US14806023 US 14806023 US 201514806023 A US201514806023 A US 201514806023A US 2017021259 A1 US2017021259 A1 US 2017021259A1
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player
data
system
performance
input
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US14806023
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Ryke Dismuke
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Ryke Dismuke
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/36Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for golf
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/06Indicating or scoring devices for games or players, or for other sports activities
    • A63B71/0619Displays, user interfaces and indicating devices, specially adapted for sport equipment, e.g. display mounted on treadmills
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/06Indicating or scoring devices for games or players, or for other sports activities
    • A63B71/0619Displays, user interfaces and indicating devices, specially adapted for sport equipment, e.g. display mounted on treadmills
    • A63B71/0669Score-keepers or score display devices
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/08Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions
    • A63B71/14Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the hands, e.g. baseball, boxing or golfing gloves
    • A63B71/141Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the hands, e.g. baseball, boxing or golfing gloves in the form of gloves
    • A63B71/146Golf gloves
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q50/00Systems or methods specially adapted for a specific business sector, e.g. utilities or tourism
    • G06Q50/10Services
    • G06Q50/22Health care, e.g. hospitals; Social work
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2102/00Application of clubs, bats, rackets or the like to the sporting activity ; particular sports involving the use of balls and clubs, bats, rackets, or the like
    • A63B2102/32Golf
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2208/00Characteristics or parameters related to the user or player
    • A63B2208/02Characteristics or parameters related to the user or player posture
    • A63B2208/0204Standing on the feet

Abstract

An electronic device having a program configured to track player performance according to a number of criteria is described. The device is programmed to receive player input data and course input data to process and provide feedback data. Feedback data may be tabular information describing an overall performance analysis of the player. Additionally, the feedback data may be the generation of a targeted location on the green during an approach shot. Feedback data may also be used to modify training activities.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • [0001]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    The present application relates generally to a golf performance, and more particularly to an electronic program used to track and improve golf performance.
  • [0003]
    2. Description of Related Art
  • [0004]
    Golf is a popular sport that has gained in popularity over the years. Golf involves the use of a variety of clubs to hit golf balls into a series of holes. The idea is to take the fewest number of swings with the club to place the ball in the hole. Each hole begins with the player teeing off to drive the ball as close to the hole as possible. The distance to the hole varies and may require a number of intermediate length shots to reach the green. Once on the green, a golfer puts until the ball reaches the hole. Golf, as a game, is composed of a number of different types of shots at varying lengths. To become proficient at golf, a player must master the techniques and skills necessary.
  • [0005]
    Proficiency in golf requires practice. Traditionally, golf instruction seems to be focused on general applications and techniques without sufficient focus on how a player should tactically play a golf course so that they are able to utilize their current strengths and understand their weaknesses to shoot lower scores. Time is limited, and the time spent practicing should be spent on areas that the golfer will face most often and will have the greatest impact on their tactical success, which will ultimately have an impact on better scores. However, at the present time there is not a simplified and effective way to isolate and track key areas that determine the degree of success or failure in a golfer's tactical execution.
  • [0006]
    Additionally, golf is one of the few sports without a standard court or field. All golf courses read differently. Additionally, cup locations on a green change between rounds which affect how a player may attack the hole. These variations make golf even more difficult. Presently a golfer must rely on experience at a particular hole gained from a practice round, caddy advice, or other counsel when navigating the course. It would be of great advantage if there was a way to provide detailed course information based on current conditions to a golfer as they prepare for each shot. It is important to note that for non-professional golfers, the need for more tailored practices and course information is even more important since typically their time is more limited and have less financial means to receive quality instruction and counsel.
  • [0007]
    It is desirable to provide a system to track the performance strengths of a golfer and provide player specific detailed information about how to attack a course. Although great strides have been made, considerable shortcomings remain.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0008]
    The novel features believed characteristic of the application are set forth in the appended claims. However, the application itself, as well as a preferred mode of use, and further objectives and advantages thereof, will best be understood by reference to the following detailed description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • [0009]
    FIG. 1 is a schematic of a system of tracking and improving golf performance according to the preferred embodiment of the present application;
  • [0010]
    FIG. 2 is an exemplary schematic of an electronic device used in the system of FIG. 1;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 3 is a chart of the functions of the system of FIG. 1;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 4 is a chart of the course input data entered into the system of FIG. 1;
  • [0013]
    FIGS. 5 and 6 are charts of the player performance input data entered into the system of FIG. 1;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 7 is a chart of player analysis data generated by the system of FIG. 1;
  • [0015]
    FIGS. 8-9 are exemplary formats for the graphical display of the player analysis data of FIG. 7; and
  • [0016]
    FIG. 10 is an exemplary hole location illustrating the providing of a targeted location for an approach shot as seen in the system of FIG. 1.
  • [0017]
    While the system and method of the present application is susceptible to various modifications and alternative forms, specific embodiments thereof have been shown by way of example in the drawings and are herein described in detail. It should be understood, however, that the description herein of specific embodiments is not intended to limit the application to the particular embodiment disclosed, but on the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the spirit and scope of the process of the present application as defined by the appended claims.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0018]
    Illustrative embodiments of the preferred embodiment are described below. In the interest of clarity, not all features of an actual implementation are described in this specification. It will of course be appreciated that in the development of any such actual embodiment, numerous implementation-specific decisions must be made to achieve the developer's specific goals, such as compliance with system-related and business-related constraints, which will vary from one implementation to another. Moreover, it will be appreciated that such a development effort might be complex and time-consuming but would nevertheless be a routine undertaking for those of ordinary skill in the art having the benefit of this disclosure.
  • [0019]
    In the specification, reference may be made to the spatial relationships between various components and to the spatial orientation of various aspects of components as the devices are depicted in the attached drawings. However, as will be recognized by those skilled in the art after a complete reading of the present application, the devices, members, apparatuses, etc. described herein may be positioned in any desired orientation. Thus, the use of terms to describe a spatial relationship between various components or to describe the spatial orientation of aspects of such components should be understood to describe a relative relationship between the components or a spatial orientation of aspects of such components, respectively, as the device described herein may be oriented in any desired direction.
  • [0020]
    The system and method of use in accordance with the present application overcomes one or more of the above-discussed problems commonly associated with tracking and training devices used to increase golf performance. Specifically, the system and method of the present application is configured to provide a player with detailed feedback data regarding past and present performance. The feedback may be used to adjust training activities. Additionally, the system is configured to provide a targeted location to the player to hit. The targeted location is a portion of the green and determined by the system based upon course characteristics, such as hole location. The system tracks the performance of the player according to their ability to place the ball in the targeted location. These and other unique features of the system are discussed below and illustrated in the accompanying drawings.
  • [0021]
    The system and method of use will be understood, both as to its structure and operation, from the accompanying drawings, taken in conjunction with the accompanying description. Several embodiments of the system are presented herein. It should be understood that various components, parts, and features of the different embodiments may be combined together and/or interchanged with one another, all of which are within the scope of the present application, even though not all variations and particular embodiments are shown in the drawings. It should also be understood that the mixing and matching of features, elements, and/or functions between various embodiments is expressly contemplated herein so that one of ordinary skill in the art would appreciate from this disclosure that the features, elements, and/or functions of one embodiment may be incorporated into another embodiment as appropriate, unless otherwise described.
  • [0022]
    The system of the present application is programmed to track and process past and present player performance data and provide feedback data to the player to assist in training activities and current shot selection during play. The system includes a program processed and stored by an electronic device. The program is processed by the electronic device and may be accessed by one or more users, including the player. Communications may be sent to the player through the program and corresponding electronic device in real time.
  • [0023]
    Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference characters identify corresponding or similar elements in form and function throughout the several views. FIG. 1 illustrates a system of tracking and improving the golf performance of a player. System 101 includes an electronic device 104 or 106 for running a software program used to process and store player performance data and provide the player with feedback. The player 102 is able to access the program through either device 104 or 106. Multiple devices may be used and may be in communication via a network or internet. The program of system 101 may be downloaded and operated by a portable handheld electronic device 106 or access by a web portal. System 101 is configured to permit multiple users to access the program used by player 102. For example, user 103 may be a coach or other authorized user. Access to the program by user 103 may be provided through similar devices 105 and 107. Devices 105 and 107 are similar in form and function to that of devices 104 and 106.
  • [0024]
    Referring now also to FIG. 2 in the drawings, an example of system 101 for use by player 102 and/or user 103 is provided herein. System 101 includes the electronic device and the program used to track and process performance data related to player 102 and optionally the course. Through the devices, player 102 and/or user 103 are able to input course information and player information to be processed. That information is then processed and provided as feedback to player 102 and user 103. System 101 is also configured to provide the player with a target location when shooting onto the green that is determined upon particular hole locations and other course characteristics. Performance feedback is provided separately for successfully hitting the targeted area and for unsuccessfully hitting the targeted area. Player 102 is able to compare the success and resultant scores for each hole.
  • [0025]
    System 101 includes an input/output (I/O) interface 12, a control processor 14, a database 16, and a maintenance interface 18. Alternative embodiments can combine or distribute the input/output (I/O) interface 12, control processor 14, database 16, and maintenance interface 18 as desired. Embodiments of the system 101 can include one or more computers that include one or more processors and memories configured for performing tasks described herein below. This can include, for example, a computer 104 having a central processing unit (CPU) and non-volatile memory that stores software instructions for instructing the CPU to perform at least some of the tasks described herein. This can also include, for example, two or more computers that are in communication via a computer network, where one or more of the computers includes a CPU and non-volatile memory, and one or more of the computer's non-volatile memory stores software instructions for instructing any of the CPU(s) to perform any of the tasks described herein. Thus, while the exemplary embodiment is described in terms of a discrete machine, it should be appreciated that this description is non-limiting, and that the present description applies equally to numerous other arrangements involving one or more machines performing tasks distributed in any way among the one or more machines. It should also be appreciated that such machines need not be dedicated to performing tasks described herein, but instead can be multi-purpose machines, for example computer workstations, that are suitable for also performing other tasks. Furthermore the computers may use transitory and non-transitory forms of computer-readable media. Non-transitory computer-readable media is to be interpreted to comprise all computer-readable media, with the sole exception of being a transitory, propagating signal.
  • [0026]
    The I/O interface 12 provides a communication link between external users, systems, and data sources and components of the system 101. The I/O interface 12 is in communication with the control processor 14 and database 16 and is configured to provide an interactive link between the player, input data, and the feedback data. The I/O interface 12 can be configured for allowing one or more users to input information to the system 101 via any known input device (for example computer 104 and device 105). Examples can include a keyboard, mouse, touch screen, microphone, and/or any other desired input device. The I/O interface 12 provides a display portal defining a plurality of visually perceptible elements corresponding to the prediction data. The I/O interface 12 can be configured for allowing one or more users to receive information output from the system 101 via any known output device. Examples can include a display monitor, a printer, a speaker, and/or any other desired output device. The I/O interface 12 can be configured for allowing other systems to communicate with the system 101. For example, the I/O interface 12 can allow one or more remote computer(s) to access information, input information, and/or remotely instruct the system 101 to perform one or more of the tasks described herein. The I/O interface 12 can be configured for allowing communication with one or more remote data sources. For example, the I/O interface 12 can allow one or more remote data source(s) to access information, input information, and/or remotely instruct the system 101 to perform one or more of the tasks described herein.
  • [0027]
    The database 16 provides persistent data storage (computer readable storage media, i.e. hardware) for system 101. Database 16 is in communication with control processor 14 and I/O interface 12. While the term “database” is primarily used, a memory or other suitable data storage arrangement may provide the functionality of the database 16. In alternative embodiments, the database 16 can be integral to or separate from the system 101 and can operate on one or more computers. The database 16 preferably provides non-volatile data storage for any information suitable to support the operation of the system 101, including various types of data discussed below.
  • [0028]
    The maintenance interface 18 is configured to allow users to maintain desired operation of the system 101. In some embodiments, the maintenance interface 18 can be configured to allow for reviewing and/or revising the data stored in the database 16 and/or performing any suitable administrative tasks commonly associated with database management. This can include, for example, updating database management software, revising security settings, and/or performing data backup operations. In some embodiments, the maintenance interface 18 can be configured to allow for maintenance of the control processor 14 and/or the I/O interface 12. This can include, for example, software updates and/or administrative tasks such as security management and/or adjustment of certain tolerance settings.
  • [0029]
    The control processor 14 can be configured to perform a process or a plurality of processes, such as the processes described below, in connection with the associated Figures. Additionally, control processor 14 includes software programmed to receive player input data and course input data. Control processor 14 is also programmed to compile performance data of one or more players and course input data related to one or more golf courses. Processor 14 includes a non-transitory computer-readable medium with instructions stored thereon to execute predetermined steps. Player 102 makes determination regarding shot selection and training methods based upon the feedback provided through the predetermined steps. The control processor 14 automatically tracks and records the performance history of the player. The performance history relates to the past accuracy and performances on various courses and is ideally segregated according to performance at predetermine lengths of shots. There are a plurality of different types of information that may be provided to player 102. For example, scores, number of puts, greens hit in regulation, accuracy and so forth. Using this information the player can alter or modify training activities, particularly with an emphasis at practicing shots of different lengths. Additionally, the player may use the feedback to receive suggestions about how to approach the green with a shot by aiming for a targeted area on the green. These and other uses are available to player 102.
  • [0030]
    Referring now also to FIG. 3 in the drawings, a chart 110 illustrating the type of data input into system 101 and the type of feedback provided to player 102 is illustrated. System 101 is configured to receive course input data 109 related to a golf course and player input data 111 related to the past and present performance history of player 102. Course input data is either downloaded or inputted into system 101. An analysis 113, 115 is selectively performed of data 109/111 and feedback data is selectively provided to player 102 in the form of training advice 117 and shot advice 119.
  • [0031]
    Referring now also to FIG. 4 in the drawings, a chart 121 is provided to show some exemplary information that may be input into and collected by system 101 with respect to a course. Ideally, information related to each of the holes on each course is provided. It is understood that not all holes have to be provided. Data 109 may include many types of information. The information may relate to present day environmental conditions, such as temperature, wind and humidity. Additionally, course specific information may be provided, such as hole locations, distance to the hole, tee distance, trap locations, course topography, and so forth. Course input data 109 may also permit player 102 to input interpretative data that cannot be quantified through measurement. For example, player 102 may input data related to how fast the greens are. System 101 is configured to allow player 102 to enter various interpretative data into course data 109 for system 101 to use when performing a course analysis 113. Information may be updated or adjusted as necessary by either player 102, user 103, or course personnel. Updates may be made automatically through a wireless network and the internet on a regular basis.
  • [0032]
    A benefit of system 101 is that the player may input course input data 109 while playing a round at the course. The environmental data may be entered and updated during play. The interpretative data may also be modified during play. Additionally, as hole locations change from round to round in a tournament, such locations may be modified.
  • [0033]
    Referring now also to FIGS. 5 and 6 in the drawings, charts 112/114 illustrating the type of performance input data 111 provided in system 101 is shown. Performance data is collected from player 102 for analysis to provide player 102 with instructional feedback to assist in the improvement of his/her golf game. Data may be collected and associated with the playing at a particular golf course. Therefore, player 102 may enter both course input data 109 and player performance data 111 simultaneously.
  • [0034]
    System 101 may track performance in various ways. One such way is to track the performance relative to the shot distance from the hole. For example, shots may be tracked as follows: shots between 121-130 yards from the hole, shots 131-140 yards from the hole, and so forth. Golfers typically determine the type of club to use depending on the distance and the conditions in which the ball lies. By tracking performance based on distance to the green, a player is able to see areas and shots where they may need practice. Player performance data 111 is therefore entered typically shot by shot. It is best that player 102 enter them during the playing of a course in real time.
  • [0035]
    As noted above, system 101 is configured to analyze course input data and provide feedback to player 102. One type of feedback provided to player 102 is a suggested targeted location on the green in which the player should focus on and try to hit with his/her shot. The details of this feature will be discussed in greater detail with FIG. 10. For now, it is understood that performance data 111 may be tracked according to the player's ability to place the ball in the targeted location (correct side) and with respect to the times he/she fails to place the ball in the targeted location (incorrect side). The past and present performance of player 102 may be input at any time into system 101.
  • [0036]
    As seen in FIG. 6, the targeted location may include areas on the green and/or off the green. Particular data for each is compiled in system 101 for each the correct side shots and the incorrect side shots. Illustrated are representative information that may be inputted for analysis.
  • [0037]
    Referring now also to FIGS. 7-9 in the drawings, player analysis 123 is illustrated. Player analysis 123 is a type of feedback provided by system 101 to player 102. Analysis 123 provides performance related data segregated out by how well the player did when reaching the targeted location and when not reaching the targeted location. Such data is provided as a cumulative total. For example, scores when hitting the targeted location are visible to the player as well as scores when missing the targeted location. Other information such as, the number of puts, times in the traps, number of 3 puts may be provided. This information allows a player to compare their results with how well they reach the targeted location.
  • [0038]
    Additionally an overall performance for the player may be provided. This serves to provide the player with a more general view of their performance at a particular distance from the hole. As seen in particular with FIG. 8, an exemplary set of performance results are illustrated. As noted at the top of the figure, the performance data is related to shots of 121-130 yards. At such distances, the player maintained an overall score of “0” (par) by hitting a combined 17 greens in regulation and putting 33 times (just under 2 puts per green). This can be compared to when the player failed to hit the targeted location. In such situations, the player scored “+3” (3 stroke above par). When hitting the green (two times), the player had a higher average of puts per green (above 2). Also the player can visually see that when off the green, the puts increased as did scrambling.
  • [0039]
    It is understood that system 101 may present performance data 123 in different ways. It is preferred that system 101 capture data through a display or other interface and present such feedback data to the player in using graphical representations for visual inspection. It is known that other types of methods may be incorporated into system 101 to permit for the audible conveyance of feedback data to player 102 as well. Additionally, the form or order of performance data 123 is not limiting. Other formats are contemplated. Furthermore, FIG. 8 illustrates feedback performance data 123 with respect to a particular length of shot. It is understood that player 102 may sort and organize the performance data into different formats for reviewing. For example, player 102 may seek to view performance data at a particular length of approach shot (see FIG. 8) over any number of courses or time frame as a collective total. Alternatively, the data 123 may be viewed for a particular hole over a range of time. Another way is to view it according to a specific round on a particular course. This may be further modified according to length of shot or other criteria (see chart 127 in FIG. 9). Other criteria may be used to sort the performance data, such as environmental conditions, interpretative data, or course characteristics. Performance data may be reviewed and analyzed in real time before, during, or after playing a round.
  • [0040]
    Referring now also to FIG. 10 in the drawings, a targeted location 125 is provided as feedback to player 102 for how to approach the hole. Exemplary hole 129 is illustrated. As stated previously, targeted location 125 may be provided through system 101 to player 102. System 101 is configured to provide a visual display of the green as seen in FIG. 10. This display illustrates location 125 in relation to the cup. System 101 is configured to monitor and track the location of player 102 during play. Player 102 may refer to system 101 and seek feedback or shot advice 119. Shot advice 119 is designed to give player 102 the optimal location to approach the hole. This takes into consideration course input data 109. Targeted location 125 may be either on the green and/or off the green.
  • [0041]
    The particular location of targeted location 125 may be affected by any number of factors. System 101 calculates location 125 principally based upon the location of the hole and other course data 109. Targeted location 125 is configured to change as the hole location changes, as is the case usually between rounds at a tournament. However, system 101 may optionally be configured to take other factors into account. For example, it is conceived that system 101 may adjust location 125 based upon player performance input data 111. In this way, system may take into account the particular strengths of player 102 when determining the best location to approach the hole. Location 125 may also change as environmental and interpretative inputs change. For example, as the temperature rises and the greens speed up, location 125 may be adjusted in relation to the cup. The angle of approach may also have an effect upon the size and relative location of targeted location 125.
  • [0042]
    System 101 is configured to operate as a tool by player 102, user 103, and others to improve the tracking and performance of the player. System 101 may further enhance the performance of player 102 by permitting the exchange of communication between player 102 and secondary users 103 through the program. By monitoring and tracking the player's performance, it is intended that the player is able to better ascertain particular areas of weakness in their overall game and work to improve such areas in training. Additionally, by reviewing the feedback, in particular shot advice 119, the player is able to learn and compare different methods of approaching the green and see real data in support of each approach.
  • [0043]
    The current application has many advantages over the prior art including at least the following: (1) Production of a targeted location for the player to use when playing an approach shot; (2) Tracking detailed performance data relative to targeted location; and (3) Tailored method for improving execution of a game plan for golf.
  • [0044]
    The particular embodiments disclosed above are illustrative only, as the application may be modified and practiced in different but equivalent manners apparent to those skilled in the art having the benefit of the teachings herein. It is therefore evident that the particular embodiments disclosed above may be altered or modified, and all such variations are considered within the scope and spirit of the application. Accordingly, the protection sought herein is as set forth in the description. It is apparent that an application with significant advantages has been described and illustrated. Although the present application is shown in a limited number of forms, it is not limited to just these forms, but is amenable to various changes and modifications without departing from the spirit thereof.

Claims (20)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A system for tracking and improving golf performance, the system comprising:
    a processor having software programmed to receive player input data representative of the prior performance of a player, the processor processing the player input data to generate a player performance analysis;
    a database in communication with the processor and configured to provide persistent data storage; and
    an input/output interface in communication with the processor and the database and configured to provide an interactive link between the player and the player performance analysis, the input/output interface providing a display portal defining a plurality of visually perceptible elements corresponding to the player performance analysis;
    wherein the processor tracks and records the performance history that has been entered into the database concerning the one or more players, the processor provides tailored feedback to the player for use during training, the player input data being provided to the processor through the input/output interface.
  2. 2. The system of claim 1, wherein the processor is programmed to receive course input data related to each hole on the course, the processor processing the course input data and comparing the course input data with the player input data to provide shot advice to the player.
  3. 3. The system of claim 1, wherein the shot advice is a targeted location on the green based on the location of the hole.
  4. 4. The system of claim 3, wherein the player performance data tracks and compares player performance separately for shots that landed in the target and shots that landed outside of the target.
  5. 5. The system of claim 3, wherein the shot advice is displayed on a display portal.
  6. 6. The system of claim 3, wherein the shot advice is a representative geographical area on a green.
  7. 7. The system of claim 1, wherein the course input data and the player input data are input by separate users.
  8. 8. The system of claim 1, wherein the processor and the display are integrated into a portable handheld electronic device.
  9. 9. The system of claim 1, wherein the player is able to input the player performance data in real time.
  10. 10. The system of claim 1, wherein the database is configured to store course data concerning the course including at least one of elevation change, distance, and slope.
  11. 11. A method of tracking and improving golf performance of a player, the method comprising:
    inputting player performance data of the player into an electronic device;
    storing the player performance data in a database in communication with a processor; and
    processing the player performance data to produce feedback data to the player directed at improving player performance, the feedback data provided to the player via an input/output interface.
  12. 12. The method of claim 11, wherein the player reviews the feedback data and receives advice as to where to place the shot in relation to a cup.
  13. 13. The method of claim 11, wherein the player is provided a target in relation to a green, the target being determined based upon course input data.
  14. 14. The method of claim 11, wherein w/in the player performance analysis tracks and compares player performance separately for shots that landed in the target and shots that landed outside of the target.
  15. 15. The method of claim 11, wherein the feedback data is used by the player to selectively tailor and track training methods.
  16. 16. The method of claim 11, wherein the player performance data is processed to generate a player performance analysis.
  17. 17. The method of claim 16, wherein the player performance analysis is used by the player to isolate areas of need during training.
  18. 18. The method of claim 16, wherein the player performance analysis is segregated according to the length of a shot
  19. 19. The method of claim 11, further comprising:
    entering player input data in real time.
  20. 20. The method of claim 11, further comprising:
    receiving communication from a secondary user through the electronic device.
US14806023 2015-07-22 2015-07-22 System and method of tracking and improving golf performance Abandoned US20170021259A1 (en)

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US20050209050A1 (en) * 2004-03-15 2005-09-22 Dirk Bartels Interactive mobile device
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