US20160228757A1 - System and method for golf score tracking and management - Google Patents

System and method for golf score tracking and management Download PDF

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Publication number
US20160228757A1
US20160228757A1 US14/614,957 US201514614957A US2016228757A1 US 20160228757 A1 US20160228757 A1 US 20160228757A1 US 201514614957 A US201514614957 A US 201514614957A US 2016228757 A1 US2016228757 A1 US 2016228757A1
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golf
scores
scoring system
computing devices
golfers
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US14/614,957
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Damian Thomas Rhule
II Frederick William Mau
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Damian Thomas Rhule
II Frederick William Mau
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Priority to US14/614,957 priority Critical patent/US20160228757A1/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/06Indicating or scoring devices for games or players, or for other sports activities
    • A63B71/0619Displays, user interfaces and indicating devices, specially adapted for sport equipment, e.g. display mounted on treadmills
    • A63B71/0669Score-keepers or score display devices
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/06Indicating or scoring devices for games or players, or for other sports activities
    • A63B2071/0691Maps, e.g. yardage maps or electronic maps
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2220/00Measuring of physical parameters relating to sporting activity
    • A63B2220/10Positions
    • A63B2220/12Absolute positions, e.g. by using GPS
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2220/00Measuring of physical parameters relating to sporting activity
    • A63B2220/10Positions
    • A63B2220/13Relative positions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2220/00Measuring of physical parameters relating to sporting activity
    • A63B2220/70Measuring or simulating ambient conditions, e.g. weather, terrain or surface conditions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2220/00Measuring of physical parameters relating to sporting activity
    • A63B2220/70Measuring or simulating ambient conditions, e.g. weather, terrain or surface conditions
    • A63B2220/76Wind conditions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2225/00Other characteristics of sports equipment
    • A63B2225/15Other characteristics of sports equipment with identification means that can be read by electronic means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2225/00Other characteristics of sports equipment
    • A63B2225/20Other characteristics of sports equipment with means for remote communication, e.g. internet or the like
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2225/00Other characteristics of sports equipment
    • A63B2225/50Wireless data transmission, e.g. by radio transmitters or telemetry
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/36Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for golf
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges
    • H04M1/72Substation extension arrangements; Cordless telephones, i.e. devices for establishing wireless links to base stations without route selecting
    • H04M1/725Cordless telephones
    • H04M1/72519Portable communication terminals with improved user interface to control a main telephone operation mode or to indicate the communication status
    • H04M1/72522With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality

Abstract

A golf scoring system and method for the recordation and management of golf scores for one or more golfers. The golf scoring system provides a user with the ability to record golf scores for one or more golfers by inputting scores and commands via a touch screen or screen accepting inputs via a stylus or similar tool during a round of golf. Upon completion of the round, the golf scoring system may calculate the total score for each of the one or more golfers and communicate the scores to the golf course clubhouse or online network. Once communicated to the golf course clubhouse, the scores may be input into a handicapping system used to update the handicap of the one or more golfers for which the scores were recorded (e.g. USGA handicap system). The scores communicated from the golf scoring system may also be used to update a scoreboard for a golf outing or tournament. Additionally, the scores may be printed onto a hard copy scorecard for the user to take with them or turn in for official tournament purposes. Additionally, the golf scoring system may be used to communicate scores to other golfers utilizing the golf scoring system in a real-time basis.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This disclosure generally relates to a scoring system for golf. More particularly, this disclosure relates to an electronic golf scoring system for tracking and communicating golf scores.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Golf is a very popular sport enjoyed by many people worldwide on a regular basis. Golf may be played individually, in small groups, in large golf events, or tournaments. Whether played individually or in groups, every golfer typically utilizes a scorecard to record their scores. As a result scorecards are distributed to every player or placed on every golf cart used for a round of golf. When rounds of golf are finished many of the scorecards are typically discarded after the round is finished or after the scores have been recorded. Scorecards can be very expensive for golf courses over a long period of time as one or more new scorecards must be distributed for each round of golf played. Another issue with utilizing traditional golf score cards is the amount of time and effort to calculate and record scores during and after a round of golf. For golf tournaments, all of the score cards must be collected to transfer the scores to a leaderboard or display. This can be a very time consuming endeavor and can also be very problematic when a score card is lost.
  • While there are various devices and methods currently known for allowing golfers to record scores, such systems fail to take into consideration the aforementioned problems. As such, there is a need in the art for an improved golf scoring system to allow golfers to utilize a reusable scorecard which provides or simple calculation and recordation of golf scores.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Disclosed herein, is a golf scoring system comprising one or more computing devices, each of the one or more computing devices including one or more microprocessors and a display screen with touch screen capability allowing for input of information into the computing device; and a computer network in wireless communication with the one or more computing devices. The one or more microprocessors run a computer application displaying a golf scorecard on the display screen and receiving hole by hole golf scores for one or more golfers by the one or more computing devices via touch screen capability of the display screen. Each of the one or more computing devices also calculates a total golf score for each of the one or more golfers based on the hole by hole golf scores. The hole by hole golf scores and the total golf score are displayed on the display screen for each of the one or more golfers.
  • The one or more computing devices communicate the hole by hole golf scores and/or total golf scores for each of the one or more golfers to the computer network. The hole by hole golf scores and/or the total golf scores may be manually communicated to the computer network via selection of a submission option in the computer application.
  • The computer network may be in communication with a tournament scoring system whereby the tournament scoring system updates a tournament leaderboard with the hole by hole golf scores and/or total golf scores.
  • The one or more computing devices are may be in wireless communication with each other. The wireless communication may be accomplished via connection to a computer network. The one or more computing devices may communicate hole by hole golf scores and/or total golf scores to one or more of the one or more computing devices. The computer application may include a selection to view one or more of the hole by hole golf scores and/or one or more of the total golf scores from one or more of the one or more computing devices.
  • The computer application may also provide communication between one or more golfers via the one or more computing devices. The computer application may also provide communication between one or more golfers and a golf clubhouse via the computer network.
  • The computer application may receive one or more inputs selected from the number of putts by a golfer, fairways hit by a golfer, and skins won by a golfer. The computer application may display golf course information on the display screen of the one or more computing devices. The golf course information may include one or more selected from hole yardage, distance to pin, hole layout, weather conditions, pro shop notifications, and menu selections. The one or more computing devices may also display updated handicaps for one or more of the one or more golfers on the display screen. The one or more computing devices may display previous scores and/or previous performance on golf holes for one or more of the one or more golfers on the display screen. The one or more computing devices may allow one or more of the one or more golfers to establish a personal account in the golf scoring system. The personal account allows one or more of the one or more golfers to personalize settings and retrieve personal data on the one or more computing devices.
  • The one or more computing devices may further include a GPS device. The GPS device may calculate the positioning of the one or more computing devices on the golf course and communicate the positioning of the one or more computing devices to the one or more golfers via the display screen.
  • One or more of the one or more computing devices may be mounted onto a golf cart steering wheel. Alternatively, one or more of the one or more computing devices may be mounted onto a platform mounted onto the dashboard of a golf cart.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a depiction of a computing device according to one or more embodiments as described herein.
  • FIG. 2 is a depiction of a golf cart with the computing device installed on the steering wheel according to one or more embodiments as described herein.
  • FIG. 3 is a depiction of a golf cart with the computing device mounted on a support platform installed within the interior of the golf cart according to one or more embodiments as described herein.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • In accordance with this disclosure, there is provided a golf scoring system and method for the recordation and management of golf scores for one or more golfers. The golf scoring system provides a user with the ability to record golf scores for one or more golfers by inputting scores and commands via a touch screen or screen accepting inputs via a stylus or similar tool during a round of golf. A user may be a golfer or person accompanying a golfer during a round of golf. Upon completion of the round, the golf scoring system may calculate the total score for each of the one or more golfers and communicate the scores to the golf course clubhouse or online network. Once communicated to the golf course clubhouse, the scores may be input into a computerized or online handicapping system used to update the handicap of the one or more golfers for which the scores were recorded (e.g. USGA handicap system). The scores communicated from the golf scoring system may also be used to update a scoreboard for a golf outing or tournament. The scoreboard may be based on a computer application run on a computer which allows scores to be input, calculated, and displayed on a screen. Additionally, the scores may be communicated to a printer and printed onto a hard copy scorecard for the user to take with them or turn in for official tournament purposes. Such a golf scoring system eliminates the need to supply scorecards prior to beginning a round of golf thus resulting in overall cost savings for golf courses. Also, the golf scoring system provides for a streamlined transfer of scores to a computer system resulting in overall time savings for golfers and staff at golf courses when saving scores or tabulating scores for tournament purposes. Additionally, the golf scoring system may be used to communicate scores to other golfers utilizing the golf scoring system in a real-time basis.
  • The golf scoring system as shown in FIG. 1, generally comprises a computing device 10 and a computer network in communication with the computing device. The computing device 10 comprises a display screen 20 for displaying and accepting information from a user. An example of such a computing device is a tablet type computer having a display screen (i.e. touch screen) which accepts inputs and commands from a stylus 30 or a user's touch. The computing device further includes one or more microprocessors which run one or more computer applications which accept input from and display output on the display screen 20.
  • To allow communication with the computer network, the computing device 10 may include the capability to wirelessly connect to the computer network. This wireless connectivity allows two way communication between the computer network and the computing device. The wireless communication may be performed via a personal area network (PAN), a local area network (LAN), or any other type of network allowing for communication between the computing device and the computer network. This allows the computing devices to be updated and configured for each round of golf via the computer network while allowing scores and other information from the computing device 10 to be transmitted to the golf course clubhouse for processing. The wireless connectivity may also allow one or more of the computing devices to communicate with each other. Communication between computing devices may be performed directly from the computing devices or through the computer network. This is particularly beneficial where it is necessary to keep track of scores of other individuals or groups playing a tournament or other type of golf event, whether formal or informal. In the case of a golf foursome whereby golfers are in separate carts each with a separate computing device, scores from each cart may be automatically updated to the computing device in the accompanying cart. In the case of two or more foursomes in a golf event, scores may be shared between all of the computing devices utilized by golfers participating in the event. This may be particularly useful in a golf skins game to notify participating golfers of scores on the various holes being played. This may also be advantageous in a golf scramble to keep track of the other teams participating in the event. To view scores tracked on other computing devices, a user may select a view group scores selection 40 on the computing device. The user may then be allowed to search or select other computing devices being used on the golf course. In the case of a tournament or golf outing, the list may be preprogrammed to allow a user to view all participants in the event.
  • The computer network may include a server providing for data storage. The server may be on-site or off-site. The server will allow for data from the computing device to be saved and utilized in the future. This may be beneficial when recording scores for a tournament or event. The server may also be utilized to save information regarding preferences, scores, or other information regarding individual golfers.
  • The golf scoring systems may also allow for communication between golfers via the golf scoring system. This may be performed by selecting a send message selection 50 on the computing device. In one example, a golfer in one group may record a birdie on a hole. In such case, the recorded score may be sent to other golfers playing in a golf event. Upon receipt of the score, other golfers may respond with “nice shot” or “lucky shot” which will be transmitted to the user posting the score and others playing in the event. Text messages may be entered into the system via typing on the display screen or may be input by writing or typing on the display screen with a stylus or user's finger.
  • As previously discussed, the computing device further includes one or more microprocessors which run one or more computer applications on the computing device. An application running on the computing device may display a scorecard 60 on the display screen 20 of the computing device 10. The scorecard 60 may be displayed on a hole by hole basis or may show the entire list of holes to be played in the round. The display screen 20 thereby allows scores for each hole to be input into the golf scoring system as the golfer progresses through a round of golf. The scorecard may allow for input of scores for each of the golfers playing in the golf group. As with a typical golf score card, the scores for each golfer will be displayed next to each golfer's name. In addition to allowing the number of strokes to be input into the golf scoring system, the golf scoring system may also allow the number of putts, fairways hit and other type of golfer information to be input. This may be performed by making a selection for scoring options 70 on the computing device 10. To input the scores or other information, values may be typed or written onto the screen by the user or selected by the user from a list of values displayed on the screen. As previously discussed, all entries may be performed via a touch screen or screen accepting inputs from a stylus.
  • Once the one or more golfers finish their round, the scores and input values may be summarized on the display for view by the one or more golfers. The summarized golf totals for each golfer may then be communicated to the golf course clubhouse along with the information of each individual golfer. The computing device may also allow the golfers to sign their scorecard on the display screen. The signature from each golfer may be transmitted with the scores to demonstrate verification of the score by each golfer. The signature may also be printed on a hard copy score card along with the golf scores.
  • Communication of the golf scores and any accompanying information may be sent to the golf clubhouse automatically or manually from the computing device. Where the information is sent automatically, the information may be sent once the final scores are input and tallied. Where the information is sent manually, a user would select a post score option 80 on the display screen of the computing device thereby causing the golf information to be sent to the golf clubhouse via the computer network. Where a golfer's signature is required to verify a score for a specific golf event, the scores may not be transmitted to the golf clubhouse until signed off by the golfers responsible for the scoring.
  • In addition to allowing input of scores or other values into the golf scoring system, the golf scoring system may display data to the golfer with respect to the golf course being played. Information displayed on the screen may include hole yardage, distance to pin, hole layout, weather conditions, pro shop notifications, and menu selections. To allow for information such as distance to pin, the golf scoring system may include a GPS device or communicate with a GPS device already located on the golf cart. The golf scoring system may also display updated golfer handicap information which will be needed to calculate actual scores for a formal or informal event. The golf scoring system may also list previously saved scores for golfers to inform golfers of previous performance on various holes or golf courses.
  • To allow a user to personalize settings and retrieve personal data on the computing device, the golf scoring system may allow users to establish personal accounts in the golf scoring system. In such case, a user will select a username and password or be assigned one by the golf clubhouse. Upon entering their name or having their name entered by the golf clubhouse, the golfer will be logged into the system. This will aid in uploading scores to the golf handicap system up finishing a round as well as providing access to the specific saved information with respect to the golfer. Saved information may be previous scores, current golf handicap, and preferences with respect to the golf course or specific golf holes. Once logged in, the golf scoring system may allow the golfer to make notes about hole preferences which will then be saved in the system.
  • The golf scoring system may also include one or more functionalities in addition to tracking the score of one or more golfers. For purposes of golf outings, the application may allow a team to start on any hole of the golf course. For example, in a scramble type golf outing teams may start on each of the holes on an 18 hole golf course in what is typically called a shotgun start. In such case, the application on the golf scoring system given to each group or located in each golf cart may be preprogrammed to allow the golfers to start on any one of the golf holes and then proceed until the entire 18 hole round is finished. This will allow the golf course staff to pre-set each computing device for each golf cart to direct the golf groups to the starting hole for the event. The application may also allow set up for a 9 hole round. Due to the connection to the computer network, the set-up of each device may be performed remotely from the clubhouse without the need to manually set-up each device on each golf cart. To assist with remote set-up, each golf cart may be assigned a number which will be programmed into each computing device. This will allow the golf club house to track and program the computing device on each cart as desired. This will allow the golf clubhouse to track pace of play and send notifications to golfers as needed.
  • As discussed, the computing device may allow for communication between the golf clubhouse and golfers. In cases of inclement weather, the clubhouse may send notices to take precautionary measures. The golf clubhouse may also send radar pictures of nearby storms to provide additional warnings. The golf clubhouse may also send notices to golfers who may be taking too long to play a round of golf by not keeping up with a designated pace of play.
  • The application running on the computing device may also allow golfers to view a menu and make drink and food orders to the golf clubhouse during a round of golf. In addition to making food or drink orders, users may also order golf gear or items from the golf pro-shop during their round of golf. In such case, the user may submit the order and make payment for the order via credit card or in-house account number through the computing device.
  • As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the computing device 10 may be mounted onto a golf cart 100 thus allowing the display to be visible to users while also allowing the input of values into the system. FIG. 2 shows a depiction of a computing device being mounted on the steering wheel 110 of a golf cart 100. Alternatively, the computing device may be mounted within the interior of the golf cart as shown in FIG. 3. FIG. 3 shows a depiction of the computing device mounted onto a support platform 120 extending inwardly from the front dashboard 130 of the golf cart. When mounted in a golf cart, the computing device may be affixed or locked to the golf cart thereby preventing unauthorized removal. The computing device may also be detachably connected to the golf cart. In the case where the computing devices are detachably connected, the computing devices may be distributed to golfers upon registration with the golf clubhouse and installed into a receiving structure located onto the cart by the golfer.
  • To use the golf scoring system, one or more golfers may need to sign-in with the golf scoring system. Sign-in may be performed directly on the computing device or may be performed by the golf clubhouse. To sign-in, the system may require names or alternative identification information (i.e. log-in ID) for each golfer. Golfers may be pre-registered with the system thereby allowing their information to be saved and populated into the computing device upon sign-in. Sign-in may be performed in person, online, or in advance on an individual or group basis. In the case of tournaments or golf events, a list of golfers may be provided to the golf clubhouse in advance. To allow the golf clubhouse to upload scores to a golf handicapping website, an assigned user ID or email may also need to be provided by each golfer which a user's scores to be uploaded.
  • As discussed, sign-in for each golfer may be performed by the golf clubhouse. Once identifying information is received by the golf clubhouse for each golfer in the group, the golf clubhouse would then assign a computing device to each golfer or golf cart, input the golfer's names and program the computing device for the round to be played. Options that may be programmed into the computing device may include one or more selected from number of holes to be played, type of golf outing, starting hole, and number of golfers in group.
  • In the case of a group where two or more computing devices may be used, the golf clubhouse may form a communication link between the two or more computing devices to allow for communication between the two or more computing devices. As previously described, the communications link may allow golfers to share scores and communicate with other computing devices in the golfing group. The computing device may also include an option which allows golfers to search for other computing devices on the golf course. The search may be performed based on assigned number for computing device, assigned cart, or names of golfers utilizing the computing device. Once a computing device is identified that a golfer would like to connect to, the golfer will be able to select an option to request a communications link with the identified device. The identified device would then be sent a request to create a communications link between the two computing devices. The request may be accepted or denied by the users of the identified computing device.
  • Once registered, the golfers may begin playing their round of golf. Prior to teeing off, the golfers may enter handicaps and make tee selections. Where golfers are already registered with the system, handicaps may be loaded when the registered golfer signs in to the system. Once all the necessary information is input into the golf scoring system, the golfers may proceed with playing their round of golf. At the end of each hole, scores may be entered onto the scorecard displayed on the display screen of the computing device. Golfers may additionally include other information such as the number of putts, fairways hit, skins won, closest to the pin, or other types of information by selecting the appropriate scoring option. Scores or other information may be input into the display screen by selecting a scoring options tag displayed on the display screen. All inputs and selections may be made on the display screen by utilizing a stylus or the user's finger as the display screen is preferably a touch screen as described herein.
  • As the golfers progress through the round of golf, total scores may be calculated and displayed on the scorecard. Preferably, each computing device will keep track of up to four scores to keep track of each golfer in the foursome. The users may also view scores of other golfers utilizing other computing devices on the golf course by selecting the appropriate option. The scorecard may also keep track of other scoring options through the round such as number of putts, fairways hit, skins won, closest to the pin. Upon finishing the round of golf, all totals will be calculated for each golfer and displayed on the display screen. The user may then select to submit the scores to the golf clubhouse. The user may be prompted to confirm and submit the scores upon completion of the round of golf Alternatively, the scores and totals may be automatically submitted to the clubhouse upon completion.
  • Upon receipt of the scores by the golf clubhouse, the golf clubhouse may present the users to print the scores on a hardcopy scorecard. The scores may also be uploaded to a handicapping service to update the golfer's handicap. The scores may also be automatically uploaded to a tournament scoring system for simple updating of scoring results.
  • While there have been described what are believed to be the preferred embodiments of the present invention, those skilled in the art will recognize that other and further changes and modifications may be made thereto without departing from the spirit of the invention, and it is intended to claim all such changes and modifications as fall within the true scope of the invention.

Claims (17)

1. A golf scoring system comprising:
one or more computing devices, each of said one or more computing devices including one or more microprocessors and a display screen with touch screen capability allowing for input of information into said computing device; and
a computer network in wireless communication with said one or more computing devices;
said one or more microprocessors running a computer application displaying a golf scorecard on said display screen and receiving hole by hole golf scores for one or more golfers by said one or more computing devices via said touch screen capability of said display screen, each of said one or more computing devices calculating a total golf score for each of said one or more golfers based on said hole by hole golf scores, said hole by hole golf scores and said total golf score being displayed on said display screen for each of said one or more golfers;
said one or more computing devices communicating said hole by hole golf scores and/or total golf scores for each of said one or more golfers to said computer network.
2. The golf scoring system according to claim 1, wherein said computer network is in communication with a tournament scoring system, said tournament scoring system updating a tournament leaderboard with said hole by hole golf scores and/or said total golf scores.
3. The golf scoring system according to claim 1, wherein said one or more computing devices are in wireless communication with each other.
4. The golf scoring system according to claim 3, wherein said one or more computer devices are in wireless communication with each other via said computer network.
5. The golf scoring system according to claim 3, wherein said one or more computing devices communicate said hole by hole golf scores and/or said total golf scores to one or more of said one or more computing devices.
6. The golf scoring system according to claim 5, wherein said computer application includes a selection to view one or more of said hole by hole golf scores and/or one or more of said total golf scores from one or more of said one or more computing devices.
7. The golf scoring system according to claim 3, wherein said computer application provides communication between one or more golfers via said one or more computing devices.
8. The golf scoring system according to claim 3, wherein said computer application provides communication between one or more golfers and a golf clubhouse via said computer network.
9. The golf scoring system according to claim 1, wherein said computer application receives one or more inputs selected from the number of putts by a golfer, fairways hit by a golfer, and skins won by a golfer.
10. The golf scoring system according to claim 1, wherein said hole by hole golf scores and/or said total golf scores are manually communicated to said computer network via selection of an submission option in said computer application.
11. The golf scoring system according to claim 1, wherein said computer application displays golf course information on said display screen of said one or more computing devices, said golf course information including one or more selected from hole yardage, distance to pin, hole layout, weather conditions, pro shop notifications, and menu selections.
12. The golf scoring system according to claim 11, wherein said one or more computing devices further includes a GPS device, said GPS device calculating the positioning of said one or more computing devices on the golf course and communicating the positioning of said one or more computing devices to said one or more golfers via said display screen.
13. The golf scoring system according to claim 1, wherein said one or more computing devices display updated handicaps for one or more of said one or more golfers on said display screen.
14. The golf scoring system according to claim 1, wherein said one or more computing devices display previous scores and/or previous performance on golf holes for one or more of said one or more golfers on said display screen.
15. The golf scoring system according to claim 1, wherein said one or more computing devices allow one or more of said one or more golfers to establish a personal account in said golf scoring system, said personal account allowing one or more of said one or more golfers to personalize settings and retrieve personal data on said one or more computing devices.
16. The golf scoring system according to claim 1, wherein one or more of said one or more computing devices are mounted onto a golf cart steering wheel.
17. The golf scoring system according to claim 1, wherein one or more of said one or more computing devices are mounted onto a platform mounted onto the dashboard of a golf cart.
US14/614,957 2015-02-05 2015-02-05 System and method for golf score tracking and management Abandoned US20160228757A1 (en)

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US20150217179A1 (en) * 2014-02-02 2015-08-06 Mikael Olsson Digital scoreboard

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US20120004748A1 (en) * 2010-06-30 2012-01-05 Scott Taffera System for scoring golf tournament
US20140277627A1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2014-09-18 Peter S. Bastawros Golf game management and entertainment system integrating pre-game, in-game, and post-game content for enhanced golfing experience
US20150281342A1 (en) * 2014-03-26 2015-10-01 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method for grouping a plurality of devices and grouping system

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US20080108456A1 (en) * 2006-11-02 2008-05-08 Bonito Anthony P Golf scoring, marketing and reporting system and method of operation
US20120004748A1 (en) * 2010-06-30 2012-01-05 Scott Taffera System for scoring golf tournament
US20140277627A1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2014-09-18 Peter S. Bastawros Golf game management and entertainment system integrating pre-game, in-game, and post-game content for enhanced golfing experience
US20150281342A1 (en) * 2014-03-26 2015-10-01 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method for grouping a plurality of devices and grouping system

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US20150217179A1 (en) * 2014-02-02 2015-08-06 Mikael Olsson Digital scoreboard

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