US20160071103A1 - Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry - Google Patents

Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20160071103A1
US20160071103A1 US14942192 US201514942192A US2016071103A1 US 20160071103 A1 US20160071103 A1 US 20160071103A1 US 14942192 US14942192 US 14942192 US 201514942192 A US201514942192 A US 201514942192A US 2016071103 A1 US2016071103 A1 US 2016071103A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
client
account
verification
screening
screen
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US14942192
Inventor
Scott Fergusson
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Broadridge Securities Processing Solutions Inc
Original Assignee
Broadridge Securities Processing Solutions Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/38Payment protocols; Details thereof
    • G06Q20/40Authorisation, e.g. identification of payer or payee, verification of customer or shop credentials; Review and approval of payers, e.g. check credit lines or negative lists
    • G06Q20/401Transaction verification
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F17/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific functions
    • G06F17/30Information retrieval; Database structures therefor ; File system structures therefor
    • G06F17/30286Information retrieval; Database structures therefor ; File system structures therefor in structured data stores
    • G06F17/30345Update requests
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F17/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific functions
    • G06F17/30Information retrieval; Database structures therefor ; File system structures therefor
    • G06F17/30286Information retrieval; Database structures therefor ; File system structures therefor in structured data stores
    • G06F17/30345Update requests
    • G06F17/30377Details of updates performed during online database operations; commit processing
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F17/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific functions
    • G06F17/30Information retrieval; Database structures therefor ; File system structures therefor
    • G06F17/30286Information retrieval; Database structures therefor ; File system structures therefor in structured data stores
    • G06F17/30557Details of integrating or interfacing systems involving at least one database management system
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F17/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific functions
    • G06F17/30Information retrieval; Database structures therefor ; File system structures therefor
    • G06F17/30861Retrieval from the Internet, e.g. browsers
    • G06F17/30864Retrieval from the Internet, e.g. browsers by querying, e.g. search engines or meta-search engines, crawling techniques, push systems
    • G06F17/30867Retrieval from the Internet, e.g. browsers by querying, e.g. search engines or meta-search engines, crawling techniques, push systems with filtering and personalisation
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F21/00Security arrangements for protecting computers, components thereof, programs or data against unauthorised activity
    • G06F21/30Authentication, i.e. establishing the identity or authorisation of security principals
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F21/00Security arrangements for protecting computers, components thereof, programs or data against unauthorised activity
    • G06F21/60Protecting data
    • G06F21/62Protecting access to data via a platform, e.g. using keys or access control rules
    • G06F21/6218Protecting access to data via a platform, e.g. using keys or access control rules to a system of files or objects, e.g. local or distributed file system or database
    • G06F21/6245Protecting personal data, e.g. for financial or medical purposes
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q40/00Finance; Insurance; Tax strategies; Processing of corporate or income taxes
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q40/00Finance; Insurance; Tax strategies; Processing of corporate or income taxes
    • G06Q40/02Banking, e.g. interest calculation, credit approval, mortgages, home banking or on-line banking
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L63/00Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security
    • H04L63/08Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for supporting authentication of entities communicating through a packet data network
    • H04L63/0884Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for supporting authentication of entities communicating through a packet data network by delegation of authentication, e.g. a proxy authenticates an entity to be authenticated on behalf of this entity vis-à-vis an authentication entity
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L63/00Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security
    • H04L63/14Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for detecting or protecting against malicious traffic
    • H04L63/1441Countermeasures against malicious traffic
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L63/00Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security
    • H04L63/20Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for managing network security; network security policies in general
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/28Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications for the provision of proxy services, e.g. intermediate processing or storage in the network
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/28Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications for the provision of proxy services, e.g. intermediate processing or storage in the network
    • H04L67/2809Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications for the provision of proxy services, e.g. intermediate processing or storage in the network for brokering
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q50/00Systems or methods specially adapted for specific business sectors, e.g. utilities or tourism
    • G06Q50/10Services
    • G06Q50/26Government or public services
    • G06Q50/265Personal security, identity or safety
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S902/00Electronic funds transfer
    • Y10S902/01Electronic funds transfer with electronic means providing security
    • Y10S902/04Means to read data stored on identifier*
    • Y10S902/05And to verify identity of user*

Abstract

Systems, methods, and interfaces for screening clients for security compliance with a Customer Identification Program are disclosed. An illustrative system for screening clients can include a client screening engine adapted to filter client account data based on one or more filtering criteria, a database adapted to store client account information and verification status information, and a graphical user interface adapted to selectively display client account information and verification status information for one or more selected clients on a screen. The system can be used to submit identity verification requests to Customer Identification Program vendors for only those clients whose identity have not been verified.

Description

    FIELD
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates generally to the field of client screening. More specifically, the present invention pertains to systems, methods, and interfaces for client identity screening in the financial services industry.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    Compliance with newly enacted security rules and regulations in the financial services industry has placed additional burdens on broker-dealers to conduct client identity screening for both new and existing clients. With the recent promulgation of the USA Patriot Act, for example, broker-dealers are now required to develop a Customer Identification Program (CT) that implements reasonable procedures (1) to collect identifying information about their customers upon opening an account; (2) to verify their customer's identity; (3) to maintain records of the information used to verify the customer's identity; and (4) to determine whether the customer appears on any list of suspected terrorists or terrorist organizations. Financial institutions that are required to comply with such rules include, for example, securities brokers and dealers, banks and trust companies, currency exchanges, insurance companies, savings associations, credit unions, mutual fund companies, futures commission merchants, futures introducing brokers, as well as other organizations operating in the financial services industry. In some cases, organizations outside of the financial services industry may also be obligated to comply with these rules and regulations.
  • [0003]
    As a part of their Customer Identification Program obligations to collect and verify customer information, many financial institutions are required to develop procedures to collect relevant identifying information regarding each customer's name, address, date of birth, and taxpayer identification number such as Social Security Number or government-issued passport number. Verification of the customer's identifying information typically occurs with traditional documentation such as a driver's license or passport, although other alternative methods may be implemented provided the documentation meets certain threshold requirements.
  • [0004]
    In addition to collecting and verifying customer information, financial institutions must also implement procedures to check their customers against lists of suspected terrorists or terrorist organizations maintained by the government. To fulfill this obligation, some financial institutions elect to partner with a third-party vendor that specializes in performing client identity verification. An example of such CIP vendor can include RemitPro, LLC of Omaha, Nebr., which provides a client validation software module under the trade name RISKALERT. Access to the CIP vendor's verification program is typically accomplished by a direct connection or via an Internet portal, and generally involves the transmission of client identifying information to the vendor for cross-checking the customer against multiple databases. Once checked against these databases, a message indicating whether the verification passed, failed, or requires further review is then provided back to the requesting party. In some cases, additional information about the customer may be sent back to the requesting party in the event the verification request was unsuccessful, or if the customer's name appears on a watch list of suspicious individuals or organizations.
  • [0005]
    More automated systems for client identity screening are becoming increasingly necessary in the financial services industry as a result of the additional requirements placed on compliance managers and other corporate officials responsible for compliance with Customer Identification Programs. With respect to some broker-dealers, for example, compliance with the Customer Identification Program is typically accomplished by the same compliance manger or officer responsible for overseeing compliance with other securities provisions such as trade confirmations, suitability provisions, etc., placing additional burdens on these individuals to ensure full compliance.
  • [0006]
    Although many financial institutions are able to offload some of their identification and verification obligations to CIP vendors, the costs associated with such offloading can be significant. Existing software programs used by financial institutions to ensure CIP compliance is often conducted on a per account basis, and do not provide a mechanism for filtering existing clients that have already been screened for compliance and/or who have certain accounts that may be exempted from compliance. In some cases, the software program employed may not provide the ability to specify more detailed information about the customer, or may not associate together multiple accounts held by a single customer. Because many CIP vendors charge on a per item basis each time a verification request is performed, the practice of duplicating client identifying information used by many institutions often results in an increase in the total cost of compliance. In addition, the practice of submitting duplicative entries for verification often increases the storage space required to maintain records of the information used to verify the customer's identity, further adding to the total cost of compliance
  • [0007]
    Accordingly, there is a need for automated solutions for performing client identity screening in the financial services industry in order to more efficiently meet security rules and regulations.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0008]
    The present invention pertains to systems, methods, and interfaces for client identity screening in the financial services industry. An illustrative system for screening clients for security compliance can include a database adapted to store client account information and verification status information, a client screening engine adapted to filter client account data based on one or more filtering criteria, and a graphical user interface adapted to selectively display client account information and verification status information for one or more clients on a screen. The client screening engine can be configured to automatically update the database each time a new account is opened for a new or existing client, when a name or address change of a client is received, and/or when a request is received from a representative or supervisor. The engine can be further configured to associate account data from multiple accounts together via a unique client identification number.
  • [0009]
    An illustrative method of screening clients for security compliance can include the steps of initiating a client screening request and receiving client account data for one or more new or existing clients from an account custodian, and associating such account data with a unique client identification tag for each client. Once associated, the client account data can then be filtered based on one or more filter criteria to provide a filtered subset of the client account data. In some embodiments, for example, such filtering can include identifying whether the client has been previously verified, or determining whether the account prompting the verification request is exempted from compliance. Once filtered, a dataset containing only unverified clients can be outputted to a Customer Identification Program (CIP) vendor for identity verification. A report indicating the verification status of each client can then be provided back to the user indicating the verification status of each client.
  • [0010]
    In some embodiments, a graphical user interface may be employed to permit a user to filter various client account data for display on a display screen. The graphical user interface can include a submission screen for use in submitting client account data to the CIP vendor, and a verification screen for notifying the user of the verification status of one or more clients submitted for verification. The graphical user interface can include various fields to facilitate client identity screening, including a client verification field, a filtering field, an account type field, and an action-to-take field. In some embodiments, a separate reporting screen may be used to display client verification information along with other account information pertaining to a particular client or clients.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0011]
    FIG. 1 is a schematic view of an illustrative client identity verification system for screening clients of a broker-dealer for security compliance;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 2 is a schematic view showing a sample client account managed by the broker-dealer of FIG. 1;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 3 is a schematic view of an illustrative system for screening clients for security compliance;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 4 is a schematic view showing an illustrative list of client account data stored within the broker-dealer database of FIG. 3;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 5 is a flow chart of an illustrative method of screening clients for security compliance using the illustrative system of FIG. 3;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 6 is a flow chart showing an illustrative implementation of the method of FIG. 5;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 7 is a screen shot of an illustrative menu-driven graphical user interface for use in screening clients;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 8 is a screen shot of an illustrative submission screen for selecting clients to be verified;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 9 is a screen shot showing the selection of an account type field on the submission screen of FIG. 8;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 10 is a screen shot showing the selection of an action-to-take field on the submission screen of FIG. 8;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 11 is a screen shot showing the selection of a filtering field on the submission screen of FIG. 8;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 12 is a screen shot showing a lower section of the submission screen of FIG. 8;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 13 is a screen shot showing the selection of a report screen for displaying customer identification exception information;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 14 is a screen shot showing an illustrative report screen for generating an account summary report;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 15 is a screen shot showing an illustrative account summary screen for displaying verification status information for a selected client;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 16 is a screen shot showing an illustrative verification screen for requesting verification of a selected client; and
  • [0027]
    FIG. 17 is a flow chart showing an illustrative method of screening clients using the graphical user interface of FIGS. 7-16.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0028]
    The following description should be read with reference to the drawings, in which like elements in different drawings are numbered in like fashion. The drawings depict selected embodiments, and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention. Although examples of various systems, methods, and interfaces are illustrated in the various views, those skilled in the art will recognize that many of the examples provided have suitable alternatives that can be utilized. In addition, while the illustrative systems, methods, and interfaces are described with respect to broker-dealers, it should be understood that many of the elements and steps described herein can be applied to client identity screening for other financial service organizations or other organizations where client identity screening is desired.
  • [0029]
    Referring now to FIG. 1, a schematic view of an illustrative client identity verification system 10 for screening clients of a broker-dealer 12 for security compliance will now be described. As shown in FIG. 1, the system 10 can include a number of clients 14, 16, 18, 20 each of which whose identity must be verified as a part of an in-house Customer Identification Program (CIP) 22 implemented by the broker-dealer 12. The CIP 22 implemented by broker-dealer 12, for example, may be provided as part of a compliance program for screening new and existing clients for compliance with the provisions of the USA Patriot Act. It should be understood, however, that the CIP 22 can be implemented in response to other rules or regulations, or as a general security measure to screen clients for possible fraudulent activity or account errors. In other industries such as the mortgage lending industry, for example, the CIP 22 may be implemented to perform client identification and verification for the loan approval process. As a further example in the context of business hiring, the CIP 22 may be implemented as part of a hiring program for screening potential employees.
  • [0030]
    As a part of its services, the broker-dealer 12 can act as an intermediary for the purchase of private and/or public securities from a number of account custodians 24, 26, 28. For example, the account custodians 24, 26, 28 may comprise mutual fund companies, annuities companies, insurance companies, or other such organizations or businesses licensed to sell particular types of securities, either directly to the clients 14, 16, 18, 20 or through an intermediary such as the broker-dealer 12. A first and second account custodian 24, 26 of the broker-dealer 12, for example, can include mutual fund firms such Vanguard Group, Inc. or American Funds Service Company whereas a third account custodian 28 of the broker-dealer 12 can include an insurance provider such as the Jefferson National Life Insurance Company. In some cases, one or more of the account custodians 24, 26, 28 can comprise a separate broker-dealer licensed to conduct business on behalf of the broker-dealer 12. In some cases, the broker-dealer 12 itself may be an account custodian that provides its own private-label brand of securities to its clients 14, 16, 18, 20. An example of a situation where the broker-dealer 12 is also an account custodian may be Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc., which sells its own private-label brand of securities.
  • [0031]
    The clients 14, 16, 18, 20 to the broker-dealer 12 can include personal investors and/or institutional investors who wish to purchase securities or securities-related products from one or more of the account custodians 24, 26, 28. The clients 14, 16, 18, 20 can be existing customers having an existing business relationship with the broker-dealer 12, or can be new customers seeking to open an account with the broker-dealer 12.
  • [0032]
    Each of the account custodians 24, 26, 28 can have a respective database 30, 32, 34 for storing account information 36, 38, 40 for each client. Account information 36, 38, 40 maintained by the account custodian will typically vary depending on the type of services provided. In some cases, state and federal securities laws will dictate the type of account information 36, 38, 40 to be maintained by the account custodian 24, 26, 28. By way of example and not limitation, account information 36, 38, 40 stored within the databases 30, 32, 34 can include customer name, address, contact information, birth-date, social-security number, net-worth, investment objectives, account type(s), number of shares, trade dates, confirmation dates, activity dates, stock powers, etc.
  • [0033]
    The broker-dealer 12 can further include a broker-dealer (B/D) database 42 for storing account related information received from the clients 14, 16, 18, 20 and account custodians 24, 26, 28. As a part of its CIP 22, the broker-dealer database 42 may store various client identifying information, including customer name, address, contact information, birth-date, and social-security number. Information used to verify the client's identity such as drivers license number or passport number may also be stored within the broker-dealer database 42 along with the dates and times on which such records were relied upon. Other account-related information such as account type(s), number of shares, trade dates, confirmation dates, activity dates, stock powers, etc. may also be stored within the broker-dealer database 42.
  • [0034]
    The broker-dealer 12 can be further partnered with a third-party Customer Identification Program (CIP) vendor 44 that specializes in performing client identity verification. The CIP vendor 44, in turn, can be configured to scan one or more sources 46 to confirm the identity of the client. Examples of sources 46 used to cross-check a client's identity may include property tax records, legal records, public lien recordings, bankruptcy records, federal and state income tax records, driver's license records, credit-bureau records, etc. The CIP vendor 44 may also cross-check the client's identity against a list of terrorists or terrorist organizations maintained by various branches of the government. Typically, the CIP vendor 44 will provide identity verification based on the client's social security number (SSN) or other unique client identifier.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 2 is a schematic view showing a sample client account managed by the broker-dealer 12 of FIG. 1. As can be seen in FIG. 2, the broker-dealer 12 can be configured to maintain client account data 48 for each client, which can include data from one or more existing accounts 50, 52, 54, as shown. Accounts 50, 52, 54 may represent, for example, multiple existing accounts held by an individual or institutional investor. Typically, the client account data 48 will be linked together via a client identification tag 56 such as a social security number (SSN), passport number, or other unique client identifier.
  • [0036]
    In a conventional CIP verification system, the addition of one or more new accounts 58, 60, 62 will typically prompt the broker-dealer 12 to send out a request to the CIP vendor to verify the client's identity. Such identity verification request is usually made without regard to whether a previous verification request for that client was made, or whether the type of account being established requires such verification. If, for example, each of the new accounts 58, 60, 62 to be opened are accounts that fall under the provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), existing verification systems would prompt the broker-dealer 12 to request client verification from the CIP vendor even though such accounts are specifically exempted from compliance from the provisions of the USA Patriot Act. In the illustrative case depicted in FIG. 2, for example, the opening of three accounts 58, 60, 62 exempted under ERISA would result in three separate requests being sent to the CIP vendor for verification, duplicating the verification process and increasing the total cost of client screening. In some cases, a change in a client's address may prompt the broker-dealer 12 to instigate an identity verification request even when such request may have already been performed, further increasing the costs associated with client screening.
  • [0037]
    FIG. 3 is a schematic view of an illustrative system 64 for screening clients for security compliance. As shown in FIG. 3, the system 64 can generally include a client screening submission engine 66, a database 68 adapted to store client account information and verification status information 70, and an interface such as a graphical user interface (GUI) 72 adapted to display client account and verification status information for one or more users 74 on a display screen 76. The client screening engine 66 can be implemented as software and/or hardware configured to run on a personal computer, LAN network server, a WLAN network server, a WAN network server, or other suitable computer platform. In some embodiments, the client screening engine 66 can comprise an Internet or intranet-based application accessible to the users 74 via the World Wide Web (WWW). The graphical user interface 72 used to provide access to the client screening engine 66 can be configured to operate on a personal computer, laptop computer, Palm® pilot, Blackberry®, pager, or other suitable device capable of displaying information to users on a display screen.
  • [0038]
    The client screening engine 66 can be linked to a submission/receiving engine 78, which provides software and/or hardware functionality for communicating with one or more third-party CIP vendors 80 capable of performing client identity verification. The submission/receiving engine 78 can include, for example, a software module operating on an Application Service Provider (ASP) using a platform such as Linux®, Oracle 9i®, and/or Java® to facilitate communications and interfacing between the client screening engine 66 and each CIP vendor 80. The submission/receiving engine 78 can be integrated with client screening engine 66, as indicated generally by the dashed box 82, or can comprise a separate module linked to the client screening engine 66.
  • [0039]
    Initiation of client screening engine 66 can occur automatically in response to a triggering event such as the opening of a new client account from an account custodian 84, a name or address change received from the account custodian 86, and/or a client screening request received from a representative or supervisor 88 desiring to verify the identity of one or more new or existing clients. As indicated generally by box 90, the client screening engine 66 can also be initiated in response to other triggering events. Examples of other triggering events 90 may include, but are not limited to, a change in marital status by a client, a change in citizenship of a client, an inconsistency in client identifying data between one or more accounts held by an account custodian, etc.
  • [0040]
    The client screening engine 66 can be configured to filter account data provided to the user's 74 display screen 76 allowing the user 74 to select only certain clients to be submitted for screening based on one or more filtering criteria. The graphical user interface 72 may permit the user 74 to display a list of only those clients that fall within a particular category, allowing the user 74 to better manage their customers. In some embodiments, for example, the graphical user interface 72 can be configured to selectively display a list of only those clients that have not been previously submitted for client identity verification with the CIP vendor 80. Alternatively, and in other embodiments, the graphical user interface 72 can be configured to selectively display only those clients whose identity has been previously verified. Other filtering criteria for managing the client screening process can be further understood with respect to FIGS. 7-16, which show several screen shots of an illustrative graphical user interface 148 that can be employed by the user 74 to interact with the client screening engine 66.
  • [0041]
    FIG. 4 is a schematic view showing an illustrative list of client account data 70 that can be stored within the broker-dealer database 68 of FIG. 3. As shown in FIG. 4, client account data 70 stored within the database 68 can include a client account data 92, client contact information 94, calendar information 96, correspondence history logs 98, user activity logs 100, screening compliance logs 102, general ledger data 104, securities-related ledger data 106, trade blotter data 108, as well as other data 110. In some embodiments, the database 68 used to store such account data 70 may comprise a relational database operating on a suitable platform such as Microsoft Access®, Microsoft SQL Server 2000®, or Oracle 9i®. Although a single database 68 is shown in FIG. 4, it should be understood that multiple local and/or remote databases can be employed to store the client account data 70.
  • [0042]
    The account data file 92 can contain information about each customer's account including customer account numbers, current and past account holdings, investment objectives for the account, etc. The contact information file 94, in turn, can contain personal information for each client including the customer's full name, nick-name, address, address type (e.g. prime residence, secondary residence, business address, etc.), phone number, fax number, E-mail address, etc. In some cases, the contact information file 94 may contain more specific information about the customer including interests and important dates (e.g. anniversary dates, graduations dates, etc.). The calendar information file 96 contains a list of appointments as well as other items provided by the users 74. A client screening log file 102 can be recorded within the database 68 for maintaining records of the information used to verify each customer's identity. Information that can be stored within the client screening log file 102 can include, for example, the driver's license number, passport number, or other document used to confirm the identity of the client as well as the dates and/or times upon which such documents were relied upon. Data relating to whether the each client has been screened for identity verification can also be stored within the client screening log file 102.
  • [0043]
    The correspondence history data file 98 can be provided to store the correspondence history between each user and their customers. The user activity data file 100 can store information related to each user's activity on the system. General ledger data file 104 can store a general ledger for the broker-dealer firm. The securities ledger data file 106, in turn, can contain records for each buy and sell executed by the broker dealer firm. The trade blotter data file 108 can be used to store each trade executed by the broker-dealer.
  • [0044]
    Referring now to FIG. 5, a flow chart of an illustrative method 112 of screening clients for security compliance with the system 64 of FIG. 3 will now be described. As shown in FIG. 5, method 112 may generally begin with the step 114 of initiating a client screening request and receiving client account data for one or more new or existing clients from an account custodian. Initiation of the client screening request can occur automatically, for example, when a new account is opened for a new or existing client, or when a name and/or address change is received for at least one client. In some cases, initiation of the client screening request may occur when a representative or supervisor of the broker-dealer requests verification of a client's identity.
  • [0045]
    Once a client screening request is received at block 114, the client screening engine may then associate the account data received from the account custodian with a unique client identification tag for each client, as indicated generally by block 116. The accounts held by the account custodian can be associated to each client via a client identification tag such as social security number (SSN), passport number, or other unique number. Multiple accounts held by a single client can be associated together with the client's identification tag. If, for example, the client screening request is initiated when the client opens a new account number, the new account number along with any existing accounts owned by the client can be associated together via the client identification tag. In some embodiments, the step 116 of associating client account data with a client identification tag can occur by comparing data received from the account custodian with account data already stored within the broker-dealer database.
  • [0046]
    Once the account data received from the account custodian is associated with each client, the client screening engine may next identify for each client whether the client's identity has been previously verified, as indicated generally by block 118. If at block 118 the client screening engine determines that a particular client's identity has been previously verified, the engine can be configured to exclude that client from a list of clients to be submitted for screening by the CIP vendor.
  • [0047]
    If the client screening engine determines that a particular client's identity has not be verified at block 118, the engine may next determine whether an exception exists to exclude the account from screening, as indicated generally by block 120. If, for example, a new account request from the account custodian is responsible for triggering the client screening request, the client screening engine can be configured to determine whether the account is of a type that requires client screening. In some embodiments, for example, the client screening engine can be configured to determine whether the account to be opened falls under ERISA where client screening under the USA Patriot Act is exempted. The client screening engine may further determine if the account falls under another applicable exception implemented under the Customer Identification Program (CIP). If the account to be opened falls within an exception, the client screening engine can output an identification exception report indicating that the account has been exempted from client screening, as indicated generally by box 122.
  • [0048]
    If the client's identity has not been previously verified at box 116 and the triggering even causing the client screening request does not fall within an exception, the client screening engine may next filter the client account data received from the account custodian and output a filtered subset of the client account data to the user for review, as indicated generally by block 124. Filtering of the client account data may occur, for example, based on whether the user's clients have been previously screened by the CIP vendor, whether the client is a new client, and/or whether the client screening process for the client has been suppressed or bypassed. Filtering can also occur based on the date in which the account was opened, the representative or supervisor responsible for overseeing that customer's account, or other filtering criteria, as desired.
  • [0049]
    For those clients that the client screening engine determines have not been previously screened and who do not fall within a screening exception, the engine may prompt the user to output a dataset of unverified clients to be screened to the CIP vendor, as indicated generally at box 126. Submission of the client names to be verified by the CIP vendor may occur, for example, by the user clicking a “Request Verification” icon on the graphical user interface. Client information sent by this request may include the customer's social security number (SSN), name, birth-date, and address. Other identifying information may also be sent to the CIP vendor, if necessary.
  • [0050]
    From the information received, the CIP vendor may then compare such information against one or more databases to verify the customer's identity. As indicated generally by block 128, the verification status for each submitted client within the dataset can then be returned back to the submission/receiving engine. Information returned from the CIP vendor can include an indication whether the verification was successful such as “pass”, “fail”, or “review”. In some cases, additional information about the client or the reason why the verification search was unsuccessful can be delivered to the user. As indicated generally by block 130, the user can be notified if the identity of one or more of the clients was unverified or requires further action. In those instances where the individual or organization being screened appears on a list of terrorists or terrorist organizations, a suspicious activity report (SAR) can be displayed on the user's screen prompting the user to take further action, if necessary.
  • [0051]
    FIG. 6 is a flow chart showing an illustrative implementation of the method of FIG. 5 once the verification results have been received back from the CIP vendor 80. As shown in FIG. 6, the verification status results 132 received from the CIP vendor 80 can be stored within the database, as indicated generally by box 134. Once the database is populated with the verification status results 132, the account data can be applied against business logic rule-set 136 containing those rules to be applied and interpreted by the client screening engine in filtering client account data. In some embodiments, for example, the business logic rule-set 136 can include those rules necessary to ensure compliance with the USA Patriot Act, including a list of account exceptions to be applied by the client screening engine to the dataset. As indicated generally by box 138, a log of ledgers and exceptions can be stored for each client account.
  • [0052]
    Once the verification status information 132 is applied against the business logic rule-set 136, an account screen including a verification status indicator can then be provided to the user via the display screen, as indicated generally by box 140. The account screen 140, for example, can be configured to display a stop light icon 142 with a green light indicating that the verification for the client was successful, a yellow light indicating that a problem occurred in the verification process and that further action is required, or a red light indicating that the verification was unsuccessful. If desired, a text message or other status indicator may also be display on the screen in addition to, or in lieu of, the stop sign icon 142.
  • [0053]
    From the account screen 140, the user may then access the client's identification history in order to view more specific information about the client's identification history, as indicated generally by box 144. From the account screen 140, the user may then chose to submit the client's information for verification, suppress or hold the submission of client data until a future date or time, or bypass the verification process altogether. If necessary, the user may also request verification of the client directly from the account screen 140, sending a request to the CIP vendor 80 to cross-check the client's identifying information against their databases.
  • [0054]
    Referring now to FIGS. 7-16, several screen shots of an illustrative menu-driven graphical user interface 148 for use in screening clients for security compliance under the USA Patriot Act will now be described. In an initial screen shot depicted in FIG. 7, the graphical user interface 148 can be configured to display a main menu screen 150 from which the various screens described in greater detail below can be accessed. The main menu screen 150 can include a “Daily Administration” pull-down menu 152 (shown highlighted), a “System Administration” pull-down menu 154, a “Reports” pull-down menu 156, and a “Help” pull-down menu 158. The Daily Administrative pull-down menu 152 may provide functionality for performing daily administrative tasks such as maintaining client contact information, setting up new customer accounts, performing searches on particular accounts, viewing E-mail, viewing customer activity, performing order entry activity, etc. The System Administration pull-down menu 154 may provide functionality for performing system administrative tasks such as network administration, maintenance of access keys for representatives and supervisors, etc. The Reports pull-down menu 156, in turn, may provide functionality for creating various reports, including reports pertaining to the verification status of selected clients, as described further with respect to FIGS. 13-16.
  • [0055]
    Selection of the Daily Administration pull-down menu 152 on the main menu screen 150 causes a selection box 160 to appear on the screen, providing the user with the ability to select among several administrative tasks to be performed. The selection of a “RemitPro Submission” section 162 within the selection box 160 causes the graphical user interface 148 to display a client verification submission screen 164, as further shown in a second screen shot depicted in FIG. 8. The submission screen 164 can be configured to display a worktable 166 containing various fields relating to one or more client accounts. The worktable 166 can include an account number section 168, a name section 170, an address section 172, a primary social security number (SSN) section 174, and a secondary social security number (SSN) section 176, as shown.
  • [0056]
    An account type section 178 of the worktable 166 can be configured to display the type of account corresponding with each client account. An icon selection bar 180 can be provided to permit the user to indicate the type of account to be associated with each account. As depicted in another illustrative screen shot in FIG. 9, for example, the icon selection bar 180 can permit the user to input whether the address for a particular account is either “residential” or “business” by selecting the appropriate text 182, 184 on the screen. The ability to select the account type in this fashion allows the OP vendor to more accurately cross-check the client identity information submitted against their databases.
  • [0057]
    As can be further seen in FIG. 8, the worktable 166 can include a previous activity section 186, which can indicate whether the client's identity has been previously verified. With respect to account number “894651” displayed on the first line of the worktable 166, for example, the text “Not verified” is shown under the previous activity section 186, indicating that the client's identity for that account has not yet been verified. In contrast, with respect to account number “546812” displayed on the fifth line of the worktable 166, the text “Passed” is shown under the previous activity section 186, indicating that the client's identity for that account has already been verified. An activity date section 188 of the worktable 166 can be provided to display the date in which verification was successful.
  • [0058]
    In some cases, other account information may be displayed on the worktable 166. A reconciled date section 190, for example, can be provided to display the date in which the account was last reconciled. A balance section 192, in turn, can be provided to display the current balance of the account. To facilitate viewing, selection of each of the heading sections can cause the graphical user interface 148 to sort each line within the worktable 166 based on entries within that section, in either ascending or descending order. With respect to the primary social security number section 174, for example, selection of that section heading can cause all of the field entries within the worktable 166 to be arranged numerically in either ascending or descending order based on social security number.
  • [0059]
    An action-to-take section 194 of the submission screen 164 can be provided to permit the user to select a screening action to be performed for each account entry within the worktable 166. An action icon selection bar 196 for each account entry can be displayed on the submission screen 164, providing the user with feedback on the current action to be taken for that account. As shown in another screen shot in FIG. 10, selection of each of the action icon selection bars 196 can cause a menu box 198 to be displayed on the screen, providing the user with one or more choices. In the illustrative embodiment of FIG. 10, for example, the action fields can include a “Submit” field 200, a “Bypass” field 202, and a “Hold” field 204. The “Submit” field 200 can be provided to permit the user to select the account for identity verification submission. The “Bypass” field 202, in turn, can be provided to permit the user to bypass the client verification process for that particular account. The “Hold” field 204 can be provided to permit the user to delay submission until a later point. For each account entry in which no client verification has been performed, the graphical user interface 148 can be configured to default to a particular field such as the “Submit” field 200.
  • [0060]
    A filtering selection bar 206 located on the submission screen 164 can be provided to permit the user to filter entries within the worktable 166 based on one or more filtering criteria. As shown in another screen shot in FIG. 11, selection of the filtering selection bar 206 can cause a menu box 208 to be displayed on the screen. The menu box 208 can include one or more fields to permit the user to display only certain entries within the worktable 166. In the illustrative embodiment depicted in FIG. 11, for example, the menu box 208 can include a “Submit” field 210, an “On Hold” field 212, and a “Bypass” field 214. Other filtering criteria may also be displayed within the menu box 208, if desired. When one of the fields 210, 212, 214 is selected by the user, the graphical user interface 148 can be configured to display only those entries within the worktable 166 that meet the selected filter criterion. If, for example, the user selects the “Submit” field 210 (shown highlighted), the graphical user interface 148 can be configured to display only those entries within the worktable 166 in which the “Submit” field 200 is selected under the action-to-take section 194.
  • [0061]
    The submission screen 164 can further include a number of icon buttons to permit the user to perform other functions on the worktable 166. As shown in another screen shot in FIG. 12, which represents a lower section of the submission screen 164 accessible via slide bar 216, the submission screen 164 can include a “Reset Selections” icon button 218 that can be used to reset each account within the worktable 166 back to their previous settings, and a “Reset Sort Order” icon button 220 that can be used to reset the sorting order of the worktable 166 back to its previous or default settings.
  • [0062]
    Once the user has selected each account entry in which client screening is desired, an “Update Accounts” icon button 222 provided on the submission screen 164 can be selected, causing the submission/receiving engine to submit customer identifying information to the CIP vendor information for each account in which the “Submit” field 200 is selected under the action-to-take section 194. The client screening engine can be configured to associate each account owned by a particular client to a unique client identification tag so that only one submission for verification is made when the client has multiple accounts.
  • [0063]
    If at any time the user desires to view a report of any customer accounts in which a customer identification exception was made, the user may select the Reports pull down menu 156 from either the main screen 150 or submission screen 164, causing the graphical user interface 148 to display the option to generate various reports relating to client screening as well as other functions. As shown in another screen shot in FIG. 13, for example, selection of the Reports pull-down menu 156 on the submission screen 164 can cause a menu box 224 to be displayed on the screen, providing the user with various selection fields for generating various reports.
  • [0064]
    Selection of a “Customer Identification Exception” field 226 within the menu box 224 can cause the graphical user interface 148 to display a report screen 228, as shown in another screen shot in FIG. 14. The report screen 228 can include a date box 230 and calendar display icon 232 that can be used to select a start date in which to generate a report of those customers whose identity have not yet been verified. In similar fashion, a date box 234 and calendar display icon 236 can be provided to permit the user to select an end date of the report, if desired. Typically, the end date box 234 will default to display the current date, which can then be changed by the user to narrow the dates of the report, if desired. A representative selection icon bar 238 displayed on the report screen 228 can be provided to permit the user to limit the report to only those clients associated with a particular representative or supervisor, if desired. Once a report has been generated and displayed on the report screen 228, a save button icon 240 can be used to save the report for future reference, if desired.
  • [0065]
    The selection of each client listed on the report screen 228 can cause an account summary screen 242 to be displayed on the screen, providing the user with more specific information about the client, as shown in another screen shot in FIG. 15. A verification status indicator 244 can be displayed on the account summary screen 242, providing the user with feedback on the verification status of that client. The verification status indicator 244 can comprise, for example, a stop light icon with a green light indicating that the verification for that client was successful, a yellow light indicating that a problem occurred in the verification process and that further action is required, or a red light indicating that the verification was unsuccessful. From the account summary screen 242, selection of the verification status indicator 244 can cause the graphical user interface 148 to display a customer verification screen 246, as shown in another screen shot depicted in FIG. 16. The verification screen 246 can be configured to display a “Customer Identification” section 248 including a verification status field 248; a name, address, and contact information field 252; a social security number field 254, a date of birth field 256, and a driver license number field 258. Other fields in addition to, or in lieu of, these fields can also be displayed on the verification screen 246, as desired.
  • [0066]
    A “Request Verification” icon button 260 provided on the verification screen 246 can be selected to immediately perform a verification request of the selected client. An “Override Status” icon button 262, in turn, can be provided to permit the user to override client screening for that selected client. If desired, a text box 264 provided on the verification screen 246 can be used to enter the reason or reasons for the override. A date/time stamp may also be provided to record the date and time in which the resubmission or override request is made.
  • [0067]
    A “Customer Identification History” section 266 of the verification screen 246 can be configured to display the history of any previous verification requests that may have been performed for the client. Information that can be displayed in this section can include, for example, the date and/or time that each verification request was made, the verification status of each request such as “pass”, “fail”, or “review”, the client information relied upon by the CIP vendor involved in the identity verification, the name and contact information of the CIP vendor involved in the identity verification, the representative or supervisor responsible for making the verification request, etc. In some cases, additional information received from the CIP vendor regarding the verification search may be further displayed on the screen.
  • [0068]
    FIG. 17 is a flow chart showing an illustrative method 268 of screening clients using the illustrative graphical user interface 148 of FIGS. 7-16. As shown in FIG. 17, the method 268 may begin with the step of initiating a client screening request and receiving account data for one or more new or existing clients from an account custodian. Initiation of the screening request can occur automatically, for example, when a new account is opened, as indicated generally by block 270, or when a name and/or address change is received from the account custodian, as indicated generally by block 272. As further indicated by box 274, initiation of the client screening request may also occur when a representative or supervisor requests verification of a client's identity by selecting the “Update Accounts” icon button 222 on the submission screen 164 shown in FIG. 12, or the “Request Verification” icon button 260 on the verification screen 246 shown in FIG. 16.
  • [0069]
    Once a client screening request is received, the client screening engine 276 may then associate the account data received with a unique client identification tag 278 (e.g. Social Security number (SSN)) and determine if the client's identity has been previously verified. If the client screening engine 276 determines that a particular client's identity has not bee verified, the client screening engine 2176 may then determine whether an exception exists to exclude the account from screening, as indicated generally by block 280. In those embodiments where the Customer Identification Program is targeted for compliance under the USA Patriot Act, for example, the client screening engine 276 can be configured to determine whether the account falls under an ERISA exception where screening is unnecessary.
  • [0070]
    As indicated by box 282, the submission screen 164 can be configured to display client account data to the user, which may then be filtered based on filtering criteria such as verification status (e.g. pass, fail, review), submission status (e.g. submit, hold, bypass), date, and/or representative or supervisor. As further indicated by box 282, the submission screen 164 can be configured to display the worktable 166 to the user. From this worktable 166, the user may then generate an ID exception report, as indicated generally by block 286. The client identifying information can then be submitted for verification by the CIP vendor 80, as indicated generally by block 288. The verification screen 246 can also be displayed, as indicated generally by block 290, providing the user with notification of the verification status of the client or clients submitted for verification.
  • [0071]
    Having thus described the several embodiments of the present invention, those of skill in the art will readily appreciate that other embodiments may be made and used which fall within the scope of the claims attached hereto. Numerous advantages of the invention covered by this document have been set forth in the foregoing description. It will be understood that this disclosure is, in many respects, only illustrative. Changes can be made with respect to various elements described herein without exceeding the scope of the invention.

Claims (20)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A system for screening clients for security compliance, the system comprising:
    a client screening engine adapted to filter client account data based on one or more filtering criteria;
    a database adapted to store client account information and verification status information; and
    a graphical user interface adapted to selectively display client account information and verification status information for one or more selected clients on a screen.
  2. 2. The system of claim 1, wherein said client screening engine is adapted to automatically update the database each time a new account is opened for a new or existing client.
  3. 3. The system of claim 1, wherein said client screening engine is adapted to automatically update the database when a name and/or address change is received for at least one client.
  4. 4. The system of claim 1, wherein said client screening engine is adapted to associate client account data received from the account custodian with account data stored within the database using a unique client identification tag.
  5. 5. The system of claim 1, wherein said graphical user interface includes a verification status field.
  6. 6. The system of claim 1, wherein said graphical user interface includes a means for filtering client account data received from the account custodian based on one or more filtering criteria and displaying a filtered subset of the client account data on the screen.
  7. 7. The system of claim 1, wherein said graphical user interface includes an account type field.
  8. 8. The system of claim 1, wherein said graphical user interface includes an action-to-take field.
  9. 9. The system of claim 8, wherein said action-to-take field includes a selection means for submitting client identifying information for verification, a selection means for bypassing verification of a client's identity, and a selection means for suppressing client identifying information for verification.
  10. 10. The system of claim 1, wherein said system is a computer software system.
  11. 11. A method of screening clients for security compliance, the method comprising the steps of:
    initiating a client screening request and receiving client account data for one or more new or existing clients from an account custodian;
    associating the account data received from the account custodian with a unique client identification tag for each client;
    identifying for each client whether the client's identification has been previously verified;
    filtering the client account data received from the account custodian based on one or more filtering criteria and outputting a filtered subset of the client account data for review by a user;
    outputting customer identifying information of only unverified clients to a customer identification program vendor for verification of each client's identity;
    receiving the verification status of each submitted client from the customer identification program vendor; and
    notifying the user of the verification status of one or more submitted clients.
  12. 12. The method of claim 11, wherein said step of initiating a client screening request is performed automatically each time a new account is opened for a new or existing client.
  13. 13. The method of claim 11, wherein said step of initiating a client screening request is performed automatically when a name and/or address change is received for at least one client.
  14. 14. The method of claim 11, wherein said step of initiating a client screening request is performed automatically when a user request is received from a representative or supervisor.
  15. 15. The method of claim 11, wherein said step of associating the client account data received from the account custodian includes the step of comparing the account data against a database containing previously stored account data of one or more clients.
  16. 16. The method of claim 11, wherein said step of filtering client account data received from the account custodian includes associating one or more accounts belonging to a particular client with a unique client identification tag.
  17. 17. The method of claim 16, wherein said client identification tag includes a social security number.
  18. 18. The method of claim 16, wherein said client identification tag includes a customer identification number.
  19. 19. The method of claim 11, wherein said step of filtering client account data received from the account custodian includes the step of filtering the client account data based on address type.
  20. 20. The method of claim 11, wherein said step of filtering client account data received from the account custodian includes the step of filtering client account data based on any clients previously verified by the customer identification program vendor.
US14942192 2006-06-01 2015-11-16 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry Abandoned US20160071103A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11421686 US8606669B2 (en) 2006-06-01 2006-06-01 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry
US14100534 US20140096239A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2013-12-09 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry
US14676561 US20160063075A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2015-04-01 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry
US14942192 US20160071103A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2015-11-16 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14942192 US20160071103A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2015-11-16 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry
US15621343 US20170278106A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2017-06-13 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14676561 Continuation US20160063075A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2015-04-01 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15621343 Continuation US20170278106A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2017-06-13 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20160071103A1 true true US20160071103A1 (en) 2016-03-10

Family

ID=39052231

Family Applications (5)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11421686 Active 2029-07-21 US8606669B2 (en) 2006-06-01 2006-06-01 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry
US14100534 Abandoned US20140096239A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2013-12-09 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry
US14676561 Abandoned US20160063075A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2015-04-01 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry
US14942192 Abandoned US20160071103A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2015-11-16 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry
US15621343 Pending US20170278106A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2017-06-13 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry

Family Applications Before (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11421686 Active 2029-07-21 US8606669B2 (en) 2006-06-01 2006-06-01 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry
US14100534 Abandoned US20140096239A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2013-12-09 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry
US14676561 Abandoned US20160063075A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2015-04-01 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15621343 Pending US20170278106A1 (en) 2006-06-01 2017-06-13 Systems and methods for client screening in the financial services industry

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (5) US8606669B2 (en)

Families Citing this family (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9710852B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2017-07-18 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Credit report timeline user interface
US9443268B1 (en) 2013-08-16 2016-09-13 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Bill payment and reporting
US9286595B2 (en) * 2006-08-02 2016-03-15 Emc Corporation System and method for collecting and normalizing entitlement data within an enterprise
US8127986B1 (en) 2007-12-14 2012-03-06 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Card registry systems and methods
US20090210344A1 (en) * 2008-02-15 2009-08-20 Jeffrey Kevin Lange System and method for providing data for use in reducing fraudulent transactions between holders of financial presentation devices and merchants
US8606662B2 (en) * 2008-04-04 2013-12-10 Mastercard International Incorporated Methods and systems for managing co-brand proprietary financial transaction processing
US8271392B2 (en) * 2008-04-04 2012-09-18 Mastercard International Incorporated Methods and systems for managing merchant screening
US20100042520A1 (en) * 2008-08-12 2010-02-18 27804Branch Banking and Trust Company System and method for an electronic lending system
US20100121778A1 (en) * 2008-11-10 2010-05-13 The Prudential Insurance Company Of America Systems and Methods for Providing a Secure Financial Plan
US20100161509A1 (en) * 2008-12-24 2010-06-24 Industrial Technology Research Institute Intellectual property management method and intellectual property bank system
US9147042B1 (en) 2010-11-22 2015-09-29 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Systems and methods for data verification
US9607336B1 (en) * 2011-06-16 2017-03-28 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Providing credit inquiry alerts
US9106691B1 (en) 2011-09-16 2015-08-11 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Systems and methods of identity protection and management
US8738516B1 (en) 2011-10-13 2014-05-27 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Debt services candidate locator
US9853959B1 (en) 2012-05-07 2017-12-26 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Storage and maintenance of personal data
US9654541B1 (en) 2012-11-12 2017-05-16 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Aggregating user web browsing data
US9916621B1 (en) 2012-11-30 2018-03-13 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Presentation of credit score factors
US9870589B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2018-01-16 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Credit utilization tracking and reporting
US9406085B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2016-08-02 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. System and methods for credit dispute processing, resolution, and reporting
US9721147B1 (en) 2013-05-23 2017-08-01 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Digital identity
US20150026214A1 (en) * 2013-07-19 2015-01-22 New Jersey Appleseed Public Interest Law Center System and Method for Facilitating Access to Open Public Records
US9477737B1 (en) 2013-11-20 2016-10-25 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Systems and user interfaces for dynamic access of multiple remote databases and synchronization of data based on user rules
US9892457B1 (en) 2014-04-16 2018-02-13 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Providing credit data in search results
US9652489B2 (en) * 2014-08-26 2017-05-16 Bank Of America Corporation Compliance verification system

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5930764A (en) * 1995-10-17 1999-07-27 Citibank, N.A. Sales and marketing support system using a customer information database
US6985887B1 (en) * 1999-03-19 2006-01-10 Suncrest Llc Apparatus and method for authenticated multi-user personal information database
US7349557B2 (en) * 1998-06-19 2008-03-25 Solidus Networks, Inc. Electronic transaction verification system

Family Cites Families (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6965865B2 (en) * 1999-12-30 2005-11-15 Bank One Delaware N.A. System and method for integrated customer management
US20020032640A1 (en) 2000-02-03 2002-03-14 Lafore David W. Data processing system and method for managing broker transaction information
WO2001099015A2 (en) 2000-06-22 2001-12-27 Stock Decision Software Co., Inc. Apparatus and method for displaying trading trends
US7689489B2 (en) 2001-07-27 2010-03-30 Scott Fergusson Methods and systems for assisting financial services firms and their representatives
US8224723B2 (en) * 2002-05-31 2012-07-17 Jpmorgan Chase Bank, N.A. Account opening system, method and computer program product
US7870078B2 (en) * 2002-11-01 2011-01-11 Id Insight Incorporated System, method and computer program product for assessing risk of identity theft
US7686214B1 (en) * 2003-05-12 2010-03-30 Id Analytics, Inc. System and method for identity-based fraud detection using a plurality of historical identity records
US7761480B2 (en) * 2003-07-22 2010-07-20 Kinor Technologies Inc. Information access using ontologies
US20050222931A1 (en) * 2003-08-27 2005-10-06 Ascential Software Corporation Real time data integration services for financial information data integration
US20050144143A1 (en) * 2003-09-03 2005-06-30 Steven Freiberg Method and system for identity theft prevention, detection and victim assistance
US20060271457A1 (en) * 2005-05-26 2006-11-30 Romain Martin R Identity theft monitoring and prevention

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5930764A (en) * 1995-10-17 1999-07-27 Citibank, N.A. Sales and marketing support system using a customer information database
US7349557B2 (en) * 1998-06-19 2008-03-25 Solidus Networks, Inc. Electronic transaction verification system
US6985887B1 (en) * 1999-03-19 2006-01-10 Suncrest Llc Apparatus and method for authenticated multi-user personal information database

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20170278106A1 (en) 2017-09-28 application
US8606669B2 (en) 2013-12-10 grant
US20080040610A1 (en) 2008-02-14 application
US20140096239A1 (en) 2014-04-03 application
US20160063075A1 (en) 2016-03-03 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8589273B2 (en) Methods and systems for managing risk management information
US7536346B2 (en) System and method for facilitating reciprocative small business financial information exchanges
US7103556B2 (en) System and method for aggregate portfolio client support
US20070033129A1 (en) Automated system and method for monitoring, alerting and confirming resolution of critical business and regulatory metrics
US20100070424A1 (en) System, apparatus and methods for comparing fraud parameters for application during prepaid card enrollment and transactions
US20060136330A1 (en) Product, system and method for certification of closing and mortgage loan fulfillment
US20020082961A1 (en) Apparatus, systems and methods for transacting and managing like-kind exchanges
US6711554B1 (en) Method and system for managing and preparing documentation for real estate transactions
US20060288090A1 (en) Privacy Information Reporting Systems with Refined Content Model
US20060155594A1 (en) Adaptive step-by-step process with guided conversation logs for improving the quality of transaction data
US20040059653A1 (en) System and method for rendering automated real property title decisions
US20050055231A1 (en) Candidate-initiated background check and verification
US20040243588A1 (en) Systems and methods for administering a global information database
US20070288360A1 (en) Systems and methods for determining whether candidates are qualified for desired situations based on credit scores
US20040064340A1 (en) System and method for performing a legal audit
US7877304B1 (en) System and method for managing consumer information
US20080033775A1 (en) Method and apparatus for managing risk, such as compliance risk, in an organization
US20020029194A1 (en) System and method of managing financial transactions over an electronic network
US20070192242A1 (en) System and method for credit risk detection and monitoring
US20050044015A1 (en) Architecture for account reconciliation
US20090235084A1 (en) Anonymous reporting system
US20070038483A1 (en) Computer-implemented personal information manager method and system
US20070226093A1 (en) Financial services data model
US20060271457A1 (en) Identity theft monitoring and prevention
US20090171723A1 (en) Systems and methods for electronic account certification and enhanced credit reporting