US20160029696A1 - Electrical heating device for water pipes - Google Patents

Electrical heating device for water pipes Download PDF

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US20160029696A1
US20160029696A1 US14446239 US201414446239A US2016029696A1 US 20160029696 A1 US20160029696 A1 US 20160029696A1 US 14446239 US14446239 US 14446239 US 201414446239 A US201414446239 A US 201414446239A US 2016029696 A1 US2016029696 A1 US 2016029696A1
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housing
heating element
device
circuitry
chamber
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US14446239
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Obeidallah Jamil Obeidallah
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Obeidallah Jamil Obeidallah
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24FSMOKERS' REQUISITES; MATCH BOXES
    • A24F47/00Smokers' requisites not provided for elsewhere, e.g. devices to assist in stopping or limiting smoking
    • A24F47/002Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes
    • A24F47/004Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes with heating means, e.g. carbon fuel
    • A24F47/008Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes with heating means, e.g. carbon fuel with electrical heating means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24FSMOKERS' REQUISITES; MATCH BOXES
    • A24F1/00Tobacco pipes
    • A24F1/30Hookahs
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23QIGNITION; EXTINGUISHING-DEVICES
    • F23Q7/00Incandescent ignition; Igniters using electrically-produced heat, e.g. lighters for cigarettes; Electrically-heated glowing plugs
    • F23Q7/22Details

Abstract

The invention is generally an electrical heating device for water pipes, and more specifically, a device for enabling a water pipe with electrical heating, which ignites or vaporizes aromatic substances via an electric-powered heating element. In exemplary embodiments, the device includes a housing that keeps the device's circuitry in thermal isolation from the heating element. The housing of the device may include openings to allow proper airflow and may be adapted for secure placement on top of the bowl of a water pipe. The device is placed on top of a bowl containing an aromatic substance, and a heating element is thereby placed in close proximity or in contact with the aromatic substance. Upon generating a heat output, the aromatic substance may be either vaporized or ignited for inhalation. Users may simply turn the device on and enjoy their experience.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates in general to an electrical heating device for water pipes, and more specifically, to a device for retrofitting a water pipe with electrical heating capabilities, which ignites or vaporizes aromatic substances via an electric-powered heating element.
  • COPYRIGHT AND TRADEMARK NOTICE
  • A portion of the disclosure of this patent application may contain material that is subject to copyright protection. The owner has no objection to the facsimile reproduction by anyone of the patent document or the patent disclosure, as it appears in the Patent and Trademark Office patent file or records, but otherwise reserves all copyrights whatsoever.
  • Certain marks referenced herein may be common law or registered trademarks of third parties affiliated or unaffiliated with the applicant or the assignee. Use of these marks is by way of example and should not be construed as descriptive or to limit the scope of this invention to material associated only with such marks.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • In the past, water pipes—also known as narghile, arghila, qalyān, shisha, or Hookahs—have been used as instruments for vaporizing and smoking flavored tobacco or other aromatic substances. These devices, or water pipes, may be single or multi-stemmed instruments that typically comprise a water reservoir through which the smoke is passed before inhalation.
  • FIG. 1 shows an exploded view of a water pipe, or hookah commonly known in the prior art; the hookah is the type that requires ignited charcoal to combust or heat the flavored tobacco. More specifically, FIG. 1 shows hookah 100, depicting the parts and components that enable a user to enjoy a smoking experience. Hookah 100's various components include bowl 101, which is where an aromatic substance, such as flavored tobacco, may be placed for smoking. Bowl grommet 102 and bowl stem 103 connect the bowl of the hookah to the body or shaft—thereby creating a fluid connection that allows any smoke created at the bowl (i.e. smoke from burning the aromatic substance) to flow through a water reservoir and to a user inhaling through the hookah's hose.
  • Tray 104 is typically stabilized by stabilizing ring 105 so that the tray may rest above hookah shaft 106 and directly below bowl 101. This way, when charcoal is used to burn the aromatic substance, for example flavored tobacco, any undesirable ashes or spent charcoal will be prevented from falling on the floor or table where the device rests during use. Additionally, tray 104 may be used to place tools such as tongs commonly used to stir, or rearrange burning charcoal.
  • Hookah shaft 106 further comprises air purge valve 107 and hose adapter 108. Hookah shaft 106 is coupled to base grommets 109 and securely connected to base 110, which is the device's water reservoir. Extending from hookah shaft 106 and into the water reservoir of base 110, is stem 111, which is in fluid connection with bowl 101 as mentioned above. Extending from hose adapted 108 is hose 112, which is connected to the adapted via hose grommet 113. Typically, hose 112 further comprises a removable mouth tip for users to share their smoking experience with others. Other variations of hookah 100 are well known, including multi-stem, multi-bowl, and multi-hose variations that enable similar smoking experiences for a group of users.
  • A major set-back presented by these prior art devices is the need to use hot charcoals to burn the aromatic substance. That is, in order to combust the aromatic substance, charcoal must be pre-ignited so that when placed atop the bowl, typically on top of a foil or similar material, the substance will be heated until the substance burns and produces smoke. The problem lies in the requirement that the charcoal remain properly ignited so that the charcoal produces suitable heat; the heat source must be maintained properly during smoking sessions, thus typically requiring preparation of additional charcoals or repositioning of the charcoals. Furthermore, it is typical that byproducts of the burning charcoal—including volatile gases and Ashes—are spilled around the hookah, or fall inside the water reservoir. These byproducts create a mess the user must clean up after each smoking session (although the tray may alleviate some of the mess created), and a less pleasant smoking experience (i.e. since water polluted with burnt charcoal pieces or ashes affect the taste of the smoke that flows through it). Additionally, a significant fire hazard exists since burning charcoal may fall to the floor or table and ignite nearby combustibles. Finally, burning charcoal is difficult to regulate, hence not every smoking experience may be equally satisfying.
  • Thus, it would be desirable to provide a heat source, or heating element that avoids the problems presented by the prior art requirement of utilizing burning charcoal as a source of heat. It is to these ends that the present invention has been developed.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • To minimize the limitations in the prior art, and to minimize other limitations that will be apparent upon reading and understanding the present specification, the present invention describes an electrically heated water pipe, and more specifically, a water pipe that is retrofitted with an electrical heating element that ignites aromatic substances for smoking.
  • An electric heating device for water pipes, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, comprises a housing configured to couple with a bowl of a water pipe; circuitry situated within the housing; and a heating element connected to the circuitry, wherein the heating element is supplied power from a power source via the circuitry and is configured to generate heat for vaporizing or igniting an aromatic substance situated in the bowl.
  • An electrically heated water pipe, in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention, comprises a base in fluid communication with a hose and a bowl, wherein the base forms a water reservoir, the base connected to the bowl via a stem; a heating element connected to circuitry, wherein the heating element is supplied power from a power source and is configured to generate heat for vaporizing or igniting an aromatic substance situated inside the bowl; and a housing configured to couple with the bowl, wherein the housing comprises a first chamber for housing the circuitry and a second chamber for housing the heating element, the second chamber configured to thermally isolate the circuitry from the heating element.
  • An electric heating device for water pipes, in accordance with yet another embodiment of the present invention, comprises: a housing including first and second chambers, the housing configured to couple with a bowl of a water pipe; circuitry, including a controller for executing a programmable code to control a heat output of the heating device, the circuitry situated within the first chamber of the housing, the first chamber of the housing configured for thermal isolation from the second chamber of the housing; and a heating element situated within the second chamber of the housing and in communication with the controller, wherein the heating element is supplied power from a power source via the circuitry and is configured to generate heat in response to a command from the controller for vaporizing or igniting an aromatic substance situated in the bowl.
  • It is an objective of the present invention to provide a heat source to ignite or vaporize aromatic substances, such as flavored tobacco, that does not require the use of lit charcoals.
  • It is another objective of the present invention to provide a cleaner smoking experience without undesirable byproducts produced from combustibles.
  • It is yet another objective of the present invention to provide users with a retrofitted water pipe that does not require an open flame to ignite.
  • These and other advantages and features of the present invention are not meant as limiting objectives, and are described herein with specificity so as to make the present invention understandable to one of ordinary skill in the art.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Elements in the figures have not necessarily been drawn to scale in order to enhance their clarity and improve understanding of the various embodiments of the invention. Furthermore, elements that are known to be common and well understood to those in the industry are not depicted in order to provide a clear view of the various embodiments of the invention. The drawings that accompany the detailed description can be briefly described as follows:
  • FIG. 1 shows an exploded view of a water pipe, or hookah commonly known in the prior art; the hookah is the type that requires ignited charcoal to combust or heat the flavored tobacco typically smoked on these devices.
  • FIG. 2 depicts a cross-sectional view of a water pipe that has been retrofitted with an electronic heating element in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 3( a) shows a diagram depicting the components of a device in accordance with one embodiment of present invention.
  • FIG. 3( b) shows a diagram depicting the components of a device in accordance with another embodiment of present invention.
  • FIG. 4( a) depicts one exemplary embodiment of a device in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 4( b) depicts the exemplary embodiment of the heating element described with reference to FIG. 4( a).
  • FIG. 5( a) depicts one exemplary embodiment of a device in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 5( b) depicts the exemplary embodiment of the heating element described with reference to FIG. 5( a).
  • FIG. 6( a) depicts one exemplary embodiment of a device in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 6( b) depicts the exemplary embodiment of the heating element described with reference to FIG. 6( a).
  • FIG. 7 shows a cross-sectional view of an embodiment for a device in accordance with the present invention, wherein the device fits snuggly atop a bowl of a water pipe.
  • FIG. 8 shows a perspective view of a water pipe that has been retrofitted with an electrical heating device, in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • In the following discussion that addresses a number of embodiments and applications of the present invention, reference is made to the accompanying figures that form a part thereof, where depictions are made, by way of illustration, of specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. It is to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and changes may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention.
  • Generally, the invention involves an electronic device that comprises a heating element for combusting or heating aromatic substances, such as flavored tobacco. As mentioned above in relation to FIG. 1, the prior art involves use of charcoal, which carries several set-backs. The present invention overcomes those setbacks by implementing an electronic heating element that rests at the top of the bowl of the water pipe. The heating element may be powered by a rechargeable battery or an adapter that is connected to any suitable power source. Once properly placed in contact with the desired substance, the device heats or ignites the substance without the need to ignite or maintain burning charcoal during use of the water pipe. The device may comprise a body configured to support the heating element atop the bowl of a water pipe. Because heating is accomplished electronically, a user may simply turn on the device and start inhaling the vapors or smoke generated therein without concerning themselves over preparing and maintaining burning charcoal. In exemplary embodiments, the body of the device may contain channels to facilitate airflow during its use, and different types of heating elements may be implemented to achieve a desired heating or combustion of the aromatic substance. The present invention may be configured for burning substances, such as flavored tobacco, or vaporizing other aromatic substances.
  • Turning now to the remaining figures, FIG. 2 depicts a cross sectional view of a water pipe that has been retrofitted with an electronic heating element in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 2 depicts electronically heated water pipe (system 200) including device 201, which rests atop of bowl 202. Bowl 202 is in fluid communication with stem 203, which reaches water reservoir 204 of base 205. Base 205 further comprises valve 206 and hose inlet 207, which connects to hose 208.
  • Device 201 comprises a body and a heating element supported by the body of device 201, wherein the heating element is powered by a battery. When placed on top of bowl 202, device 201 heats up substance 209 and creates a vapor or smoke, depending on the substance being inhaled and temperature provided by device 201's heating element. That is, in one embodiment of the present invention, the heating element of device 201 may be heated to a temperature for combusting substance 209, which would burn the substance and thus produce smoke for inhaling. In another embodiment, the heating element of device 201 may be set to a different temperature for vaporizing substance 209, which would allow a user to inhale the vapors instead. Thus, device 201 may be configured for vaporizing a substance or for burning a substance depending on its intended use.
  • Whether vaporizing or burning smoke is desired, device 201 may be placed in an appropriate distance from substance 209 in order to create the desired effect. In some applications, direct contact may be used between the heated element of device 201 and substance 209. In alternative applications, a close proximity rather than direct contact may be preferred. In either case, device 201 may comprise circuitry such as various resistors and components, including a potentiometer to allow control of the temperature that the substance is preferably exposed to. The internal components of a device in accordance with the present invention are disclosed in more detail below, in relation to FIG. 3.
  • For example, and without limiting the scope of the present invention, substance 209 may be flavored tobacco. Since flavored tobacco is typically enjoyed by combusting the substance into an inhalable smoke, it may be desirable to heat substance 209 until substance 209 combusts. This in turn would create smoke that may be pulled by a user inhaling via hose 208. Airflow being drawn through hose inlet 207 would pull the smoke from bowl 202 through stem 203, and through water reservoir 204, to the user via hose 208. Because the user does not need to re-adjust charcoals, maintain a desired temperature, or clean up a mess after use, system 200 creates a more desirable smoking experience over prior art devices.
  • Turning to the next figure, FIG. 3( a) shows a diagram depicting the components for a device that can be used to retrofit a water pipe for electrically heating aromatic substances. More specifically, the diagram of FIG. 3( a) depicts device 300, which includes housing 301 for supporting circuitry and a heating element. Generally, device 300 comprises: housing 301, heating element 302 (housed in chamber 304 a), and circuitry 303 (housed in chamber 304 b), wherein the circuitry includes rechargeable battery 305, thermostat 306, safety fuse 307, potentiometer 308 and for enabling user control of a desired temperature, and switch 309 for turning device 300 on or off. As will be discussed further below, device 300 may be configured to draw power directly form a power source such as a regular power socket in a home or business; in the shown embodiment, rechargeable battery 305 may be re-charged and draw power from such an external power supply 311.
  • Housing 301 supports heating element 302 and houses circuitry 303. Thus, housing 301 may be constructed of any material that is suitable for containing heat element 302 and protecting circuitry 303 from damage by the heat radiated from heating element 302. That is, housing 301 should be able to withstand the temperatures that are generated by heating element 302 without being damaged or without damaging the circuitry components of device 300. Typically, housing 301 comprises support members that allow device 300 to be placed atop a bowl of a water pipe.
  • For example, and without limiting the scope of the present invention, housing 301 may comprise support members 312, which may extend externally or internally to a wall around heating element 302. Support members 312 may be used to couple device 300 to a bowl, configuring housing 301 for snuggly fitting on top of the circumference of the water pipe's bowl.
  • Housing 301 may include one or more cavities to house its components. For example, and without limiting the scope of the present invention, housing 301 (as shown) includes cavities 304 a and 304 b, which house heating element 302 and circuitry 303, respectively. This may be desirable to both protect the components of the device's circuitry, and to create a chamber wherein the generated heat will be maintained throughout use of the device. That is, in the embodiment shown, chamber 304 b houses circuitry 303 and keeps the electrical components safe from the radiated heat generated by heating element 302; chamber 304 a houses heating element 302 and creates a chamber when device 300 is coupled to a bowl of a water pipe. This chamber helps to maintain the desired temperature to properly combust or vaporize the aromatic substance being exposed to heating element 302.
  • To increase airflow and improve the oxygen content within chamber 304 a, in exemplary embodiments, the wall of chamber 304 a may include openings or channels 310; in alternative embodiments, channels 310 may be adjustable to control a desired airflow depending, for example, on the number of individuals using the water pipe at one time.
  • Heating element 302 generates the desired heat to either vaporize or combust an aromatic substance such as flavored tobacco. Heating element 302 may comprise of heat lamps, incandescent heating, ceramic heaters, immersion heaters, glass-rope heaters, or any other type of heating device that is suitable for generating a heat source that either vaporizes or ignites an aromatic substance. Different embodiments of heating elements in accordance with the present invention are discussed in more detail below with reference to FIG. 4( a)-6(b). As mentioned above, heating element 302 is connected to device 300's circuitry, but resides in an external chamber or chamber 304 a, which may be external to or shielded from circuitry 303.
  • Circuitry 303 may include rechargeable battery 305, which draws power from a power source 305 and provides an adequate voltage to heating element 302. Circuitry 303 may also include thermostat 306 to control the temperature of heating element 302, safety fuse 307 to prevent electrical damage from unforeseen malfunctions, and potentiometer 308 to provide users with a means to manually control the temperature generated by heating element 302. Circuitry 303 may also include switch 309 for turning power on or off; alternatively, switch 309 may be implemented with potentiometer 308—furthermore, it should be noted that circuitry 303 may include more or less components that are well known in the art, including one or more resistors, conductors, and any other well known components typical of circuitry used to power and control heating elements.
  • Rechargeable battery 305 may be any type of suitable battery that can draw power from a power source such as an electricity socket at a home or a business. Rechargeable battery 305 is preferably removable, or may have a removable component to facilitate recharging device 300. Rechargeable battery 305 may include different interfaces for charging device 300, including but not limited to electric lighter adapters, USB adapters, or any other adapter that enables rechargeable battery to draw power from different types of power sources. Furthermore, rechargeable battery 305 has the necessary components to supply an adequate voltage to heating element 302. For example, and without deviating from the scope of the present invention, rechargeable battery 305 may supply a lower voltage to heating element 302 than a voltage supply directly drawn from a typical socket. In alternative embodiments, other components for supplying an adequate voltage to heating element 302 may be implemented. For example, and without deviating from the scope of the present invention, a small step-down transformer may be implemented instead of rechargeable battery 305 in order to draw power from a typical 120 volt input, and output a lower voltage suitable for heating element 302. In such embodiment, device 300 may require an electrical cord to connect directly to power source 311.
  • As mentioned above, one or more components may be implemented in device 300's circuitry in order to control the heat output generated by heating element 302. The example embodiment shown depicts thermostat 306, safety fuse 307, potentiometer 308, and switch 309—however more or less components may be utilized to enable heating element 302 with the require power to generate and radiate enough heat. A simple circuitry containing these elements enables a user to safely configure the device for any desired temperature suitable for vaporizing or combusting an aromatic substance.
  • FIG. 3( b) shows a diagram depicting the components of a device in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention. More specifically, FIG. 3( b) depicts a device similar to that described in reference to FIG. 3( a), however, with a different circuitry 303. With reference to FIG. 3( b) circuitry 303 comprises the same components, except that potentiometer 308 may be omitted or replaced, and instead circuitry 303 includes controller 313, user interface 314, and a very basic memory 315 for storing one or more basic programmable instructions to control heating element 302. Naturally, with this configuration, device 300 components will have to be configured to communicate with controller 313.
  • For example, and in no way limiting the scope of the present invention, controller 313 may include a basic logic, or executable program code, that enables control of the heat generated by heating element 302. To this end, a basic memory, such as memory 315 may be included in circuitry 303. Thermostat 306, safety fuse 307, and switch 309 may be configured in circuitry 303 so that they are all in communication with controller 313. Furthermore, circuitry 303 may further include user interface 314, which may be a simple dial input device such as a potentiometer, or a more complex input/output device that allows a user to input a desired temperature range to which maintain heating element 302.
  • For example, and without deviating from the scope of the present invention, in one embodiment user interface 314 may include a digital display with several inputs to increase or decrease a desired temperature setting. In another embodiment, user interface 314 may include a touchscreen display to provide this functionality. In yet another embodiment, a user interface may simply include an input button for setting the temperature and or turning the device on or off.
  • Turning to the next figures, FIG. 4( a)-(b) depict one exemplary embodiment of a device and heating element, in accordance with the present invention. More specifically, FIG. 4( a) depicts device 400, which includes housing 401, circuitry 402, power supply 403, and heating element 404. In the shown embodiment, heating element 404 comprises of a plurality of ceramic heaters 405, a close-up of which is shown in FIG. 4( b). Each of ceramic heaters 405 comprises a ceramic body or encasing 406, which includes resistance element 407—encasing 406 typically packed with a suitable insulating material, such as magnesium oxide, to encase resistance element 407.
  • In order to supply adequate power, ceramic heaters 405 also include flexible insulated lead wires 408, which supply a suitable voltage to resistance element 407. It should be noted that these components are well known, and ceramic heaters are used for a variety of purposes, including outdoor cooking appliances; similar ceramic heaters may be utilized in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 5( a)-(b) depict another exemplary embodiment of a device and heating element, in accordance with the present invention. In such embodiment, a single heating element as oppose to a plurality, may be used. More specifically, FIG. 5( a) depicts device 500, which includes housing 501, circuitry 502, power supply 503, and heating element 504. In the shown embodiment, heating element 504 comprises of a single ceramic heater, similar to the plurality of heaters 405, a close-up of which is shown in FIG. 5( b). Ceramic heater 504 comprises a wide ceramic body or encasing 506, which includes resistance element 507—encasing 506 typically packed with a suitable insulating material, such as magnesium oxide, to encase resistance element 507. Like the embodiment described and shown in FIG. 4( a)-(b), ceramic heater 504 also includes flexible insulated lead wires 408, which supply a suitable voltage to resistance element 507.
  • FIG. 6( a)-(b) depict yet another exemplary embodiment of a device and heating element, in accordance with the present invention. More specifically, FIG. 6( a) depicts device 600, which includes housing 601, circuitry 602, power supply 603, and heating element 604. In the shown embodiment, heating element 604 comprises of a single glass-rope or flexible heater 405, a close-up of which is shown in FIG. 6( b). This type of heater comprises flexible body 605, which is typically constructed of flexible fiber glass, created with a woven fiber glass braid clamped with retaining bands 606. Like the heaters described in the embodiments above, a resistance wire element 607 is embedded within flexible body 605 and connected to flexible fiberglass leads 604, which supply a suitable voltage to generate heat.
  • Now turning to the next figure, FIG. 7 shows a cross-sectional view of an embodiment for a device in accordance with the present invention, wherein the device fits snuggly atop a bowl of a water pipe. More specifically, FIG. 7 depicts device 700, which includes housing 701 and bowl 709. Housing 701 is removably coupled to bowl 709 and comprises heating element 702 (housed in chamber 704 a), and circuitry 703 (housed in chamber 704 b), wherein the circuitry includes power supply 705 and control switch 706 for controlling the temperature output of device 700, and to turn the device on or off.
  • Housing 701 supports heating element 702 and houses circuitry 703. Thus, housing 301 may be constructed of any material that is suitable for containing heat element 702 and protecting circuitry 703 from damage by the heat radiated from heating element 702. That is, housing 701 should be able to withstand the temperatures that are generated by heating element 702 without being damaged or without damaging the circuitry components of device 700. Housing 701 comprises perimeter walls 707, which form a substantially conical shape with chamber 704 b towards its apex and chamber 704 a towards the base. At the bottom of perimeter walls 707, and protruding in the interior of perimeter walls 707, extend support members 708, which allow device 700 to be placed atop bowl 709 in a tight fit—this configuration allows for stability and sturdiness of the device.
  • Housing 701 may include one or more cavities or chambers to house its components. For example, and without limiting the scope of the present invention, housing 701 includes cavities 704 a and 704 b, which house heating element 702 and circuitry 703, respectively. This may be desirable to both protect the components of the device's circuitry, and to create a chamber wherein the generated heat will be maintained throughout use of the device—as described above in relation to FIG. 3. Furthermore, to increase airflow and improve the oxygen content within chamber 704 a, in exemplary embodiments, perimeter walls 707 of chamber 704 a may include openings or channels 710; in alternative embodiments, channels 710 may be adjustable to control a desired airflow depending, for example, on the number of individuals using the water pipe at one time.
  • Heating element 702 comprises of ceramic heaters similar to those shown and described in reference to FIGS. 4( a) and 4(b). Heating element 702 may comprise such a plurality of ceramic heaters, wherein they reach into bowl 709 in a manner so that they make contact with the aromatic substance.
  • Circuitry 703 and rechargeable battery 705 may be configured in a similar manner as any of the embodiments described above. For example, and without limiting the scope of the present invention, circuitry 703 may include the components described with reference to FIG. 3 or any other variation of resistors, connectors, a potentiometer, and/or switches in order to properly supply power and control a heat output generated by heating element 702. Similarly, power supply 705 may include a rechargeable battery with different interfaces for charging device 700, including but not limited to electric lighter adapters, USB adapters, or any other adapter that enables power supply 705 to draw power from different types of power sources—so long as circuitry 703 and power supply 705 have the necessary components to supply an adequate voltage to heating element 702.
  • FIG. 8 shows a perspective view of a water pipe that has been retrofitted with an electrical heating device, in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention. More specifically, FIG. 8 depicts a perspective view of device 700 in use. Device 700 may be coupled to bowl 709 via a frictional force created between support member 708 and the inner walls of bowl 709. Alternatively, and without limiting the scope of the present invention, other means of coupling the device to bowl 709 may be implemented such as using snap-on components, clamps, or any other attaching means.
  • An electrical heating device for water pipes has been described. The foregoing description of the various exemplary embodiments of the invention has been presented for the purposes of illustration and disclosure. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. Many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1. An electric heating device for water pipes, comprising:
a housing configured to couple with a bowl of a water pipe;
circuitry situated within the housing; and
a heating element connected to the circuitry, wherein the heating element is supplied power from a power source via the circuitry and is configured to generate heat for vaporizing or igniting an aromatic substance situated in the bowl.
2. The device of claim 1, wherein the housing comprises a first chamber for housing the circuitry and a second chamber for housing the heating element, the second chamber configured to thermally isolate the circuitry from the heating element.
3. The device of claim 2, wherein the housing comprises one or more openings for providing airflow to the first chamber.
4. The device of claim 3, wherein the housing includes a perimeter wall that forms a substantially conical shape so that the first chamber for housing the circuitry is near an apex of the housing and the second chamber for housing the heating element is located near the base of the housing.
5. The device of claim 3, wherein the heating element includes one or more ceramic heaters.
6. The device of claim 3, wherein the heating element includes a flexible fiberglass heater.
7. The device of claim 3, wherein the circuitry draws power from a rechargeable battery.
8. The device of claim 3, wherein the circuitry includes a controller for controlling the power supplied to the heating element.
9. An electrically heated water pipe, comprising:
a base in fluid communication with a hose and a bowl, wherein the base forms a water reservoir, the base connected to the bowl via a stem;
a heating element connected to circuitry, wherein the heating element is supplied power from a power source and is configured to generate heat for vaporizing or igniting an aromatic substance situated inside the bowl; and
a housing configured to couple with the bowl, wherein the housing comprises a first chamber for housing the circuitry and a second chamber for housing the heating element, the second chamber configured to thermally isolate the circuitry from the heating element.
10. The water pipe of claim 9, wherein the housing comprises one or more openings for providing airflow to the first chamber.
11. The water pipe of claim 10, wherein the housing includes a perimeter wall that forms a substantially conical shape so that the first chamber for housing the circuitry is near an apex of the housing and the second chamber for housing the heating element is located near the base of the housing.
12. The water pipe of claim 10, wherein the heating element includes one or more ceramic heaters.
13. The water pipe of claim 10, wherein the heating element includes a flexible fiberglass heater.
14. The water pipe of claim 10, wherein the circuitry draws power from a rechargeable battery.
15. The water pipe of claim 10, wherein the circuitry includes a controller for controlling the power supplied to the heating element.
16. An electric heating device for water pipes, comprising:
a housing including first and second chambers, the housing configured to couple with a bowl of a water pipe;
circuitry, including a controller for executing a programmable code to control a heat output of the heating device, the circuitry situated within the first chamber of the housing, the first chamber of the housing configured for thermal isolation from the second chamber of the housing; and
a heating element situated within the second chamber of the housing and in communication with the controller, wherein the heating element is supplied power from a power source via the circuitry and is configured to generate heat in response to a command from the controller for vaporizing or igniting an aromatic substance situated in the bowl.
17. The device of claim 16, wherein the housing comprises one or more openings for providing airflow to the first chamber.
18. The device of claim 17, wherein the housing includes a perimeter walls that forms a substantially conical shape so that the first chamber for housing the circuitry is near an apex of the housing and the second chamber for housing the heating element is located near the base of the housing.
19. The device of claim 17, wherein the heating element includes one or more ceramic heaters.
20. The device of claim 17, wherein the heating element includes a flexible fiberglass heater.
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US20150257443A1 (en) * 2014-03-13 2015-09-17 Lubby Holdings, LLC Apparatus and methods for vaporizing essential oils and waxes
USD757999S1 (en) * 2015-11-12 2016-05-31 Wael Elhalwani Hookah
USD757998S1 (en) * 2014-04-09 2016-05-31 Wael Elhalwani Hookah
USD757997S1 (en) * 2015-11-12 2016-05-31 Wael Elhalwani Hookah
USD759301S1 (en) * 2015-11-12 2016-06-14 Wael Elhalwani Hookah
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USD773113S1 (en) * 2014-04-09 2016-11-29 Wael Elhalwani Hookah
USD779723S1 (en) * 2015-10-22 2017-02-21 MOB Hookah LLC Hookah
WO2017178931A1 (en) * 2016-04-11 2017-10-19 Philip Morris Products S.A. Shisha device for heating a substrate without combustion
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US10098380B2 (en) * 2016-07-20 2018-10-16 William Jordan Rives Pressure differential device

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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160249677A1 (en) * 2009-02-26 2016-09-01 Edwar Bishara Electric heater for hookah
US10021909B2 (en) * 2014-03-13 2018-07-17 Lubby Holdings, LLC Apparatus and methods for vaporizing essential oils and waxes
US20150257443A1 (en) * 2014-03-13 2015-09-17 Lubby Holdings, LLC Apparatus and methods for vaporizing essential oils and waxes
USD757998S1 (en) * 2014-04-09 2016-05-31 Wael Elhalwani Hookah
USD773113S1 (en) * 2014-04-09 2016-11-29 Wael Elhalwani Hookah
US10004264B2 (en) 2015-09-28 2018-06-26 Lubby Holdings, LLC Vaporizer and detachable power source
USD779723S1 (en) * 2015-10-22 2017-02-21 MOB Hookah LLC Hookah
USD759301S1 (en) * 2015-11-12 2016-06-14 Wael Elhalwani Hookah
USD757997S1 (en) * 2015-11-12 2016-05-31 Wael Elhalwani Hookah
USD757999S1 (en) * 2015-11-12 2016-05-31 Wael Elhalwani Hookah
WO2017178931A1 (en) * 2016-04-11 2017-10-19 Philip Morris Products S.A. Shisha device for heating a substrate without combustion
US10098380B2 (en) * 2016-07-20 2018-10-16 William Jordan Rives Pressure differential device
RU2645568C1 (en) * 2016-10-10 2018-02-21 Алексей Иванович Бондарь Device for formation of smoking gas mixture in hookah

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