US20150342305A1 - Anti-Slip Overshoe with Flexible Cleats and Method of Gripping Natural Surfaces - Google Patents

Anti-Slip Overshoe with Flexible Cleats and Method of Gripping Natural Surfaces Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20150342305A1
US20150342305A1 US14/292,922 US201414292922A US2015342305A1 US 20150342305 A1 US20150342305 A1 US 20150342305A1 US 201414292922 A US201414292922 A US 201414292922A US 2015342305 A1 US2015342305 A1 US 2015342305A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
spikes
gripping
traction arm
shoe
traction
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US14/292,922
Inventor
Jon C. Larson
Van B. Larson
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Sure Foot Corp
Original Assignee
Sure Foot Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Sure Foot Corp filed Critical Sure Foot Corp
Priority to US14/292,922 priority Critical patent/US20150342305A1/en
Publication of US20150342305A1 publication Critical patent/US20150342305A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C15/00Non-skid devices or attachments
    • A43C15/02Non-skid devices or attachments attached to the sole
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole-and-heel integral units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole-and-heel integral units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/22Soles made slip-preventing or wear-resisting, e.g. by impregnation or spreading a wear-resisting layer
    • A43B13/223Profiled soles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/16Overshoes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B5/00Footwear for sporting purposes
    • A43B5/001Golf shoes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B5/00Footwear for sporting purposes
    • A43B5/18Attachable overshoes for sporting purposes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C15/00Non-skid devices or attachments
    • A43C15/06Ice-gripping devices or attachments, e.g. ice-spurs, ice-cleats, ice-creepers, crampons; Climbing devices or attachments, e.g. mountain climbing irons
    • A43C15/061Ice-gripping devices or attachments, e.g. ice-cleats, ice-creepers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C15/00Non-skid devices or attachments
    • A43C15/16Studs or cleats for football or like boots
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C15/00Non-skid devices or attachments
    • A43C15/16Studs or cleats for football or like boots
    • A43C15/161Studs or cleats for football or like boots characterised by the attachment to the sole

Definitions

  • the present invention relates in general to shoe apparel and, more particularly, to an anti-slip overshoe with flexible cleats and method of gripping turf and other natural surfaces.
  • Footwear is a fundamental and necessary component of wardrobe for foot protection and stability in movement across surfaces.
  • Shoes including athletic shoes, work boots, dress shoes, casual shoes, and all manner of footwear, often provide poor traction on many irregular surfaces, including turf, slippery or uneven surfaces, loose material, and other natural surfaces found in outdoor settings.
  • the difficulties of moving across a slippery or uneven natural surface including walking, running, jogging, and sporting activities, can result in instability, poor footing, and even injury. For example, when swinging a golf club, significant rotational torque is exerted on the body. To maintain a stable stance, the shoe should remain in firm contact with the turf surface without slipping or other unintended movement.
  • the generally smooth soles of most shoes are often unsuitable for such body mechanics, particularly on slippery or uneven natural surfaces, such as turf, that do not provide resistance against upper and lower body motion.
  • the smooth shoe soles also may not establish stable support when walking on sand, gravel, dirt, snow, ice, or other natural surfaces. The instability, slipping, falling, and sometimes injuries are typically caused by a lack of good footing.
  • a golfer may wear golf specific shoes with integrated cleats or spikes designed for stable footing on grass or turf.
  • a hiker may wear boots with a deep and rugged tread pattern.
  • the specialized footwear is typically expensive and require transport and ready access to two or more different pairs of shoes, i.e., one for everyday wear and one for the activity at hand.
  • the golfer may bring specialized golf shoes to the golf course, remove and stow the everyday shoes, and then put on the specialized golf shoes while on the golf course.
  • the hiker may bring specialized boots or shoes for the planned activity, remove the everyday shoes at the head of the trail, and then switch to the specialized boots or shoes. In many cases, the person will have to carry the everyday shoes in a backpack or bag during the activity.
  • the present invention is a golf oriented footwear comprising a footwear structure, and plurality of gripping devices attached to the footwear structure.
  • the gripping devices include a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body for traction, neck extending from the body, and button extending from the neck opposite the spikes.
  • the present invention is a gripping device comprising a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body.
  • the spikes each include a traction arm with a plurality of edges formed along the traction arm and a concave surface between a first edge and second edge of the traction arm.
  • a neck extends from the body.
  • the present invention is a gripping device comprising a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body.
  • the spikes each including a traction arm and plurality of edges formed along the traction arm.
  • a neck extends from the body.
  • the present invention is a method of making a gripping device, comprising the steps of forming a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body, and forming a neck extending from the body.
  • the spikes each include a traction arm and plurality of edges formed along the traction arm.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an upper perspective view of an anti-slip overshoe with cleats
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a bottom view of the anti-slip overshoe with cleats
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a side view of the anti-slip overshoe with cleats
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an upper perspective view of the anti-slip overshoe without cleats
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a lower perspective view of the anti-slip overshoe without cleats
  • FIG. 6 illustrates an upper perspective view of a cleat with top button, body, and spikes
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a lower perspective view of the cleat with top button, body, and spikes
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a bottom view of the cleat with spikes around a perimeter of the body
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a lower perspective view of the cleat with top button, body, perimeter spikes, and central spike
  • FIGS. 10 a - 10 b illustrate attaching the cleats to the anti-slip overshoe
  • FIGS. 11 a - 11 d illustrate attaching the anti-slip overshoe to a shoe
  • FIG. 12 illustrates the cleats of the anti-slip overshoe compressed against a natural surface
  • FIG. 13 illustrates a top view of a relaxed flat anti-slip overshoe with cleats
  • FIG. 14 illustrates a bottom view of the relaxed flat anti-slip overshoe with cleats
  • FIG. 15 illustrates a side view of the relaxed flat anti-slip overshoe with cleats.
  • the footwear described below can be a device which is worn over other footwear. As a result, the footwear is referred to as an “anti-slip overshoe.”
  • An anti-slip overshoe 10 as shown in FIG. 1 , easily slips on and slips off of dress shoes, athletic shoes, casual shoes, boots, or other types of footwear, and provides exceptional grip and traction on slippery and uneven natural surfaces.
  • Anti-slip overshoe 10 is made with a durable elastic material that is tough, light-weight, and flexible in warm and cold temperatures, e.g., below 0° F.
  • Overshoe 10 can be constructed using elastic material, such as natural and synthetic polymers, rubbers, reinforced rubbers, silicone, amorphous and crystalline thermoplastic resins, and other suitable materials.
  • Overshoe 10 is formed by an injection molding process where hot, molten polymer is injected into a mold.
  • a screw or nozzle apparatus can be used to inject the polymer into the mold.
  • overshoe 10 can be formed by using an injection molding technique that extrudes material over a core plate in the mold to provide a continuous and unitary construction. After overshoe 10 cools and hardens, the mold is opened and overshoe 10 is ejected from the mold in a continuous and unitary product.
  • overshoe 10 can be formed by using compression molding. Any resulting flashing or extra material is cut, shaved, or otherwise removed from overshoe 10 .
  • Overshoe 10 includes a contoured outer band or outer ring structure 12 .
  • Outer band 12 is contoured to the shoe sole so that overshoe 10 fits snugly while being easily attachable and removable from the shoe.
  • Contoured outer band 12 can be oval-shaped or elongated, including a frontal toe box 14 and back heel strap 16 .
  • frontal toe box 14 and back heel strap 16 are formed to extend above outer band 12 .
  • frontal toe box 14 conforms to the tip of the shoe and back heel strap 16 conforms to the back of the shoe.
  • contoured design of outer band 12 allows for the proper amount of stretching and corresponding fitment in the correct direction, toe to heel and side to side, of overshoe 10 .
  • the design of contoured outer band 12 can be well-suited for use with dress shoes, athletic shoes, casual shoes, boots, or other types of footwear.
  • a gripping pad or structure 18 is disposed within outer band 12 and designated for placement of the ball of the foot or shoe.
  • Gripping pad 18 is generally oval, elongated, or egg-shaped to give enhanced traction from all angles and directions when standing, walking, or running on slippery or uneven natural surfaces.
  • gripping pad 18 includes a plurality of slots or openings 20 and gripping ridges 24 disposed around flat area 25 of the gripping pad.
  • gripping pad 18 includes a plurality of interconnected concentric rings, or a smooth, flat surface for maximum surface area contact with the sole of the shoe.
  • Slots or openings 20 provide an outlet or channel to dislodge debris (grass, dirt, sand) from an upper surface of gripping pad 18 to avoid a buildup of debris around and between buttons 22 and gripping ridges 24 and the sole of the shoe. Slots or openings 20 tend to dislodge debris by limiting the available surface area of contact and accumulation, as well as providing an outlet or channel for the debris to fall free. When debris becomes dislodged, the surface area of gripping pad 18 is again free to make efficient and maximum contact with the sole of the shoe to ensure appropriate traction.
  • debris grass, dirt, sand
  • Buttons 22 are shown as a backside of cleats 42 , see FIG. 6 . Buttons 22 secure cleats 42 to gripping pad 18 and may have a rough surface to increase the bond between gripping pad 18 and the sole of the shoe.
  • Gripping ridges 24 also increase the surface bonds between gripping pad 18 and the sole of the shoe. Gripping ridges 24 are a series of pointed protrusions formed as part of gripping pad 18 and extending toward the sole of the shoe. Gripping ridges 24 can have many individual ridge structures interspaced with trough structures, gaps, or spaces to channel moisture away from gripping pad 18 and reduce debris accumulation.
  • a gripping pad or structure 26 is disposed within outer band 12 and designated for placement of the heel of the foot or shoe.
  • Gripping pad 26 is generally rectangular, oval, rounded, or elongated to give enhanced traction from all angles and directions when standing, walking, or running on slippery or uneven natural surfaces.
  • gripping pad 26 includes a plurality of slots or openings 28 and gripping ridges 32 disposed around flat area 34 of the gripping pad.
  • gripping pad 26 includes a plurality of interconnected concentric rings, or a smooth, flat surface for maximum surface area contact with the heel of the shoe.
  • Slots or openings 28 provide an outlet or channel to dislodge debris (grass, dirt, sand) from an upper surface of gripping pad 26 to avoid a buildup of debris around and between buttons 30 and gripping ridges 32 and the heel of the shoe. Slots or openings 28 tend to dislodge debris by limiting the available surface area of contact and accumulation, as well as providing an outlet or channel for the debris to fall free. When debris becomes dislodged, the surface area of gripping pad 26 is again free to make efficient and maximum contact with the heel of the shoe to ensure appropriate traction.
  • debris grass, dirt, sand
  • Buttons 30 are shown as a backside of cleats 44 , similar to FIG. 6 . Buttons 30 secure cleats 44 to gripping pad 26 and may have a rough surface to increase the bond between gripping pad 26 and the sole of the shoe.
  • Gripping ridges 32 also increase the surface bonds between gripping pad 26 and the heel of the shoe. Gripping ridges 32 are a series of pointed protrusions formed as part of gripping pad 26 and extending toward the heel of the shoe. Gripping ridges 32 can have many individual ridge structures interspaced with trough structures, gaps, or spaces to channel moisture away from gripping pad 26 and reduce debris accumulation. Gripping ridges 32 can be similar in height, width, and depth, or different in height, width, and depth, as gripping ridges 24 .
  • a plurality of connecting arms or straps 40 is formed in a web structure to securely interconnect gripping pad 18 and gripping pad 26 to contoured outer band 12 .
  • Connecting arms 40 are integrally molded with outer band 12 and gripping pads 18 and 26 .
  • connecting arms 40 a fix the position of gripping pad 18 within outer band 12
  • connecting arms 40 b fix the position of gripping pad 26 within outer band 12 .
  • fourteen connecting arms 40 a and 40 b secure gripping pads 18 and 26 to outer band 12 .
  • connecting arms 40 b connect directly to connecting arms 40 a for additional rigidity between outer band 12 and gripping pads 18 and 26 , which reduces the potential of the gripping pads to drag on the natural surface and for overshoe 10 to unintentionally become detached from the shoe.
  • the material of connecting arms 40 is formulated to stretch with elasticity. The web structure can stretch in response to tension being applied to overshoe 10 . Once tension is released, the web structure returns to its original state.
  • FIG. 2 shows a bottom view of anti-slip overshoe 10 .
  • a plurality of flexible cleats or gripping devices 42 and 44 is secured to gripping pads 18 and 26 with buttons 22 and 30 , respectively.
  • Cleats 42 and 44 are removable from gripping pads 18 and 26 for repair, maintenance, and safety.
  • buttons 22 are formed integral to flexible cleats 42 including an intermediate neck or slot to seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 18 . That is, button 22 is pressed through the opening in gripping pads 18 , which is sized smaller than the button diameter, and secured by the lip around the opening in the gripping pad being disposed into the intermediate neck. Button 22 holds cleat 42 to gripping pad 18 .
  • buttons 30 are formed integral to cleats 44 including an intermediate neck or slot to seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 26 .
  • Button 30 is pressed through the opening in gripping pads 26 , which is sized smaller than the button diameter, and secured by the lip around the opening in the gripping pad being disposed into the intermediate neck.
  • Button 30 holds cleat 44 to gripping pad 26 .
  • buttons 22 and 30 are removable from cleats 42 and 44 by disposing the buttons and cleats on opposing sides of gripping pads 18 and 26 and securing by screw, rivet, clip, or other fastener. Cleats 42 and 44 can also be over-molded or integrally molded into overshoe 10 .
  • Cleats 42 have a plurality of flexible spikes or talons 46 that extend from and are disposed around a perimeter of a body of the cleat for contacting the natural surface, e.g., grass, turf, sand, earth, snow, ice, and other loose or unstable natural material.
  • Spikes 46 include an angled shaft or traction arm at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges oriented toward the natural surface for enhanced traction.
  • Cleats 44 have a plurality of flexible spikes or talons 48 that extend from and are disposed around a perimeter of the body for contacting the natural surface, e.g., grass, turf, sand, earth, snow, ice, and other loose, porous, or unstable natural material.
  • Spikes 48 include an angled shaft or traction arm at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges oriented toward the natural surface for enhanced traction.
  • cleats 42 and 44 each have eight spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body.
  • cleats 42 and 44 can have 6-10 spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body.
  • Cleats 42 and 44 are made with flexible polymer, polycarbonate, graphite, fiberglass, nylon, tungsten carbide, or other suitable non-slip material or combination thereof.
  • cleats 42 and 44 can be a harder material, such as a fibrous polyvinylchloride (PVC) or metal.
  • Spikes 46 and 48 provide grip and traction on slippery or uneven natural surfaces.
  • the weight of the person applies pressure to cleats 42 and 44 and, in some embodiments, compresses spikes 46 and 48 for a larger circumference area and enhanced traction.
  • Spikes 46 and 48 dig into the natural surface to provide stability and traction.
  • Gripping pad 18 and gripping pad 26 work together to provide traction at both ball and heel of the foot or shoe to ensure that adequate traction on natural surfaces in all phases of personal gait in various activities.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a side view of anti-slip overshoe 10 with cleats 42 and 44 fixed to gripping pads 18 and 26 by buttons 22 and 30 .
  • the intermediate neck or slot between buttons 22 and cleats 42 seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 18 .
  • the intermediate neck or slot between buttons 30 and cleats 44 seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 26 .
  • Gripping pads 18 and 26 are connected to contoured outer band 12 by connecting arms 40 a - 40 b .
  • Contoured outer band 12 wraps around a side portion of the shoe.
  • Frontal toe box 14 is adapted for receiving the tip of the shoe, and back heel strap 16 is adapted for received the heel of the shoe.
  • the sole of the shoe contacts gripping pads 18 and 26 as a firm bond by nature of buttons 22 and 30 and gripping ridges 24 and 32 .
  • Cleats 42 and 44 provide traction and stability on slippery and uneven natural surfaces.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates anti-slip overshoe 10 prior to installation of cleats 42 and 44 .
  • Gripping pad 18 includes recesses or indentations 50 with a perimeter edge for receiving the intermediate neck between buttons 22 and the body of cleats 42 .
  • An opening 52 is provided central to recesses 50 for inserting button 22 .
  • Gripping pad 26 includes recesses or indentations 54 with a perimeter edge for receiving the intermediate neck between buttons 30 and the body of cleats 44 .
  • Recesses 50 and 54 tend to keep buttons 22 and 30 in place during activities.
  • An opening 56 is provided central to recesses 54 for inserting button 30 .
  • FIG. 5 shows a bottom view of anti-slip overshoe 10 with openings 52 and 56 in gripping pads 18 and 26 .
  • Gripping pad 18 includes gripping ridges 38 to increase the surface bonds between gripping pad 18 and the natural surface.
  • Gripping pad 26 includes gripping ridges 39 to increase the surface bonds between gripping pad 26 and the natural surface.
  • overshoe 10 can be increased with greater material thickness in areas of highest force impact and shock absorbing properties. For instance, since the heel of the shoe usually contacts the ground first in stride, gripping pad 26 can have thicker material than gripping pad 18 . In another embodiment, gripping pads 18 and 26 are thicker than connecting arms 40 . In addition, the areas around cleats 42 and 44 can be reinforced with additional material. Alternatively, overshoe 10 can be substantially uniform thickness throughout.
  • FIG. 6 provides further detail of flexible cleat 42 including integral molded button 22 , body 58 , and eight flexible spikes 46 disposed around a perimeter of the body.
  • cleat 42 has 6-10 spikes disposed around a perimeter of body 58 .
  • An intermediate neck or slot 60 is provided between button 22 and spikes 46 .
  • the intermediate neck 60 has a gap or span between button 22 and spikes 46 of 0.32 centimeters (cm) and extends to a rounded body 58 having a diameter of 0.64 cm.
  • Spikes 46 include an angled shaft or traction arm 64 at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges 62 a , 62 b , and 62 c oriented toward the slippery or uneven natural surface for enhanced traction.
  • the angle of traction arm 64 can range from 20 to 60 degrees.
  • a durometer of spike 46 has a range between 70-100 Shore A hardness which allows the traction arms 64 to collapse outward when depressed and stretch out thus providing enhanced traction, see FIG. 12 .
  • Spikes 46 include a concave cupped or curved surface 66 extending from edge 62 a to edge 62 b oriented toward the natural surface for enhanced traction.
  • Button 22 may have a round, oval, or elongated (football-shaped) upper surface with a knurled texture or diamond-shaped gripping ridges 68 interspaced with trough structures, gaps, or spaces for enhanced bonding to the sole of the shoe.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a lower perspective view of flexible cleat 42 including integral molded button 22 , body 58 , and flexible spikes 46 .
  • An intermediate neck or slot 60 is provided between button 22 and spikes 46 .
  • Spikes 46 include an angled shaft or traction arm 64 at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges 62 a - 62 c oriented toward the natural surface.
  • Spikes 46 include a concave surface 66 extending from edge 62 a to edge 62 b.
  • FIG. 8 shows a bottom view of flexible cleat 42 including eight spikes 46 extending from a perimeter of body 58 to reduce lateral or forward movement, whether golfing, walking on snow or ice, or any other types of slippery or uneven natural surfaces.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a lower perspective view of flexible cleat 42 including integral molded button 22 , body 58 , eight flexible spikes 46 , and a ninth center spike 70 extending from the body to reduce lateral or forward movement, whether golfing, walking on snow or ice, or any other types of slippery or uneven natural surfaces.
  • the center spike 70 has a sufficient durometer or hardness sufficient to penetrate the natural surface.
  • Pointed end 71 of center spike 70 is metal or other hard material to assist with penetration of the natural surface.
  • Cleats 44 have a similar construction as shown in FIGS. 6-9 , although cleat 44 may be a different size or have a different number of spikes than cleat 42 .
  • FIG. 10 a illustrates removable cleats 42 and 44 disposed beneath anti-slip overshoe 10 with integral molded buttons 22 and 30 aligned with openings 52 and 56 .
  • Button 22 is pressed through opening 52 in gripping pads 18 , which is sized smaller than the button diameter, at an angle and secured to gripping pad 18 by the lip around the opening in the gripping pad being disposed within intermediate neck 60 .
  • the elongated shape of button 22 simplifies the insertion into opening 52 and keeps the cleat attached to overshoe 10 while in use. That is, button 22 holds cleat 42 to gripping pad 18 .
  • button 30 is pressed through opening 56 in gripping pads 26 , which is sized smaller than the button diameter, at an angle and secured to gripping pad 26 by the lip around the opening in the gripping pad being disposed within intermediate neck 60 .
  • the elongated shape of button 30 simplifies the insertion into opening 56 and keeps the cleat attached to overshoe 10 while in use. That is, button 30 holds cleat 44 to gripping pad 26 .
  • FIG. 10 b shows removable cleats 42 and 44 disposed beneath anti-slip overshoe 10 and separate buttons 22 and 30 disposed over an opposite side of gripping pads 18 and 26 .
  • Buttons 22 and 30 are secured to cleats 42 and 44 with screws, rivets, clips, or other fastener 72 through openings 52 and 56 in gripping pads 18 and 26 .
  • cleats 42 and 44 provide a safety feature in that the cleat will detach or break free from overshoe 10 , i.e., if the cleat becomes inadvertently wedged into a crack or crevice of uneven natural surface to prevent injury to the person.
  • Cleats 42 and 44 and buttons 22 and 30 can come out of openings 52 and 56 or break at intermediate neck 60 under sufficient force or stress.
  • FIG. 11 a illustrates anti-slip overshoe 10 with installed cleats 42 and 44 and shoe 74 being inserted into the anti-slip overshoe.
  • Shoe 74 is placed in an orientation over anti-slip overshoe 10 with cleats 42 and 44 pointing opposite the shoe and the toe of shoe 74 first disposed into frontal toe box 14 .
  • Back heel strap 16 includes opening 76 to aid with stretching of anti-slip overshoe 10 .
  • the person grasps back heel strap 16 by placing fingers through opening 76 and pulling contoured outer band 12 over the side of shoe 74 .
  • connecting arms 40 stretch to allow outer band 12 to fit around the periphery of the sole of shoe 74 .
  • Outer band 12 is generally smaller than the periphery of the shoe sole in which outer band 12 accommodates.
  • the elastic property of outer band 12 is stretchable by application of pressure or tension.
  • the heel of shoe 74 is then placed within back heel strap 16 so that overshoe 10 surrounds the periphery of shoe 74 , as shown in FIG. 11 b .
  • outer band 12 tends to return to its original shape for a snug fit around the periphery and sole of shoe 74 .
  • the elastic force exerted by outer band 12 provides for a snug fit that conforms to shoe 74 as overshoe 10 is held in place by friction.
  • the elastic nature of overshoe 10 maintains the overshoe 10 a substantially stationary position with respect to shoe 74 .
  • FIG. 11 c is a front view of anti-slip overshoe 10 attached to shoe 74 .
  • Frontal toe portion 14 may have one or more openings 78 to aid with stretching of anti-slip overshoe 10 .
  • Frontal toe box 14 covers the front of shoe 74 .
  • FIG. 11 d is a back view of anti-slip overshoe 10 attached to shoe 74 .
  • Back heel strap 16 may have a flat surface in contact with the flat surface of the heel of shoe 74 for a secure fit.
  • overshoe 10 can be formulated to stretch, while maintaining durability and light weight.
  • the bulk of stretching that occurs in overshoe 10 is performed by outer band 12 in conjunction with connecting arms 40 .
  • the plurality of connecting arms 40 that make up the web structure stretches appropriately to accommodate the respective size of shoe 10 , while the basic size and form of gripping pads 18 and 26 remain substantially unchanged.
  • the web structure of connecting arms 40 appropriately stretches on both left and right sides to ensure that gripping pads 18 and 26 are positioned properly under shoe 74 .
  • overshoe sizes By allowing for stretching, a limited number of overshoe sizes can be provided which accommodate a larger range of shoe sizes.
  • a small/medium size overshoe 10 can easily accommodate a range of shoe sizes from small women's shoes to medium sized men's shoes.
  • a large or extra-large size overshoe 10 can easily accommodate a range of shoe sizes from medium sized men's shoes to much larger sized men's shoes.
  • two or more sizes of overshoe 10 can be constructed to cover the broad range of both men's and women's shoe sizes.
  • Anti-slip overshoe 10 is removed by reversing the process described for attaching the overshoe.
  • the person grasps back heel strap 16 to stretch and pull back heel strap 16 off the heel of shoe 74 .
  • Contoured outer band 12 is removed from the side of shoe 74 and the toe of shoe 74 is removed from frontal toe box 14 .
  • contoured outer band 12 is a marked improvement over previous overshoe patterns.
  • the stretching in each portion of outer band 12 is uniform throughout.
  • overshoe 10 stretches primarily around back heel strap 16 , as well as other areas of outer band 12 .
  • the forward portion of outer band 12 is held at the same tension as the side portions of outer band 12 and the rear portions of outer band 12 .
  • Overshoe 10 is then more securely held in place to the sole of shoe 74 consistently around the periphery of the shoe. A wearer can feel more confident when engaged in outdoor activities, such as playing golf or running on slippery or uneven natural surfaces, that overshoe 10 is securely fastened to the shoe and will unlikely become detached.
  • outer band 12 is intended to enhance the traction provided by overshoe 10 while minimizing the portion of overshoe 10 that extends over an upper portion of a shoe.
  • Outer band 12 can serve as an anchor point for optional, removable straps which can be oriented over the upper portion of shoe 74 to better secure overshoe 10 to the shoe in cases of heavy activity.
  • anti-slip overshoe 10 and cleats 42 and 44 significantly reduces pronation or sliding of shoe 74 within the overshoe.
  • the tight form fit is achieved in part by making the polymer material of overshoe 10 with a durometer of 44 ⁇ 3 Shore A hardness, or within the range of 35-70 Shore A hardness.
  • frontal toe box 14 and back heel strap 16 extending partially over the toe and heel of shoe 74 reduce pronation and sliding of anti-slip overshoe 10 with respect to the shoe.
  • the rough surfaces of buttons 22 and 30 , as well as gripping ridges 24 and 32 also reduce pronation and sliding of shoe 74 within overshoe 10 .
  • anti-slip overshoe 10 results in greater safety, efficiency, and confidence for a person moving across irregular, slippery, or uneven natural surfaces, such as grass, turf, sand, gravel, dirt, snow, ice, loose material, and other natural surfaces found in outdoor settings.
  • anti-slip overshoe 10 remains in firm contact with the turf surface without slipping or other unintended movement.
  • Anti-slip overshoe 10 is convenient to transport, easy to attach to footwear, and helps to maintain a stable stance on natural surfaces, such as grass or turf, while swinging the club and otherwise moving about the golf course. For example, the golfer will continue to wear the everyday shoes and simply attach overshoe 10 when on the golf course.
  • anti-slip overshoe 10 assists with balance and stable footing for the activity at hand.
  • the hiker will continue to wear the everyday shoes and attach overshoe 10 at the head of the trail, or at the point of the challenging terrain.
  • Runners, joggers, and persons that exercise outdoors will benefit from the traction and stability provided by anti-slip overshoe 10 on slippery and uneven natural surfaces.
  • FIG. 12 shows a person wearing shoes 74 with anti-slip overshoes 10 on natural surface 79 , such as grass, turf, sand, gravel, dirt, snow, ice, loose material, and other surfaces found in outdoor settings.
  • natural surface 79 such as grass, turf, sand, gravel, dirt, snow, ice, loose material, and other surfaces found in outdoor settings.
  • the angle and durometer of traction arms 64 allows cleats 42 and 44 to collapse outward when depressed against natural surface 79 for stability and enhanced traction.
  • anti-slip overshoe 80 includes a contoured outer band or outer ring structure 82 , as shown in FIG. 13 .
  • frontal toe strap 84 and back heel strap 86 are substantially flat with outer band 82 .
  • frontal toe strap 84 conforms to the tip of the shoe and back heel strap 86 conforms to the back of the shoe.
  • Outer band 82 is contoured to the shoe sole so that overshoe 80 fits snugly while being easily attachable and removable from the shoe.
  • Contoured outer band 82 can be oval-shaped or elongated, including a frontal toe strap 84 and back heel strap 86 .
  • contoured design of outer band 82 allows for the proper amount of stretching and corresponding fitment in the correct direction, toe to heel and side to side, of overshoe 80 .
  • the design of contoured outer band 82 can be well-suited for use with dress shoes, athletic shoes, casual shoes, boots, or other types of footwear.
  • a gripping pad or structure 88 is disposed within outer band 82 and designated for placement of the ball of the foot or shoe.
  • Gripping pad 88 is generally oval, elongated, or egg-shaped to give enhanced traction from all angles and directions when standing, walking, or running on slippery or uneven natural surfaces.
  • gripping pad 88 includes a plurality of slots or openings 90 disposed around flat area 94 of the gripping pad.
  • gripping pad 88 includes a plurality of interconnected concentric rings, or a smooth, flat surface for maximum surface area contact with the sole of the shoe.
  • Slots or openings 90 provide an outlet or channel to dislodge debris (grass, dirt, sand) from an upper surface of gripping pad 88 to avoid a buildup of debris around and between buttons 92 and the sole of the shoe. Slots or openings 90 tend to dislodge debris by limiting the available surface area of contact and accumulation, as well as providing an outlet or channel for the debris to fall free. When debris becomes dislodged, the surface area of gripping pad 88 is again free to make efficient and maximum contact with the sole of the shoe to ensure appropriate traction.
  • Buttons 92 are shown as a backside of cleats 112 . Buttons 92 secure cleats 112 to gripping pad 88 and may have a rough surface to increase the bond between gripping pad 88 and the sole of the shoe, similar to FIG. 6 .
  • a gripping pad or structure 96 is disposed within outer band 82 and designated for placement of the heel of the foot or shoe.
  • Gripping pad 96 is generally rectangular, oval, or elongated to give enhanced traction from all angles and directions when standing, walking, or running on slippery or uneven natural surfaces.
  • gripping pad 96 includes a plurality of slots or openings 98 disposed around flat area 104 of the gripping pad.
  • gripping pad 96 includes a plurality of interconnected concentric rings, or a smooth, flat surface for maximum surface area contact with the heel of the shoe.
  • Slots or openings 98 provide an outlet or channel to dislodge debris (grass, dirt, sand) from an upper surface of gripping pad 96 to avoid a buildup of debris around and between buttons 100 and the heel of the shoe. Slots or openings 98 tend to dislodge debris by limiting the available surface area of contact and accumulation, as well as providing an outlet or channel for the debris to fall free. When debris becomes dislodged, the surface area of gripping pad 96 is again free to make efficient and maximum contact with the heel of the shoe to ensure appropriate traction.
  • Buttons 100 are shown as a backside of cleats 114 . Buttons 100 secure cleats 114 to gripping pad 96 and may have a rough surface to increase the bond between gripping pad 96 and the sole of the shoe, similar to FIG. 6 .
  • a plurality of connecting arms 110 is formed in a web structure to securely interconnect gripping pad 88 and gripping pad 96 to contoured outer band 82 .
  • Connecting arms 110 are integrally molded with outer band 82 and gripping pads 88 and 96 .
  • connecting arms 110 a fix the position of gripping pad 88 within outer band 82
  • connecting arms 110 b fix the position of gripping pad 96 within outer band 82 .
  • the material of connecting arms 110 a and 110 b is formulated to stretch with elasticity.
  • the web structure can stretch in response to tension being applied to overshoe 80 . Once tension is released, the web structure returns to its original state.
  • FIG. 14 shows a bottom view of anti-slip overshoe 80 .
  • a plurality of flexible cleats or gripping devices 112 and 114 are secured to gripping pads 88 and 96 with buttons 92 and 100 , respectively.
  • Cleats 112 and 114 are removable from gripping pads 88 and 96 for repair, maintenance, and safety.
  • buttons 92 are formed integral to flexible cleats 112 including an intermediate neck or slot to seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 88 . That is, button 92 is pressed through the opening in gripping pads 88 , which is sized smaller than the button diameter, and secured by the lip around the opening in the gripping pad occupying the intermediate neck.
  • buttons 92 and 100 are removable from cleats 112 and 114 by disposing the buttons and cleats on opposing sides of gripping pads 88 and 96 and securing by screw, rivet, clip, or other fastener, similar to FIG. 10 b.
  • Cleats 112 have a plurality of flexible spikes or talons 116 that extend from and are disposed around a perimeter of a body of the cleat for contacting the natural surface, e.g., grass, turf, sand, earth, snow, ice, and other loose or unstable natural material.
  • Spikes 116 include an angled shaft or traction arm at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges oriented toward the natural surface for enhanced traction.
  • Cleats 114 have a plurality of flexible spikes or talons 118 that extend from and around a perimeter of the body for contacting the natural surface, e.g., grass, turf, sand, earth, snow, ice, and other loose, porous, or unstable natural material.
  • Spikes 118 include an angled shaft or traction arm at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges oriented toward the natural surface for enhanced traction.
  • the angle of the traction arms can range from 20 to 60 degrees.
  • cleats 112 and 114 each have eight spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body and one spike central to the body. In other embodiments, cleats 112 and 114 can have 6-10 spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body.
  • Cleats 112 and 114 are made with flexible polymer, polycarbonate, graphite, metal, or other suitable non-slip material. Alternatively, cleats 112 and 114 can be a harder material, such as fibrous PVC.
  • Spikes 116 and 118 provide grip and traction on slippery or uneven natural surfaces.
  • the weight of the person applies pressure to cleats 112 and 114 and, in some embodiments, compresses spikes 116 and 118 .
  • Spikes 116 and 118 dig into the natural surface to provide stability and traction.
  • Gripping pad 88 and gripping pad 96 work together to provide traction at both ball and heel of the foot or shoe to ensure that adequate traction on natural surfaces in all phases of personal gait in various activities.
  • FIG. 15 illustrates the flat profile of anti-slip overshoe 80 with cleats 112 and 114 fixed to gripping pads 88 and 96 by buttons 92 and 100 .
  • the intermediate neck or slot between buttons 92 and cleats 112 seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 88 .
  • the intermediate neck or slot between buttons 100 and cleats 114 seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 96 .
  • Gripping pads 88 and 96 are connected to contoured outer band 82 by connecting arms 110 a - 110 b .
  • Contoured outer band 82 wraps around a side portion of the shoe.
  • Frontal toe strap 84 is adapted for receiving the tip of the shoe
  • back heel strap 86 is adapted for receiving the heel of the shoe.
  • the sole of the shoe contacts gripping pads 88 and 96 as a firm bond by nature of buttons 92 and 100 .
  • Cleats 112 and 114 provide traction and stability on slippery and uneven natural surfaces.
  • overshoe 80 can be formulated to stretch, while maintaining durability and light weight.
  • the bulk of stretching that occurs in overshoe 80 is performed by outer band 82 in conjunction with connecting arms 110 .
  • the plurality of connecting arms 110 that make up the web structure stretching appropriately to accommodate the respective size of shoe 80 , while the basic size and form of gripping pads 88 and 96 remain substantially unchanged.
  • the web structure of connecting arms 110 appropriately stretches on both left and right sides to ensure that gripping pads 88 and 96 are positioned properly under the shoe. Because of the elasticity and deformability associated with the web structure of connecting arms 110 and contoured outer band 82 , overshoe 80 can take on a virtually flat, two-dimensional form when not in use. Having a virtually flat form is attractive for storage purposes, as a number of stored overshoes 80 can be placed in a relatively small storage space.
  • anti-slip overshoe 80 results in greater safety, efficiency, and confidence for a person moving across irregular, slippery, or uneven natural surfaces, such as grass, turf, sand, gravel, dirt, snow, ice, loose material, and other natural surfaces found in outdoor settings.
  • anti-slip overshoe 80 remains in firm contact with the turf surface without slipping or other unintended movement.
  • Anti-slip overshoe 80 is convenient to transport, easy to attach to footwear, and helps to maintain a stable stance on natural surfaces, such as grass or turf, while swinging the club and otherwise moving about the golf course. For example, the golfer will continue to wear the everyday shoes and simply attach overshoe 80 when on the golf course.
  • anti-slip overshoe 80 assists with balance and stable footing for the activity at hand.
  • the hiker will continue to wear the everyday shoes and attach overshoe 80 at the head of the trail.
  • Runners, joggers, and persons that exercise outdoors will benefit from the traction and stability provided by anti-slip overshoe 80 on slippery and uneven natural surfaces.

Abstract

An anti-slip overshoe has a contoured outer band and first gripping pad and second gripping pad disposed interior to the contoured outer band for enhanced traction. A web structure connects the first gripping pad and second gripping pad to the contoured outer band. A plurality of gripping devices is attached to the first gripping pad and second gripping pad for enhanced traction on natural surfaces. The gripping devices includes a body, button extending from a first end of the body, plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body, and central spike extending from a second end of the body. A neck is disposed around the body between the button and spikes. The spikes include a traction arm, plurality of edges formed along the traction arm, and concave surface between a first edge and second edge along the traction arm.

Description

  • The present application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/744,116, filed Jan. 17, 2013, which application is incorporated herein by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates in general to shoe apparel and, more particularly, to an anti-slip overshoe with flexible cleats and method of gripping turf and other natural surfaces.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Footwear is a fundamental and necessary component of wardrobe for foot protection and stability in movement across surfaces. Shoes, including athletic shoes, work boots, dress shoes, casual shoes, and all manner of footwear, often provide poor traction on many irregular surfaces, including turf, slippery or uneven surfaces, loose material, and other natural surfaces found in outdoor settings. The difficulties of moving across a slippery or uneven natural surface, including walking, running, jogging, and sporting activities, can result in instability, poor footing, and even injury. For example, when swinging a golf club, significant rotational torque is exerted on the body. To maintain a stable stance, the shoe should remain in firm contact with the turf surface without slipping or other unintended movement. The generally smooth soles of most shoes are often unsuitable for such body mechanics, particularly on slippery or uneven natural surfaces, such as turf, that do not provide resistance against upper and lower body motion. The smooth shoe soles also may not establish stable support when walking on sand, gravel, dirt, snow, ice, or other natural surfaces. The instability, slipping, falling, and sometimes injuries are typically caused by a lack of good footing.
  • Even if a person does not actually fall, the need to concentrate on maintaining stable footing while engaged in physical activity is inconvenient, slows movement, and can be a distraction to completing the task at hand. For example, if a golfer is partially focused on maintaining stable footing, then the timing, accuracy, and consistency of the golf swing can be adversely affected. In other cases, movement across slippery and uneven natural surfaces interferes with many physical activities, such as performing work tasks on turf, loose material, and other natural surfaces. Runners, joggers, and persons that exercise outdoors are hampered by the loss of traction and instability on slippery and uneven natural surfaces.
  • The problem of slippery and uneven surfaces is particularly acute for the elderly or handicapped persons with disabilities that interfere with standard gait. Many elderly persons have weakness in the limbs, as well as lack of balance, that make them more vulnerable to slipping or falling on natural surfaces that what would otherwise be considered as normal conditions. An amputee may experience irregular gait that can be aggravated by poor footing.
  • Many people purchase and use specialized footwear to account for particular surfaces. For example, a golfer may wear golf specific shoes with integrated cleats or spikes designed for stable footing on grass or turf. A hiker may wear boots with a deep and rugged tread pattern. The specialized footwear is typically expensive and require transport and ready access to two or more different pairs of shoes, i.e., one for everyday wear and one for the activity at hand. The golfer may bring specialized golf shoes to the golf course, remove and stow the everyday shoes, and then put on the specialized golf shoes while on the golf course. Likewise, the hiker may bring specialized boots or shoes for the planned activity, remove the everyday shoes at the head of the trail, and then switch to the specialized boots or shoes. In many cases, the person will have to carry the everyday shoes in a backpack or bag during the activity.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A need exits for footwear that provides good traction and stability on slippery and uneven natural surfaces while eliminating the need to change shoes during each specialized activity. The footwear should be versatile to function with many sizes and types of shoes. In one embodiment, the present invention is a golf oriented footwear comprising a footwear structure, and plurality of gripping devices attached to the footwear structure. The gripping devices include a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body for traction, neck extending from the body, and button extending from the neck opposite the spikes.
  • In another embodiment, the present invention is a gripping device comprising a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body. The spikes each include a traction arm with a plurality of edges formed along the traction arm and a concave surface between a first edge and second edge of the traction arm. A neck extends from the body.
  • In another embodiment, the present invention is a gripping device comprising a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body. The spikes each including a traction arm and plurality of edges formed along the traction arm. A neck extends from the body.
  • In another embodiment, the present invention is a method of making a gripping device, comprising the steps of forming a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body, and forming a neck extending from the body. The spikes each include a traction arm and plurality of edges formed along the traction arm.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an upper perspective view of an anti-slip overshoe with cleats;
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a bottom view of the anti-slip overshoe with cleats;
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a side view of the anti-slip overshoe with cleats;
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an upper perspective view of the anti-slip overshoe without cleats;
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a lower perspective view of the anti-slip overshoe without cleats;
  • FIG. 6 illustrates an upper perspective view of a cleat with top button, body, and spikes;
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a lower perspective view of the cleat with top button, body, and spikes;
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a bottom view of the cleat with spikes around a perimeter of the body;
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a lower perspective view of the cleat with top button, body, perimeter spikes, and central spike;
  • FIGS. 10 a-10 b illustrate attaching the cleats to the anti-slip overshoe;
  • FIGS. 11 a-11 d illustrate attaching the anti-slip overshoe to a shoe;
  • FIG. 12 illustrates the cleats of the anti-slip overshoe compressed against a natural surface;
  • FIG. 13 illustrates a top view of a relaxed flat anti-slip overshoe with cleats;
  • FIG. 14 illustrates a bottom view of the relaxed flat anti-slip overshoe with cleats; and
  • FIG. 15 illustrates a side view of the relaxed flat anti-slip overshoe with cleats.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention is described in one or more embodiments in the following description with reference to the figures, in which like numerals represent the same or similar elements. While the invention is described in terms of the best mode for achieving the invention's objectives, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that it is intended to cover alternatives, modifications, and equivalents as may be included within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims and their equivalents as supported by the following disclosure and drawings.
  • The footwear described below can be a device which is worn over other footwear. As a result, the footwear is referred to as an “anti-slip overshoe.” An anti-slip overshoe 10, as shown in FIG. 1, easily slips on and slips off of dress shoes, athletic shoes, casual shoes, boots, or other types of footwear, and provides exceptional grip and traction on slippery and uneven natural surfaces. Anti-slip overshoe 10 is made with a durable elastic material that is tough, light-weight, and flexible in warm and cold temperatures, e.g., below 0° F. Overshoe 10 can be constructed using elastic material, such as natural and synthetic polymers, rubbers, reinforced rubbers, silicone, amorphous and crystalline thermoplastic resins, and other suitable materials. Overshoe 10 is formed by an injection molding process where hot, molten polymer is injected into a mold. A screw or nozzle apparatus can be used to inject the polymer into the mold. Alternatively, overshoe 10 can be formed by using an injection molding technique that extrudes material over a core plate in the mold to provide a continuous and unitary construction. After overshoe 10 cools and hardens, the mold is opened and overshoe 10 is ejected from the mold in a continuous and unitary product. In yet another embodiment, overshoe 10 can be formed by using compression molding. Any resulting flashing or extra material is cut, shaved, or otherwise removed from overshoe 10.
  • Overshoe 10 includes a contoured outer band or outer ring structure 12. Outer band 12 is contoured to the shoe sole so that overshoe 10 fits snugly while being easily attachable and removable from the shoe. Contoured outer band 12 can be oval-shaped or elongated, including a frontal toe box 14 and back heel strap 16. In a relaxed state (not attached to the shoe), frontal toe box 14 and back heel strap 16 are formed to extend above outer band 12. In a stretched form (attached to the shoe), frontal toe box 14 conforms to the tip of the shoe and back heel strap 16 conforms to the back of the shoe. The contoured design of outer band 12 allows for the proper amount of stretching and corresponding fitment in the correct direction, toe to heel and side to side, of overshoe 10. The design of contoured outer band 12 can be well-suited for use with dress shoes, athletic shoes, casual shoes, boots, or other types of footwear.
  • A gripping pad or structure 18 is disposed within outer band 12 and designated for placement of the ball of the foot or shoe. Gripping pad 18 is generally oval, elongated, or egg-shaped to give enhanced traction from all angles and directions when standing, walking, or running on slippery or uneven natural surfaces. In one embodiment, gripping pad 18 includes a plurality of slots or openings 20 and gripping ridges 24 disposed around flat area 25 of the gripping pad. Alternatively, gripping pad 18 includes a plurality of interconnected concentric rings, or a smooth, flat surface for maximum surface area contact with the sole of the shoe.
  • Slots or openings 20 provide an outlet or channel to dislodge debris (grass, dirt, sand) from an upper surface of gripping pad 18 to avoid a buildup of debris around and between buttons 22 and gripping ridges 24 and the sole of the shoe. Slots or openings 20 tend to dislodge debris by limiting the available surface area of contact and accumulation, as well as providing an outlet or channel for the debris to fall free. When debris becomes dislodged, the surface area of gripping pad 18 is again free to make efficient and maximum contact with the sole of the shoe to ensure appropriate traction.
  • Buttons 22 are shown as a backside of cleats 42, see FIG. 6. Buttons 22 secure cleats 42 to gripping pad 18 and may have a rough surface to increase the bond between gripping pad 18 and the sole of the shoe.
  • Gripping ridges 24 also increase the surface bonds between gripping pad 18 and the sole of the shoe. Gripping ridges 24 are a series of pointed protrusions formed as part of gripping pad 18 and extending toward the sole of the shoe. Gripping ridges 24 can have many individual ridge structures interspaced with trough structures, gaps, or spaces to channel moisture away from gripping pad 18 and reduce debris accumulation.
  • A gripping pad or structure 26 is disposed within outer band 12 and designated for placement of the heel of the foot or shoe. Gripping pad 26 is generally rectangular, oval, rounded, or elongated to give enhanced traction from all angles and directions when standing, walking, or running on slippery or uneven natural surfaces. In one embodiment, gripping pad 26 includes a plurality of slots or openings 28 and gripping ridges 32 disposed around flat area 34 of the gripping pad. Alternatively, gripping pad 26 includes a plurality of interconnected concentric rings, or a smooth, flat surface for maximum surface area contact with the heel of the shoe.
  • Slots or openings 28 provide an outlet or channel to dislodge debris (grass, dirt, sand) from an upper surface of gripping pad 26 to avoid a buildup of debris around and between buttons 30 and gripping ridges 32 and the heel of the shoe. Slots or openings 28 tend to dislodge debris by limiting the available surface area of contact and accumulation, as well as providing an outlet or channel for the debris to fall free. When debris becomes dislodged, the surface area of gripping pad 26 is again free to make efficient and maximum contact with the heel of the shoe to ensure appropriate traction.
  • Buttons 30 are shown as a backside of cleats 44, similar to FIG. 6. Buttons 30 secure cleats 44 to gripping pad 26 and may have a rough surface to increase the bond between gripping pad 26 and the sole of the shoe.
  • Gripping ridges 32 also increase the surface bonds between gripping pad 26 and the heel of the shoe. Gripping ridges 32 are a series of pointed protrusions formed as part of gripping pad 26 and extending toward the heel of the shoe. Gripping ridges 32 can have many individual ridge structures interspaced with trough structures, gaps, or spaces to channel moisture away from gripping pad 26 and reduce debris accumulation. Gripping ridges 32 can be similar in height, width, and depth, or different in height, width, and depth, as gripping ridges 24.
  • A plurality of connecting arms or straps 40 is formed in a web structure to securely interconnect gripping pad 18 and gripping pad 26 to contoured outer band 12. Connecting arms 40 are integrally molded with outer band 12 and gripping pads 18 and 26. In particular, connecting arms 40 a fix the position of gripping pad 18 within outer band 12, and connecting arms 40 b fix the position of gripping pad 26 within outer band 12. In one embodiment, fourteen connecting arms 40 a and 40 b secure gripping pads 18 and 26 to outer band 12. Some connecting arms 40 b connect directly to connecting arms 40 a for additional rigidity between outer band 12 and gripping pads 18 and 26, which reduces the potential of the gripping pads to drag on the natural surface and for overshoe 10 to unintentionally become detached from the shoe. The material of connecting arms 40 is formulated to stretch with elasticity. The web structure can stretch in response to tension being applied to overshoe 10. Once tension is released, the web structure returns to its original state.
  • FIG. 2 shows a bottom view of anti-slip overshoe 10. Most particularly, a plurality of flexible cleats or gripping devices 42 and 44 is secured to gripping pads 18 and 26 with buttons 22 and 30, respectively. Cleats 42 and 44 are removable from gripping pads 18 and 26 for repair, maintenance, and safety. In one embodiment, buttons 22 are formed integral to flexible cleats 42 including an intermediate neck or slot to seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 18. That is, button 22 is pressed through the opening in gripping pads 18, which is sized smaller than the button diameter, and secured by the lip around the opening in the gripping pad being disposed into the intermediate neck. Button 22 holds cleat 42 to gripping pad 18. Likewise, buttons 30 are formed integral to cleats 44 including an intermediate neck or slot to seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 26. Button 30 is pressed through the opening in gripping pads 26, which is sized smaller than the button diameter, and secured by the lip around the opening in the gripping pad being disposed into the intermediate neck. Button 30 holds cleat 44 to gripping pad 26. Alternatively, buttons 22 and 30 are removable from cleats 42 and 44 by disposing the buttons and cleats on opposing sides of gripping pads 18 and 26 and securing by screw, rivet, clip, or other fastener. Cleats 42 and 44 can also be over-molded or integrally molded into overshoe 10.
  • Cleats 42 have a plurality of flexible spikes or talons 46 that extend from and are disposed around a perimeter of a body of the cleat for contacting the natural surface, e.g., grass, turf, sand, earth, snow, ice, and other loose or unstable natural material. Spikes 46 include an angled shaft or traction arm at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges oriented toward the natural surface for enhanced traction. Cleats 44 have a plurality of flexible spikes or talons 48 that extend from and are disposed around a perimeter of the body for contacting the natural surface, e.g., grass, turf, sand, earth, snow, ice, and other loose, porous, or unstable natural material. Spikes 48 include an angled shaft or traction arm at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges oriented toward the natural surface for enhanced traction. In one embodiment, cleats 42 and 44 each have eight spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body. In other embodiments, cleats 42 and 44 can have 6-10 spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body. Cleats 42 and 44 are made with flexible polymer, polycarbonate, graphite, fiberglass, nylon, tungsten carbide, or other suitable non-slip material or combination thereof. Alternatively, cleats 42 and 44 can be a harder material, such as a fibrous polyvinylchloride (PVC) or metal. Spikes 46 and 48 provide grip and traction on slippery or uneven natural surfaces. The weight of the person applies pressure to cleats 42 and 44 and, in some embodiments, compresses spikes 46 and 48 for a larger circumference area and enhanced traction. Spikes 46 and 48 dig into the natural surface to provide stability and traction. Gripping pad 18 and gripping pad 26 work together to provide traction at both ball and heel of the foot or shoe to ensure that adequate traction on natural surfaces in all phases of personal gait in various activities.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a side view of anti-slip overshoe 10 with cleats 42 and 44 fixed to gripping pads 18 and 26 by buttons 22 and 30. The intermediate neck or slot between buttons 22 and cleats 42 seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 18. The intermediate neck or slot between buttons 30 and cleats 44 seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 26. Gripping pads 18 and 26 are connected to contoured outer band 12 by connecting arms 40 a-40 b. Contoured outer band 12 wraps around a side portion of the shoe. Frontal toe box 14 is adapted for receiving the tip of the shoe, and back heel strap 16 is adapted for received the heel of the shoe. The sole of the shoe contacts gripping pads 18 and 26 as a firm bond by nature of buttons 22 and 30 and gripping ridges 24 and 32. Cleats 42 and 44 provide traction and stability on slippery and uneven natural surfaces.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates anti-slip overshoe 10 prior to installation of cleats 42 and 44. Gripping pad 18 includes recesses or indentations 50 with a perimeter edge for receiving the intermediate neck between buttons 22 and the body of cleats 42. An opening 52 is provided central to recesses 50 for inserting button 22. Gripping pad 26 includes recesses or indentations 54 with a perimeter edge for receiving the intermediate neck between buttons 30 and the body of cleats 44. Recesses 50 and 54 tend to keep buttons 22 and 30 in place during activities. An opening 56 is provided central to recesses 54 for inserting button 30.
  • FIG. 5 shows a bottom view of anti-slip overshoe 10 with openings 52 and 56 in gripping pads 18 and 26. Gripping pad 18 includes gripping ridges 38 to increase the surface bonds between gripping pad 18 and the natural surface. Gripping pad 26 includes gripping ridges 39 to increase the surface bonds between gripping pad 26 and the natural surface.
  • The longevity of overshoe 10 can be increased with greater material thickness in areas of highest force impact and shock absorbing properties. For instance, since the heel of the shoe usually contacts the ground first in stride, gripping pad 26 can have thicker material than gripping pad 18. In another embodiment, gripping pads 18 and 26 are thicker than connecting arms 40. In addition, the areas around cleats 42 and 44 can be reinforced with additional material. Alternatively, overshoe 10 can be substantially uniform thickness throughout.
  • FIG. 6 provides further detail of flexible cleat 42 including integral molded button 22, body 58, and eight flexible spikes 46 disposed around a perimeter of the body. In other embodiments, cleat 42 has 6-10 spikes disposed around a perimeter of body 58. An intermediate neck or slot 60 is provided between button 22 and spikes 46. The intermediate neck 60 has a gap or span between button 22 and spikes 46 of 0.32 centimeters (cm) and extends to a rounded body 58 having a diameter of 0.64 cm. Spikes 46 include an angled shaft or traction arm 64 at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges 62 a, 62 b, and 62 c oriented toward the slippery or uneven natural surface for enhanced traction. The angle of traction arm 64 can range from 20 to 60 degrees. A durometer of spike 46 has a range between 70-100 Shore A hardness which allows the traction arms 64 to collapse outward when depressed and stretch out thus providing enhanced traction, see FIG. 12. Spikes 46 include a concave cupped or curved surface 66 extending from edge 62 a to edge 62 b oriented toward the natural surface for enhanced traction. Button 22 may have a round, oval, or elongated (football-shaped) upper surface with a knurled texture or diamond-shaped gripping ridges 68 interspaced with trough structures, gaps, or spaces for enhanced bonding to the sole of the shoe.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a lower perspective view of flexible cleat 42 including integral molded button 22, body 58, and flexible spikes 46. An intermediate neck or slot 60 is provided between button 22 and spikes 46. Spikes 46 include an angled shaft or traction arm 64 at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges 62 a-62 c oriented toward the natural surface. Spikes 46 include a concave surface 66 extending from edge 62 a to edge 62 b.
  • FIG. 8 shows a bottom view of flexible cleat 42 including eight spikes 46 extending from a perimeter of body 58 to reduce lateral or forward movement, whether golfing, walking on snow or ice, or any other types of slippery or uneven natural surfaces.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a lower perspective view of flexible cleat 42 including integral molded button 22, body 58, eight flexible spikes 46, and a ninth center spike 70 extending from the body to reduce lateral or forward movement, whether golfing, walking on snow or ice, or any other types of slippery or uneven natural surfaces. The center spike 70 has a sufficient durometer or hardness sufficient to penetrate the natural surface. Pointed end 71 of center spike 70 is metal or other hard material to assist with penetration of the natural surface.
  • Cleats 44 have a similar construction as shown in FIGS. 6-9, although cleat 44 may be a different size or have a different number of spikes than cleat 42.
  • FIG. 10 a illustrates removable cleats 42 and 44 disposed beneath anti-slip overshoe 10 with integral molded buttons 22 and 30 aligned with openings 52 and 56. Button 22 is pressed through opening 52 in gripping pads 18, which is sized smaller than the button diameter, at an angle and secured to gripping pad 18 by the lip around the opening in the gripping pad being disposed within intermediate neck 60. The elongated shape of button 22 simplifies the insertion into opening 52 and keeps the cleat attached to overshoe 10 while in use. That is, button 22 holds cleat 42 to gripping pad 18. Likewise, button 30 is pressed through opening 56 in gripping pads 26, which is sized smaller than the button diameter, at an angle and secured to gripping pad 26 by the lip around the opening in the gripping pad being disposed within intermediate neck 60. The elongated shape of button 30 simplifies the insertion into opening 56 and keeps the cleat attached to overshoe 10 while in use. That is, button 30 holds cleat 44 to gripping pad 26.
  • In another embodiment, FIG. 10 b shows removable cleats 42 and 44 disposed beneath anti-slip overshoe 10 and separate buttons 22 and 30 disposed over an opposite side of gripping pads 18 and 26. Buttons 22 and 30 are secured to cleats 42 and 44 with screws, rivets, clips, or other fastener 72 through openings 52 and 56 in gripping pads 18 and 26.
  • In addition, the detachable nature of cleats 42 and 44 provides a safety feature in that the cleat will detach or break free from overshoe 10, i.e., if the cleat becomes inadvertently wedged into a crack or crevice of uneven natural surface to prevent injury to the person. Cleats 42 and 44 and buttons 22 and 30 can come out of openings 52 and 56 or break at intermediate neck 60 under sufficient force or stress.
  • FIG. 11 a illustrates anti-slip overshoe 10 with installed cleats 42 and 44 and shoe 74 being inserted into the anti-slip overshoe. Shoe 74 is placed in an orientation over anti-slip overshoe 10 with cleats 42 and 44 pointing opposite the shoe and the toe of shoe 74 first disposed into frontal toe box 14. Back heel strap 16 includes opening 76 to aid with stretching of anti-slip overshoe 10. The person grasps back heel strap 16 by placing fingers through opening 76 and pulling contoured outer band 12 over the side of shoe 74. By pulling on back heel strap 16, connecting arms 40 stretch to allow outer band 12 to fit around the periphery of the sole of shoe 74. Outer band 12 is generally smaller than the periphery of the shoe sole in which outer band 12 accommodates. The elastic property of outer band 12 is stretchable by application of pressure or tension. The heel of shoe 74 is then placed within back heel strap 16 so that overshoe 10 surrounds the periphery of shoe 74, as shown in FIG. 11 b. Upon release of tension, outer band 12 tends to return to its original shape for a snug fit around the periphery and sole of shoe 74. The elastic force exerted by outer band 12 provides for a snug fit that conforms to shoe 74 as overshoe 10 is held in place by friction. The elastic nature of overshoe 10 maintains the overshoe 10 a substantially stationary position with respect to shoe 74.
  • FIG. 11 c is a front view of anti-slip overshoe 10 attached to shoe 74. Frontal toe portion 14 may have one or more openings 78 to aid with stretching of anti-slip overshoe 10. Frontal toe box 14 covers the front of shoe 74. FIG. 11 d is a back view of anti-slip overshoe 10 attached to shoe 74. Back heel strap 16 may have a flat surface in contact with the flat surface of the heel of shoe 74 for a secure fit.
  • The material of overshoe 10 can be formulated to stretch, while maintaining durability and light weight. The bulk of stretching that occurs in overshoe 10 is performed by outer band 12 in conjunction with connecting arms 40. The plurality of connecting arms 40 that make up the web structure stretches appropriately to accommodate the respective size of shoe 10, while the basic size and form of gripping pads 18 and 26 remain substantially unchanged. The web structure of connecting arms 40 appropriately stretches on both left and right sides to ensure that gripping pads 18 and 26 are positioned properly under shoe 74.
  • By allowing for stretching, a limited number of overshoe sizes can be provided which accommodate a larger range of shoe sizes. A small/medium size overshoe 10 can easily accommodate a range of shoe sizes from small women's shoes to medium sized men's shoes. Similarly, a large or extra-large size overshoe 10 can easily accommodate a range of shoe sizes from medium sized men's shoes to much larger sized men's shoes. Essentially, two or more sizes of overshoe 10 can be constructed to cover the broad range of both men's and women's shoe sizes.
  • Anti-slip overshoe 10 is removed by reversing the process described for attaching the overshoe. The person grasps back heel strap 16 to stretch and pull back heel strap 16 off the heel of shoe 74. Contoured outer band 12 is removed from the side of shoe 74 and the toe of shoe 74 is removed from frontal toe box 14.
  • Use of a contoured outer band 12 is a marked improvement over previous overshoe patterns. By utilizing a contoured outer band 12 which matches the overall contour of a shoe sole, the stretching in each portion of outer band 12 is uniform throughout. Alternatively, overshoe 10 stretches primarily around back heel strap 16, as well as other areas of outer band 12. The forward portion of outer band 12 is held at the same tension as the side portions of outer band 12 and the rear portions of outer band 12. Overshoe 10 is then more securely held in place to the sole of shoe 74 consistently around the periphery of the shoe. A wearer can feel more confident when engaged in outdoor activities, such as playing golf or running on slippery or uneven natural surfaces, that overshoe 10 is securely fastened to the shoe and will unlikely become detached. The low profile of outer band 12 is intended to enhance the traction provided by overshoe 10 while minimizing the portion of overshoe 10 that extends over an upper portion of a shoe. Outer band 12 can serve as an anchor point for optional, removable straps which can be oriented over the upper portion of shoe 74 to better secure overshoe 10 to the shoe in cases of heavy activity.
  • The combination of anti-slip overshoe 10 and cleats 42 and 44 significantly reduces pronation or sliding of shoe 74 within the overshoe. The tight form fit is achieved in part by making the polymer material of overshoe 10 with a durometer of 44±3 Shore A hardness, or within the range of 35-70 Shore A hardness. In addition, frontal toe box 14 and back heel strap 16 extending partially over the toe and heel of shoe 74 reduce pronation and sliding of anti-slip overshoe 10 with respect to the shoe. The rough surfaces of buttons 22 and 30, as well as gripping ridges 24 and 32, also reduce pronation and sliding of shoe 74 within overshoe 10.
  • The improvement in grip and traction with anti-slip overshoe 10 results in greater safety, efficiency, and confidence for a person moving across irregular, slippery, or uneven natural surfaces, such as grass, turf, sand, gravel, dirt, snow, ice, loose material, and other natural surfaces found in outdoor settings. In sporting activities, such as golf, anti-slip overshoe 10 remains in firm contact with the turf surface without slipping or other unintended movement. Anti-slip overshoe 10 is convenient to transport, easy to attach to footwear, and helps to maintain a stable stance on natural surfaces, such as grass or turf, while swinging the club and otherwise moving about the golf course. For example, the golfer will continue to wear the everyday shoes and simply attach overshoe 10 when on the golf course. In other activities involving moving across slippery and uneven natural surfaces, such as hiking and performing work tasks sand, earth, snow, ice, and other loose, porous, or unstable natural material, that do not provide a stable contact surface or otherwise provide the necessary resistance against upper and lower body motion, anti-slip overshoe 10 assists with balance and stable footing for the activity at hand. The hiker will continue to wear the everyday shoes and attach overshoe 10 at the head of the trail, or at the point of the challenging terrain. Runners, joggers, and persons that exercise outdoors will benefit from the traction and stability provided by anti-slip overshoe 10 on slippery and uneven natural surfaces.
  • FIG. 12 shows a person wearing shoes 74 with anti-slip overshoes 10 on natural surface 79, such as grass, turf, sand, gravel, dirt, snow, ice, loose material, and other surfaces found in outdoor settings. The angle and durometer of traction arms 64 allows cleats 42 and 44 to collapse outward when depressed against natural surface 79 for stability and enhanced traction.
  • In another embodiment, anti-slip overshoe 80 includes a contoured outer band or outer ring structure 82, as shown in FIG. 13. In a relaxed state (not attached to the shoe), frontal toe strap 84 and back heel strap 86 are substantially flat with outer band 82. In a stretched form (attached to the shoe), frontal toe strap 84 conforms to the tip of the shoe and back heel strap 86 conforms to the back of the shoe. Outer band 82 is contoured to the shoe sole so that overshoe 80 fits snugly while being easily attachable and removable from the shoe. Contoured outer band 82 can be oval-shaped or elongated, including a frontal toe strap 84 and back heel strap 86. The contoured design of outer band 82 allows for the proper amount of stretching and corresponding fitment in the correct direction, toe to heel and side to side, of overshoe 80. The design of contoured outer band 82 can be well-suited for use with dress shoes, athletic shoes, casual shoes, boots, or other types of footwear.
  • A gripping pad or structure 88 is disposed within outer band 82 and designated for placement of the ball of the foot or shoe. Gripping pad 88 is generally oval, elongated, or egg-shaped to give enhanced traction from all angles and directions when standing, walking, or running on slippery or uneven natural surfaces. In one embodiment, gripping pad 88 includes a plurality of slots or openings 90 disposed around flat area 94 of the gripping pad. Alternatively, gripping pad 88 includes a plurality of interconnected concentric rings, or a smooth, flat surface for maximum surface area contact with the sole of the shoe.
  • Slots or openings 90 provide an outlet or channel to dislodge debris (grass, dirt, sand) from an upper surface of gripping pad 88 to avoid a buildup of debris around and between buttons 92 and the sole of the shoe. Slots or openings 90 tend to dislodge debris by limiting the available surface area of contact and accumulation, as well as providing an outlet or channel for the debris to fall free. When debris becomes dislodged, the surface area of gripping pad 88 is again free to make efficient and maximum contact with the sole of the shoe to ensure appropriate traction.
  • Buttons 92 are shown as a backside of cleats 112. Buttons 92 secure cleats 112 to gripping pad 88 and may have a rough surface to increase the bond between gripping pad 88 and the sole of the shoe, similar to FIG. 6.
  • A gripping pad or structure 96 is disposed within outer band 82 and designated for placement of the heel of the foot or shoe. Gripping pad 96 is generally rectangular, oval, or elongated to give enhanced traction from all angles and directions when standing, walking, or running on slippery or uneven natural surfaces. In one embodiment, gripping pad 96 includes a plurality of slots or openings 98 disposed around flat area 104 of the gripping pad. Alternatively, gripping pad 96 includes a plurality of interconnected concentric rings, or a smooth, flat surface for maximum surface area contact with the heel of the shoe.
  • Slots or openings 98 provide an outlet or channel to dislodge debris (grass, dirt, sand) from an upper surface of gripping pad 96 to avoid a buildup of debris around and between buttons 100 and the heel of the shoe. Slots or openings 98 tend to dislodge debris by limiting the available surface area of contact and accumulation, as well as providing an outlet or channel for the debris to fall free. When debris becomes dislodged, the surface area of gripping pad 96 is again free to make efficient and maximum contact with the heel of the shoe to ensure appropriate traction.
  • Buttons 100 are shown as a backside of cleats 114. Buttons 100 secure cleats 114 to gripping pad 96 and may have a rough surface to increase the bond between gripping pad 96 and the sole of the shoe, similar to FIG. 6.
  • A plurality of connecting arms 110 is formed in a web structure to securely interconnect gripping pad 88 and gripping pad 96 to contoured outer band 82. Connecting arms 110 are integrally molded with outer band 82 and gripping pads 88 and 96. In particular, connecting arms 110 a fix the position of gripping pad 88 within outer band 82, and connecting arms 110 b fix the position of gripping pad 96 within outer band 82. The material of connecting arms 110 a and 110 b is formulated to stretch with elasticity. The web structure can stretch in response to tension being applied to overshoe 80. Once tension is released, the web structure returns to its original state.
  • FIG. 14 shows a bottom view of anti-slip overshoe 80. Most particularly, a plurality of flexible cleats or gripping devices 112 and 114 are secured to gripping pads 88 and 96 with buttons 92 and 100, respectively. Cleats 112 and 114 are removable from gripping pads 88 and 96 for repair, maintenance, and safety. In one embodiment, buttons 92 are formed integral to flexible cleats 112 including an intermediate neck or slot to seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 88. That is, button 92 is pressed through the opening in gripping pads 88, which is sized smaller than the button diameter, and secured by the lip around the opening in the gripping pad occupying the intermediate neck. Button 92 holds cleat 112 to gripping pad 88. Likewise, buttons 100 are formed integral to cleats 114 including an intermediate neck or slot to seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 96. Button 100 is pressed through the opening in gripping pads 96, which is sized smaller than the button diameter, and secured by the lip around the opening in the gripping pad occupying the intermediate neck. Button 100 holds cleat 114 to gripping pad 96. Alternatively, buttons 92 and 100 are removable from cleats 112 and 114 by disposing the buttons and cleats on opposing sides of gripping pads 88 and 96 and securing by screw, rivet, clip, or other fastener, similar to FIG. 10 b.
  • Cleats 112 have a plurality of flexible spikes or talons 116 that extend from and are disposed around a perimeter of a body of the cleat for contacting the natural surface, e.g., grass, turf, sand, earth, snow, ice, and other loose or unstable natural material. Spikes 116 include an angled shaft or traction arm at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges oriented toward the natural surface for enhanced traction. Cleats 114 have a plurality of flexible spikes or talons 118 that extend from and around a perimeter of the body for contacting the natural surface, e.g., grass, turf, sand, earth, snow, ice, and other loose, porous, or unstable natural material. Spikes 118 include an angled shaft or traction arm at approximately 46 degrees with three ridges or edges oriented toward the natural surface for enhanced traction. The angle of the traction arms can range from 20 to 60 degrees. In one embodiment, cleats 112 and 114 each have eight spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body and one spike central to the body. In other embodiments, cleats 112 and 114 can have 6-10 spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body. Cleats 112 and 114 are made with flexible polymer, polycarbonate, graphite, metal, or other suitable non-slip material. Alternatively, cleats 112 and 114 can be a harder material, such as fibrous PVC. Spikes 116 and 118 provide grip and traction on slippery or uneven natural surfaces. The weight of the person applies pressure to cleats 112 and 114 and, in some embodiments, compresses spikes 116 and 118. Spikes 116 and 118 dig into the natural surface to provide stability and traction. Gripping pad 88 and gripping pad 96 work together to provide traction at both ball and heel of the foot or shoe to ensure that adequate traction on natural surfaces in all phases of personal gait in various activities.
  • FIG. 15 illustrates the flat profile of anti-slip overshoe 80 with cleats 112 and 114 fixed to gripping pads 88 and 96 by buttons 92 and 100. The intermediate neck or slot between buttons 92 and cleats 112 seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 88. The intermediate neck or slot between buttons 100 and cleats 114 seat into a lip around an opening in gripping pads 96. Gripping pads 88 and 96 are connected to contoured outer band 82 by connecting arms 110 a-110 b. Contoured outer band 82 wraps around a side portion of the shoe. Frontal toe strap 84 is adapted for receiving the tip of the shoe, and back heel strap 86 is adapted for receiving the heel of the shoe. The sole of the shoe contacts gripping pads 88 and 96 as a firm bond by nature of buttons 92 and 100. Cleats 112 and 114 provide traction and stability on slippery and uneven natural surfaces.
  • The material of overshoe 80 can be formulated to stretch, while maintaining durability and light weight. The bulk of stretching that occurs in overshoe 80 is performed by outer band 82 in conjunction with connecting arms 110. The plurality of connecting arms 110 that make up the web structure stretching appropriately to accommodate the respective size of shoe 80, while the basic size and form of gripping pads 88 and 96 remain substantially unchanged. The web structure of connecting arms 110 appropriately stretches on both left and right sides to ensure that gripping pads 88 and 96 are positioned properly under the shoe. Because of the elasticity and deformability associated with the web structure of connecting arms 110 and contoured outer band 82, overshoe 80 can take on a virtually flat, two-dimensional form when not in use. Having a virtually flat form is attractive for storage purposes, as a number of stored overshoes 80 can be placed in a relatively small storage space.
  • The improvement in grip and traction with anti-slip overshoe 80 results in greater safety, efficiency, and confidence for a person moving across irregular, slippery, or uneven natural surfaces, such as grass, turf, sand, gravel, dirt, snow, ice, loose material, and other natural surfaces found in outdoor settings. In sporting activities, such as golf, anti-slip overshoe 80 remains in firm contact with the turf surface without slipping or other unintended movement. Anti-slip overshoe 80 is convenient to transport, easy to attach to footwear, and helps to maintain a stable stance on natural surfaces, such as grass or turf, while swinging the club and otherwise moving about the golf course. For example, the golfer will continue to wear the everyday shoes and simply attach overshoe 80 when on the golf course. In other activities involving moving across slippery and uneven natural surfaces, such as hiking and performing work tasks sand, earth, snow, ice, and other loose, porous, or unstable natural material, that do not provide a stable contact surface or otherwise provide the necessary resistance against upper and lower body motion, anti-slip overshoe 80 assists with balance and stable footing for the activity at hand. The hiker will continue to wear the everyday shoes and attach overshoe 80 at the head of the trail. Runners, joggers, and persons that exercise outdoors will benefit from the traction and stability provided by anti-slip overshoe 80 on slippery and uneven natural surfaces.
  • While one or more embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated in detail, the skilled artisan will appreciate that modifications and adaptations to those embodiments may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention as set forth in the following claims.

Claims (25)

What is claimed:
1. A golf oriented footwear, comprising:
a footwear structure; and
a plurality of gripping devices attached to the footwear structure, the gripping devices including,
(a) a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body for traction,
(b) a neck extending from the body, and
(c) a button extending from the neck opposite the spikes.
2. The golf oriented footwear of claim 1, wherein the button is detachably coupled to the neck.
3. The golf oriented footwear of claim 1, wherein the spikes include:
a traction arm; and
a plurality of edges formed along the traction arm.
4. The golf oriented footwear of claim 3, wherein the traction arm further includes a concave surface formed between a first edge and second edge along the traction arm.
5. The golf oriented footwear of claim 3, wherein the traction arm includes an angle ranging from 20 to 60 degrees.
6. The golf oriented footwear of claim 1, wherein the body includes 6-10 spikes disposed around the perimeter of the body.
7. The golf oriented footwear of claim 1, wherein the body includes a material selected from a group consisting of flexible polymer, polycarbonate, graphite, fiberglass, nylon, tungsten carbide, fibrous polyvinylchloride, and metal.
8. A gripping device, comprising:
a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body, the spikes each including a traction arm with a plurality of edges formed along the traction arm and a concave surface between a first edge and second edge of the traction arm; and
a neck extending from the body.
9. The gripping device of claim 8, wherein the traction arm includes an angle ranging from 20 to 60 degrees.
10. The gripping device of claim 8, wherein the body includes 6-10 spikes disposed around the perimeter of the body.
11. The gripping device of claim 8, wherein the body includes a material selected from a group consisting of flexible polymer, polycarbonate, graphite, fiberglass, nylon, tungsten carbide, fibrous polyvinylchloride, and metal.
12. The gripping device of claim 8, further including a central spike extending from the body.
13. The gripping device of claim 8, further including a button extending from the neck opposite the spikes.
14. A gripping device, comprising:
a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body, the spikes each including a traction arm and plurality of edges formed along the traction arm; and
a neck extending from the body.
15. The gripping device of claim 14, wherein the traction arm further includes a concave surface formed between a first edge and second edge along the traction arm.
16. The gripping device of claim 14, wherein the traction arm includes an angle ranging from 20 to 60 degrees.
17. The gripping device of claim 14, wherein the body includes 6-10 spikes disposed around the perimeter of the body.
18. The gripping device of claim 14, wherein the body includes a material selected from a group consisting of flexible polymer, polycarbonate, graphite, fiberglass, nylon, tungsten carbide, fibrous polyvinylchloride, and metal.
19. The gripping device of claim 14, further including a button extending from the neck opposite the spikes.
20. A method of making a gripping device, comprising:
forming a body including a plurality of spikes disposed around a perimeter of the body, the spikes each including a traction arm and plurality of edges formed along the traction arm; and
forming a neck extending from the body.
21. The method of claim 20, further including forming the traction arm to include a concave surface between a first edge and second edge along the traction arm.
22. The method of claim 20, wherein the traction arm includes an angle ranging from 20 to 60 degrees.
23. The method of claim 20, wherein the body includes 6-10 spikes disposed around the perimeter of the body.
24. The method of claim 20, wherein the body includes a material selected from a group consisting of flexible polymer, polycarbonate, graphite, fiberglass, nylon, tungsten carbide, fibrous polyvinylchloride, and metal.
25. The method of claim 20, further including forming a button extending from the neck opposite the spikes.
US14/292,922 2014-06-01 2014-06-01 Anti-Slip Overshoe with Flexible Cleats and Method of Gripping Natural Surfaces Abandoned US20150342305A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14/292,922 US20150342305A1 (en) 2014-06-01 2014-06-01 Anti-Slip Overshoe with Flexible Cleats and Method of Gripping Natural Surfaces

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14/292,922 US20150342305A1 (en) 2014-06-01 2014-06-01 Anti-Slip Overshoe with Flexible Cleats and Method of Gripping Natural Surfaces

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20150342305A1 true US20150342305A1 (en) 2015-12-03

Family

ID=54700321

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/292,922 Abandoned US20150342305A1 (en) 2014-06-01 2014-06-01 Anti-Slip Overshoe with Flexible Cleats and Method of Gripping Natural Surfaces

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20150342305A1 (en)

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20190142110A1 (en) * 2017-11-15 2019-05-16 Eric Joseph CRUZ Exterior shoe attachement and method of use thereof
USD928482S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-08-24 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD928485S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-08-24 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD928484S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-08-24 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD928483S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-08-24 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD929091S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-08-31 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD929716S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-09-07 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD929717S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-09-07 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD930338S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-09-14 Nike, Inc. Shoe
WO2024059544A1 (en) * 2022-09-13 2024-03-21 Virtuix Holdings, Inc. Anti-slip footwear with rotatable traction element

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20190142110A1 (en) * 2017-11-15 2019-05-16 Eric Joseph CRUZ Exterior shoe attachement and method of use thereof
USD928482S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-08-24 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD928485S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-08-24 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD928484S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-08-24 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD928483S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-08-24 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD929091S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-08-31 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD929716S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-09-07 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD929717S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-09-07 Nike, Inc. Shoe
USD930338S1 (en) * 2021-01-13 2021-09-14 Nike, Inc. Shoe
WO2024059544A1 (en) * 2022-09-13 2024-03-21 Virtuix Holdings, Inc. Anti-slip footwear with rotatable traction element

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US20150342305A1 (en) Anti-Slip Overshoe with Flexible Cleats and Method of Gripping Natural Surfaces
EP1715769B1 (en) Anti-slip overshoe
USRE42965E1 (en) Anti-slip overshoe
US4872273A (en) Spike shoe slip
US4045888A (en) Athletic shoe
US9220313B2 (en) Spare cleat
US5666746A (en) Spiked shoe protector with adjustable strap to accommodate different shoe sizes
US9161593B2 (en) Heel traction aid and method of manufacture therefor
US6295742B1 (en) Sandal with resilient claw shaped cleats
US20090249652A1 (en) Sports shoe sole with functional topography
US20190208857A1 (en) Athletic shoe protector
JPH09505489A (en) Snow shoes
US20030145489A1 (en) Full or partial footweat attaching anti-slip surface gripper
US20080000102A1 (en) Shoe covering for traction and/or sports
US20060288615A1 (en) Cleat Guard
US20070051014A1 (en) Overshoe for sports
US20140196320A1 (en) Anti-Slip Overshoe with Flexible Cleats and Method of Gripping Natural Surfaces
US20080000104A1 (en) Traction element for shoes
US20080000103A1 (en) Shoes having deployable traction elements
US20090307931A1 (en) Slip resistant ski boot protection apparatus
US20150143719A1 (en) Temporary Footwear Modification Device
US20090071034A1 (en) Sole attachment for footwear
US20120266491A1 (en) Slip resistant ski boot protection apparatus
US20210015203A1 (en) Spike-Saver
US20060096130A1 (en) Slip resistant ski boot protection apparatus

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION