US20150264998A1 - Sole structure for biomechanical control - Google Patents

Sole structure for biomechanical control Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20150264998A1
US20150264998A1 US14/434,225 US201314434225A US2015264998A1 US 20150264998 A1 US20150264998 A1 US 20150264998A1 US 201314434225 A US201314434225 A US 201314434225A US 2015264998 A1 US2015264998 A1 US 2015264998A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
sole structure
section
protruding
inner edge
shoe
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US14/434,225
Inventor
Svante Berggren
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
BS SWEEDSPEED AB
Original Assignee
BS SWEEDSPEED AB
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to SE1251143 priority Critical
Priority to SE1251143-2 priority
Application filed by BS SWEEDSPEED AB filed Critical BS SWEEDSPEED AB
Priority to PCT/EP2013/069346 priority patent/WO2014056687A2/en
Assigned to BS SWEEDSPEED AB reassignment BS SWEEDSPEED AB ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BERGGREN, SVANTE
Publication of US20150264998A1 publication Critical patent/US20150264998A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/16Pieced soles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/142Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the medial arch, i.e. the navicular or cuneiform bones
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/1425Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the ball of the foot, i.e. the joint between the first metatarsal and first phalange
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/143Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the lateral arch, i.e. the cuboid bone
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/1435Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the joint between the fifth phalange and the fifth metatarsal bone
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1475Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the type of support
    • A43B7/148Recesses or holes filled with a support or pad
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1475Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the type of support
    • A43B7/1485Recesses or holes, traversing partially or completely the thickness of the pad
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1475Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the type of support
    • A43B7/149Pad, e.g. protruding on the foot facing surface

Abstract

A sole structure having a front section, a back section, and at least a first protruding section located at or in connection to the front section for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be inclining in one of two transversal directions extending from an outer edge to an inner edge of the sole structure with respect to a surface on which the sole structure is located. The sole structure is further arranged such that inclination in in an outwards transversal direction is prevented when the sole structure is in use.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The invention relates to a sole structure and a shoe arranged with the sole structure.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Prior art sport shoes usually comprise a substantially flat and flexible sole. Other sport shoes have been proposed, in particular shoes that are used for running, such as e.g. a shoe having a rigid sole structure with a toe part being bent upwards in relation to the remaining part of the sole structure as disclosed in European patent number 0 964 625, in order to better exploit dynamic forces created during running. In recent years, shoes having rigid soles with bent-upwards toe parts have increased in popularity, especially for sprinting and hurdling.
  • A further sport shoe having a non-flat sole is the EasyTone sneaker from Reebook. The EasyTone is a walking shoe arranged with balancing pods on the underside of the sole, which pods are arranged around a central axis along substantially the complete length of the shoe. This creates an unstable shoe where the point of balance of a wearer's foot alternately shifts from the inner edge to the outer edge of the shoe and vice versa, depending on the wearer's motion pattern. This instability allegedly encourages toning through increased muscle activation.
  • There are further examples where soles are designed to cause a wearer's foot to perform in some devised manners. For instance, a pronating runner can have custom-made insoles designed by means of having an orthotist plaster cast the feet and using the plaster cast to create a removable insole with the aim to counteract the wearer's pronation. Typically, for a pronating runner, the insole is built up at its inner edge, at the back section of the sole, thereby reducing pronation.
  • SUMMARY
  • An object of the present invention is to provide a sole structure and a shoe using the sole structure which improves biomechanical conditions for a wearer of the shoe.
  • This object is attained in a first aspect of the present invention by a sole structure having a front section and a back section, comprising means located at or in connection to the front section for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be inclining in one of two transversal directions extending from an outer edge to an inner edge of the sole structure with respect to a surface on which the sole structure is located. The sole structure is further arranged such that inclination in the other of the two transversal directions is prevented when the sole structure is in use.
  • During walking as well as running, there are many individual variations to how a person places her feet on the ground and how acting forces and contact points change during the ground contact phase until the feet lose contact with the ground. However, in a general movement pattern, when a person walks or runs, her foot contacts the underlying surface with either the heel, or the mid or front foot such that after the foot contacts the surface, the outer edge of the foot or shoe, i.e. the side where the fifth metatarsal bone and phalanx bone, respectively, is located (a.k.a. the little toe) comes in contact with the surface at the front foot pad. Subsequently, the foot pronates inwards against the first metatarsal. The foot then moves forward and upwards, but now with an ankle tilting angle in the other transversal direction of the foot, until the front foot pad loses contact with the underlying surface and only the toes are in contact with the surface until the foot is lifted and hence entirely loses contact with the surface and the other foot is set to contact the surface. Typically, when walking, the other foot is set to contact the surface before the first foot entirely has lost contact with the surface.
  • When a person runs fast, the contact of the person's foot with the underlying surface can be different as compared to when the person walks or runs slowly. Sometimes, the heel has a tendency of not contacting the underlying surface at all, but the foot initially contacts the surface at its outer side, at the fifth metatarsal, at the front foot pad and subsequently pronate inwards against the first metatarsal. The foot then moves forward and upwards causing propulsion until the front foot pad loses contact with the underlying surface and only the toes are in contact with the surface until the foot is lifted and hence entirely loses contact with the surface. These movements require muscular motion and force from the person, resulting in fatigue and loss of energy in order for the body to perform the necessary movements.
  • The present invention advantageously facilitates improvement of the person's biomechanical condition, e.g. by reducing fatigue and use of energy of the person by changing biomechanical movement, thereby better utilizing the speed and gravitational pull of the person in her forward motion.
  • As will be described in the following, the sole structure is arranged with means for causing at least a portion of the structure to incline in either one of the two transversal directions of the sole structure, or of a shoe being arranged with the sole structure, depending on how said means of the sole structure is arranged. However, to provide the sole structure or shoe with transversal stability when in use, inclination in the other one of the two transversal directions of the shoe is prevented. Thus, the sole structure or shoe of the present invention facilitates tilting of a wearer's shoe—and consequently the wearer's foot—in one transversal direction but is arranged to prevent tilting of the wearer's shoe in the other transversal direction. Further, by arranging the sole structure such that the inclining portion is located in the front section, or at least in connection to the front section, propulsion can be improved. It should be noted that in some embodiments of the present invention, a portion of the sole structure is caused to incline, while in other embodiments the complete sole structure is caused to incline.
  • Thus, in a first embodiment of the present invention, the means for causing a portion to be inclining is arranged such that a plane extending in the portion at an upper side of the sole structure, from the outer edge to the inner edge, is located at a greater distance from the surface on which the sole structure is located at the outer edge than at the inner edge. Thus, a wearer of the shoe on which the sole structure is arranged will experience that her foot is inclined such that the inner side of the foot is closer to the surface on which the shoe is located as compared to the outer side of her foot, thereby tilting the foot inwards.
  • The inventor has come to the insight that the sole structure and shoe of this particular embodiment of the present invention improves the biomechanical conditions for the wearer of the shoe, ultimately facilitating the wearer of the shoe to run faster. With the sole structure and shoe of the present invention, an inclining plane is created such that the wearer's foot is tilted inwards when the shoe contacts the underlying surface.
  • A runner can further increase her speed by either increasing her stride length or her stride rate, also known as cadence. The inventor has come to the insight that a shoe according to the present embodiment of the invention increases the cadence of a runner wearing the shoe and consequently also her running speed.
  • In a second embodiment of the present invention, the means for causing portion to be inclining is arranged such that a plane extending in the portion at an upper side of the sole structure, from the outer edge to the inner edge, is located at a greater distance from the surface on which the sole structure is located at the inner edge than at the outer edge. Thus, a wearer of the shoe on which the sole structure is arranged will experience that her foot is inclined such that the outer side of the foot is closer to the surface on which the shoe is located as compared to the inner side of her foot, thereby tilting the foot outwards.
  • The inventor has come to the insight that the sole structure and shoe of this particular embodiment of the present invention improves the biomechanical conditions for the wearer of the shoe, ultimately facilitating the wearer of the shoe to walk and run faster under certain conditions. With the sole structure 3 o and shoe of the present invention, an inclining plane is created such that the wearer's foot is tilted outwards when the shoe contacts the underlying surface.
  • The sole structure and shoe of the second embodiment of the present invention is particularly advantageous when taking corners, for instance when running a 400 m or 800 m race on a running track. There are indications that a shoe according to the second embodiment of the present invention enables more efficient cornering for a wearer of the shoe, thus ultimately increasing the running speed of the wearer.
  • In another embodiment of the present invention, the plane extending at the upper side of the sole structure forms an angle with the surface on which the sole structure is located of approximately 10 degrees or more. Thus, to attain an appropriate tilting of a wearer's foot, the angle that is formed between the plane and the surface, i.e. the tilting angle for the foot on which the shoe is placed, should be at least 10 degrees. A slight inclination may not be enough to cause the appropriate tilting angle.
  • In a further embodiment of the present invention, the front section of the sole structure is bent upwards in relation to the back section. The angle formed with the surface is preferably in the range of 1-50°, and more preferably above 30°, in relation to the surface and the back section. In an embodiment of the present invention, an arched section of the sole structure defines a transition between the front section and the back section, while in another embodiment, a line defines a transition between the front section and the back section. In the case of having a line defining the transition, the transition will be relatively sharp and direct as compared to the smoother and gradual transition provided by the arched transition.
  • As previously has been discussed, when a person runs fast, the contact of the person's foot with the underlying surface is different as compared to when the person runs slow, or walks. The heel has a tendency of not contacting the underlying surface at all, but the foot initially contacts the surface at its outer edge, at the fifth metatarsal, at the front foot pad and subsequently pronate inwards against the first metatarsal. The foot then moves forward and upwards until the front foot pad loses contact with the underlying surface and only the toes are in contact with the surface until the foot is lifted and hence entirely loses contact with the surface. These movements require muscular motion and force from the person, resulting in fatigue and loss of energy in order for the body to perform the necessary movements. A sole structure being bent upwards according to embodiments of the present invention facilitates reduction of fatigue and energy loss of the person by helping the person perform these movements, e.g. by better utilizing the speed and gravitational pull of the person in her forward motion.
  • In an embodiment of the present invention, the utilization of speed and gravitational pull of a wearer of the sole structure or shoe according to the invention will further be improved by a sole structure being at least partly composed of a rigid material. The sole structure is preferably rigid enough not to bend when the weight of a runner acts on the sole structure. For instance, the sole structure may be composed of carbon fibre or aluminium, or any other suitable rigid and light-weight material.
  • In yet another embodiment of the present invention, the inclining portion of the sole structure is arranged to be tapered in a transversal direction from the outer edge of the sole structure towards the inner edge of the sole structure. As will be discussed in the following, the inclination of the sole structure, i.e. the tilting of the wearer's foot, can be achieved by a tapered and thus naturally inclining sole structure having non-uniform thickness, in that the thickness of the sole structure is greater at the outer edge than at the inner edge in the case of providing an inward inclining plane, while being thicker at the inner edge than at the outer edge in the case of providing an outward inclining plane.
  • In still another embodiment of the present invention, the sole structure has a uniform thickness, and is rigid and thin, typically of a light-weight material such as carbon fibre, in which case the inclination is achieved by means of bending the sole structure along appropriately selected rupture line(s).
  • Advantageously, the tapered sole structure is easier to design and manufacture; in one embodiment, a raised section is created on an upper side of the sole structure at its outer edge e.g. by means of an appropriately arranged insole in order to tilt the wearer's foot in the direction of the inner edge of the sole structure. The rigid sole having uniform thickness is advantageous since different inclining planes can be created along one or more rupture lines, thus creating highly elaborated inclinations which further easier can be adapted to an individual wearer, if necessary.
  • In embodiments where the inclining portion is arranged to be tapered, a variety of different shapes for the sole structure is envisaged, where the means for causing inclination is embodied in different ways. In one embodiment, the sole structure is arranged with a raised section on an upper side of the sole structure at the outer edge. This is an easy and straightforward way of creating an inward tilting angle for a wearer's foot. This can be attained by providing the sole structure as an insole to be positioned within a shoe. In another embodiment where an inward tilting angle is provided for the wearer's foot, the sole structure is arranged with a recessed section on its upper side at the inner edge. This may be attained by providing a midsole of a shoe with the recessed section in order to achieve an inward tilting angle. In yet another embodiment where an inward tilting angle is provided, the sole structure is arranged with a protruding section on its under side at the outer edge. This may be attained by providing an outsole of a shoe with the protruding section thus achieving an inward tilting angle. In still another embodiment where an inward tilting angle is to be achieved, the sole structure is arranged with a recessed section on its under side at the inner edge. This may be attained by cutting a recess in an outsole of a shoe. As is understood, different combinations of raised, protruding and recessed sections as described in these embodiments can be envisaged to achieve an inward tilting angle of the wearer's foot.
  • In embodiments where the inclining portion is arranged to be tapered, but where an outward tilting angle for a wearer's foot is created, a variety of different shapes for the sole structure is accordingly envisaged, where the means for causing inclination is embodied in different ways. In one embodiment, the sole structure is arranged with a raised section on an upper side of the sole structure at the inner edge. This is an easy and straightforward way of creating an outward tilting angle for a wearer's foot. This can be attained by providing the sole structure as an insole to be positioned within a shoe. In another embodiment where an outward tilting angle is provided for the wearer's foot, the sole structure is arranged with a recessed section on its upper side at the outer edge. This may be attained by providing a midsole of a shoe with the recessed section in order to achieve an inward tilting angle. In yet another embodiment where an outward tilting angle is provided, the sole structure is arranged with a protruding section on its under side at the inner edge. This may be attained by providing an outsole of a shoe with the protruding section thus achieving an outward tilting angle. In still another embodiment where an outward tilting angle is to be achieved, the sole structure is arranged with a recessed section on its under side at the outer edge. This may be attained by cutting a recess in an outsole of a shoe. Again, different combinations of raised, protruding and recessed sections as described in these embodiments can be envisaged to achieve an outward tilting angle of the wearer's foot.
  • In embodiments of the present invention where the sole structure is arranged with a recessed section on its underside, a further embodiment is envisaged where a padding piece is inserted in the recessed section, thereby filling the recessed section and creating a shoe with a substantially flat outsole. Preferably, the padding piece is fastened to the recessed section in the outsole by means of a suitable fastening means such as e.g. Velcro, thereby providing a removable padding piece. Thus, a wearer of the shoe can selectively remove the padding piece to create a shoe which tilts the wearer's foot in the appropriate direction. By inserting the padding piece into the recessed section, a “normal” running shoe is obtained.
  • Correspondingly, in embodiments of the present invention where the sole structure is arranged with a protruding section on its underside, a further embodiment is envisaged where a removable protruding piece is attached to a substantially flat outsole of a shoe, thereby creating a shoe with an outsole that tilts the wearer's foot in the appropriate direction. Preferably, the protruding piece is fastened to the outsole by means of a suitable fastening means such as e.g. Velcro. Thus, a wearer of the shoe can selectively attach the protruding piece to a “normal” running shoe to create a shoe which tilts the wearer's foot in the appropriate direction.
  • In yet further embodiments of the invention, where the sole structure is provided on the under side of a shoe, either as an outsole or alternatively as an add-on to the outsole, the means for causing the inclination of the sole structure located in or in connection to the front section comprises a first protruding section on an under side of the sole structure at the outer edge to create an inward tilting angle. To further improve the biomechanical conditions of a wearer of the shoe on which the sole structure is arranged, providing transversal stability, comfort and an appropriate tilting angle, as will be shown in the following, the means for causing inclination may comprise one or more further protruding sections. Thus, in another embodiment of the present invention, said means further comprises a second protruding section on the under side of the sole structure at the inner edge and located longitudinally on a level with, and being less protruding than, the first protruding section. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, said means further comprises a third protruding section on the under side of the sole structure at the outer edge and located in front of the first protruding section. In still another embodiment of the present invention, said means further comprises a fourth protruding section on the under side of the sole structure at the inner edge and located longitudinally on a level with, and being less protruding than, the third protruding section. In still a further embodiment of the present invention, said means further comprises a fifth protruding section on the under side of the sole structure in front of the third and the fourth protruding section at a central part of the front section, and being less protruding than both the third and the fourth protruding section. Different combinations of the first, second, third, fourth and fifth protruding sections can be envisaged.
  • In embodiments where the transition between the front section and the back section of the sole structure is defined by a line, thus creating a sharp and direct transition, various embodiments are envisaged. In one of these embodiments, the line along which the front section is bent upwards in relation to the back section extends from the inner edge backwards towards the outer edge of the sole structure. Preferably, the line forms an angle α with the transversal direction of the sole in the range of −15°-35°. Since the sole structure is adapted to a foot and is used with a shoe, the line roughly follows the natural angle/anatomy of the foot, i.e. the transition between the metatarsal bone and the phalanx bone of the foot, from the fifth (i.e. the little toe) to the second metatarsal to the fifth to the and second phalanx, respectively
  • In an embodiment of the present invention, the means for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be inclining comprises a raised section at the back section of the sole structure in connection to the line at the inner edge. Thus, the inclining portion of the sole structure is arranged with the raised section in connection to the front section. The raised section is such that when the sole structure or shoe is viewed from the inner edge, the raised section will have the appearance of an arch at the inner edge which decreases in width and height towards the outer edge, where the rear of the back section and the outer edge lies in the same horizontal plane. Thus, the raised section is preferably at its highest and widest at the inner edge and narrows in width and reduces in height in the direction of the outer edge.
  • In yet an embodiment of the present invention, the raised section extends into the front section of the sole structure.
  • In further embodiments of the present invention, the raised section is arranged to extend from the inner edge of the sole structure to a first point located on a distance from the inner edge, which distance constitutes at least a third of the width of the sole at the transition between the front section and the back section of the sole and wherein the first point is arranged to be located in a same horizontal plane as the back section of the sole. Other distances may be envisaged, such as half or two thirds of the width of the sole structure. Alternatively, the raised section can extend all the way to the outer edge.
  • In line with previous discussions, the raised section will further improve the biomechanical conditions of a wearer of a shoe on which the sole structure according to embodiments of the invention is arranged, since it will aid the foot in tilting inwards.
  • The object of the present invention is further attained in a second aspect of the present invention by a sole structure being arranged with a resilient section at its inner edge, wherein a plane extending at an upper side of the sole structure, from an outer edge to an inner edge of the sole structure, is located at a greater distance from a surface on which the sole rests at the outer edge than at the inner edge, when a force acts on the resilient section and presses the resilient section against said surface. Advantageously, when contacting an underlying surface, the resilient section will be compressed when acted upon by a force applied by the weight of a wearer of a shoe on which the sole structure is arranged, and cause the foot to tilt inwards.
  • The object of the present invention is further attained in a third aspect of the present invention by a sole structure being arranged with a resilient section at its outer edge, wherein a plane extending at an upper side of the sole structure, from an outer edge to an inner edge of the sole structure, is located at a greater distance from a surface on which the sole is located at the inner edge than at the outer edge, when a force acts on the resilient section and presses the resilient section against said surface. Advantageously, when contacting an underlying surface, the resilient section will be compressed when acted upon by a force applied by the weight of a wearer of a shoe on which the sole structure is arranged, and cause the foot to tilt outwards.
  • It should be noted that the inclining of the sole structure could be achieved already when the sole structure rests on a surface, or that the inclining of the sole structure is achieved when an applied force presses the sole structure towards the surface, depending on where the point of balance of the sole structure (or the shoe on which the sole structure is arranged) is located. Thus, with reference to the above described sole structure and/or shoe of embodiments of the present invention, which causes the wearer's foot to tilt either inwards or outwards, respectively, the tilting could be obtained already when the sole structure rests on a surface, or alternatively that pressure must be applied to the sole structure towards the underlying surface to cause the sole structure to tilt. However, the sole structure or shoe should cause the wearer's foot to tilt when the sole structure/shoe is in use.
  • It is noted that the invention relates to all possible combinations of features recited in the claims. Further features of, and advantages with, the present invention will become apparent when studying the appended claims and the following description. Those skilled in the art realize that different features of the present invention can be combined to create embodiments other than those described in the following.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The invention is now described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 1 b shows a cross section of the sole structure of FIG. 1 a in a front view;
  • FIG. 2 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure according to another embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 b shows a cross section of the sole structure of FIG. 2 a in a front view;
  • FIG. 3 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure according to yet another embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 b shows a cross section of the sole structure of FIG. 3 a in a front view;
  • FIG. 3 c shows an elevated perspective view of a variant of the sole structure according to FIG. 3 a;
  • FIG. 4 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure according to still another embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 4 b shows a cross section of the sole structure of FIG. 4 a in a front view;
  • FIG. 4 c shows an elevated perspective view of a variant of the sole structure according to FIG. 4 a;
  • FIG. 5 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure according to a further embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 b shows a cross section of the sole structure of FIG. 5 a in a front view;
  • FIG. 6 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure according to still a further embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 6 b shows a cross section of the sole structure of FIG. 6 a in a front view;
  • FIG. 7 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure according to yet a further embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 7 b shows a cross section of the sole structure of FIG. 7 a in a front view;
  • FIG. 7 c shows an elevated perspective view of a variant of the sole structure according to FIG. 7 a;
  • FIG. 8 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure according to even a further embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 8 b shows a cross section of the sole structure of FIG. 8 a in a front view;
  • FIG. 8 c shows an elevated perspective view of a variant of the sole structure according to FIG. 8 a;
  • FIG. 9 shows a further embodiment of the present invention, where a protruding piece is selectively removable from, or attachable to, a sole structure at an inner edge;
  • FIG. 10 shows a further embodiment of the present invention, where a protruding piece is selectively removable from, or attachable to, a sole structure at an outer edge;
  • FIG. 11 a shows a bottom view of a sole structure according to embodiments of the present invention where up to five protruding sections are used for causing inclination;
  • FIG. 11 b shows a side view of the sole structure shown in FIG. 11 a;
  • FIG. 12 a shows an elevated perspective view a sole structure according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 12 b shows a side view of the sole structure of FIG. 12 a;
  • FIG. 13 a shows a top view of a sole structure according to another embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 13 b shows an elevated perspective view of the sole structure of FIG. 13 a;
  • FIG. 13 c shows a cross section of the sole structure of FIG. 13 a in a front view; and
  • FIG. 14 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure according to still a further embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 14 b shows a cross section of the sole structure of FIG. 14 a in a front view;
  • FIG. 15 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure according to yet a further embodiment of the present invention; and
  • FIG. 15 b shows a cross section of the sole structure of FIG. 15 a in a front view.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The invention will now be described more fully hereinafter with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which certain embodiments of the invention are shown. This invention may, however, be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein; rather, these embodiments are provided by way of example so that this disclosure will be thorough and complete, and will fully convey the scope of the invention to those skilled in the art.
  • In the following, a number of directions will be referred to when describing different embodiments of the present invention. A longitudinal direction is defined as the direction along a shoe, i.e. from heel to toe or from toe to heel. A transversal direction is defined as being perpendicular, or at least substantially perpendicular, to the longitudinal direction.
  • Further, an inner edge of a shoe is defined as the edge running along the first metatarsal bone of the foot, informally referred to as the big toe, while an outer edge of a shoe is defined as the edge running along the fifth metatarsal bone of the foot, i.e. the little toe.
  • Moreover, a shoe is oftentimes referred to as having a front section and a back section, where the front section is defined as the part of the shoe extending substantially from the medial malleolus of the foot, i.e. the ankle to the end of the heel part. The front section is defined as the part of the shoe extending substantially from the end of the arch of the foot towards the first metatarsal bone to the end of the toe part of the foot.
  • FIG. 1 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 1 b shows a cross section of the sole structure 1 in a front view, which sole structure 1 is arranged as an insole or midsole of a shoe illustrated in cross section by means of its outsole 20. The sole structure 1 has a front section 2 and a back section 3 and further comprises means in the form of a raised section 6 a on an upper side 8 for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be inwards inclining towards an inner edge 4 of the sole structure, i.e. the sole structure 1 is tapered in the direction of the inner edge 4. In the particular embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 a and 1 b, the inclining portion substantially consists of the longitudinally extending portion delimited by dashed lines L1-L2.
  • With reference to the cross section along line A-A1 shown in FIG. 1 b of the outsole 20 of a shoe in which the sole structure 1 is arranged, it can be seen that the raised section 6 a causes an inwards inclination in the form of a plane extending along line P1-P2 in the inclining portion at an upper side of the sole structure, from the outer edge to the inner edge, which plane is located at a greater distance di from a surface on which the sole structure 1 (or shoe) is located at the outer edge 7 than at the inner edge 4. Thus, an angle β is formed with the surface in which the shoe is located. In an embodiment of the present invention, the angle β is preferably 10° or more.
  • It should be noted that the raised section 6 a could be placed closer to the very front of the sole structure, or further in the longitudinal direction towards the back section 3, as long as it is located in the front section 2, or in direct connection to the front section 2 of the sole structure 1. Further, the raised section 6 a could even extend from the front section 2 towards the very back section 3 of the sole structure, in which case the inclining portion will stretch across almost the complete length of the sole structure, even though this is not shown on a particular drawing for this embodiment.
  • FIG. 2 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure 1 according to another embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 2 b shows a cross section of the sole structure 1 in a front view, which sole structure 1 is arranged as an insole or midsole of a shoe illustrated in cross section by means of an outsole 20. The sole structure 1 has a front section 2 and a back section 3 and further comprises means in the form of a recessed section 12 a on an upper side 8 for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be inwards inclining towards an inner edge 4 of the sole structure, i.e. the sole structure 1 is tapered in the direction of the inner edge 4. In the particular embodiment shown in FIGS. 2 a and 2 b, the inclining portion substantially consists of the longitudinally extending portion delimited by dashed lines L1-L2.
  • With reference to the cross section along line B-B1 shown in FIG. 2 b of the outsole 20 of a shoe in which the sole structure 1 is arranged, it can be seen that the recessed section 12 a causes an inwards inclination in the form of a plane extending along line P1-P2 in the inclining portion at an upper side of the sole structure, from the outer edge to the inner edge, which plane is located at a greater distance di from a surface on which the sole structure 1 (or shoe) is located at the outer edge 7 than at the inner edge 4. Thus, an angle β is formed with the surface in which the shoe is located. In an embodiment of the present invention, the angle β is preferably 10° or more.
  • It should be noted that the recessed section 12 a could be placed closer to the very front of the sole structure, or further in the longitudinal direction towards the back section 3, as long as it is located in the front section 2, or in direct connection to the front section 2 of the sole structure 1. Further, the recessed section 12 a could even extend from the front section 2 towards the very back section 3 of the sole structure, in which case the inclining portion will stretch across almost the complete length of the sole structure, even though this is not shown on a particular drawing for this embodiment.
  • FIG. 3 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure 1 according to a further embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 3 b shows a cross section of the sole structure 1 in a front view, which sole structure 1 is arranged as an outsole of a shoe. The sole structure 1 has a front section 2 and a back section 3 and further comprises means in the form of a protruding section 6 b on an under side 9 for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be inwards inclining towards an inner edge 4 of the sole structure, i.e. the sole structure 1 is tapered in the direction of the inner edge 4. In the particular embodiment shown in FIGS. 3 a and 3 b, the inclining portion substantially consists of the longitudinally extending portion delimited by dashed lines L1-L2.
  • With reference to the cross section along line C-C1 shown in FIG. 3 b of the sole structure 1, it can be seen that the protruding section 6 b causes an inwards inclination in the form of a plane extending along line P1-P2 in the inclining portion at an upper side of the sole structure, from the outer edge to the inner edge, which plane is located at a greater distance from a surface on which the sole structure 1 (or shoe) is located at the outer edge 7 than at the inner edge 4. Thus, an angle β is formed with the surface in which the shoe is located. In an embodiment of the present invention, the angle β is preferably 10° or more.
  • In analogy with the embodiments shown on FIGS. 1 and 2, it should be noted that the protruding section 6 b could be placed closer to the very front of the sole structure, or further in the longitudinal direction towards the back section 3, as long as it is located in the front section 2, or in direct connection to the front section 2 of the sole structure 1.
  • Further, with reference to FIG. 3 c, the protruding section 6 b could even extend from the front section 2 towards the very back section 3 of the sole structure, in which case the inclining portion will stretch across almost the complete length of the sole structure. As can be concluded from FIGS. 3 a-c, the protruding section 6 b preferably, but optionally, extends longitudinally over a greater part of the front section 2. Further, the protruding section 6 b has a transversal width and thus extends transversally over a part of the sole structure, such as over at least a third of the width of the sole structure 1. The transversally extending protruding section 6 b will advantageously have the sole structure 1 (or the shoe using the sole structure) smoothly and seamlessly roll over from its outer edge 7 initially contacting the underlying surface when in use towards the inner edge 4 of the sole structure. FIG. 4 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure 1 according to another embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 4 b shows a cross section of the sole structure 1 in a front view, which sole structure 1 is arranged as an outsole of a shoe. The sole structure 1 has a front section 2 and a back section 3 and further comprises means in the form of a recessed section 12 b on an under side 9 for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be inwards inclining towards an inner edge 4 of the sole structure, i.e. the sole structure 1 is tapered in the direction of the inner edge 4. In the particular embodiment shown in FIGS. 4 a and 4 b, the inclining portion substantially consists of the longitudinally extending portion delimited by dashed lines L1-L2.
  • With reference to the cross section along line D-D1 shown in FIG. 4 b of the sole structure 1, it can be seen that the recessed section 12 b causes an inwards inclination in the form of a plane extending along line P1-P2 in the inclining portion at an upper side of the sole structure, from the outer edge to the inner edge, which plane is located at a greater distance from a surface on which the sole structure 1 (or shoe) is located at the outer edge 7 than at the inner edge 4. Thus, an angle β is formed with the surface in which the shoe is located. In an embodiment of the present invention, the angle β is preferably 10° or more.
  • It should be noted that the recessed section 12 b could be placed closer to the very front of the sole structure, or further in the longitudinal direction towards the back section 3, as long as it is located in the front section 2, or in direct connection to the front section 2 of the sole structure 1.
  • Further, with reference to FIG. 4 c, the recessed section 12 b could even extend from the front section 2 towards the very back section 3 of the sole structure, in which case the inclining portion will stretch across almost the complete length of the sole structure.
  • As can be seen in all embodiments described with reference to FIGS. 1-4, the respective sole structure 1 is arranged to incline inwards but is further due to its construction prevented from inclining outwards when in use.
  • FIG. 5 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 5 b shows a cross section of the sole structure 1 in a front view, which sole structure 1 is arranged as an insole or midsole of a shoe illustrated in cross section by means of its outsole 20. The sole structure 1 has a front section 2 and a back section 3 and further comprises means in the form of a raised section 6 c on an upper side 8 for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be outwards inclining towards an outer edge 7 of the sole structure, i.e. the sole structure 1 is tapered in the direction of the outer edge 7. In the particular embodiment shown in FIGS. 5 a and 5 b, the inclining portion substantially consists of the longitudinally extending portion delimited by dashed lines L1-L2.
  • With reference to the cross section along line E-E1 shown in FIG. 5 b of the outsole 20 of a shoe in which the sole structure 1 is arranged, it can be seen that the raised section 6 c causes an outwards inclination in the form of a plane extending along line P1-P2 in the inclining portion at an upper side of the sole structure, from the outer edge to the inner edge, which plane is located at a greater distance di from a surface on which the sole structure 1 (or shoe) is located at the inner edge 4 than at the outer edge 7. Thus, an angle γ is formed with the surface in which the shoe is located. In an embodiment of the present invention, the angle γ is preferably 10° or more.
  • As in previous embodiments, it should be noted that the raised section 6 c could be placed closer to the very front of the sole structure, or further in the longitudinal direction towards the back section 3, as long as it is located in the front section 2, or in direct connection to the front section 2 of the sole structure 1. Further, the raised section 6 c could even extend from the front section 2 towards the very back section 3 of the sole structure, in which case the inclining portion will stretch across almost the complete length of the sole structure, even though this is not shown on a particular drawing for this embodiment.
  • FIG. 6 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure 1 according to another embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 6 b shows a cross section of the sole structure 1 in a front view, which sole structure 1 is arranged as an insole or midsole of a shoe illustrated in cross section by means of an outsole 20. The sole structure 1 has a front section 2 and a back section 3 and further comprises means in the form of a recessed section 12C on an upper side 8 for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be outwards inclining towards an outer edge 7 of the sole structure, i.e. the sole structure 1 is tapered in the direction of the outer edge 7. In the particular embodiment shown in FIGS. 6 a and 6 b, the inclining portion substantially consists of the longitudinally extending portion delimited by dashed lines L1-L2.
  • With reference to the cross section along line F-F1 shown in FIG. 6 b of the outsole 20 of a shoe in which the sole structure 1 is arranged, it can be seen that the recessed section 12C causes an outwards inclination in the form of a plane extending along line P1-P2 in the inclining portion at an upper side of the sole structure, from the outer edge to the inner edge, which plane is located at a greater distance di from a surface on which the sole structure 1 (or shoe) is located at the inner edge 4 than at the outer edge 7. Thus, an angle γ is formed with the surface in which the shoe is located. In an embodiment of the present invention, the angle γ is preferably 10° or more.
  • It should be noted that the recessed section 12C could be placed closer to the very front of the sole structure, or further in the longitudinal direction towards the back section 3, as long as it is located in the front section 2, or in direct connection to the front section 2 of the sole structure 1. Further, the recessed section 12C could even extend from the front section 2 towards the very back section 3 of the sole structure, in which case the inclining portion 3 o will stretch across almost the complete length of the sole structure, even though this is not shown on a particular drawing for this embodiment.
  • FIG. 7 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure 1 according to a further embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 7 b shows a cross section of the sole structure 1 in a front view, which sole structure 1 is arranged as an outsole of a shoe. The sole structure 1 has a front section 2 and a back section 3 and further comprises means in the form of a protruding section 6 d on an under side 9 for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be outwards inclining towards an outer edge 7 of the sole structure, i.e. the sole structure 1 is tapered in the direction of the outer edge 7. In the particular embodiment shown in FIGS. 7 a and 7 b, the inclining portion substantially consists of the longitudinally extending portion delimited by dashed lines L1-L2.
  • With reference to the cross section along line G-G1 shown in FIG. 7 b of the sole structure 1, it can be seen that the protruding section 6 d causes an outwards inclination in the form of a plane extending along line P1-P2 in the inclining portion at an upper side of the sole structure, from the outer edge to the inner edge, which plane is located at a greater distance from a surface on which the sole structure 1 (or shoe) is located at the inner edge 4 than at the outer edge 7. Thus, an angle γ is formed with the surface in which the shoe is located. In an embodiment of the present invention, the angle γ is preferably 10° or more.
  • In analogy with the embodiments shown on FIGS. 5 and 6, it should be noted that the protruding section 6 d could be placed closer to the very front of the sole structure, or further in the longitudinal direction towards the back section 3, as long as it is located in the front section 2, or in direct connection to the front section 2 of the sole structure 1.
  • Further, with reference to FIG. 7 c, the protruding section 6 d could even extend from the front section 2 towards the very back section 3 of the sole structure, in which case the inclining portion will stretch across almost the complete length of the sole structure. As can be concluded from FIGS. 7 a-c, the protruding section 6 d preferably, but optionally, extends longitudinally over a greater part of the front section 2. Further, the protruding section 6 d has a transversal width and thus extends transversally over a part of the sole structure, such as over at least a third of the width of the sole structure 1. The transversally extending protruding section 6 d will advantageously have the sole structure 1 (or the shoe using the sole structure) smoothly and seamlessly roll over from its inner edge 4 contacting the underlying surface towards the outer edge 7 of the sole structure.
  • FIG. 8 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure 1 according to another embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 8 b shows a cross section of the sole structure 1 in a front view, which sole structure 1 is arranged as an outsole of a shoe. The sole structure 1 has a front section 2 and a back section 3 and further comprises means in the form of a recessed section 12 d on an under side 9 for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be outwards inclining towards an outer edge 7 of the sole structure, i.e. the sole structure 1 is tapered in the direction of the outer edge 7. In the particular embodiment shown in FIGS. 8 a and 8 b, the inclining portion substantially consists of the longitudinally extending portion delimited by dashed lines L1-L2.
  • With reference to the cross section along line H-Hi shown in FIG. 8 b of the sole structure 1, it can be seen that the recessed section 12 d causes an outwards inclination in the form of a plane extending along line P1-P2 in the inclining portion at an upper side of the sole structure, from the outer edge to the inner edge, which plane is located at a greater distance from a surface on which the sole structure 1 (or shoe) is located at the inner edge 4 than at the outer edge 7. Thus, an angle γ is formed with the surface in which the shoe is located. In an embodiment of the present invention, the angle γ is preferably 10° or more.
  • It should be noted that the recessed section 12 d could be placed closer to the very front of the sole structure, or further in the longitudinal direction towards the back section 3, as long as it is located in the front section 2, or in 3 o direct connection to the front section 2 of the sole structure 1.
  • Further, with reference to FIG. 8 c, the recessed section 12 d could even extend from the front section 2 towards the very back section 3 of the sole structure, in which case the inclining portion will stretch across almost the complete length of the sole structure.
  • As can be seen in all embodiments described with reference to FIGS. 5-8, the respective sole structure 1 is arranged to incline outwards but is further due to its construction prevented from inclining inwards when in use.
  • FIG. 9 shows a further embodiment of the present invention, where the sole structure 1 of FIG. 4 is arranged as an outsole on a shoe, i.e. a recessed section 12 b is arranged on an under side 9 of the sole structure 1 at its inner edge 4 to cause an inwards inclination. A padding piece 25 is arranged to be inserted in the recessed section, thereby filling the recessed section and creating a shoe with a substantially flat outsole. Preferably, the padding piece is fastened to the recessed section in the outsole by means of a suitable fastening means such as e.g. Velcro, thereby providing a removable padding piece. Thus, a wearer of the shoe can selectively remove the padding piece 25 to create a shoe which tilts the wearer's foot inwards. By inserting the padding piece into the recessed section, a “normal” running shoe is obtained.
  • FIG. 10 shows a still a further embodiment of the present invention, where the sole structure 1 of FIG. 8 is arranged as an outsole on a shoe, i.e. a recessed section 12 d is arranged on an under side 9 of the sole structure 1 at its outer edge 7 to cause an outwards inclination. A padding piece 25 is arranged to be inserted in the recessed section, thereby filling the recessed section and creating a shoe with a substantially flat outsole. Preferably, the padding piece is fastened to the recessed section in the outsole by means of a suitable fastening means such as e.g. Velcro, thereby providing a removable padding piece. Thus, a wearer of the shoe 30 can selectively remove the padding piece 25 to create a shoe which tilts the wearer's foot inwards. By inserting the padding piece into the recessed section, a “normal” running shoe is obtained.
  • In analogy with the embodiments discussed in connection to FIGS. 9 and 10, a further embodiment of the present invention envisages that a removable protruding piece is attached to a substantially flat outsole of a shoe, thereby creating a shoe with an outsole that tilts the wearer's foot in the appropriate direction. Hence, the removable protruding piece would embody any one of the protruding sections 6 b (inward tilting) or 6 d (outward tilting) shown in FIGS. 3 and 7, respectively. Preferably, the protruding piece is fastened to the outsole by means of a suitable fastening means such as e.g. Velcro. Thus, a wearer of the shoe can selectively attach the protruding piece to a “normal” running shoe to create a shoe which tilts the wearer's foot in the appropriate direction.
  • FIG. 11 a shows a bottom view of a sole structure 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 11 b shows a side view of the same sole structure 1, where the sole structure is provided on the under side of a shoe, either as an outsole or alternatively as an add-on to the outsole, the means for causing the inclination of the sole structure located in or in connection to the front section 2 comprises a first protruding section 13 on an under side 9 of the sole structure at the outer edge 7 to create an inward tilting angle. To further improve the biomechanical conditions of a wearer of the shoe on which the sole structure 1 is arranged, providing transversal stability, comfort and an appropriate tilting angle, as will be shown in the following, the means for causing inclination may comprise one or more further protruding sections. As can be concluded from FIG. 11 a, the first protruding section 13 preferably, but optionally, extends longitudinally over a greater part of the front section 2. Further, the first protruding section 13 has a transversal width and thus extends transversally over a part of the sole structure 1, such as at least over a third of the width of the front section 2 of the sole structure 1. The transversally extending first protruding section 13 will advantageously have the sole structure 1 (or the shoe using the sole structure) smoothly and seamlessly roll over from its outer edge 7 initially contacting the underlying surface when in use towards the inner edge 4 of the sole structure.
  • Thus, again with reference to FIGS. 11 a and 11 b, in another embodiment of the sole structure 1 of the present invention, the means for causing inwards inclination further comprises a second protruding section 15 on the under side 9 of the sole structure at the inner edge 4 and located longitudinally on a level with, and being less protruding than, the first protruding section 13.
  • With further reference to FIGS. 11 a and 11 b, in yet another embodiment of the sole structure 1 of the present invention, the means for causing inwards inclination further comprises a third protruding section 14 on the under side 9 of the sole structure at the outer edge 7 and located in front of the first protruding section 13. The third protruding section 14 could be more or less protruding than the first protruding section 13. Alternatively, the third protruding section 14 could be equally protruding to the first protruding section 13.
  • As can be seen in FIGS. 11 a and 11 b, in still another embodiment of the sole structure 1 of the present invention, the means for causing inwards inclination further comprises a fourth protruding section 16 on the under side 9 of the sole structure at the inner edge 4 and located longitudinally on a level with, and being less protruding than, the third protruding section 14.
  • With further reference to FIGS. 11 a and 11 b, in still a further embodiment of the sole structure 1 of the present invention, the means for causing inwards inclination further comprises a fifth protruding section 17 on the under side 9 of the sole structure in front of the third 14 and the fourth 16 protruding section at a central part of the front section 2, and being less protruding than both the third 14 and the fourth 16 protruding section. Different combinations of the first 13, second 15, third 14, fourth 16 and fifth 17 protruding sections can be envisaged.
  • Thus, a combination of the different embodiments described with reference to FIGS. 11 a and 11 b would result in means for causing inclination of the sole structure 1 comprising up to five protruding portions 13-17. However, it should be noted that all possible combinations of the first 13, second 15, third 14, fourth 16 and fifth 17 protruding sections is possible. As further can be concluded from FIG. 11 a, the second 15, third 14, fourth 16 and fifth 17 protruding section, respectively, has a transversal width and thus extends transversally over a part of the sole structure 1, such as at least over a third of the width of the front section 2 of the sole structure 1. This will advantageously cause a smooth motion of the shoe when the user's bodyweight is distributed over the respective protruding section, thus causing center of gravity to move from one protruding section to another.
  • As further can be seen in FIG. 11 b, the front section 2 of the sole structure 1 is bent upwards in relation to the back section 3. In an embodiment of the present invention, the front section 2 forms and angle Δ with the surface on which the sole structure rests of 30 degrees or more. The advantages of having the front section 2 being bent upwards in relation to the back section 3 are more apparent in case of a rigid sole structure, or at least where the front section 2 of the sole structure is rigid or at least substantially non-flexible, namely that propulsion is increased when a wearer of the shoe on which the sole structure is arranged presses the front section 2 against the surface by means of her forefoot and thus causes the wearer to experience a so called trebuchet effect.
  • The sole structure according to the embodiments described with reference to any one of FIGS. 1-11 could be either rigid or flexible depending on the particular usage for which the respective sole structure is designated.
  • FIG. 12 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 12 b shows a side view of the same sole structure 1, where the sole structure is arranged at a shoe either as an insole, a midsole or an outsole. In this particular embodiment, the sole structure 1 is rigid and has a front section 2 being bent upwards in relation to a back section 3. The sole structure 1 is further preferably thin and of a light-weight material such as carbon fibre. In this embodiment (and the embodiment shown in FIG. 11), an arched section 11 defines a transition between the front section 2 and the back section 3, as can be seen in FIG. 12 b. The arched section 11 provides a smooth and gradual transition between the back section 3 and the front section 2.
  • To cause at least a portion of the sole structure 1 to be inclining in one of two transversal directions (either inwards or outwards) while preventing the sole structure from inclining in the other one of the two transversal directions when in use, The sole structure can be designed to have a greater thickness at its outer edge 7 in case inwards inclination is to be attained, or alternatively to have a greater thickness at its inner edge 4 in case outwards inclination is to be achieved. Thus, similar to previously described embodiments, the means for causing the inclination of the sole structure 1, which means is located in or in connection to the front section 2, could be a protruding section on an under side of the sole structure, at the outer edge 7 to create an inward tilting angle, or alternatively at the inner edge 4 to create an outward tilting angle. In an embodiment of the present invention, the front section 2 forms an angle with the surface on which the sole structure rests of 30 degrees or more.
  • As discussed in connection to FIG. 11 b, the front section 2 of the sole structure 1 is bent upwards in relation to the back section 3. The front section 2 thus forms and angle with the surface on which the sole structure rests of preferably 30 degrees or more, thereby increasing propulsion when a wearer of the shoe on which the sole structure 1 is arranged presses the front section 2 against the surface by means of her forefoot and thus causes the wearer to experience a trebuchet effect.
  • FIG. 13 a shows a top view of a sole structure 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, FIG. 13 b shows an elevated perspective view of an under side of a sole structure 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 13 c shows a front view of the same sole structure 1, which sole structure is arranged on a shoe either as an insole, a midsole or an outsole. In this embodiment, the sole structure 1 is rigid and has a front 3 o section 2 being bent upwards in relation to a back section 3. The sole structure 1 is further preferably thin and of a light-weight material such as carbon fibre. Further, in this particular embodiment, the transition between the front section 2 and the back section 3 of the sole structure is defined by a line B-B, thus creating a sharp and direct transition. Preferably, the sole structure 1 has a substantially uniform thickness.
  • In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 13 a-c, the means for causing the inclination of the sole structure 1 in an inwards direction is embodied in the form of a raised section 6 e arranged at the back section 3 of the sole structure in connection to the line B-B at the inner edge 4, which line defines the transition between the front section 2 and the back section 3. Thus, the raised section 6 e is located in direct connection to the front section 6 e. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 13 a-c, the raised section 6 e extends into the front section 2. However, in an embodiment, the raised section 6 e is located in connection to the front section 2 at the inner edge 4, at the transition defined by line B-B, without actually extending into the front section 2.
  • The raised section 6 e is such that when the sole structure or shoe is viewed from the inner edge 4, the raised section 6 e will have the appearance of an arch at the inner edge 4 which decreases in width and height towards the outer edge 7, where the rear of the back section 3 and the outer edge 7 lies in the same horizontal plane. Thus, the raised section 6 e is preferably at its highest and widest at the inner edge 4 and narrows in width and reduces in height in the direction of the outer edge 7. In use in a running shoe to which the sole structure 1 is adapted, the raised section 6 e located in the back section 3 at line B-B is positioned at the front foot pad of the wearer behind the big toe at the first metatarsal bone and thus narrows in width and reduces in height in the direction of the fifth metatarsal bone.
  • As can be seen in FIGS. 13 a-c, the raised section 6 e is arranged to extend from the inner edge 4 of the sole structure 1 to a first point 5 located on a distance from the inner edge 4, which distance constitutes at least a third of the width of the sole structure at the transition B-B between the front section 2 and the back section 3 and wherein the first point 5 is arranged to be located in a same horizontal plane as the back section 3 of the sole structure 1. As can be deducted from FIGS. 13 a-c, the first point 5 is located at the back section 3 in connection to transition line B-B. Other distances may be envisaged, such as half or two thirds of the width of the sole structure. Alternatively, the raised section 6 e can extend all the way to the outer edge 7. It can be seen that a first edge is created in the sole structure along a rupture line extending from the first point 5 to a second point 10, a second edge is created along a rupture line extending from the first point 5 to a third point 13, and a third edge is created along a rupture line extending from the first point 5 to a fourth point 18, this invention is particularly advantageous since inclining planes can be created along one or more rupture lines, thus creating highly elaborated inclinations which further easier can be adapted to individual requirements of a wearer, if necessary.
  • With reference to FIG. 13 a, the line B-B along which the front section 2 is bent upwards in relation to the back section 3 extends in an embodiment of the present invention from the inner edge 4 backwards towards the outer edge 7 of the sole structure 1. Preferably, the line forms an angle α with the transversal direction of the sole structure 1 in the range of 0-35°. In a further embodiment, the line B-B along which the front section 2 is bent upwards in relation to the back section 3 extends from the inner edge 4 forwards towards the outer edge 7 of the sole structure 1. Preferably, the line forms an angle α with the transversal direction of the sole structure 1 in the range of −15°-0°. Since the sole structure is adapted to a foot and is used with a shoe, the line roughly follows the natural angle/anatomy of the foot, i.e. the transition between the metatarsal bone and the phalanx bone of the foot, from the fifth (i.e. the little toe) to the second metatarsal to the fifth to the and second phalanx, respectively.
  • The front section 2 of the sole structure 1 is bent upwards in relation to the back section 3. The front section 2 thus forms an angle with the surface on which the sole structure rests of preferably 30 degrees or more, thereby increasing propulsion when a wearer of the shoe on which the sole structure 1 is arranged presses the front section 2 against the surface by means of her forefoot and thus causes the wearer to experience a trebuchet effect.
  • When the sole structure described with reference to FIGS. 13 a-c is in use and mounted in a running shoe, a wearer will by means of her weight press the raised section 6 e against the underlying surface, thus causing the sole structure 1 to be inwards inclining in a transversal direction. Further, when in use, the design of the sole structure 1 is such that inclination in the other of the two transversal directions, i.e. in this embodiment an outwards inclination, is prevented when the weight of the wearer presses the raised section 6 e against the underlying surface. Hence, the raised section 6 e will further improve the biomechanical conditions of a wearer of a shoe on which the sole structure according to embodiments of the invention is arranged, since it will aid the foot in tilting inwards and further facilitate transversal stability.
  • FIG. 14 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure 1 according to a further embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 14 b shows a cross section of the sole structure 1 taken along line I-I1, being arranged with a resilient section 19 at its inner edge 4, wherein a plane P1-P2 extending at an upper side of the sole structure, from an outer edge 7 to the inner edge 4 of the sole structure 1, is located at a greater distance from a surface on which the sole structure rests at the outer edge 7 than at the inner edge 4, when a force acts on the resilient section 19 (delimited by dashed lines L1-L2) and presses the resilient section against the surface. Advantageously, when contacting an underlying surface, the resilient section 19 will be compressed when acted upon by a force applied by the weight of a wearer of a shoe on which the sole structure 1 is arranged, and cause the foot to tilt inwards.
  • FIG. 15 a shows an elevated perspective view of a sole structure 1 according to a further embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 15 b shows a cross section of the sole structure 1 taken along line J-J1, being arranged with a resilient section 20 at its outer edge 7, wherein a plane P1-P2 extending at an upper side of the sole structure 1, from the outer edge 7 to an inner edge 4 of the sole structure 1, is located at a greater distance from a surface on which the sole structure is located at the inner edge 4 than at the outer edge 7, when a force acts on the resilient section 20 (delimited by dashed lines L1-L2) and presses the resilient section against the surface. Advantageously, when contacting an underlying surface, the resilient section 20 will be compressed when acted upon by a force applied by the weight of a wearer of a shoe on which the sole structure 1 is arranged, and cause the foot to tilt outwards.
  • Even though the invention has been described with reference to specific exemplifying embodiments thereof, many different alterations, modifications and the like will become apparent for those skilled in the art. The described embodiments are therefore not intended to limit the scope of the invention, as defined by the appended claims.

Claims (26)

1-35. (canceled)
36. A sole structure to be provided on an under side of a shoe, the sole structure having a front section and a back section, comprising at least a first protruding section being located in the front section on an under side of the sole structure at an outer edge of the sole structure for causing at least a portion of the sole structure to be inclining in an inwards transversal direction extending from the outer edge to an inner edge of the sole structure with respect to a surface on which the sole structure is located, which first protruding section extends longitudinally over a greater part of the front section, said sole structure further being arranged such that inclination in an outwards transversal direction is prevented when the sole structure is in use.
37. The sole structure of claim 36, wherein said first protruding section is arranged such that a plane extending in the inclining portion at an upper side of the sole structure, from the outer edge to the inner edge, is located at a greater distance from said surface at the outer edge than at the inner edge.
38. The sole structure of claim 37, wherein the plane extending at the upper side of the sole structure forms an angle with the surface on which the sole structure rests of 10 degrees or more.
39. The sole structure of claim 36, wherein the front section is bent upwards in relation to the back section.
40. The sole structure of claim 39, wherein the front section forms an angle with the surface on which the sole structure rests of 30 degrees or more.
41. The sole structure of claim 39, wherein an arched section defines a transition between the front section and the back section.
42. The sole structure of claim 36, wherein the sole structure is at least partly composed of a rigid material.
43. The sole structure of claim 42, wherein the sole structure has a substantially uniform thickness.
44. The sole structure of claim 39, wherein said portion of the sole structure is arranged to be tapered in the inwards transversal direction from the outer edge to the inner edge of the sole structure.
45. The sole structure of claim 44, further comprising a raised section on an upper side of the sole structure at the outer edge.
46. The sole structure of claim 44, further comprising a recessed section on an upper side of the sole structure at the inner edge.
47. The sole structure of claim 44, further comprising a recessed section on an under side of the sole structure at the inner edge.
48. The sole structure of claim 36, wherein said first protruding section comprises a protruding piece arranged to be removably attached to the under side of the sole structure in order to selectively create a substantially flat under side of the sole structure when the protruding piece is removed from the under side.
49. The sole structure of claim 36, further comprising a second protruding section on the under side of the sole structure at the inner edge of the front section and located longitudinally on a level with, and being less protruding than, the first protruding section.
50. The sole structure of claim 49, further comprising a third protruding section on the under side of the sole structure at the outer edge of the front section and located in front of the first protruding section.
51. The sole structure of claim 50, further comprising a fourth protruding section on the under side of the sole structure at the inner edge of the front section and located longitudinally on a level with, and being less protruding than, the third protruding section.
52. The sole structure of claim 51, further comprising a fifth protruding section on the under side of the sole structure in front of the third protruding section and the fourth protruding section at a central part of the front section, and being less protruding than both the third and the fourth protruding section.
53. The sole structure of claim 39, wherein a line (B-B) defines a transition between the front section and the back section (3).
54. The sole structure of claim 53, wherein the line (B-B) along which the front section is bent upwards in relation to the back section extends from the inner edge backwards towards the outer edge of the sole structure.
55. The sole structure of claim 53, wherein the line (B-B) along which the front section of the sole is bent upwards in relation to the back section of the sole forms an angle (a) with the transversal direction of the sole in the range of −15°-35°.
56. The sole structure of claim 53, further comprising a raised section at the back section of the sole structure in connection to the line (B-B) at the inner edge.
57. The sole structure of claim 56, wherein the raised section extends into the front section of the sole structure.
58. The sole structure of claim 56, wherein the raised section is arranged to extend from the inner edge of the sole structure to a point located at a distance from the inner edge, which distance constitutes at least a third of the width of the sole at the transition between the front section and the back section of the sole and wherein the point is arranged to be located in a same horizontal plane as the back section of the sole structure.
59. The sole structure of claim 56, wherein the raised section is arranged to extend from the inner edge of the sole structure such that the height of said raised section is greatest at the inner edge and successively decreases towards said point located in a same horizontal plane as the back section of the sole structure.
60. A shoe being arranged with the sole structure of claim 36.
US14/434,225 2012-10-09 2013-09-18 Sole structure for biomechanical control Abandoned US20150264998A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
SE1251143 2012-10-09
SE1251143-2 2012-10-09
PCT/EP2013/069346 WO2014056687A2 (en) 2012-10-09 2013-09-18 Sole structure for biomechanical control

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20150264998A1 true US20150264998A1 (en) 2015-09-24

Family

ID=49209375

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/434,225 Abandoned US20150264998A1 (en) 2012-10-09 2013-09-18 Sole structure for biomechanical control

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US20150264998A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2906065B1 (en)
WO (1) WO2014056687A2 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20180084864A1 (en) * 2015-03-23 2018-03-29 Asics Corporation Shoe having stabilizer
USD870432S1 (en) * 2018-02-12 2019-12-24 Nike, Inc. Shoe with sole having translucent panel

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2097759A (en) * 1933-11-30 1937-11-02 Ehrlich Edward Corrective sole
WO2010132364A2 (en) * 2009-05-12 2010-11-18 Georgetown University Orthotic devices
US8079159B1 (en) * 2007-03-06 2011-12-20 Adriano Rosa Footwear
US9072339B2 (en) * 2008-05-15 2015-07-07 Ashton Industries, Inc. Children's progressive development orthotic system
USD734933S1 (en) * 2013-09-25 2015-07-28 Erik Barr Rigid shoe insert with raised heel

Family Cites Families (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2568455B1 (en) * 1984-08-02 1987-08-28 Noel France Perfected shoe especially for the practice of a sport.
CA2003881A1 (en) * 1988-11-24 1990-05-24 Peter A. Wynd Full foot posted orthotic
US6119373A (en) * 1996-08-20 2000-09-19 Adidas International B.V. Shoe having an external chassis
DK0964625T3 (en) 1996-12-23 2005-03-14 Svante Berggren sole construction
FR2838308B1 (en) * 2002-04-15 2004-10-29 Pascal Chenut Proprioceptive orthopedic sole including modular correction means
ITMC20040120A1 (en) * 2004-09-27 2004-12-27 Riccardo Diomedi totally dismantled multifunctional Foot,
EP1714624A1 (en) * 2005-04-01 2006-10-25 Song, Ching-hui Foot orthosis
CZ307552B6 (en) * 2009-08-31 2018-11-28 Boty J HANÁK R, s.r.o. A shoe insole

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2097759A (en) * 1933-11-30 1937-11-02 Ehrlich Edward Corrective sole
US8079159B1 (en) * 2007-03-06 2011-12-20 Adriano Rosa Footwear
US9072339B2 (en) * 2008-05-15 2015-07-07 Ashton Industries, Inc. Children's progressive development orthotic system
WO2010132364A2 (en) * 2009-05-12 2010-11-18 Georgetown University Orthotic devices
USD734933S1 (en) * 2013-09-25 2015-07-28 Erik Barr Rigid shoe insert with raised heel

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20180084864A1 (en) * 2015-03-23 2018-03-29 Asics Corporation Shoe having stabilizer
USD870432S1 (en) * 2018-02-12 2019-12-24 Nike, Inc. Shoe with sole having translucent panel

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO2014056687A2 (en) 2014-04-17
EP2906065B1 (en) 2016-12-28
EP2906065A2 (en) 2015-08-19
WO2014056687A3 (en) 2014-07-17

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9572399B2 (en) Sole assembly for article of footwear with plural cushioning members
CA2915360C (en) Contoured insoles for footwear
RU2555664C1 (en) Footwear, especially athletic footwear
US7877897B2 (en) Shoe
US8316558B2 (en) Shoe
EP2247212B1 (en) Midsole for a running shoe
US10045589B2 (en) Sole construction for energy storage and rebound
US6115941A (en) Shoe with naturally contoured sole
EP0213257B1 (en) Shoe sole
US7073275B2 (en) Shoe sole with foot guidance
US7093379B2 (en) Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US9259050B2 (en) Footwear with orthotic midsole
US7082704B2 (en) Insole, and footwear system incorporating same
US8938889B2 (en) Footwear
JP5043843B2 (en) Insole
EP2247209B1 (en) Midsole for a shoe, in particular a running shoe
US7610695B2 (en) Shoe sole with foot guidance
US8266825B2 (en) Shoe sole element
US10264847B2 (en) Footwear with metatarsal offloading
US7036244B1 (en) Rigid articulated Pointe shoe
EP2848144B1 (en) Sole provided with outer sole and midsole
RU2461345C2 (en) Footwear
US5784808A (en) Independent impact suspension athletic shoe
RU2540768C2 (en) Sole
US5826351A (en) Shoe sole and shoe and sandal including the sole

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: BS SWEEDSPEED AB, SWEDEN

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BERGGREN, SVANTE;REEL/FRAME:035471/0323

Effective date: 20150415

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION