US20150008041A1 - High Stiffness Tool For Expanding A Wellbore - Google Patents

High Stiffness Tool For Expanding A Wellbore Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20150008041A1
US20150008041A1 US14/322,420 US201414322420A US2015008041A1 US 20150008041 A1 US20150008041 A1 US 20150008041A1 US 201414322420 A US201414322420 A US 201414322420A US 2015008041 A1 US2015008041 A1 US 2015008041A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
mandrel
reamer
housing
cutter block
expandable
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US14/322,420
Inventor
David R. Hall
Jonathan D. Marshall
Adam R. Aquino
Scott S. Dahlgren
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Schlumberger Technology Corp
Smith International Inc
Original Assignee
Schlumberger Technology Corp
Smith International Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201361842034P priority Critical
Priority to US201361859665P priority
Application filed by Schlumberger Technology Corp, Smith International Inc filed Critical Schlumberger Technology Corp
Priority to US14/322,420 priority patent/US20150008041A1/en
Publication of US20150008041A1 publication Critical patent/US20150008041A1/en
Assigned to SCHLUMBERGER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION reassignment SCHLUMBERGER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: AQUINO, ADAM R., DAHLGREN, SCOTT S., HALL, DAVID R., MARSHALL, Jonathan D.
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B10/00Drill bits
    • E21B10/26Drill bits with leading portion, i.e. drill bits with a pilot cutter; Drill bits for enlarging the borehole, e.g. reamers
    • E21B10/32Drill bits with leading portion, i.e. drill bits with a pilot cutter; Drill bits for enlarging the borehole, e.g. reamers with expansible cutting tools
    • E21B10/322Drill bits with leading portion, i.e. drill bits with a pilot cutter; Drill bits for enlarging the borehole, e.g. reamers with expansible cutting tools cutter shifted by fluid pressure
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B10/00Drill bits
    • E21B10/26Drill bits with leading portion, i.e. drill bits with a pilot cutter; Drill bits for enlarging the borehole, e.g. reamers
    • E21B10/32Drill bits with leading portion, i.e. drill bits with a pilot cutter; Drill bits for enlarging the borehole, e.g. reamers with expansible cutting tools
    • E21B10/327Drill bits with leading portion, i.e. drill bits with a pilot cutter; Drill bits for enlarging the borehole, e.g. reamers with expansible cutting tools the cutter being pivoted about a longitudinal axis
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B7/00Special methods or apparatus for drilling
    • E21B7/28Enlarging drilled holes, e.g. by counterboring

Abstract

A downhole tool may be used to enlarge and widen a wellbore. The downhole tool may include a reamer with a mandrel that includes a rib extending radially outward from a cylindrical body of the mandrel. The rib may define one or more grooves. A cutter block or other expandable member may be positioned adjacent the rib and may include one or more extensions that mate with the grooves. The rib and cutter block may be positioned within a slot of a housing. The housing may also include one or more grooves on a surface along the slot. The grooves along the slot and the grooves on rib may mate with extensions on opposing sides of the expandable member to define a path by which the expandable member moves between expanded and retracted positions.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of, and priority to, U.S. Patent Application Ser. No. 61/842,034, filed on Jul. 2, 2013 and entitled “HIGH STIFFNESS REAMER WITH INDEPENDENTLY EXPANDING CUTTING TOOLS” and to U.S. Patent Application Ser. No. 61/859,665, filed on Jul. 29, 2013 and entitled “HIGH STIFFNESS REAMER WITH EXTENDED DEGRADATION TOOLS”. The foregoing applications are expressly incorporated herein by this reference in their entireties.
  • BACKGROUND
  • In the drilling of oil and gas wells, a drill bit is coupled to a drill string and rotated. Fluid may flow through the drill string and out nozzles in the drill bit. The fluid may cool the drill bit, flush cuttings away from the face of the drill bit, and carry the cuttings to the surface of the wellbore.
  • Drilling may be used to create a wellbore having a particular diameter, but the diameter of a portion of the wellbore may be enlarged for various reasons. For example, the diameter of the wellbore may be enlarged to provide clearance for running casing, to obtain adequate annular space in the hole for cementing, to enlarge zones for gravel pack completion or cementing, and for other purposes.
  • Reamers (also known as underreamers) are used for enlarging the diameter of the wellbore. A reamer generally has two states, namely an inactive or retracted state where the cutter blocks of the reamer are in a radially inward, retracted position and the reamer maintains a diameter small enough to pass through the existing wellbore or casing strings, and an active, expanded, or deployed state where cutter blocks are in an outward, radially extended position. In the active state, the cutter blocks can be used to enlarge the diameter of the wellbore.
  • SUMMARY
  • In accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure, a reamer for widening a wellbore may include a housing. The housing may have various slots therein, and multiple expandable members may be located within the slots. A mandrel inside the housing may include ribs that also extend into the slots.
  • In accordance with another embodiment of the present disclosure, a method for widening a wellbore may include tripping a downhole tool into the wellbore. The downhole tool may include a reamer with a mandrel coupled to a cutter block. Fluid may be provided to the downhole tool through the mandrel, and the fluid may be used to expand the cutter block. The cutter block may expand relative to the mandrel along a path defined by a rib that extends radially from the mandrel. The downhole tool may then be rotated while the cutter block is expanded to widen the wellbore.
  • In another embodiment, a reamer is disclosed and includes a mandrel including a cylindrical body, a flow bore, and a rib. The rib may extend radially from the cylindrical body. A cylindrical housing may include a slot and the rib of the mandrel may be positioned in the slot. An expandable member in the slot and between the rib and a side of the slot may be hydraulically actuated by a piston assembly. The piston assembly may communicate with the flow bore of the mandrel to obtain the hydraulic force to move the expandable member to an expanded position. A biasing member coupled to the cylindrical housing may mechanically drive the expandable member to a retracted position.
  • This summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts that are further described below in the detailed description. This summary is not intended to identify key or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used as an aid in limiting the scope of the claimed subject matter.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic view of a drilling system according to some embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 2-1 is a perspective view of a reamer in an inactive or collapsed state, according to some embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 2-2 is a perspective view of the reamer of FIG. 2-1, with the reamer in an active or expanded state, according to some embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a mandrel for use with the reamer of FIGS. 2-1 and 2-2, according to some embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of another reamer for use with a reamer, according to some embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 5 is a partial perspective, exploded view of a reamer for expanding a diameter of a wellbore, according to some embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 6 is a partial cross-sectional view of the reamer of FIG. 5, according to some embodiments of the present disclosure; and
  • FIG. 7 is a partial perspective view of another reamer for expanding a diameter of a wellbore, according to some embodiments of the present disclosure.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • In accordance with some aspects of the present disclosure, embodiments herein relate to downhole tools. More particularly, embodiments disclosed herein may relate to downhole tools and bottomhole assemblies (“BHA”) that include an underreamer, which may also be referred to as a reamer. An example BHA may include a reamer that may be used to expand a diameter of a wellbore along a full or partial length of the wellbore. In still other aspects, embodiments of the present disclosure may relate to high stiffness reamers including a mandrel guiding cutter blocks or other expandable members of the reamer as the expandable members move between retracted and expanded positions.
  • Referring now to FIG. 1, a schematic diagram is provided of an example downhole system 100 that may utilize wellbore enlargement systems, assemblies, devices, and methods in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure. FIG. 1 shows an example wellbore 101 formed in a formation 102. A portion of the wellbore 101 may be cased or, as shown in FIG. 1, the wellbore 101 may be uncased or an openhole wellbore.
  • In the particular embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, a BHA 103 may be provided to facilitate enlargement of the wellbore 101, to cut into the formation 102, and the like. The BHA 103 may be connected to a drill string 104. In FIG. 1, the drill string 104 is illustrated as extending from the surface and having the BHA 103 suspended therefrom. The drill string 104 may be composed of one or more tubular members. The tubular members of the drill string 104 may themselves have any number of configurations. As an example, the drill string 104 may include segmented/jointed drill pipe, slim drill pipe, wired drill pipe, coiled tubing, or the like.
  • The BHA 103 may include any number of components that may be used to perform one or more downhole operations. As an example, the BHA 103 may include a drill bit 105, one or more stabilizers 106, a reamer 107, jars, drill collars, communication subs, measurement-while-drilling (MWD) tools, logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools, other components, or any combination of the foregoing. In some embodiments, the stabilizers 106 may be used to maintain the BHA 103 in a centered position within the wellbore 101. In at least some embodiments, such centralization may reduce or minimize vibrations within the BHA 103 and the drill string 104 during a downhole operation, may center the drill bit 105, the reamer 107, or other components during a wellbore enlargement or other downhole operation, or provide other features.
  • The drill bit 105 may include a roller cone bit, a fixed cutter bit, a percussion hammer bit, a diamond impregnated bit, or some other drill bit configured for use in for drilling into the formation 102 surrounding the wellbore 101 and extending the length of the wellbore 101. In other embodiments, however, the drill bit 105 may have other structures or uses. For instance, the drill bit 105 may be a milling bit for downhole milling operations (e.g., grinding up plugs or downhole tools during a remedial operation). In still other embodiments, the drill bit 105 may include another reamer for expanding the diameter of the wellbore 101.
  • In the particular embodiment shown in FIG. 1, a reamer 107 may be provided. The reamer 107 may be used to expand a diameter of a portion of the wellbore 101. In at least some embodiments, the reamer 107 may include expandable members that may be used to expand a diameter of the wellbore 101 beyond the diameter formed by the drill bit 105. In at least some embodiments, the expandable members of the reamer 107 may include cutter blocks that can be selectively expanded and retracted. For instance, when the BHA 103 is tripped/inserted into the wellbore 101, the cutter blocks may be in a retracted position and have a diameter that is about equal to, or less than, a diameter of the wellbore 101. Upon reaching a desired depth, formation structure, or the like, a signal may be sent from the surface (e.g., through wireless, mud pulse, fluid pressure, ball drop, string rotation, or other activation techniques) to expand the cutter blocks so that they engage the formation 102 around the wellbore 101. As the BHA 103 is rotated and moved axially within the wellbore, the expandable members may cut radially outward into the formation 102 and expand the diameter of the wellbore 101 along an axial length of the wellbore 101.
  • The particular components included on the BHA 103 may be varied in any number manners, and the BHA 103 may include additional or other components 108 for use in any number of manners. By way of example, other components of the BHA 103, or which may be coupled to the BHA, may include one or more LWD tools, one or more MWD tools, memory or data storage devices, motors (e.g., mud motors, turbine motors, positive displacement motors, etc.), rotary steerable and directional drilling equipment (e.g., point-the-bit components, push-the-bit components, pad-in-bit components), casing-while-drilling or liner-while-drilling tools, disconnect subs or equipment, circulation subs, communication equipment (e.g., pulsers, a signal processor, acoustic processors, wireless processors, signal boosters, fiber optic components, mud pulse telemetry receivers/transmitters), cleaning nozzles, plugs, anchors, packers, isolation/sealing devices, liner hangers, other devices or tools, or some combination of the foregoing.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, a drilling rig 108 may be used to convey the drill string 104 and BHA 103 into the wellbore 101. In an example embodiment, the drilling rig 108 may include a derrick and hoisting system 109, a rotating system, a mud circulation system, or other components. The derrick and hoisting system 109 may suspend the drill string 104, and the drill string 104 may pass through a wellhead 110 and into the wellbore 101. In some embodiments, the drilling rig 108 or the derrick and hoisting system 109 may include a draw works, a fast line, a crown block, drilling line, a traveling block and hook, a swivel, a deadline, or other components. An example rotating system may be used, for instance, to rotate the drill string 104 and thereby also rotate one or more components of the BHA 103. Example rotating systems may include a top drive, kelly, rotary table, or other components. Although the downhole system 100 is shown in FIG. 1 as being on land, those of skill in the art will recognize that embodiments of the present disclosure are also equally applicable to offshore and marine environments.
  • Turning now to FIGS. 2-1 and 2-2, partial perspective views of a downhole tool are provided. In particular, FIG. 2-1 illustrates the downhole tool as a reamer 207 in a retracted, inactive, or collapsed state while FIG. 2-2 illustrates the downhole tool as a reamer 207 in an expanded or active state.
  • The reamer 207 may include any number of components or features that allow it to be used in a downhole operation, such as an operation to expand the diameter of a wellbore. For instance, the reamer 207 may include a mandrel 211, a fluid inlet 212, a fluid outlet 213, one or more pistons 214, one or more biasing member 215, one or more expandable members 216, other components, or any combination of the foregoing.
  • The reamer 207 may be designed to allow expansion of the one or more expandable members 216 as a result of increased pressure due to flow through the fluid inlet 212. Fluid entering the inlet 212 may flow through a bore in the mandrel 212 and out the fluid outlet 213. The flow and increased pressure may occur when the reamer 207 reaches a certain depth within a wellbore, and may act on the one or more pistons 214 to drive the expandable members 216 radially outward and into engagement with the formation around the wellbore. Rotation and axial movement of the reamer 207 may then allow the wellbore to be widened.
  • The reamer 207 may further include a body or housing 217 in which one or more slots 218 may be formed. The housing 217 may be substantially cylindrical, hexagonal, octagonal, or have some other regular or irregular geometric cross-sectional shape. The housing 217 may be formed of a single component, or multiple components may collectively make up the housing 217.
  • The housing 217 may be hollow or tubular, and the slots 218 may, in some embodiments, extend through a thickness of a wall of the housing 217. In some embodiments, the slots 218 may be aligned with the expandable members 216. As a result, when the fluid flow increases pressure in the mandrel 211 and the pistons 214, the pistons 214 may move (e.g., in an uphole direction) and cause the expandable members 216 to move radially outward through the slots 218. When the fluid pressure is reduced in the mandrel 211, the pistons 214 may move in an opposite direction (e.g., in a downhole direction) and allow the expandable members 216 to move radially inward through the slots 218, and toward a compressed or inactive position.
  • In some embodiments, the pistons 214 (or a single piston) may be located around the mandrel 211 and proximate the fluid outlet 213. The housing 217 may be located axially between the pistons 214 and the one or more biasing members 215. As discussed in greater detail with respect to FIG. 6, the biasing members 215 (or a single biasing member) may be positioned around the mandrel and expansion of the expandable members 216 may overcome the bias of the biasing members 215 (e.g., by compressing the springs or other biasing members 215). As the fluid stops flowing, or as the fluid flow decreases, the biasing members 215 may cause the expandable members 216 to move toward the inactive or retracted position. For instance, the biasing members 216 may cause the expandable members 216 (or the housing 217) to move toward the pistons 214, which may potentially also move the pistons 214.
  • As discussed herein, as fluid flows from the fluid inlet 212 and through the reamer 207 (e.g., toward or through the fluid outlet 213), the expandable members 216 may be actuated from collapsed, inactive, or retracted positions to expanded or active positions. In some embodiments, the collapsed, inactive, or retracted position of the expandable members 216 (or the collapsed, inactive, or retracted state of the reamer 207) may be defined as when the expandable members 216 are substantially positioned within the housing 217. The reamer 207 may widen the wellbore by cutting, shearing, impacting, or otherwise degrading formation material adjacent the expandable members 216 when the reamer 207 is in the expanded or active state. In some embodiments, the expandable members 216 may move at equal rates or distances when expanded or retracted. In other embodiments, however, the expandable members 216 may move at different rates or distances. For instance, each of the pistons 214 or biasing members 215 may be differently configured to operate at a different time or rate. When each expandable member 216 is expanded, each expandable member 216 may contribute to expanding and widening the wellbore.
  • In some embodiments, the housing 217 and/or the mandrel 211 may be used in expanding and/or retracting the expandable members 216. As seen in FIGS. 2-1 and 2-2, for instance, the housing 217 may include one or more grooves 219 that mate with one or more ridges, splines, or other extensions 220 of the expandable members 216. In particular, the extensions 220 may be formed in opposing lateral side surfaces of the expandable members 216, and corresponding grooves 219 may be formed on the sides of the housing 217 on each side of the expandable members 216.
  • The grooves 219 and extensions 220 may, in some embodiments, be formed at an angle relative to the longitudinal axis of the reamer 207. For instance, the grooves 219 and extensions 220 may be formed at an angle that is between 5° and 90° from the longitudinal axis of the reamer 207. More particularly, the angle may be within a range having lower and/or upper limits including any of 5°, 10°, 15°, 17°, 20°, 23°, 25°, 30°, 40°, 50°, 60°, 75°, 80°, 85°, 90°, and any values therebetween. For instance, the angle may be less than 40°, greater than 15°, between 15° and 30°, between 17° and 23°, between 20° and 60°, or between 75° and 90°. In one example, the angle may be 90°, which may facilitate moving the expandable members 216 in a radial direction that is perpendicular to the mandrel 211 and/or the longitudinal axis of the reamer 207. In another example, such as where the angle is less than 90°, the expandable members 216 may expand and retract by moving both longitudinally and axially along a path that is non-parallel and non-perpendicular relative to the mandrel 211, the housing 217, or the longitudinal axis.
  • In the same or other embodiments, the mandrel 211 may also include grooves 221 that mate with the extensions 220 of the expandable members 216 (e.g., extensions 220 on an opposite side of the expandable members 216 as compared to the extensions 220 that mate with the grooves 219). In some embodiments, the grooves 221 may be angled relative to the longitudinal axis of the reamer 207. For instance, the grooves 221 may be at a same or different angle than the grooves 219. In some embodiments, the extensions 210 on opposing sides of the expandable members 216 may be at the same angle, while in other embodiments the extensions 220 on opposing sides of the expandable members 216 may be oriented at different angles.
  • As discussed in more detail herein, one or more ribs 222 may be coupled to, or integrally formed with, the mandrel 211. The ribs 222 may include wings, extensions, appendages, or other features that extend radially outward from a central body or tube of the mandrel 211. The ribs 222 may align with the slots 218 and the expandable members 216. For instance, each rib 222 may be located along a side of one expandable member 216. The grooves 221 in the rib 222 may mate with the extensions 220, so that as the expandable members 216 expand or retract a corresponding one of the ribs 222 may engage the extensions 220 and guide the expandable members 216. In other embodiments, the ribs 222 may be formed or positioned on both sides of the expandable members 216. Further, while the illustrated embodiment may include grooves 219, 221 on the housing 217 and ribs 222, respectively, in other embodiments, the grooves 219, 221 may be replaced with extensions and the extensions 220 on the expandable members 216 may be replaced with grooves.
  • The ribs 222 may extend radially from a cylindrical or other similarly shaped body of the mandrel 211, and may assist in holding the expandable members 216 in an expanded position and/or in guiding the expandable members 216 between expanded and retracted positions. In some embodiments, moment forces on the expandable members 216 may increase as the radial distance between the expandable members 216 and a longitudinal axis of the reamer 207 increases. By fixing the ribs 222 to the mandrel 211, additional support for the expandable members 216 may be provided at or proximate the outer surface of the housing 207.
  • In particular, the ribs 222 may extend at least partially through the slots 218 in some embodiments. For instance, the ribs 222 may extend radially outward from the body of the mandrel 211 and to a position that is radially adjacent the housing 217. In some embodiments, the ribs 222 may extend radially outward to be about aligned with the outer surface of the housing 217. As will be appreciated by a person having ordinary skill in the art in view of the present disclosure, when the ribs 222 have a radius that is greater than a radius of the opening or bore within the housing 217, the housing 217 may not be able to slide over the mandrel 211 and the ribs 222. In such an embodiment, the housing 217 may be formed of multiple segments that can be positioned around the mandrel 211 and secured together using welding, clamps, clasps, mechanical fasteners, or other connectors. In other embodiments, the ribs 222 may not be integral with the mandrel 211, and the ribs 222 may be coupled to the mandrel 211 after the mandrel 211 is installed within the housing 217. In some embodiments, the mandrel 211 may hold the fluid pressure within the reamer 207 and the housing 217 may not be fluid-tight.
  • The reamer 207 may include any number of different configurations for the mandrel 211, ribs 222, housing 217, expandable members 216, and the like. For instance, the reamer 207 may include three (3) expandable members 216. As a result, there may also be three (3) slots 218 in the housing 217, and three (3) ribs 222. In other embodiments there may be six (6) ribs 222. The number of expandable members 216 may, however, be varied, and in other embodiments there may be one (1), two (2), four (4), five (5), six (6), eight (8), ten (10), or more expandable members 216.
  • FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate example mandrels 311, 411 in additional detail. The mandrels 311, 411 may be used in a downhole tool that includes expandable members. More particularly, the mandrels 311, 411 may be used to provide additional structural integrity or higher stiffness for expandable members such as cutter blocks of a reamer.
  • More particularly, FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a mandrel 311 for use in a reamer or other downhole tool. The mandrel 311 may include a body 323 and a plurality of ribs 322 extending radially from the body 323. In some embodiments, the body 323 may be substantially cylindrical, and the cross-sectional shape of the body 323 may be substantially constant. In other embodiments, however, the cross-sectional shape of the body 323 may vary. For instance, FIG. 3 illustrates a body 323 that changes in size. More particularly, the distal end portions may have a larger cross-sectional size relative to an intermediate portion 324. In at least the illustrated embodiment, the ribs 322 may extend radially outward from the intermediate portion 324. Grooves 321 in the ribs 322 may extend along a full radial length of the ribs 322. As a result, cutter blocks or other expandable members that retract into a reamer or other downhole tool may retract to a position that is proximate the reduced diameter of the intermediate portion 324. By retracting further into the downhole tool, corresponding cutter blocks or other expandable members may have an increased size allowing for a larger range of expansion and a greater ratio between the expanded radius and the retracted radius of the downhole tool. For instance, in some embodiments, the ratio of a downhole tool in expanded state relative to the retracted state may be between 1.15:1 and 1.75:1. In other embodiments, the ratio may be less than 1.15:1 or greater than 1.75:1. When the mandrel 311 thus includes a plurality of ribs 322 that extend radially outward from the body 323 and radially into the body 323 of the mandrel 311, a corresponding reamer may expand a wellbore to a larger diameter due to an increased range of motion that the cutter blocks or other expandable members can move through.
  • In FIG. 3, the mandrel 311 may include three (3) ribs 322 extending radially outward from the body 322. The three (3) ribs 322 may be spaced circumferentially around the mandrel 311 at 120° increments, such that there may be substantially equal spacing between the three ribs 322. In other embodiments, however, a mandrel may include or otherwise be coupled to more or fewer than three (3) ribs. FIG. 4, for instance, is a perspective view of a mandrel 411 for a reamer or other downhole tool, in which a body 423 is coupled to two (2) ribs 422. The two (2) ribs 422 may be circumferentially offset around the mandrel at 180° increments relative to a longitudinal axis of the mandrel 411. With the mandrel 411 including two (2) ribs 422, a corresponding reamer may be able to expand a wellbore to a larger diameter than may be possible for a similarly sized configuration that includes a larger number of ribs on the mandrel. When the reamer is in a retracted state, a larger number of ribs 422 may be limited in the positions they could occupy in or along the body 423 of the mandrel 411 due to interference between one another. This could limit the size of a reamer that could fit inside a finite space defined by the diameter of a wellbore, or the size of an expandable member or cutter block that could fit inside a finite space defined by a housing of a reamer.
  • FIG. 5 is a partial perspective view of a reamer 507 according to still another embodiment of the present disclosure. The reamer 507 may include a plurality of expandable members 516, a plurality of housings 517, and a mandrel 511. The mandrel 511 may include, or be coupled to, a plurality of ribs 522 cooperating with corresponding slots 518 in a corresponding one of the plurality of housings 517. A cutter block or other expandable member 516 and a rib 522 may be positioned in each corresponding slot 518.
  • The expandable members 516 may include extensions 520 on one or both sides thereof. One side of the expandable members 516 (and thus the extensions 520 on that side) may be adjacent the housing 517, while the other side of the expandable members (and thus the extensions 520 on that side) may be adjacent a corresponding rib 522. The housing 517 may include grooves 519 on a side adjacent the slot 518 and a corresponding expandable member 516. The grooves 519 may mate with the extensions 520 on the expandable member 516. The rib 522 may include one or more grooves 521 on a side adjacent the corresponding expandable member 516 such that the extensions 520 on the expandable member 516 can slide along the grooves 521 in the rib 522.
  • Each expandable member 516 may be positioned between a corresponding rib 522 and a housing 517. In other words, the grooves 521 on the rib 522 and the slot 518 may function as tracks on which the extensions 520 on the expandable member 516 may slide when actuated. The orientation of the expandable member 516 with respect to a mating rib 522 and mating housing 517 may allow the expandable member 516 to be in contact with both the housing 517 and the rib 522, thereby distributing the stress associated with the reaming or other downhole operation over the length of the expandable member 516, and along the mandrel 511 and the housing 517. Each of the plurality of expandable members 516 may be similarly oriented.
  • FIG. 6 is a partial cross-sectional view of a reamer 607 in accordance with another embodiment of the present disclosure. The reamer 607 may include a mandrel 611, a fluid inlet 612, and a fluid outlet 613. The mandrel 611 may define a flow bore 624 having a substantially cylindrical shape, and which optionally extends between the fluid inlet 612 and the fluid outlet 613. A fluid may pass through the flow bore 624. The mandrel 611 may further include a plurality of ribs 622 that extend radially outward from a longitudinal axis of the mandrel 611.
  • In some embodiments, the reamer 607 may further include a plurality of piston assemblies 614 and at least one biasing member 615 (e.g., a compression spring). The reamer 607 may also include a plurality of housings 617, each of which may include or define at least one slot 618. The plurality of piston assemblies 614 may be located radially around the mandrel 611 and/or proximate the fluid outlet 613. The plurality of housings 617 and/or the at least one biasing member 615 may also be located radially around the mandrel 611 (e.g., a reduced cross-sectional area portion or body of the mandrel 611). The plurality of housings 617 may be located longitudinally between the least one biasing member 615 and the plurality of piston assemblies 614. In some embodiments, the plurality of piston assemblies 614 may be coupled to the plurality of housings 617 by a plurality of connectors 625.
  • In at least some embodiments, the plurality of piston assemblies 614 may be in fluid communication with the flow bore 624. For instance, a plurality of fluid channels 626 that extend radially between the flow bore 624 and the plurality of piston assemblies 614 may fluidly couple the plurality of piston assemblies 614 to the flow bore 624. As a result, when a fluid flows from the fluid inlet 612 toward the fluid outlet 613, some of the fluid may enter the plurality of fluid channels 626. This flow of fluid in the fluid channels 626 may actuate the plurality of piston assemblies 614. Due to the connector 625 connecting the plurality of piston assemblies 614 to the plurality of housings 617, the plurality of housings 617 may then move. When the plurality of housings 617 moves axially (e.g., in an uphole direction toward the fluid inlet 612 and the at least one biasing member 615) with respect to the mandrel 611, the expandable members 616 may be forced to move to an expanded position. As the plurality of housings 617 are actuated toward the at least one biasing member 615, the at least one biasing member 615 may be compressed.
  • As the fluid stops or slows through the flow bore 624 and the plurality of fluid channels 626, the at least one biasing member 615 may actuate the plurality of housings 617 and move the plurality of housings 617 toward the plurality of piston assemblies 614 (e.g., in a downhole direction). When the plurality of housings 617 are actuated toward the plurality of piston assemblies 614, the expandable members 616 may be de-actuated to a collapsed position. Thus, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 6, the reamer 607 may be actuated and de-actuated by moving the plurality of housings 617 relative to the mandrel 611. In other embodiments, however, the reamer 607 may activated and de-actuated by moving the expandable members 616 relative to the mandrel 611 and while the plurality of housings 617 remain stationary relative to the mandrel 611.
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a reamer 707 according to still other embodiments of the present disclosure. The reamer 707 may include a mandrel 711, a plurality of housings 717, a plurality of expandable members 716, and a plurality of piston assemblies within a piston section 714. The mandrel 711 may include a substantially cylindrical shaped body, and a plurality of ribs 722 that extend radially outward therefrom. Together, the plurality of housings 717 may form a substantially cylindrical shape around a portion of the mandrel 711. In some embodiments, one of the plurality of housings 717 may include or define a slot 718 in which a rib 722 and an expandable member 716 are located. The expandable member 716 may be positioned between a side of the rib 722 and a side of the slot 718. A particular piston assembly (see FIG. 6) of the piston section 714 may correspond to each expandable member 716 or housing 717. For instance, one of the plurality of housings 717 may be coupled to a corresponding piston assembly using a connector (e.g., connector 625 of FIG. 6). Such a connector may allow for axial movement of a housing 717 but restrict rotational or radial movement of individual housings of the plurality of housings 717. Connectors may also couple different housings 717 together, in addition to coupling corresponding piston assemblies together. In some embodiments, the connector also may ensure that one piston assembly is aligned with a corresponding housing 617, as well as ensure that another piston assembly is aligned with its corresponding housing 617. This may allow each expansion region 727 of the reamer 707 to move independently of one another in an axial direction. An expansion region may be defined as an expandable member 716 along with a corresponding one of the housings 717 and piston assemblies 714.
  • The plurality of housings 717 may be coupled together in any number of manners. For instance, mechanical fasteners, slot-and-tab, and other connectors may be used. By way of illustration, in some embodiments, each of the plurality of housings 717 may include a side with a slot that runs parallel to the longitudinal axis of the mandrel 711, and a side with a tab or ridge, such that a ridge on one of the plurality of housings 717 may fit into a slot on an adjacent one of the plurality of housings 717. Each of the plurality of housings 717 may be similarly fastened to their respective adjacent housings 717. Each of the plurality of piston assemblies of the piston section 714 may be similarly fastened to their respective adjacent piston assemblies.
  • Using slots and ridges to join adjacent components may allow components to move in an axial direction, as may be allowed by using the connectors, while potentially restricting or preventing relative rotational or radial movement between adjoining components. In some embodiments, for instance, one piston assembly may exert an axial force on a corresponding housing, which may actuate an expandable member to an expanded or active position. Though each additional expandable member may be likewise actuated to an expanded or active position, each of the expandable members may be in slightly different spatial orientations due to inconsistencies in geometry resulting from wear or manufacturing error.
  • In the description herein, various relational terms are provided to facilitate an understanding of various aspects of some embodiments of the present disclosure. Relational terms such as “bottom,” “below,” “top,” “above,” “back,” “front,” “left”, “right”, “rear”, “forward”, “up”, “down”, “horizontal”, “vertical”, “clockwise”, “counterclockwise,” “upper”, “lower”, and the like, may be used to describe various components, including their operation and/or illustrated position relative to one or more other components. Relational terms do not indicate a particular orientation for each embodiment within the scope of the description or claims. For example, a component of a bottomhole assembly that is described as “below” another component may be further from the surface while within a vertical wellbore, but may have a different orientation during assembly, when removed from the wellbore, or in a deviated borehole. Accordingly, relational descriptions are intended solely for convenience in facilitating reference to various components, but such relational aspects may be reversed, flipped, rotated, moved in space, placed in a diagonal orientation or position, placed horizontally or vertically, or similarly modified. Certain descriptions or designations of components as “first,” “second,” “third,” and the like may also be used to differentiate between similar components. Such language is not intended to limit a component to a singular designation. As such, a component referenced in the specification as the “first” component may be the same or different than a component that is referenced in the claims as a “first” component.
  • Furthermore, while the description or claims may refer to “an additional” or “other” element, feature, aspect, component, or the like, it does not preclude there being a single element, or more than one, of the additional element. Where the claims or description refer to “a” or “an” element, such reference is not be construed that there is just one of that element, but is instead to be inclusive of other components and understood as “at least one” of the element. It is to be understood that where the specification states that a component, feature, structure, function, or characteristic “may,” “might,” “can,” or “could” be included, that particular component, feature, structure, or characteristic is provided in some embodiments, but is optional for other embodiments of the present disclosure. The terms “couple,” “coupled,” “connect,” “connection,” “connected,” “in connection with,” and “connecting” refer to “in direct connection with,” or “in connection with via one or more intermediate elements or members.” Components that are “integral” or “integrally” formed include components made from the same piece of material, or sets of materials, such as by being commonly molded or cast from the same material, or commonly machined from the same piece of material stock. Components that are “integral” should also be understood to be “coupled” together.
  • Although various example embodiments have been described in detail herein, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate in view of the present disclosure that many modifications are possible in the example embodiments without materially departing from the present disclosure. Accordingly, any such modifications are intended to be included in the scope of this disclosure. Likewise, while the disclosure herein contains many specifics, these specifics should not be construed as limiting the scope of the disclosure or of any of the appended claims, but merely as providing information pertinent to one or more specific embodiments that may fall within the scope of the disclosure and the appended claims. Any described features from the various embodiments disclosed may be employed in combination.
  • A person having ordinary skill in the art should realize in view of the present disclosure that equivalent constructions do not depart from the spirit and scope of the present disclosure, and that various changes, substitutions, and alterations may be made to embodiments disclosed herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the present disclosure. Equivalent constructions, including functional “means-plus-function” clauses are intended to cover the structures described herein as performing the recited function, including both structural equivalents that operate in the same manner, and equivalent structures that provide the same function. It is the express intention of the applicant not to invoke means-plus-function or other functional claiming for any claim except for those in which the words ‘means for’ appear together with an associated function. Each addition, deletion, and modification to the embodiments that falls within the meaning and scope of the claims is to be embraced by the claims.
  • While embodiments disclosed herein may be used in oil, gas, or other hydrocarbon exploration or production environments, such environments are merely illustrative. Systems, tools, assemblies, reamers, wellbore expansion systems, methods, and other components of the present disclosure, or which would be appreciated in view of the disclosure herein, may be used in other applications and environments. In other embodiments, cutting inserts, cutting tools, milling tools, methods of milling, methods of cutting, methods of initiating a cutout, or other embodiments discussed herein, or which would be appreciated in view of the disclosure herein, may be used outside of a downhole environment, including in connection with other systems, including within automotive, aquatic, aerospace, hydroelectric, manufacturing, other industries, or even in other downhole environments. The terms “well,” “wellbore,” “borehole,” and the like are therefore also not intended to limit embodiments of the present disclosure to a particular industry. A wellbore or borehole may, for instance, be used for oil and gas production and exploration, water production and exploration, mining, utility line placement, or myriad other applications.
  • Certain embodiments and features may have been described using a set of numerical values that may provide lower and upper limits. It should be appreciated that ranges including the combination of any two values are contemplated unless otherwise indicated, and that a particular value may be defined by a range having the same lower and upper limit. Any numerical value is “about” or “approximately” the indicated value, and takes into account experimental error and variations that would be expected by a person having ordinary skill in the art. Any numbers, percentages, ratios, measurements, or other values stated herein are therefore intended to include the stated value as well as other values that are about or approximately the stated value, as would be appreciated by one of ordinary skill in the art encompassed by embodiments of the present disclosure. A stated value should therefore be interpreted broadly enough to encompass values that are at least close enough to the stated value to perform a desired function or achieve a desired result. The stated values include at least experimental error and variations that would be expected by a person having ordinary skill in the art, as well as the variation to be expected in a suitable manufacturing or production process. A value that is about or approximately the stated value and is therefore encompassed by the stated value may further include values that are within 5%, within 1%, within 0.1%, or within 0.01% of a stated value.
  • The abstract included with this disclosure is provided to allow the reader to quickly ascertain the general nature of some embodiments of the present disclosure. It is submitted with the understanding that it will not be used to interpret or limit the scope or meaning of the claims.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1. A reamer for widening a wellbore, comprising:
a housing defining a plurality of slots;
a plurality of expandable members positioned within the plurality of slots; and
a mandrel within the housing, the mandrel including a plurality of ribs extending into the plurality of slots.
2. The reamer of claim 1, the plurality of expandable members being configured to expand and retract within the plurality of slots.
3. The reamer of claim 1, the plurality of expandable members each including at least one extension configured to mate with a corresponding groove on at least one of the housing or the plurality of ribs.
4. The reamer of claim 3, the housing and the plurality of ribs each including at least one groove configured to mate with extensions of the plurality of expandable members.
5. The reamer of claim 4, the plurality of expandable members being positioned to have a first side adjacent at least one groove of the housing, and a second side adjacent at least one groove of the plurality of ribs.
6. The reamer of claim 1, the housing including a plurality of housings configured to move longitudinally relative to the mandrel.
7. The reamer of claim 1, further comprising:
at least one piston configured to expand the plurality of expandable members.
8. The reamer of claim 1, further comprising:
at least one biasing member configured to return the plurality of expandable members toward a retracted position.
9. A method for widening a wellbore, comprising:
tripping a downhole tool into a wellbore, the downhole tool including a reamer having a mandrel coupled to at least one cutter block;
providing fluid to the downhole tool through the mandrel;
using the fluid to expand the at least one cutter block relative to the mandrel, and along a path defined by a rib extending radially from the mandrel; and
rotating the downhole tool while the at least one cutter block is expanded, and thereby widening the wellbore.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein using the fluid to expand the at least one cutter block relative to the mandrel includes using a piston to expand the at least one cutter block.
11. The method of claim 9, wherein the path is defined by one or more mating grooves and extensions of the rib and the at least one cutter block.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein the one or more mating grooves and extensions are oriented at an angle relative to a longitudinal axis of the mandrel.
13. The method of claim 9, wherein the reamer includes a housing defining at least one slot, the at least one cutter block and the rib being positioned in the at least one slot.
14. The method of claim 13, wherein the at least one cutter block includes at least one extension on a first side of the at least one cutter block and at least one extension on a second side of the at least one cutter block, the first and second sides of the at least one cutter block being opposing sides, and wherein the rib includes at least one groove mating with the at least one extension on the first side, and wherein the housing includes at least one groove mating with the at least one extension on the second side.
15. The method of claim 9, wherein using the fluid to expand the at least one cutter block includes expanding the at least one cutter block radially and longitudinally relative to the mandrel.
16. The method of claim 15, wherein in an expanded position, the at least one cutter block is engaged with the fin of the mandrel.
17. The method of claim 9, wherein using the fluid to expand the at least one cutter block includes moving a housing of the reamer axially to expand the at least one cutter block.
18. A reamer, comprising:
a mandrel including a substantially cylindrical body, a flow bore, and a rib extending radially from the substantially cylindrical body;
a housing defining a substantially cylindrical shape with a slot, the rib of the mandrel being positioned in the slot;
an expandable member in the slot between the rib and a side of the slot;
a piston assembly in communication with the flow bore of the mandrel and configured to hydraulically actuate the expandable member from a retracted position to an expanded position; and
a biasing member coupled to the housing and configured to mechanically drive the expandable member from the expanded position toward the retracted position.
19. The reamer of claim 18, the rib being integrally formed in the mandrel.
20. The reamer of claim 18, the housing, rib, and expandable member defining a plurality of mating grooves and extensions that define a path that is angled relative to a longitudinal axis of the mandrel and along which the expandable member moves between the retracted and expanded positions.
US14/322,420 2013-07-02 2014-07-02 High Stiffness Tool For Expanding A Wellbore Abandoned US20150008041A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201361842034P true 2013-07-02 2013-07-02
US201361859665P true 2013-07-29 2013-07-29
US14/322,420 US20150008041A1 (en) 2013-07-02 2014-07-02 High Stiffness Tool For Expanding A Wellbore

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14/322,420 US20150008041A1 (en) 2013-07-02 2014-07-02 High Stiffness Tool For Expanding A Wellbore

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20150008041A1 true US20150008041A1 (en) 2015-01-08

Family

ID=52132046

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/322,420 Abandoned US20150008041A1 (en) 2013-07-02 2014-07-02 High Stiffness Tool For Expanding A Wellbore

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20150008041A1 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2016190850A1 (en) * 2015-05-26 2016-12-01 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Ball drop tool and methods of use
WO2021226055A1 (en) * 2020-05-04 2021-11-11 Allen Kent Rives Radial cutting assembly for drilling tool

Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100108394A1 (en) * 2007-03-08 2010-05-06 Reamerco Limited Downhole Tool

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100108394A1 (en) * 2007-03-08 2010-05-06 Reamerco Limited Downhole Tool

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2016190850A1 (en) * 2015-05-26 2016-12-01 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Ball drop tool and methods of use
US10597976B2 (en) 2015-05-26 2020-03-24 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Ball drop tool and methods of use
WO2021226055A1 (en) * 2020-05-04 2021-11-11 Allen Kent Rives Radial cutting assembly for drilling tool

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US10480251B2 (en) Expandable downhole tool assemblies, bottom-hole assemblies, and related methods
US9488009B2 (en) Apparatuses and methods for stabilizing downhole tools
US10830004B2 (en) Steering pads with shaped front faces
US7370712B2 (en) Under reamer
US10526849B2 (en) Cutting structure with blade having multiple cutting edges
US9631434B2 (en) Underreamer for increasing a wellbore diameter
US10260302B2 (en) Cutting insert for initiating a cutout
US9719305B2 (en) Expandable reamers and methods of using expandable reamers
US10590724B2 (en) Mill with adjustable gauge diameter
US10526848B2 (en) Cutting structure of a downhole cutting tool
US20150008041A1 (en) High Stiffness Tool For Expanding A Wellbore
US10487590B2 (en) Cutting element assemblies and downhole tools comprising rotatable cutting elements and related methods
US10815733B2 (en) Underreamer cutter block
US20140182940A1 (en) Underreamer for Increasing a Bore Diameter
WO2015003267A1 (en) Mud motor with integrated reamer
US20210198952A1 (en) Expandable cutting tool
WO2017171933A1 (en) Cutting insert for a milling tool
US20210108477A1 (en) High ratio reamer
US10352108B2 (en) Mill catch mechanism
US20220112770A1 (en) Downhole directional drilling tool
US20150300093A1 (en) Expandable Bi-Center Drill Bit

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SCHLUMBERGER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION, TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HALL, DAVID R.;MARSHALL, JONATHAN D.;DAHLGREN, SCOTT S.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:037604/0543

Effective date: 20140508

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION