US20140288824A1 - Method and/or system for selective application of direction of travel - Google Patents

Method and/or system for selective application of direction of travel Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20140288824A1
US20140288824A1 US14082056 US201314082056A US2014288824A1 US 20140288824 A1 US20140288824 A1 US 20140288824A1 US 14082056 US14082056 US 14082056 US 201314082056 A US201314082056 A US 201314082056A US 2014288824 A1 US2014288824 A1 US 2014288824A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
vector
dot
indicator
part
measurements
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US14082056
Inventor
Tero H. Huttunen
Joseph Czompo
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Qualcomm Inc
Original Assignee
Qualcomm Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01CMEASURING DISTANCES, LEVELS OR BEARINGS; SURVEYING; NAVIGATION; GYROSCOPIC INSTRUMENTS; PHOTOGRAMMETRY OR VIDEOGRAMMETRY
    • G01C21/00Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups
    • G01C21/10Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups by using measurements of speed or acceleration
    • G01C21/12Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups by using measurements of speed or acceleration executed aboard the object being navigated; Dead reckoning
    • G01C21/16Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups by using measurements of speed or acceleration executed aboard the object being navigated; Dead reckoning by integrating acceleration or speed, i.e. inertial navigation
    • G01C21/165Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups by using measurements of speed or acceleration executed aboard the object being navigated; Dead reckoning by integrating acceleration or speed, i.e. inertial navigation combined with non-inertial navigation instruments
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01SRADIO DIRECTION-FINDING; RADIO NAVIGATION; DETERMINING DISTANCE OR VELOCITY BY USE OF RADIO WAVES; LOCATING OR PRESENCE-DETECTING BY USE OF THE REFLECTION OR RERADIATION OF RADIO WAVES; ANALOGOUS ARRANGEMENTS USING OTHER WAVES
    • G01S19/00Satellite radio beacon positioning systems; Determining position, velocity or attitude using signals transmitted by such systems
    • G01S19/38Determining a navigation solution using signals transmitted by a satellite radio beacon positioning system
    • G01S19/39Determining a navigation solution using signals transmitted by a satellite radio beacon positioning system the satellite radio beacon positioning system transmitting time-stamped messages, e.g. GPS [Global Positioning System], GLONASS [Global Orbiting Navigation Satellite System] or GALILEO
    • G01S19/42Determining position
    • G01S19/45Determining position by combining measurements of signals from the satellite radio beacon positioning system with a supplementary measurement
    • G01S19/47Determining position by combining measurements of signals from the satellite radio beacon positioning system with a supplementary measurement the supplementary measurement being an inertial measurement, e.g. tightly coupled inertial
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01SRADIO DIRECTION-FINDING; RADIO NAVIGATION; DETERMINING DISTANCE OR VELOCITY BY USE OF RADIO WAVES; LOCATING OR PRESENCE-DETECTING BY USE OF THE REFLECTION OR RERADIATION OF RADIO WAVES; ANALOGOUS ARRANGEMENTS USING OTHER WAVES
    • G01S5/00Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations
    • G01S5/02Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations using radio waves
    • G01S5/0257Hybrid positioning solutions

Abstract

Described are a system, method and apparatus for computing a navigation solution. In a particular implementation, a direction of travel (DOT) indicator or vector may be applied to augment computation of the navigation solution. The DOT indicator or vector may be selectively applied in the computation of the navigation solution based, at least in part, on an assessment of reliability of the DOT indicator or vector.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/804,575, entitled “Method and/or System for Selective Application of Direction of Travel,” filed on Mar. 22, 2013, which is assigned to the assignee hereof and expressly incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • 1. Field
  • The subject matter disclosed herein relates to control of navigation functions on mobile devices.
  • 2. Information
  • Global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs), such as the Global Positioning System (GPS), and other satellite positioning systems (SPSs), as well as terrestrial-based positioning systems, have enabled navigation capability on mobile devices and automobile navigation systems. For example, by processing SPS signals to obtain pseudorange measurements to measuring transmitters at known locations, a mobile device or automobile navigation system may estimate its location and obtain a “position fix” that may be utilized for navigation purposes. In addition to using acquired SPS signals, particular implementations of a mobile device or automobile navigation system may integrate measurements from multiple sources such as inertial sensors including accelerometers and gyroscopes. Other sources such as route maps, etc., may provide a “direction of travel” that may further assist in computation of a navigation solution.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • Non-limiting and non-exhaustive aspects are described with reference to the following figures, wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout the various figures.
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a system for determining a navigation solution according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 2 is a flow diagram of a process for selectively applying a direction of travel (DOT) vector or indicator in the computation of a navigation solution according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a mobile device according to an embodiment.
  • SUMMARY
  • Briefly, particular implementations are directed to a method comprising, at a computing device: obtaining a direction of travel (DoT) indicator or vector; and combining measurements to compute a navigation solution, wherein combining said measurements further comprises selectively applying said DoT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on an assessment of reliability of said DoT indicator or vector.
  • Another particular implementation is directed to a mobile device comprising: a receiver to receive radio frequency signals; and a processor to: obtain a DoT indicator or vector; and combine measurements obtained from said received radio frequency signals to compute a navigation solution, wherein combining said measurements further comprises selectively applying said DOT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on an assessment of reliability of said DOT indicator or vector.
  • Another particular implementation is directed to an apparatus for managing a navigation process on a mobile device, comprising: means for obtaining a DoT indicator or vector; and means for combining measurements to compute a navigation solution, wherein combining said measurements further comprises selectively applying said DoT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on an assessment of reliability of said DoT indicator or vector.
  • Another particular implementation is directed to an article comprising: a non-transitory storage medium comprising machine-readable instructions stored thereon which are executable by a special purpose computing apparatus to: obtain a DoT indicator or vector; and combine measurements to compute a navigation solution, wherein combining said measurements further comprises selectively applying said DoT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on an assessment of reliability of said DoT indicator or vector.
  • It should be understood that the aforementioned implementations are merely example implementations, and that claimed subject matter is not necessarily limited to any particular aspect of these example implementations.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • A navigation system that computes a position fix based on measurements or observations of signals transmitted by a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) typically processes such observations or measurements in a Kalman filter to update an estimate or prediction of a motion state defined, for example, by location, velocity and/or acceleration in a reference system. In a particular implementation, a direction of travel (DOT) obtained from an external source may be used as an input signal to a Kalman filter for generating a navigation solution such as a position fix. For example, a Kalman filter may combine a DOT indicator or vector with pseudorange and pseudorange rate measurements (e.g., from acquisition of signals transmitted by a GNSS and/or signal measurements obtained from on-suite inertial sensors such as accelerometers or gyroscopes) to update an estimated or predicted motion state. A DOT indicator or vector may be determined or obtained by any one of several different sources. In one implementation, a DOT indicator or vector may be provided to a position engine by an external source such as, for example, a pre-programmed navigation route. Here, an estimated location of a mobile device may be correlated with a position along a pre-programmed route. Of course this is just an example of how a DOT indicator vector may be determined and claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect. In particular implementations, a DoT indicator or vector may indicate an angular value relative to some reference angle (e.g., true North) to express a directional component of a velocity of a mobile device. For example, such a directional component may express a directional component of velocity of the mobile device in a plane (e.g., two-dimensional surface of an area covered by a map). It should be understood, however, that this is merely an example of a DoT indicator or vector, and claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect.
  • While a DOT indicator or vector may be useful in aiding GNSS and/or GNSS/sensor integrated positioning. A DOT indicator or vector, however, occasionally has limited reliability. An erroneous DOT indicator or vector may introduce erroneous inferences into a navigation solution. According to an embodiment, methods and processes may evaluate conditions to determine whether a received or incoming DOT indicator or vector is to be trusted, deweighted or discarded, for use in aiding the determination of a navigation solution (e.g., updating a Kalman filter state). This may increase an overall quality, accuracy and reliability of the GNSS or GNSS-sensor integrated positioning solution.
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a system 100 for determining a navigation solution according to an embodiment. In particular implementations, system 100 may be integrated with a mobile device (e.g., a mobile communication device such as a cellular telephone) or an automobile navigation system. Of course these are merely examples of devices that may incorporate features described in connection with system 100 for the purpose of computing a navigation solution and claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect. A Kalman filter 110 may combine measurements from multiple sources in computing a navigation solution. In a particular implementation, such a navigation solution may comprise an estimate and/or prediction of a particular motion state of a mobile device defined, at least in part, by a location and/or velocity. In one implementation, a navigation solution may indicate a “heading” or direction of movement.
  • One source of measurements processed by Kalman filter 110 to compute a navigation solution may comprise pseudorange and/or pseudorange rate measurements derived from the acquisition of signals acquired at antenna 104 and radio frequency (RF) processing 102. Baseband processing 108 may perform operations to generate measurements of pseudorange and/or pseudorange rate based, at least in part, on signals transmitted by transmitters and acquired at RF processing 102. For example, such acquired signals may be transmitted from transmitters in a global navigation satellite system (GNSS), regional satellite system (RSS) or other satellite positioning system (SPS). Alternatively, such acquired signals may be transmitted from terrestrial transmitters such as cellular base station transmitters.
  • Kalman filter 112 may also process measurements obtained from inertial sensors 112 in computing a navigation solution. For example, measurements of signals received accelerometers, magnetometers, gyroscopes, etc. may be incorporated with other measurements such as pseudorange and pseudorange rate measurements to compute a navigation solution. As pointed out above, in addition to combining measurements obtained from inertial sensors 112 or pseudorange measurements obtained from baseband processing 108, Kalman filter 110 may incorporate a DOT indicator or vector. Such a DOT indicator or vector may be provided from any one of multiple DOT sources 114. In one particular implementation, a DOT source 114 may extract a DOT indicator or vector from a portion of a predetermined or pre-planned route at a current estimated location of system 100. For example, a trajectory of a predetermined or pre-planned route at a current estimated location may provide a reliable DOT indicator or vector. In another embodiment, a DOT source 114 may extract a DOT indicator or vector based, at least in part, on magnetometer-derived direction measurements, or independently available velocity measurements. It should be understood, however, that these are merely examples of how a DOT indicator or vector may be determined at a DOT source, and claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect.
  • As pointed out above, incorporation of an erroneous DOT vector or indicator at a Kalman filter in computing a navigation solution may distort such a resulting navigation solution. According to a particular embodiment, DOT selection 106 may selectively provide a DOT vector or indicator to Kalman filter 112 for use in computing a navigation solution based, at least in part, on an assessment of reliability of the indicator or vector. For example, a DOT vector or indicator may be deweighted or disregarded altogether if the DOT vector or indicator is deemed to be unreliable.
  • FIG. 2 is a flow diagram of a process for selectively applying a DOT vector or indicator in the computation of a navigation solution according to an embodiment. At block 202, a DOT indicator or vector is obtained. For example, DOT selection 106 may receive one or more DOT indicators or vectors from DOT sources 114 as described above. At block 204, measurements may be combined for computing a navigation solution such as, for example, an estimated and/or predicted location and/or velocity. As pointed out above, the combined measurements may comprise, for example, pseudorange or pseudorange rate measurements determined from acquisition of GNSS signals and/or measurements obtained from inertial sensors. Also, the DOT indicator or vector obtained at block 202 may be selectively applied in the computation of the navigation solution at block 204 based, at least in part, on an assessment of reliability of the DOT indicator or vector. Selective application of a DOT indicator or vector may comprise a decision to apply the DOT indicator or vector in computing a navigation solution or discarding the DOT indicator or vector altogether. Particular non-limiting examples of techniques for assessing reliability or a DOT indicator or vector are discussed below. It should be understood, however, that these are merely examples of how a reliability of a DOT indicator or vector may be evaluated for the purpose of selective application of the DOT indicator or vector in computing a navigation solution, and that claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect.
  • In particular implementations, an assessment of reliability of a DOT indicator or vector may comprise an indication that the DOT indicator or vector erroneous or highly suspected of being erroneous. For example, an erroneous DOT vector or indicator may be detected retroactively in a fault detection, identification and correction (FDIC) process. Here, a particular DOT indicator or vector may have been applied for aiding in determination of a navigation solution sometime in the past (e.g., a few seconds in the past) and may be subsequently evaluated based on current measurements, calculations or observations. Thus, measurements obtained following a previous DOT vector or identifier may be corroborate or refute the previous DOT indicator or vector. If a fault has been detected (e.g., DOT indicator or vector has been identified to be not applicable), the detected fault may be corrected retroactively by recomputing a current navigation state (e.g., estimated location and/or velocity) without applying the previously applied DOT indicator or vector. In one implementation, a history of Kalman filter states, GNSS pseudorange and range rate measurements, and sensor measurements in GNSS-sensor integrated navigation may be stored in a memory to enable recomputing a navigation solution without use of the DOT indicator or vector. If a recomputed Kalman filter state is substantially different or inconsistent with a current DOT vector or indicator, the current DOT indicator or vector may be considered to be erroneous, and therefore unreliable.
  • In another particular implementation, DOT selection 106 may determine and/or maintain an uncertainty metric in combination with a DOT vector or indicator to represent a degree of uncertainty in connection with a current DOT vector or indicator. Such an uncertainty metric may comprise, for example, an uncertainty angle. In a particular implementation, a measure of uncertainty of a DOT indicator or vector may be directly indicative of a reliability of the DOT indicator or vector for use in computing a navigation solution. Here, for example, an uncertainty metric may be numerically increased in response to detection of a turn by, for example, one or more signals received from a vertical gyroscope. In particular implementations, a DOT vector or indicator obtained at DOT selection 106 from a DOT source 114 may comprise a time-lagging indicator of a direction of travel. If a turn is in fact currently taking place while evaluating reliability of a current DOT indicator or vector at DOT selection 106, it is possible that any current change in direction was not taken into account in computing the current DoT indicator or vector. Therefore, the DOT indicator or vector for a vehicle may be presumed to have a larger error if inertial sensor measurements indicate that the vehicle is turning, for example. Here, an uncertainty of the DOT indicator or vector may be quantified based, at least in part, on a computed error. For example, an amount of increase in uncertainty of a DOT indicator or vector may be determined based, at least in part, on an angular velocity measured by a vertical gyroscope and integration of the measured angular velocity over an appropriate time interval (e.g., time reference applied to the DOT indicator or vector to a present time) to quantify a change in direction. In another example, an increase in uncertainty of a DoT may be determined based, at least in part, on a difference between a change in DoT and an angular change based on an integration of a vertical gyro signal. In another example implementation, an increase in uncertainty of a particular DOT vector or indicator from a detection of turning (e.g., from angular velocity measurements) may be sustained for a significant duration even after a turn in question has ended. Here, sustaining an increase in an uncertainty in a DOT vector or indicator may enable DOT sources (e.g., DOT sources 114) to adjust to a new direction of travel at the end of the turn. It should be understood, however, that these are merely examples of quantifying an increase in uncertainty of a DoT vector or indicator, and claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect.
  • A DOT indicator or vector may be just one indication of a heading. Other sources of a heading indication may include, for example, GNSS velocity based heading, GNSS-sensor integrated heading, camera-based heading, magnetometer-based heading, WiFi or other RF signal based heading, etc., or in general, any heading info that can be observed in a vehicle by any means. It should be understood, however, that these are merely examples of sources of a heading indication, and claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect. A particular implementation may specify a fault detection method in which a received DoT indicator or vector is compared against other heading sources as listed above, or any combination of heading sources. In a particular implementation, a reference heading may be selected for comparison with DOT vector or indicator. This selection may be performed using any one of several different techniques. For example, the reference heading may be selected from among multiple available heading indications if it has a lowest associated uncertainty. Alternatively, a combination of some or all heading indications may be computed to provide a heading reference. Alternatively, multiple reference headings may be selected, in which case the DoT may be compared against some or all reference headings.
  • If the received DOT indicator or vector differs from one or more reference headings by an amount that exceeds a specified threshold, the received DOT indicator or vector may be determined to be invalid (e.g., and not applied in computing a navigation solution at Kalman filter 112). In one implementation, a DoT indicator or vector may be determined to be invalid based, at least in part, on a received DoT indicator or vector and a reference heading. As pointed out above, such a reference heading may be selected from among any one of several candidate reference headings such as, for example, a reference heading computed solely from GNSS measurements and various sensor assisted headings obtained from one or more navigation engines, just to provide a few examples. In an example embodiment, a reference heading may be selected as the candidate reference heading having the lowest associated uncertainty. According to an embodiment, a DoT vector or indicator may be determined to be invalid if a computed value exceeds a threshold according to expression (1) as follows:

  • DoT invalid if(DoT−Wheading)2 /Var(Wheading)>T,  (1)
  • where:
      • DoT=DoT indicator or vector;
      • Ref=selected reference heading;
      • Wheading=(Var(DoT)*DoT+Var(Ref)*Ref)/(Var(DoT)+Var(Ref));
      • Var(Wheading)=1/(1/Var(DoT)+1/Var(Ref));
  • Here, expression (1) specifies a ratio (DoT−Wheading)2/Var(Wheading) to be compared with a rejection threshold T. In an alternative implementation, an uncertainty value (Unc), and its square (Var), may be a suitably selected error measure of certainty in connection with a DoT indicator or vector and reference heading. For example, expression (2) as follows contemplates a different ratio abs(DoT−Wheading)/Unc(Wheading) for comparison to the same or different rejection threshold T′ to accept or reject a DoT indicator or vector:

  • DoT valid if abs(DoT−Wheading)/Unc(Wheading)>T′,  (2)
  • where:
      • Unc(Wheading) is the square root of variance Var(Wheading).
  • Determining validity or invalidity of a DoT indicator or vector (DoT) according to expressions (1) and (2) is demonstrated by four example cases below. In a first case, uncertainty of a DoT is high while an uncertainty regarding a reference heading is low. Here, a value for Wheading may approach a value for a selected reference heading (Ref). Also, Ref and Var(Wheading) may also be low. Accordingly, if DoT significantly differs from Ref, expression (1) may divide a relatively large quantity (DoT-Wheading)2 by a relatively small quantity Var(Wheading). This may produce a large ratio in expression (1) that exceeds T, leading to a rejection of DoT as being invalid. If DoT is close to Ref, DoT may be acceptable since the ratio of expression (1) may be small enough, although its contribution may be small because its uncertainty is high. Here, it can be seen that if a reference heading is already of high quality (has low unc), a DoT indicator or vector with high uncertainty may not provide substantial improvement.
  • In a second case, uncertainty for both DoT and Ref may both be low. Here, a value for Wheading may be between DoT and Ref. In this case, it may be difficult to determine whether DoT or Ref is more accurate as both have low uncertainties. Assuming that both Dot and Ref would be measurements of the true heading, a combined heading may be selected as Wheading. As both DoT and Ref have low uncertainty, a resulting uncertainty for Wheading may also be low. While DoT may not be a measurement of the true heading, DoT may be tested against Wheading to evaluate the usefulness of DoT. If DoT is far enough away from Ref such that a ratio in expression (1) or (2) is high, DoT may be rejected because Ref may be more trusted in this situation. However, if DoT is very close to Ref, Ref may be confidently wrong by a small angle. In that case DoT, may not be rejected because the ratio computed ratio at expressions (1) and (2) are small. In effect, if Ref is close to the direction of the road (e.g., as expressed by DoT), the DoT input may be allowed to be processed in a Kalman filter for generating a navigation solution. In an third case, uncertainty in DoT and Ref may both be high. Here, a value for Wheading may be near DoT and Var(Wheading) may also be high. As both uncertainties are high, information available may not be indicative of a true heading. In this case an available DoT may be accepted as valid. Here, a ratio computed according to expressions (1) or (2) may be small enough even if DoT is significantly different from Ref (e.g., since Var(Wheading) is high).
  • In a fourth case, uncertainty for DoT may be low while an uncertainty for Ref may be high. Here, a value for Wheading may be near DoT while Var(Wheading) is low. As such, a current estimate for heading (Ref) may be erroneous and a current value for DoT may be used. As Wheading approaches DoT, the difference may be small. A small ratio computed according to expressions (1) and (2) may allow the DoT input to be accepted.
  • Another particular implementation may use starting and ending DOT indicators or vectors as an indicator of a nearby intersection or other area where an erroneous DOT vector or indicator can significantly distort a computed navigation solution. Here, an uncertainty in a DOT indicator or vector may be increased to avoid applying suspicious DOT vectors or indicators. As DOT indicators or vectors are received, an additional uncertainty may be applied for a duration of few seconds before and after the intersection. If receipt of DOT indicators or vectors ceases, uncertainty may be increased retroactively. However, in this implementation, an uncertainty may be increased even if no fault is detected. Such an increase in uncertainty may be reflected by or implemented in an increase in Var(DoT) as applied in expressions (1) or (2) above.
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a mobile device according to an embodiment. System 100 (FIG. 1) may comprise one or more features of mobile device 1100 shown in FIG. 3. In particular implementations, aspects of mobile device 1100 may comprise a mobile telephone or may be integrated with an automobile navigation system, for example. In certain embodiments, mobile device 1100 may also comprise a wireless transceiver 1121 which is capable of transmitting and receiving wireless signals 1123 via wireless antenna 1122 over a wireless communication network. Wireless transceiver 1121 may be connected to bus 1101 by a wireless transceiver bus interface 1120. Wireless transceiver bus interface 1120 may, in some embodiments be at least partially integrated with wireless transceiver 1121. Some embodiments may include multiple wireless transceivers 1121 and wireless antennas 1122 to enable transmitting and/or receiving signals according to a corresponding multiple wireless communication standards such as, for example, versions of IEEE Std. 802.11, CDMA, WCDMA, LTE, UMTS, GSM, AMPS, Zigbee and Bluetooth, just to name a few examples.
  • Mobile device 1100 may also comprise SPS receiver 1155 capable of receiving and acquiring SPS signals 1159 via SPS antenna 1158. SPS receiver 1155 may also process, in whole or in part, acquired SPS signals 1159 for estimating a location of mobile device 1000. In some embodiments, general-purpose processor(s) 1111, memory 1140, DSP(s) 1112 and/or specialized processors (not shown) may also be utilized to process acquired SPS signals, in whole or in part, and/or calculate an estimated location of mobile device 1100, in conjunction with SPS receiver 1155. Storage of SPS or other signals for use in performing positioning operations may be performed in memory 1140 or registers (not shown).
  • Also shown in FIG. 3, mobile device 1100 may comprise digital signal processor(s) (DSP(s)) 1112 connected to the bus 1101 by a bus interface 1110, general-purpose processor(s) 1111 connected to the bus 1101 by a bus interface 1110 and memory 1140. Bus interface 1110 may be integrated with the DSP(s) 1112, general-purpose processor(s) 1111 and memory 1140. In various embodiments, functions may be performed in response execution of one or more machine-readable instructions stored in memory 1140 such as on a computer-readable storage medium, such as RAM, ROM, FLASH, or disc drive, just to name a few example. The one or more instructions may be executable by general-purpose processor(s) 1111, specialized processors, or DSP(s) 1112. Memory 1140 may comprise a non-transitory processor-readable memory and/or a computer-readable memory that stores software code (programming code, instructions, etc.) that are executable by processor(s) 1111 and/or DSP(s) 1112 to perform functions described herein.
  • Also shown in FIG. 3, a user interface 1135 may comprise any one of several devices such as, for example, a speaker, microphone, display device, vibration device, keyboard, touch screen, just to name a few examples. In a particular implementation, user interface 1135 may enable a user to interact with one or more applications hosted on mobile device 1100. For example, devices of user interface 1135 may store analog or digital signals on memory 1140 to be further processed by DSP(s) 1112 or general purpose processor 1111 in response to action from a user. Similarly, applications hosted on mobile device 1100 may store analog or digital signals on memory 1140 to present an output signal to a user. In another implementation, mobile device 1100 may optionally include a dedicated audio input/output (I/O) device 1170 comprising, for example, a dedicated speaker, microphone, digital to analog circuitry, analog to digital circuitry, amplifiers and/or gain control. It should be understood, however, that this is merely an example of how an audio I/O may be implemented in a mobile device, and that claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect. In another implementation, mobile device 1100 may comprise touch sensors 1162 responsive to touching or pressure on a keyboard or touch screen device.
  • Mobile device 1100 may also comprise a dedicated camera device 1164 for capturing still or moving imagery. Camera device 1164 may comprise, for example an imaging sensor (e.g., charge coupled device or CMOS imager), lens, analog to digital circuitry, frame buffers, just to name a few examples. In one implementation, additional processing, conditioning, encoding or compression of signals representing captured images may be performed at general purpose/application processor 1111 or DSP(s) 1112. Alternatively, a dedicated video processor 1168 may perform conditioning, encoding, compression or manipulation of signals representing captured images. Additionally, video processor 1168 may decode/decompress stored image data for presentation on a display device (not shown) on mobile device 1100.
  • Mobile device 1100 may also comprise sensors 1160 coupled to bus 1101 which may include, for example, inertial sensors and environment sensors. Inertial sensors of sensors 1160 may comprise, for example accelerometers (e.g., collectively responding to acceleration of mobile device 1100 in three dimensions), one or more gyroscopes or one or more magnetometers (e.g., to support one or more compass applications). As pointed out above, angular velocity as measured by a vertical gyroscope may be used to measure a change in heading that may affect an uncertainty or validity of a DOT indicator or vector. Environment sensors of mobile device 1100 may comprise, for example, temperature sensors, barometric pressure sensors, ambient light sensors, camera imagers, microphones, just to name few examples. Sensors 1160 may generate analog or digital signals that may be stored in memory 1140 and processed by DPS(s) or general purpose application processor 1111 in support of one or more applications such as, for example, applications directed to positioning or navigation operations.
  • In a particular implementation, mobile device 1100 may comprise a dedicated modem processor 1166 capable of performing baseband processing of signals received and downconverted at wireless transceiver 1121 or SPS receiver 1155. Such baseband processing may provide pseudorange and/or pseudorange rate measurements for use in computing a navigation solution (e.g., using a Kalman filter) as discussed above. Similarly, modem processor 1166 may perform baseband processing of signals to be upconverted for transmission by wireless transceiver 1121. In alternative implementations, instead of having a dedicated modem processor, baseband processing may be performed by a general purpose processor or DSP (e.g., general purpose/application processor 1111 or DSP(s) 1112). It should be understood, however, that these are merely examples of structures that may perform baseband processing, and that claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect.
  • In a particular implementation, mobile device 1000 may be capable of performing one or more of the actions set forth in the process of FIG. 2. For example, DPS(s) 1112 or general purpose application processor 1111 may perform all or a portion of actions at blocks 202 or 204. Here, DPS(s) 1112 or general purpose application processor 1111 may be used to implement a Kalman filter (e.g., Kalman filter 110) for combining measurements to provide a navigation solution. DPS(s) 1112 or general purpose application processor 1111 may also be used to implement logic for accepting or rejecting a DOT indicator or vector for selective application in the computation of a navigation solution as described above (e.g., DoT selection 106).
  • Techniques described herein may be used with an SPS that includes any one of several GNSS or combinations of GNSS. An SPS may include a system of transmitters positioned to enable entities to determine their location on or above the Earth based, at least in part, on signals received from the transmitters. Such a transmitter may transmit a signal marked with a repeating pseudo-random noise (PN) code of a set number of chips and may be located on ground based control stations, user equipment and/or space vehicles. In a particular example, such transmitters may be located on Earth orbiting satellite vehicles (SVs). For example, a SV in a constellation of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) such as Global Positioning System (GPS), Galileo, Glonass or Compass may transmit a signal marked with a PN code that is distinguishable from PN codes transmitted by other SVs in the constellation (e.g., using different PN codes for each satellite as in GPS or using the same code on different frequencies as in Glonass). In accordance with certain aspects, the techniques presented herein are not restricted to global systems (e.g., GNSS) for SPS. For example, the techniques provided herein may be applied to or otherwise enabled for use in various regional systems, such as, e.g., Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) over Japan, Indian Regional Navigational Satellite System (IRNSS) over India, Beidou over China, etc., and/or various augmentation systems (e.g., an Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS)) that may be associated with or otherwise enabled for use with one or more global and/or regional navigation satellite systems. By way of example but not limitation, an SBAS may include an augmentation system(s) that provides integrity information, differential corrections, etc., such as, e.g., Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS), European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS), Multi-functional Satellite Augmentation System (MSAS), GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation or GPS and Geo Augmented Navigation system (GAGAN), and/or the like. Thus, as used herein an SPS may include any combination of one or more global and/or regional navigation satellite systems and/or augmentation systems, and SPS signals may include SPS, SPS-like, and/or other signals associated with such one or more SPS. Furthermore, such techniques may be used with positioning systems that utilize terrestrial transmitters acting as “pseudolites”, or a combination of SVs and such terrestrial transmitters. The terms “SPS signals,” as used herein, is intended to include SPS-like signals from terrestrial transmitters, including terrestrial transmitters acting as pseudolites or equivalents of pseudolites.
  • Reference throughout this specification to “one example”, “an example”, “certain examples”, or “exemplary implementation” means that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with the feature or the example may be included in at least one feature or example of claimed subject matter. Thus, the appearances of the phrase “in one example”, “an example”, “in certain examples” or “in certain embodiments” or other like phrases in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily all referring to the same feature, example, or limitation. Furthermore, the particular features, structures, or characteristics may be combined in one or more examples or features.
  • The methodologies described herein may be implemented by various measures depending upon applications according to particular features or examples. For example, such methodologies may be implemented in hardware, firmware, or combinations thereof, along with software. In a hardware implementation, for example, a processing unit may be implemented within one or more application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), digital signal processors (DSPs), digital signal processing devices (DSPDs), programmable logic devices (PLDs), field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), processors, controllers, micro-controllers, microprocessors, electronic devices, other devices units designed to perform the functions described herein, or combinations thereof.
  • In the preceding detailed description, numerous specific details have been set forth to provide a thorough understanding of claimed subject matter. However, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that claimed subject matter may be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, methods and apparatuses that would be known by one of ordinary skill have not been described in detail so as not to obscure claimed subject matter.
  • Some portions of the preceding detailed description have been presented in terms of algorithms or symbolic representations of operations on binary digital electronic signals stored within a memory of a specific apparatus or special purpose computing device or platform. In the context of this particular specification, the term specific apparatus or the like includes a general purpose computer once it is programmed to perform particular functions pursuant to instructions from program software. Algorithmic descriptions or symbolic representations are examples of techniques used by those of ordinary skill in the signal processing or related arts to convey the substance of their work to others skilled in the art. An algorithm is here, and generally, is considered to be a self-consistent sequence of operations or similar signal processing leading to a desired result. In this context, operations or processing involve physical manipulation of physical quantities. Typically, although not necessarily, such quantities may take the form of electrical or magnetic signals capable of being stored, transferred, combined, compared or otherwise manipulated as electronic signals representing information. It has proven convenient at times, principally for reasons of common usage, to refer to such signals as bits, data, values, elements, symbols, characters, terms, numbers, numerals, information, or the like. It should be understood, however, that all of these or similar terms are to be associated with appropriate physical quantities and are merely convenient labels. Unless specifically stated otherwise, as apparent from the following discussion, it is appreciated that throughout this specification discussions utilizing terms such as “processing,” “computing,” “transitioning,” “scheduling,” “activating,” “deactivating,” “accepting,” “conveying,” “deriving,” “updating,” “determining”, “establishing”, “obtaining”, or the like refer to actions or processes of a specific apparatus, such as a special purpose computer or a similar special purpose electronic computing device. In the context of this specification, therefore, a special purpose computer or a similar special purpose electronic computing device is capable of manipulating or transforming signals, typically represented as physical electronic or magnetic quantities within memories, registers, or other information storage devices, transmission devices, or display devices of the special purpose computer or similar special purpose electronic computing device. In the context of this particular patent application, the term “specific apparatus” may include a general purpose computer once it is programmed to perform particular functions pursuant to instructions from program software.
  • While there has been illustrated and described what are presently considered to be example features, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various other modifications may be made, and equivalents may be substituted, without departing from claimed subject matter. Additionally, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation to the teachings of claimed subject matter without departing from the central concept described herein. Therefore, it is intended that claimed subject matter not be limited to the particular examples disclosed, but that such claimed subject matter may also include all aspects falling within the scope of appended claims, and equivalents thereof.

Claims (28)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A method, at a mobile device, comprising:
    obtaining a direction of travel (DOT) indicator or vector; and
    combining measurements to compute a navigation solution, wherein combining said measurements further comprises selectively applying said DOT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on an assessment of reliability of said DOT indicator or vector.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1, wherein said measurements are obtained, at least in part, by acquisition of at least one satellite positioning system (SPS) signal.
  3. 3. The method of claim 2, wherein said measurements further comprise measurements provided by one or more inertial sensors.
  4. 4. The method of claim 1, wherein said DOT indicator or vector is selectively applied based, at least in part, on a fault detection indication computed based, at least in part, on computation of a current navigation solution without use of past DOT indicators or vectors.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1, wherein said DOT indicator or vector is selectively applied based, at least in part, on a magnitude of an uncertainty metric, and further comprising increasing said magnitude in response to detection of a turn based on one or more gyroscope measurements.
  6. 6. The method of claim 1, and further comprising:
    computing a weighted mean heading based, at least in part, on multiple heading indications;
    dividing a difference between the weighted mean heading and the DOT indicator or vector by a measure of an uncertainty of the weighted mean heading; and
    comparing said divided difference with a rejection threshold to determine whether said DOT indicator or vector is to be applied in computation of the navigation solution.
  7. 7. The method of claim 1, and further comprising:
    increasing an uncertainty metric associated with the DOT indicator or vector in response to an indication of an approaching intersection; and
    selectively applying said DOT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on said increased uncertainty metric.
  8. 8. A mobile device comprising:
    a receiver to receive radio frequency signals; and
    a processor to:
    obtain a direction of travel (DOT) indicator or vector; and
    combine measurements obtained from said received radio frequency signals to compute a navigation solution, wherein combining said measurements further comprises selectively applying said DOT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on an assessment of reliability of said DOT indicator or vector.
  9. 9. The mobile device of claim 8, wherein said measurements are obtained, at least in part, by acquisition of at least one satellite positioning system (SPS) signal.
  10. 10. The mobile device of claim 9, wherein said measurements further comprise measurements provided by one or more inertial sensors.
  11. 11. The mobile device of claim 8, wherein said DOT indicator or vector is selectively applied based, at least in part, on a fault detection indication computed based, at least in part, on computation of a current navigation solution without use of past DOT indicators or vectors.
  12. 12. The mobile device of claim 8, wherein said DOT indicator or vector is selectively applied based, at least in part, on a magnitude of an uncertainty metric, and further comprising increasing said magnitude in response to detection of a turn based on one or more gyroscope measurements.
  13. 13. The mobile device of claim 8, wherein said processor is further to:
    compute a weighted mean heading based, at least in part, on multiple heading indications;
    divide a difference between the weighted mean heading and the DOT indicator or vector by a measure of an uncertainty of the weighted mean heading; and
    compare said divided difference with a rejection threshold to determine whether said DOT indicator or vector is to be applied in computation of the navigation solution.
  14. 14. The mobile device of claim 8, wherein said processor is further to:
    increase an uncertainty metric associated with the DOT indicator or vector in response to an indication of an approaching intersection; and
    selectively apply said DOT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on said increased uncertainty metric.
  15. 15. An apparatus for managing a navigation process on a mobile device, comprising:
    means for obtaining a direction of travel (DOT) indicator or vector; and
    means for combining measurements to compute a navigation solution, wherein combining said measurements further comprises selectively applying said DOT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on an assessment of reliability of said DOT indicator or vector.
  16. 16. The apparatus of claim 15, wherein said measurements are obtained, at least in part, by acquisition of at least one satellite positioning system (SPS) signal.
  17. 17. The apparatus of claim 16, wherein said measurements further comprise measurements provided by one or more inertial sensors.
  18. 18. The apparatus of claim 15, wherein said DOT indicator or vector is selectively applied based, at least in part, on a fault detection indication computed based, at least in part, on computation of a current navigation solution without use of past DOT indicators or vectors.
  19. 19. The apparatus of claim 15, wherein said DOT indicator or vector is selectively applied based, at least in part, on a magnitude of an uncertainty metric, and further comprising increasing said magnitude in response to detection of a turn based on one or more gyroscope measurements.
  20. 20. The apparatus of claim 15, and further comprising:
    means for computing a weighted mean heading based, at least in part, on multiple heading indications;
    means for dividing a difference between the weighted mean heading and the DOT indicator or vector by a measure of an uncertainty of the weighted mean heading; and
    means for comparing said divided difference with a rejection threshold to determine whether said DOT indicator or vector is to be applied in computation of the navigation solution.
  21. 21. The apparatus of claim 15, and further comprising:
    means for increasing an uncertainty metric associated with the DOT indicator or vector in response to an indication of an approaching intersection; and
    means for selectively applying said DOT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on said increased uncertainty metric.
  22. 22. An article comprising:
    a non-transitory storage medium comprising machine-readable instructions stored thereon which are executable by a special purpose computing apparatus to:
    obtain a direction of travel (DOT) indicator or vector; and
    combine measurements to compute a navigation solution, wherein combining said measurements further comprises selectively applying said DOT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on an assessment of reliability of said DOT indicator or vector.
  23. 23. The article of claim 22, wherein said measurements are obtained, at least in part, by acquisition of at least one satellite positioning system (SPS) signal.
  24. 24. The article of claim 23, wherein said measurements further comprise measurements provided by one or more inertial sensors.
  25. 25. The article of claim 22, wherein said DOT indicator or vector is selectively applied based, at least in part, on a fault detection indication computed based, at least in part, on computation of a current navigation solution without use of past DOT indicators or vectors.
  26. 26. The article of claim 22, wherein said DOT indicator or vector is selectively applied based, at least in part, on a magnitude of an uncertainty metric, and further comprising increasing said magnitude in response to detection of a turn based on one or more gyroscope measurements.
  27. 27. The article of claim 22, wherein said instructions are further executable by said special purpose computing apparatus to:
    compute a weighted mean heading based, at least in part, on multiple heading indications;
    divide a difference between the weighted mean heading and the DOT indicator or vector by a measure of an uncertainty of the weighted mean heading; and
    compare said divided difference with a rejection threshold to determine whether said DOT indicator or vector is to be applied in computation of the navigation solution.
  28. 28. The article of claim 22, wherein said instructions are further executable by said special purpose computing apparatus to:
    increase an uncertainty metric associated with the DOT indicator or vector in response to an indication of an approaching intersection; and
    selectively apply said DOT indicator or vector in computing said navigation solution based, at least in part, on said increased uncertainty metric.
US14082056 2013-03-22 2013-11-15 Method and/or system for selective application of direction of travel Abandoned US20140288824A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201361804575 true 2013-03-22 2013-03-22
US14082056 US20140288824A1 (en) 2013-03-22 2013-11-15 Method and/or system for selective application of direction of travel

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14082056 US20140288824A1 (en) 2013-03-22 2013-11-15 Method and/or system for selective application of direction of travel
PCT/US2014/031380 WO2014153483A1 (en) 2013-03-22 2014-03-20 Method and/or system for selective application of direction of travel

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20140288824A1 true true US20140288824A1 (en) 2014-09-25

Family

ID=51569738

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14082056 Abandoned US20140288824A1 (en) 2013-03-22 2013-11-15 Method and/or system for selective application of direction of travel

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20140288824A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2014153483A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150350849A1 (en) * 2014-05-31 2015-12-03 Apple Inc. Location Determination Using Dual Statistical Filters

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN104469936A (en) * 2014-12-09 2015-03-25 重庆邮电大学 Hybrid location method and system for wireless signal attenuation model based on intelligent space

Citations (55)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3659085A (en) * 1970-04-30 1972-04-25 Sierra Research Corp Computer determining the location of objects in a coordinate system
US4760397A (en) * 1986-12-22 1988-07-26 Contraves Ag Target tracking system
US5390125A (en) * 1990-02-05 1995-02-14 Caterpillar Inc. Vehicle position determination system and method
US5404307A (en) * 1991-12-19 1995-04-04 Pioneer Electronic Corporation Navigation apparatus with detected angular speed correction
US5424953A (en) * 1992-01-16 1995-06-13 Pioneer Electronic Corporation Navigation apparatus
US5469158A (en) * 1992-04-20 1995-11-21 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Apparatus for correcting the detected heading of a vehicle
US5479079A (en) * 1993-08-26 1995-12-26 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for controlling robot travel
JPH09189564A (en) * 1996-01-11 1997-07-22 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Traveling body position speed calculating device
US5694474A (en) * 1995-09-18 1997-12-02 Interval Research Corporation Adaptive filter for signal processing and method therefor
US5699256A (en) * 1994-06-02 1997-12-16 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Offset-drift correcting device for gyro-sensor
US5757317A (en) * 1997-03-17 1998-05-26 Litton Systems, Inc. Relative navigation utilizing inertial measurement units and a plurality of satellite transmitters
US5991525A (en) * 1997-08-22 1999-11-23 Voyan Technology Method for real-time nonlinear system state estimation and control
US6024655A (en) * 1997-03-31 2000-02-15 Leading Edge Technologies, Inc. Map-matching golf navigation system
US6029111A (en) * 1995-12-28 2000-02-22 Magellan Dis, Inc. Vehicle navigation system and method using GPS velocities
US6081230A (en) * 1994-11-29 2000-06-27 Xanavi Informatics Corporation Navigation system furnished with means for estimating error of mounted sensor
US6145378A (en) * 1997-07-22 2000-11-14 Baroid Technology, Inc. Aided inertial navigation system
US6253154B1 (en) * 1996-11-22 2001-06-26 Visteon Technologies, Llc Method and apparatus for navigating with correction of angular speed using azimuth detection sensor
US6317688B1 (en) * 2000-01-31 2001-11-13 Rockwell Collins Method and apparatus for achieving sole means navigation from global navigation satelite systems
US6401036B1 (en) * 2000-10-03 2002-06-04 Motorola, Inc. Heading and position error-correction method and apparatus for vehicle navigation systems
US20020099481A1 (en) * 2001-01-22 2002-07-25 Masaki Mori Travel controlling apparatus of unmanned vehicle
US20030018430A1 (en) * 2001-04-23 2003-01-23 Quentin Ladetto Pedestrian navigation method and apparatus operative in a dead reckoning mode
US6615135B2 (en) * 2001-05-24 2003-09-02 Prc Inc. Satellite based on-board vehicle navigation system including predictive filtering and map-matching to reduce errors in a vehicular position
US20030187577A1 (en) * 2000-12-08 2003-10-02 Satloc, Llc Vehicle navigation system and method for swathing applications
US6658353B2 (en) * 2000-11-08 2003-12-02 Denso Corporation Vehicle navigation apparatus providing rapid correction for excessive error in dead reckoning estimates of vehicle travel direction by direct application of position and direction information derived from gps position measurement data
US6731237B2 (en) * 1999-11-09 2004-05-04 The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. Deeply-integrated adaptive GPS-based navigator with extended-range code tracking
US20040181335A1 (en) * 2003-03-14 2004-09-16 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus for detecting location of movable body in navigation system and method thereof
US6826478B2 (en) * 2002-04-12 2004-11-30 Ensco, Inc. Inertial navigation system for mobile objects with constraints
US6895313B2 (en) * 2003-02-04 2005-05-17 Pioneer Corporation Angular velocity detection device
US7200490B2 (en) * 2003-12-12 2007-04-03 Trimble Navigation Limited GPS receiver with autopilot and integrated lightbar display
US7286933B2 (en) * 2003-08-25 2007-10-23 Lg Electronics Inc. GPS/dead-reckoning combination system and operating method thereof
JP2008032408A (en) * 2006-07-26 2008-02-14 Alpine Electronics Inc Vehicle position correcting device, and vehicle position correction method
US20080082225A1 (en) * 2006-08-15 2008-04-03 Tomtom International B.V. A method of reporting errors in map data used by navigation devices
US7418364B1 (en) * 1998-06-05 2008-08-26 Crossbow Technology, Inc. Dynamic attitude measurement method and apparatus
US20080262730A1 (en) * 2005-11-18 2008-10-23 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Mobile Object Position Estimation Apparatus and Method
US7444215B2 (en) * 2006-12-29 2008-10-28 Industrial Technology Research Institute Moving apparatus and method of self-direction testing and self-direction correction thereof
US20080309550A1 (en) * 2004-10-21 2008-12-18 Nokia Corporation Satellite Based Positioning
US7502678B2 (en) * 2006-04-21 2009-03-10 Claas Selbstfahrende Erntemaschinen Gmbh Method for controlling an agricultural machine system
US20090099774A1 (en) * 2007-10-10 2009-04-16 Leica Geosystems Ag Systems and methods for improved position determination of vehicles
US20090099772A1 (en) * 2007-10-12 2009-04-16 Di Chiu (Owners in Common 1/2) Augmented navigation system and method of a moving object
US20090119016A1 (en) * 2007-11-05 2009-05-07 Denso Corporation Vehicular present position detection apparatus and program storage medium
US20090254275A1 (en) * 2008-04-03 2009-10-08 Sirf Technology, Inc. Systems and Methods for Monitoring Navigation State Errors
US20100007550A1 (en) * 2008-07-10 2010-01-14 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Positioning apparatus for a mobile object
US7672781B2 (en) * 2005-06-04 2010-03-02 Microstrain, Inc. Miniaturized wireless inertial sensing system
US20100214161A1 (en) * 2009-02-22 2010-08-26 Trimble Navigation Limited GNSS moving base positioning
US20110037647A1 (en) * 2008-04-23 2011-02-17 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Relative position detecting apparatus, and relative position detecting system
US8086405B2 (en) * 2007-06-28 2011-12-27 Sirf Technology Holdings, Inc. Compensation for mounting misalignment of a navigation device
US8095250B2 (en) * 2009-05-21 2012-01-10 Honeywell International Inc. Real-time compensation of inertial sensor bias errors under high spin rate conditions
US20120029810A1 (en) * 2010-07-30 2012-02-02 Dai Liwen L System and Method for Moving-Base RTK Measurements
US20120203453A1 (en) * 2011-02-09 2012-08-09 SenionLab AB Method and device for indoor positioning
US8256265B2 (en) * 2007-12-25 2012-09-04 Denso Corporation Apparatus and method for inspecting sensor module
US20130076564A1 (en) * 2011-06-28 2013-03-28 Topcon Positioning Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus of gnss receiver heading determination
US20130093852A1 (en) * 2011-10-12 2013-04-18 Board Of Trustees Of The University Of Arkansas Portable robotic device
US8447518B2 (en) * 2010-05-19 2013-05-21 Denso Corporation Current position detector for vehicle
US20130138247A1 (en) * 2005-03-25 2013-05-30 Jens-Steffen Gutmann Re-localization of a robot for slam
US8577539B1 (en) * 2010-01-27 2013-11-05 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air Force Coded aperture aided navigation and geolocation systems

Family Cites Families (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5416712A (en) * 1993-05-28 1995-05-16 Trimble Navigation Limited Position and velocity estimation system for adaptive weighting of GPS and dead-reckoning information
JP4716886B2 (en) * 2006-02-06 2011-07-06 アルパイン株式会社 Movement angle determination method of the position calculating device
JP5051550B2 (en) * 2009-02-26 2012-10-17 アイシン・エィ・ダブリュ株式会社 The navigation device and a program for navigation
US8442763B2 (en) * 2010-04-16 2013-05-14 CSR Technology Holdings Inc. Method and apparatus for geographically aiding navigation satellite system solution

Patent Citations (64)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3659085A (en) * 1970-04-30 1972-04-25 Sierra Research Corp Computer determining the location of objects in a coordinate system
US4760397A (en) * 1986-12-22 1988-07-26 Contraves Ag Target tracking system
US5390125A (en) * 1990-02-05 1995-02-14 Caterpillar Inc. Vehicle position determination system and method
US5404307A (en) * 1991-12-19 1995-04-04 Pioneer Electronic Corporation Navigation apparatus with detected angular speed correction
US5424953A (en) * 1992-01-16 1995-06-13 Pioneer Electronic Corporation Navigation apparatus
US5469158A (en) * 1992-04-20 1995-11-21 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Apparatus for correcting the detected heading of a vehicle
US5479079A (en) * 1993-08-26 1995-12-26 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for controlling robot travel
US5699256A (en) * 1994-06-02 1997-12-16 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Offset-drift correcting device for gyro-sensor
US6081230A (en) * 1994-11-29 2000-06-27 Xanavi Informatics Corporation Navigation system furnished with means for estimating error of mounted sensor
US5694474A (en) * 1995-09-18 1997-12-02 Interval Research Corporation Adaptive filter for signal processing and method therefor
US6029111A (en) * 1995-12-28 2000-02-22 Magellan Dis, Inc. Vehicle navigation system and method using GPS velocities
JPH09189564A (en) * 1996-01-11 1997-07-22 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Traveling body position speed calculating device
US6253154B1 (en) * 1996-11-22 2001-06-26 Visteon Technologies, Llc Method and apparatus for navigating with correction of angular speed using azimuth detection sensor
US5757317A (en) * 1997-03-17 1998-05-26 Litton Systems, Inc. Relative navigation utilizing inertial measurement units and a plurality of satellite transmitters
US6024655A (en) * 1997-03-31 2000-02-15 Leading Edge Technologies, Inc. Map-matching golf navigation system
US6145378A (en) * 1997-07-22 2000-11-14 Baroid Technology, Inc. Aided inertial navigation system
US5991525A (en) * 1997-08-22 1999-11-23 Voyan Technology Method for real-time nonlinear system state estimation and control
US7418364B1 (en) * 1998-06-05 2008-08-26 Crossbow Technology, Inc. Dynamic attitude measurement method and apparatus
US6731237B2 (en) * 1999-11-09 2004-05-04 The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. Deeply-integrated adaptive GPS-based navigator with extended-range code tracking
US6317688B1 (en) * 2000-01-31 2001-11-13 Rockwell Collins Method and apparatus for achieving sole means navigation from global navigation satelite systems
US6401036B1 (en) * 2000-10-03 2002-06-04 Motorola, Inc. Heading and position error-correction method and apparatus for vehicle navigation systems
US6658353B2 (en) * 2000-11-08 2003-12-02 Denso Corporation Vehicle navigation apparatus providing rapid correction for excessive error in dead reckoning estimates of vehicle travel direction by direct application of position and direction information derived from gps position measurement data
US20030187577A1 (en) * 2000-12-08 2003-10-02 Satloc, Llc Vehicle navigation system and method for swathing applications
US20020099481A1 (en) * 2001-01-22 2002-07-25 Masaki Mori Travel controlling apparatus of unmanned vehicle
US20030018430A1 (en) * 2001-04-23 2003-01-23 Quentin Ladetto Pedestrian navigation method and apparatus operative in a dead reckoning mode
US6826477B2 (en) * 2001-04-23 2004-11-30 Ecole Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne (Epfl) Pedestrian navigation method and apparatus operative in a dead reckoning mode
US6615135B2 (en) * 2001-05-24 2003-09-02 Prc Inc. Satellite based on-board vehicle navigation system including predictive filtering and map-matching to reduce errors in a vehicular position
US6826478B2 (en) * 2002-04-12 2004-11-30 Ensco, Inc. Inertial navigation system for mobile objects with constraints
US6895313B2 (en) * 2003-02-04 2005-05-17 Pioneer Corporation Angular velocity detection device
US20040181335A1 (en) * 2003-03-14 2004-09-16 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus for detecting location of movable body in navigation system and method thereof
US7286933B2 (en) * 2003-08-25 2007-10-23 Lg Electronics Inc. GPS/dead-reckoning combination system and operating method thereof
US7200490B2 (en) * 2003-12-12 2007-04-03 Trimble Navigation Limited GPS receiver with autopilot and integrated lightbar display
US20080309550A1 (en) * 2004-10-21 2008-12-18 Nokia Corporation Satellite Based Positioning
US20130138247A1 (en) * 2005-03-25 2013-05-30 Jens-Steffen Gutmann Re-localization of a robot for slam
US20130138246A1 (en) * 2005-03-25 2013-05-30 Jens-Steffen Gutmann Management of resources for slam in large environments
US7672781B2 (en) * 2005-06-04 2010-03-02 Microstrain, Inc. Miniaturized wireless inertial sensing system
US20080262730A1 (en) * 2005-11-18 2008-10-23 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Mobile Object Position Estimation Apparatus and Method
US7502678B2 (en) * 2006-04-21 2009-03-10 Claas Selbstfahrende Erntemaschinen Gmbh Method for controlling an agricultural machine system
JP2008032408A (en) * 2006-07-26 2008-02-14 Alpine Electronics Inc Vehicle position correcting device, and vehicle position correction method
US20080082225A1 (en) * 2006-08-15 2008-04-03 Tomtom International B.V. A method of reporting errors in map data used by navigation devices
US7444215B2 (en) * 2006-12-29 2008-10-28 Industrial Technology Research Institute Moving apparatus and method of self-direction testing and self-direction correction thereof
US8086405B2 (en) * 2007-06-28 2011-12-27 Sirf Technology Holdings, Inc. Compensation for mounting misalignment of a navigation device
US20090099774A1 (en) * 2007-10-10 2009-04-16 Leica Geosystems Ag Systems and methods for improved position determination of vehicles
US20090099772A1 (en) * 2007-10-12 2009-04-16 Di Chiu (Owners in Common 1/2) Augmented navigation system and method of a moving object
US20090119016A1 (en) * 2007-11-05 2009-05-07 Denso Corporation Vehicular present position detection apparatus and program storage medium
US8256265B2 (en) * 2007-12-25 2012-09-04 Denso Corporation Apparatus and method for inspecting sensor module
US20090254275A1 (en) * 2008-04-03 2009-10-08 Sirf Technology, Inc. Systems and Methods for Monitoring Navigation State Errors
US8259009B2 (en) * 2008-04-23 2012-09-04 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Relative position detecting apparatus, and relative position detecting system
US20110037647A1 (en) * 2008-04-23 2011-02-17 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Relative position detecting apparatus, and relative position detecting system
US20100007550A1 (en) * 2008-07-10 2010-01-14 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Positioning apparatus for a mobile object
US8237609B2 (en) * 2009-02-22 2012-08-07 Trimble Navigation Limited GNSS position coasting
US8400351B2 (en) * 2009-02-22 2013-03-19 Trimble Navigation Limited GNSS moving base positioning
US20100214162A1 (en) * 2009-02-22 2010-08-26 Trimble Navigation Limited GNSS position coasting
US20100214161A1 (en) * 2009-02-22 2010-08-26 Trimble Navigation Limited GNSS moving base positioning
US8095250B2 (en) * 2009-05-21 2012-01-10 Honeywell International Inc. Real-time compensation of inertial sensor bias errors under high spin rate conditions
US8577539B1 (en) * 2010-01-27 2013-11-05 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air Force Coded aperture aided navigation and geolocation systems
US8447518B2 (en) * 2010-05-19 2013-05-21 Denso Corporation Current position detector for vehicle
US20120029810A1 (en) * 2010-07-30 2012-02-02 Dai Liwen L System and Method for Moving-Base RTK Measurements
US20120203453A1 (en) * 2011-02-09 2012-08-09 SenionLab AB Method and device for indoor positioning
US20130311084A1 (en) * 2011-02-09 2013-11-21 SenionLab Method and device for indoor positioning
US8498811B2 (en) * 2011-02-09 2013-07-30 SenionLab AB Method and device for indoor positioning
US20130076564A1 (en) * 2011-06-28 2013-03-28 Topcon Positioning Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus of gnss receiver heading determination
US20130093852A1 (en) * 2011-10-12 2013-04-18 Board Of Trustees Of The University Of Arkansas Portable robotic device
US20140031980A1 (en) * 2011-11-11 2014-01-30 Jens-Steffen Gutmann Systems and methods for extending slam to multiple regions

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150350849A1 (en) * 2014-05-31 2015-12-03 Apple Inc. Location Determination Using Dual Statistical Filters
US9491585B2 (en) * 2014-05-31 2016-11-08 Apple Inc. Location determination using dual statistical filters

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
WO2014153483A1 (en) 2014-09-25 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US20120072110A1 (en) Indoor positioning using pressure sensors
US20100178934A1 (en) Environment-specific measurement weighting in wireless positioning
US20120176491A1 (en) Camera-based position location and navigation based on image processing
US20110117924A1 (en) Position determination using a wireless signal
US20110275408A1 (en) Orientation sensor calibration
US20140206389A1 (en) Visual identifier of third party location
US20100130229A1 (en) Wireless-based positioning adjustments using a motion sensor
US20110172918A1 (en) Motion state detection for mobile device
US20140160959A1 (en) Methods and Systems for Enhanced Round Trip Time (RTT) Exchange
US20150045058A1 (en) Performing data collection based on internal raw observables using a mobile data collection platform
US20150045059A1 (en) Performing data collection based on external raw observables using a mobile data collection platform
US20140180627A1 (en) System, method and/or devices for applying magnetic signatures for positioning
JP2007163297A (en) Positioning terminal
US20100309044A1 (en) On Demand Positioning
US20130267260A1 (en) Map modification using ground-truth measurements
Blum et al. Smartphone sensor reliability for augmented reality applications
US20110298658A1 (en) Position Determination Using Measurements From Past And Present Epochs
US8630798B2 (en) Electronic system and method for personal navigation
US20130158860A1 (en) Location and event triggered navigation dormancy and wakeup
US20110010089A1 (en) Positioning device and positioning method
US20140104437A1 (en) Sensor calibration and position estimation based on vanishing point determination
US20110148695A1 (en) Method and system for calculating position
US20150341233A1 (en) Methods, apparatuses, and articles for location parameter reporting and processing
US20150281908A1 (en) Methods, apparatuses, and devices for positioning mobile devices using measured receiver gain
US20110143683A1 (en) Portable Electronic Device Positioning Based On Multipath Characterization Information Associated With Wireless Network Transmitting Devices

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: QUALCOMM INCORPORATED, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HUTTUNEN, TERO H.;CZOMPO, JOSEPH;SIGNING DATES FROM 20140328 TO 20140410;REEL/FRAME:032839/0208