US20140194029A1 - Toy Play Set with Multiple Modes and a Housing for a Portable Electronic Device - Google Patents

Toy Play Set with Multiple Modes and a Housing for a Portable Electronic Device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20140194029A1
US20140194029A1 US14/147,076 US201414147076A US2014194029A1 US 20140194029 A1 US20140194029 A1 US 20140194029A1 US 201414147076 A US201414147076 A US 201414147076A US 2014194029 A1 US2014194029 A1 US 2014194029A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
electronic device
portable electronic
housing
play set
movable portion
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US14/147,076
Inventor
Jared P. Pardi
Brian John ARGAUER, JR.
Bruce Robert CORDIER
Daniel J. Damon
Anthony Favorito
William Joseph MCCORMICK
Brian P. MYSLIWY
Ross Rumfola, III
Donald W. Stucke, Jr.
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Mattel Inc
Original Assignee
Mattel Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201361749030P priority Critical
Application filed by Mattel Inc filed Critical Mattel Inc
Priority to US14/147,076 priority patent/US20140194029A1/en
Assigned to MATTEL, INC. reassignment MATTEL, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ARGAUER, BRIAN JOHN, JR., CORDIER, BRUCE ROBERT, FAVORITO, ANTHONY, MCCORMICK, WILLIAM JOSEPH, MYSLIWY, BRIAN P., PARDI, JARED P., RUMFOLA, ROSS, III, STUCKE, DONALD W., JR., DAMON, DANIEL J.
Publication of US20140194029A1 publication Critical patent/US20140194029A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H33/00Other toys
    • A63H33/003Convertible toys, e.g. robots convertible into rockets or vehicles convertible into planes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H33/00Other toys
    • A63H33/26Magnetic or electric toys
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H33/00Other toys
    • A63H33/42Toy models or toy scenery not otherwise covered
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2250/00Miscellaneous game characteristics
    • A63F2250/30Miscellaneous game characteristics with a three-dimensional image

Abstract

A toy play set with multiple modes and a housing for a touchscreen portable electronic device includes a support structure, a first movable portion defining a housing configured to receive a portable electronic device, and a second movable portion. The first and second movable portions are rotatably coupled to the support structure and movable between a first configuration and a second configuration. In the first configuration, the first movable portion is in an upright orientation and in the second configuration the first movable portion is in a flat orientation. The portable electronic device is configured to provide different game modes depending at least upon the orientation of the first movable portion and the detection of certain toy objects thereon.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims priority to and is based on U.S. Patent Application No. 61/749,030, filed Jan. 4, 2013, Attorney Docket No. 0621.2035P, entitled “A Toy Play Set with Multiple Modes and a Housing for a Portable Electronic Device,” the entire disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to a toy play set. More particularly, the present invention relates a play set for toys, such as figurines, that can be used in conjunction with a portable electronic device (“PED”). The present invention also relates to a play set that includes a movable or reconfigurable housing for a PED, the housing being movable into multiple configurations or orientations within the play set.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • As touch-based or touchscreen technology has become more prevalent in society, the range of users for the same technology has dramatically increased. In fact, many touch-based tablets and apps are now created explicitly for children. Some of these touch-based devices are configured to detect an object (e.g. a stylus) or a user's finger in order to increase the play value of the touch-based device and some devices may even recognize certain toy objects. One example of a touch based device that recognize toy objects is described in more detail in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/053,550, filed on Mar. 22, 2011, entitled Electronic Device and the Input and Output of Data (now U.S. Publication No. 2011/0227871 A1), which is hereby incorporated by reference in full.
  • Although many touch based devices have been successfully configured or adapted for use by children, many touch based PEDs are still fragile and easy to break. Thus, many PEDs must be kept in a case or cover when a child is using the PED. In order to increase the play value of cases and covers for touch screen PEDs, some cases and covers have incorporated additional play features or designs. However, the play features of the cases and covers do not always interact with the play included on the touch screen device and frequently confine touchscreen PEDs to one configuration within the case or cover. In other words, once a PED is placed in a case or cover, the PED device may not be moved within the cover or case. Thus, a toy play set with multiple modes that includes a movable or reconfigurable housing for a PED is desired.
  • SUMMARY
  • According to at least one embodiment of the present invention a toy play set includes a support structure, a first movable portion, and a second movable portion. The first movable portion defines a housing configured to receive a portable electronic device and the first and second movable portions are movably coupled to the support structure and movable between a first configuration and a second configuration. The first movable portion is in an upright orientation in the first configuration and a flat orientation in the second configuration and the portable electronic device is configured to provide different game modes depending at least upon the orientation of the first movable portion.
  • In some embodiments of the above toy play set, the second movable portion is in a flat orientation in both the first configuration and the second configuration. In other embodiments, the first and second movable portions are rotatable between the flat orientation and the upright orientation with respect to the support structure. In yet other embodiments, the second movable portion also includes controls electronically coupled to the portable electronic device. In some of these embodiments, the controls include at least one of a movement sensing assembly or buttons.
  • In yet other embodiments of the above play set, the game mode provided by the portable electronic device is further dependent upon the detected presence of a certain character or object. In some of these embodiments, the toy play set is operable in at least a first game mode or a second game mode when in the first configuration and a third or fourth game mode when in the second configuration, wherein the first and second game modes are only accessible when the portable electronic device is electronically coupled to the playset. For example, in embodiments where the second movable portion includes controls electronically coupled to the portable electronic device, the second game mode is played via the controls. In embodiments where at least one of the first, second, third and fourth games modes includes character-specific sub modes, each of the sub modes is initiated upon detection of a character. In yet other embodiments, the support structure includes a theme and the portable electronic device displays interactive images that match the theme of the support structure when in the first and third game modes. For example, the support structure may include a castle theme.
  • In still further embodiments, the first movable portion includes a top and a bottom. The top and bottom form a housing for receiving the portable electronic device therebetween and the top and the bottom are selectively coupleable along at least one of their edges in order to selectively secure the portable electronic device within the housing. In some of these embodiments, the first movable portion also includes at least two actuators, the top and bottom only being decoupleable along at least one of their edges when more than one of the at least two actuators are actuated simultaneously.
  • According to another embodiment of the present invention, a toy play set includes a support structure and a housing. The support structure is configured to rest atop a support surface and includes at least one feature configured to receive a toy accessory. The housing is configured to removably receive a portable electronic device and is movably coupled to the support structure and movable with respect to the support structure between a flat orientation and an upright orientation.
  • In some embodiments of the above toy play set, the support structure and housing include a theme and the portable electronic device is configured to display images or games which match the theme when the portable electronic device is received within the housing. In other embodiments, the portable electronic device is configured to provide at least a first play mode in the flat orientation and at least a second play mode in the upright orientation, the first play mode being different from the second play mode. In still other embodiments, the housing is a first movable portion and the toy play set also includes a second movable portion. The second movable portion also being movably coupled to the support structure and including controls to allow a user to interact with the portable electronic device.
  • According to another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, a housing for a portable electronic device includes a top including at least two lateral edges, a bottom hingedly coupled to the top at a first lateral edge, at least two actuators, and a hinge coupled to a toy play set. The bottom is removably securable to the top via a locking mechanism at a second lateral edge and the top and bottom are configured to receive the portable electronic device therebetween. In order to release the locking mechanism and decouple the second lateral edge of the bottom from the top, more than one of the at least two actuators must be actuated simultaneously. The hinge allows the housing for the portable electronic device to be rotatably coupled to the toy play set along the first lateral edge so that the housing is rotatable between a flat orientation and an upright orientation.
  • Some embodiments of the above housing are configured to be electronically coupled to the portable electronic device when the portable electronic device is received therein. In other embodiments, the top also includes a cover and a slot. The cover is biased in a first position that aligns the cover to cover a home button of a portable electronic device when the portable electronic device is oriented in a first direction within the housing. The cover is selectively retractable to a second position which reveals the home button. The slot is alignable with the home button in order to expose the home button when the portable electronic device is oriented in a second direction within the housing.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of a play set in a first or upright configuration, in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of a portion of the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of an object that may be used with the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIGS. 4-5 show perspective views of the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 1 between configurations.
  • FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 1 in a flat or second configuration.
  • FIG. 7 shows a perspective view of a portion of the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 6 with an exemplary toy figurine placed thereon.
  • FIGS. 8-9 show rear views of the portion of the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 7.
  • FIGS. 10 a, 10 b, and 11 show perspective views of the portion of the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 7.
  • FIGS. 12-13 show perspective views of a bottom of the portion of the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 7.
  • FIG. 14 shows a perspective view of a top of the portion of the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 7.
  • FIGS. 15 a-c show front views of a portion of the top of FIG. 14.
  • FIG. 16 a-b show perspective views of the play set of FIG. 1 in a first or upright configuration, in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 17 a-b show perspective views of the play set of FIG. 1 in a second configuration, in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 18 shows a perspective view of the play set of FIG. 1, including multiple figurines that may be used with the play set.
  • FIG. 19 shows a flow chart of the exemplary play modes for a toy play set with multiple modes and a housing for an electronic device, in accordance with the present invention.
  • Like reference numerals have been used to identify like elements throughout this disclosure.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Generally referring to FIGS. 1-19, at least one exemplary embodiment of a toy play set with multiple modes and a housing for a PED is shown. The play set may include a housing configured to receive a PED and a support structure configured to support the housing in multiple configurations. A PED that is disposed within the housing may be programmed to function in different modes based on at least orientation with respect to the support structure and/or the presence of different objects or toys on the device or the play set.
  • Referring first to FIG. 1, an exemplary play set 100 is shown. The play set may include a support structure 102 with various platforms 108 and mounting points 106, to increase the play value of the play set 100 when it is used without a portable electronic device. The support structure also includes a base 104 in order to stabilize the play set 100 regardless of its configuration. The support structure 102 may also support at least two movable portions, including a first movable portion 200 and a second movable portion 300.
  • Still referring to FIG. 1, each of the movable portions 200, 300 may house or provide a housing for various electronics and may be movable between a substantially upright or vertical orientation and a substantially flat or horizontal orientation. For example, in FIG. 1, the play set is in a first configuration 10 with the first movable portion 200 being in an upright orientation and the second movable portion 300 being in a flat orientation. Also, in FIG. 1, the first movable portion 200 includes a housing 201 for a PED 40, while the second movable portion 300 includes various controls, such as buttons 306 and a movement sensing assembly 310 configured to receive an object 60. The second movable portion 300 may also include and electronics to electronically couple any controls included therein to the portable electronic device.
  • In some embodiments, the electronics included in the second movable portion 300 may be electronically coupled to the PED 40 housed in the first movable portion 200. In the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the buttons 306 and movement sensing assembly 310 may be linked to the PED 40 via a dongle that is inserted into a headphone jack included in the PED 40. However, in other embodiments, electronics included in movable portion may linked to PED 40 via any desirable method (wired or wireless) such that when a PED 40 is mounted or housed within the first movable portion 200, a user may communicate with the PED 40 via controls included on second movable portion 300, such as buttons 306 and movement sensing assembly 310. In some embodiments, the necessary wires and couplings to provide such a connection may be included in play set 100.
  • Now referring to FIGS. 2-3, with continued reference to FIG. 1, the movement sensing assembly 310 and object 60 are shown in closer detail. As seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, the second movable portion 300 may include a housing 302 and a stand 304. The top surface of the housing 302 may include an aperture 308 and a receiver 312 may be housed or rotatably mounted within aperture 308. A movement sensor (not pictured) may be disposed substantially beneath or within receiver 312 and may be configured to sense or track the movement of receiver 312. Thus, movement sensing assembly 310 may, in essence, allow an object to communicate with a movement sensor. For example, an object 60 may be inserted into a receiver 312, such that movement of the object may control movement of the receiver 312. In the exemplary embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-3, object 60 is shaped as cannon, but it is to be understood that object 60 may be any desirable shape or size which allows object 60 to function in accordance with the scope of the present invention. In fact, in some embodiments, a user may even use a finger to manipulate receiver 312.
  • Still referring to FIGS. 2-3, in order ensure that the receiver 312 follows the movements of object 60, including both rotational and lateral movement, receiver 312 may include a cavity 314 with at least one flat wall and object 60 may include insertable section 65 with substantially the same shape. Although FIG. 3 does not clearly show the cross-sectional area of insertable section 65, at least a portion of section 65 (the lowermost portion in FIG. 3) may be shaped substantially the same as cavity 314, such that insertable section 65 may prevent object 60 from simply spinning within cavity 314 when object 60 is disposed therein. The flat side of cavity 314 and insertable section 65 may also assist users in aligning the object 60 as intended. Although the cavity 314 and insertable section 65 are shown to be substantially circular with a flat side, it is to be understood that cavity 314 and insertable section 65 may be shaped as desired so long as that when insertable section 65 is inserted into cavity 314, receiver 312 moves with object 60.
  • Now turning to FIGS. 4-5, two perspective views of play set 100 are shown and illustrate at least a portion of the range of motion of each movable portion 200 and 300. In FIG. 4, the first movable portion 200 is shown between an upright orientation and a flat orientation while in FIG. 5, the second movable portion 300 is shown between an upright orientation and flat orientation. Both movable portions 200 and 300 may be pivotably coupled to the support structure 102, such as by hinges 280 and 320, respectively, such that each movable portion 200, 300 may rotate, at least partially, about an axis parallel to or contiguous with base 104, such as axis A. However, in other embodiments, hinges 280 and 320 may be coupled to support structure 102 at separate locations, such that each movable portion may rotate about a separate axis.
  • In the exemplary embodiment shown in FIGS. 4-5, since each portion 200, 300 is mounted to the support structure 102 along the same axis, each movable portion 200, 300 may limit the range of the other movable portion. Alternatively or additionally, the range of motion of each portion 200, 300 may also be limited by parts of portions of the support structure 102, such as the innermost edges of the towers included in the exemplary embodiment shown in FIGS. 4-5, wherein innermost simply denotes the edges disposed closest to the support structure 102. However, it is to be understood that movable portions 200, 300 may at least rotate ninety degrees, from an upright orientation to a flat orientation, such that the play set 100 may move between configuration 10 (see FIG. 1), configuration 20 (see FIG. 6), and a folded configuration (not pictured). In the folded configuration, both movable portions 200, 300 may be in substantially upright orientations.
  • Still referring to FIGS. 4-5, FIG. 4 provides a partial top view of the first movable portion 200 while FIG. 5 provides a partial top view of the second movable portion 300. As can be seen in FIG. 4, housing 201 may include a top or front portion 202 and a bottom or rear portion 208. The uppermost portion of top 202 may substantially overlap or hang over bottom 208, such that a portion of top 202 may serve as a stand or platform when the first movable portion 200 is in a flat orientation, such as when play set 100 is in the second configuration 20. Similarly, as shown in FIG. 5, housing 302 includes a stand 304 that may serve as a stand or platform when the second movable portion 300 is in a flat orientation.
  • Thus, in embodiments where movable portions 200 and 300 are rotatably coupled to support structure 102 at a position elevated above the surface that the support structure 102 is resting upon, movable portions 200, 300 may actually be flat when disposed in a flat or horizontal orientation. In other embodiments, such as those where movable portions 200, 300 are rotatably coupled to support structure 102 in a non-elevated orientation with respect to the surface that support structure 102 is resting upon, the overhanging portion of top 202 and the stand 304 may be omitted from the first and second movable portions 200, 300, respectively. In still further embodiments, the overhanging portion of top 202 and stand 304 may be sized as desired so that movable portions 200, 300 may be disposed at desirable angles when either is disposed in a flat configuration, such as second configuration 20.
  • Now turning to FIGS. 6-7, the play set 100 is shown in the second configuration 20. In the second configuration 20, both the movable portions 200, 300 are substantially horizontal or flat. Thus, in configuration 20, a PED 40 housed within housing 201 may be substantially parallel to the support surface that the play set 100 is resting on, such that objects or toys may rest on top of PED 40. In order to protect the protect PED 40, the top 202 of housing 201 may include a protective film 204 which prevents scratches but allows conductive touches to still be sensed by the PED 40. Preferably, the film 204 is simply thin enough to allow the conductive sensing of the PED 40 to work through the film 204. Thus, when a conductive figurine 50 is placed on top of housing 201, as is shown in FIG. 7, the PED 40 may be protected from damage, but may still be able to sense that the conductive figurine is “touching” the PED 40.
  • As can also be seen in FIGS. 6-7, housing 201 may also include a retractable cover 206 and a slot 205 disposed on opposite lateral edges of top 202. These features may allow a “home” button included on a PED 40 to either be selectively protected or accessible, as desired, depending on the orientation of the PED 40. In other words, cover 206 and slot 205 may allow a parent to set up a PED 40 for their child, with or without restricting access to other programs or software applications included on the PED 40.
  • For example, if a parent wants the home button to be covered, the parent may place the PED 40 in tray 260 so that the home button is aligned with cover 206. In some embodiments, cover 206 may be biased in a covering position so that cover 206 may also serve as a child lock, as desired. If biased, the cover 206 must be held in a retracted position in order to press the home button and the cover 206 will automatically move back into a covering orientation once released. On the other hand, if a parent is comfortable with their child having access to the home button, the parent may rotate the PED 180 degrees to align the “home” button with slot 205, such that the “home” button is still accessible when PED 40 is in play set 100. Alternatively, if a child is old enough to operate retractable cover 206 but still wants the home button of a PED 40 to be covered to prevent it from being accidentally pushed, the home button may be aligned with cover 206 for convenience. Additionally, the slot 205 and cover 206 may allow the PED's camera or light sensor to be selectively or permanently exposed for at least some PED's, such as those PED's which include a camera or light sensor at an edge opposite the home button, as the camera or light sensor will be aligned with the slot 205 or cover 206 that is not disposed over the home button.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 8-9, the bottom 208 of housing 201 is shown from a rear perspective. As can be seen in FIGS. 8-9, the bottom 208 includes a locking mechanism 210 that may secure the first movable portion 200 in an upright orientation—the orientation that the first movable portion 200 is disposed in when the play set is in the first configuration 10. The locking mechanism 210 includes a rotatable knob 212 coupled to two elongate members 214. When extended or locked, each elongate member 214 may extend into a housing 216 included on support structure 102, as seen in FIG. 8. Upon being rotated, such as in direction “C,” the elongate members 214 may retract or move inwards until the elongate members 214 are removed from housings 216, as seen in FIG. 9, thereby allowing first movable portion 200 to rotate freely about hinges 280.
  • In some embodiments, the locking mechanism may be biased in a locking orientation (as seen in FIG. 8) or an unlocked orientation (as seen in FIG. 9), but in the present embodiment, the locking mechanism 210 is not biased. Instead, the locking mechanism will remain in either a locked orientation or unlocked orientation until manually manipulated. Thus, once unlocked, a user must align the elongate members 214 with housings 216 and turn knob 212 in direction “D” in order to lock movable portion 200 in an upright orientation. However, it is to be understood that the housings 216 included in FIGS. 8-9 are merely exemplary and that, in other embodiments, housings 216 may be any desirable portion of support structure 102 that may retain a movable portion 200 or 300 in an upright position. For example, in some embodiments housings 216 may not receive elongate members 214 therein and, instead, may simply prevent elongate members 214 from moving in one direction (i.e. housing 216 may be a solid protrusion that an elongate member 214 can rest upon). Additionally, housing 216 may, in some embodiments, secure elongate members 214 in non-upright orientations, as desired.
  • Turning to FIGS. 10 a-10 b and 11, housing 201 is shown in further detail. As can be seen, housing 201 is formed from top 202 and bottom 208 such that an interior cavity shaped to receive a PED 40 is defined. In some embodiments, bottom 208 may also include a tray 260 to securely receive the PED 40. Furthermore, the top 202 and bottom 208 may be rotatably coupled at one end (i.e. via hinges 280) and may be selectively coupleable at the opposite end, such as by latches 220. As will be addressed in more detail below, latches 220 may include at least two sets of movable projections 224, 230 (see FIG. 14) configured to selectively engage openings 240 in a manner which requires each set of projections 224, 230 to move in an opposite direction in order to decouple top 202 from bottom 208. Thus, in order to decouple top 202 from bottom 208, two actuators 250 (best shown in FIG. 11) must be engaged simultaneously. When both actuators 250 are engaged, a user may lift top 202 away from bottom 208, as seen in FIGS. 10 a-10 b. However, in some embodiments, the sets of projections 224, 230 may be configured so that the top 202 and bottom 208 may be secured together without actuating any of the actuators 250, as is described below.
  • As mentioned above, and as shown in more detail in FIGS. 12-13, the interior side of bottom 208 may include a tray 260 configured to receive a PED 40. A PED 40 may be inserted into tray 260 when top 202 and bottom 208 are separated from each other, and top 202 and bottom 208 may subsequently secured together around PED 40, via latches 220 in order to form a protective case for the PED 40. In order to securely receive the PED 40, the tray 260 may include various stops, supports and spacers, as needed, such as support members 262. Support members 262 may allow tray 260 to receive PEDs of various sizes and shapes and may ensure that the PED is secured tightly against the film 204 included in top 202. Thus, when objects are placed on film 204, the film 204 will not sag or otherwise deform.
  • Additionally, in some embodiments, tray 260 may be removable and/or reversible. As an example, tray 260 may be “reversible” by removing it and reinserting it with the supports 262 facing downwards (i.e. towards bottom 208). Reversing the tray 260 in the absence of a PED 40 may provide a solid surface under film 204, allowing the play set 100 to be used for play when a PED 40 is not available or installed within the play set 100 while still protecting film 204. Additionally, in some embodiments, the housing 201 may not include a film 204 and reversing the tray may simply provide a play surface that is coplanar with the top surface of top 202.
  • Now referring to FIGS. 14 and 15 a-c, the sets of movable projections 224, 230 that may be received within openings 240 are shown in more detail. As shown in FIG. 14, each set of movable projections 224, 230 may include three projections 226, 234, respectively, spaced along the length of the uppermost edge of top 202. In some embodiments, each of these projections may be independent, but in the present embodiment, each of the projections 226, 234 included in the sets of projections 224, 230 is mechanically coupled to the other projections in that set, such that all projections 226, 234 in a set of projections 224, 230 may be actuated together. Thus, although only one projection from each set 224, 230 is shown in FIGS. 15 a-c, it is understood to be representative of the set of projections 224, 230. Further, in the present embodiment, for redundancy, each actuator 250 actuates one set of projections 224, 230, but in some embodiments, both sets of projections 224, 230 may be actuated by one of the actuators 250.
  • In FIGS. 15 a-c, projections 226, 234 are shown in closer detail. Each projection 226, 234 extends from or through a slot 228, 232 in the top surface of top 202 and is slidable therein. Each slot 228, 232 may minor and substantially align with an opening 240 included on the bottom 208, such that when top 202 is closed atop of bottom 208, each pair of slots 228 and 232 may form one contiguous cavity with each opening 240. Thus, if the entirety of the projection is disposed within its slot 228, 232, it may be received in the opening 240. However, each projection 226, 234 also includes a respective overhanging portion 227, 235 that may extend over a lateral edge of its respective slot 228, 232. In some embodiments, such as the one shown in FIGS. 15 a-c, the projections 226, 234 may be biased in an orientation where the overhanging portion 227, 235 is extending past a lateral edge of its respective slot 228, 232. Thus, in order to insert, and subsequently lock the projections 226, 234 within openings 240 the projections 226, 234 must first be moved within slots 228, 232. This may be accomplished by actuating each set of projections 224, 230, by, for example, simultaneously actuating both actuators 250.
  • When actuated, each projection 226, 234 may slide away from one end of slot 228, 232, but while projection 226 may slide in a first direction, projection 234 slides in a second, opposite direction. In FIG. 15 a, neither set of projections 224, 230 is actuated, in FIG. 15 b, set 224 is actuated, and in FIG. 15 b, both set 224 and set 230 are actuated. As seen in FIGS. 15 b and 15 c, once actuated, projection 226 move in a first direction such that it is disposed substantially within slot 228. Similarly, as shown in FIG. 15 c, once projection 234 is actuated, projection 234 moves in a second direction such that it is disposed substantially within slot 232.
  • Once both projections 226 and 234 are disposed within slots 228, 232, the top 202 may be lowered onto bottom 208, inserting every projection 226, 234 from sets 224, 230 into openings 240. In some embodiments, overhanging portions 235 and 227 may be angled or sloped so that even if the projections are disposed slightly exterior of their respective slots, the projections may still be inserted into openings 240. Thus, even if the projections 226, 234 are disposed slightly exteriorly of their respective slots 228, 232, the projections 226, 234 may still, in some embodiments, be inserted into openings 240. In other words, the projections 226, 234 may automatically align with opening 240 when the top 202 and bottom 208 are closed together. Alternatively, each set of projections 226, 234 may be moved within slots 240 by simultaneously actuating actuators 250. Regardless, once projections 226, 234 are inserted into openings 240, actuators 250 may be released and the projections may return to their biased or non-actuated orientations (see FIG. 15 a), locking top 202 to bottom 208.
  • In order to remove or unlock top 202 from bottom 208, the same steps may be taken in reverse. In short, the actuators 250 may be depressed, so that the projections 226, 234 are aligned with the openings 240 such that the top 202 can be removed from the bottom 208. However, in contrast with the steps for closing the housing 201, the top 202 and bottom 208 may not simply be pulled apart without actuating the actuators 250, thereby preventing or discouraging a child below a desired age from removing a PED 40 form the housing 201.
  • Next, generally referring to FIGS. 16 a-19, the various play modes of play set 100 are shown or illustrated. The PED 40 may determine which play mode to provide based on at least the orientation of the PED 40 and the presence of various objects or toys on the PED 40. In order to sense orientation, a PED may utilize any motion, tilt, or orientation sensor included in the PED 40 that is capable of distinguishing between when the PED 40 is in an upright orientation or a flat orientation. For example, in FIGS. 16 a, 16 b and 18 the play set 100 is in first configuration 10, so the PED 40 may provide vertical play modes, but in FIGS. 17 a and 17 b, the play set 100 is in second configuration 20, so the PED 40 may provide flat or horizontal play modes. In some embodiments, the PED 40 may continue to provide play modes when it is disconnected from the playset 100 and oriented in similar positions to the position the PED 40 is oriented in in these configurations, but, preferably, the vertical play modes will only be available when the PED 40 is electronically coupled to the playset 100.
  • In FIGS. 16A, 16B and 18, the PED 40 is in an upright or vertical orientation and the PED 40 is electronically coupled to the playset 100. Consequently, the play set 100 is in a first configuration 10. However, in other embodiments, the PED 40 might not be electronically coupled to the playset 100 when in the first configuration 10 and the PED 40 may recognize that it is installed within the playset 100 in a vertical position in any desirable manner. In other words, while it is preferred that the PED 40 be electronically coupled to the playset 100 in the first configuration 10, the playset 100 may be considered to be in its first configuration when configured substantially as shown in FIGS. 16A, 16B, and 18, regardless of how or if the PED 40 is electronically connected thereto. When in the first configuration 10, the PED 40 may provide at least two vertical play modes, such as “living backgrounds” mode (see FIG. 16 a) and “cannon games” mode” (see FIG. 16 a), and the specific vertical play mode provided may be dependent on objects detected by the playset 100 or PED 40 and/or user selections or inputs.
  • For example, in some embodiments, the PED 40 may function in a first mode, such as living backgrounds mode, by default, and provide access to the second mode, such as cannon games mode, in response to certain user actions or inputs. In the present embodiment, a user may simply make a selection or series of selections in order to initiate the second mode (i.e. cannon games mode). However, in other embodiments, the PED 40 may function in the second mode in response to feedback from the movement sensor 310. For example, in some embodiments, the presence of an object 60 in the movement sensor 310 may trigger the PED 40 to move into cannon games mode and in still other embodiments (i.e. embodiments in which movement sensor 310 only detects the movement of receiver 312 and not the mere presence of an object 60), the PED 40 may move into cannon games mode when an object 60 is moved within the receiver 312 (like a joystick). In yet other embodiments, a user may only access the second mode from within the first mode. In other words, a user may be required to touch a portion of the screen or a menu that is presented in the first mode in order to access the second mode. Regardless of how the modes are accessed or provided, each vertical play mode may also include character-specific sub modes which may be provided upon the detection of a character. In fact, in some embodiments, the detection of a character may trigger a certain mode or sub mode to be provided.
  • In FIGS. 17 a and 17 b, play set 100 is shown in the second configuration 20 and, thus, the PED 40 in a substantially flat or horizontal orientation. When the playset 100 is in the second configuration 20, the playset 100 may provide any number of horizontal play modes that may be accessed in a similar manner to the manner described above for accessing the first and second modes of the first configuration 10. Also, and similar to the first configuration 10, the PED 40 is preferably electronically coupled to the playset 100 in the second configuration 20. However, in contrast with the first configuration 10, it is preferred that the PED 40 is able to provide any horizontal play modes whether or not the PED 40 is electronically coupled to the playset 100.
  • In this particular embodiment, the PED 40 is configured to provide a third mode, such as “adventure and exploration” mode, which may alternatively be referred to as adventure mode (see FIG. 17 a), and a fourth mode, such as “figure-based games” mode (see FIG. 17 b) when the playset 100 is in the second configuration 20. Adventure mode may be the default mode initially provided by the PED 40 upon recognizing that it is in the second configuration 20. Again similar to the vertical play modes, regardless of how these modes are accessed or provided, each horizontal play mode may also include character-specific sub modes which may be provided upon the detection of a character.
  • Now referring to FIGS. 18-19, with continued reference to FIGS. 16 a-b and 17 a-b, the PED 40 may be configured to recognize any number of characters, which may alternatively be referred to as figures or figurines. In this particular embodiment, the PED 40 is configured to recognize at least a knight 501, a troll 502, a wizard 503, and an archer 505, as seen in FIG. 18. In other embodiments, the PED 40 could be configured to recognize and adapt (i.e., “unlock” new content) to any number of other figures/characters. Regardless of the number of characters, each of these characters triggers slightly different versions or “sub modes” within the modes—living background mode, cannon mode, adventure mode and character-based games mode—provided by the PED 40. FIG. 19 is a flow chart representation of the different modes of play.
  • As can be seen in the flow chart of FIG. 19 and as described above, there are four main modes of play in this particular embodiment, living backgrounds, cannon games, adventure, and figure-based games. These game modes may alternatively be referred to as a first, second, third, and fourth game modes, respectively. The software associated with these games may also include at least one menu-type setting or mode, such as “the great hall” and “the courtyard” which may include doors or areas which may allow a user to literally and figuratively enter into the available modes in a particular configuration. For example, the great hall may provide access to the cannon games and living backgrounds modes when the PED 40 is in vertical game mode while the courtyard provides access the adventure and figure-based games modes when the PED 40 is in horizontal game mode. In order to determine which of the four main modes or menu-type settings the PED 40 should enter, the PED 40 may constantly check or determine whether it is in a vertical or horizontal orientation. Upon a change in orientation, the PED 40 may shift between modes or menus. Furthermore, each of the four aforementioned modes includes sub modes, which provide slight, character-dependent variations of the main play mode that the sub mode depends from. In order to determine which of the sub modes the PED 40 should present, the PED 40 may constantly check or determine if a character has been recognized by the PED 40.
  • As a more specific example of some of the modal functionality, in some embodiments, when the playset 100 is moved to an upright configuration 10, the PED 40 may initially present the great hall. Then, upon recognition of a character, character specific sub modes of the vertical play modes may become available. In embodiments where living backgrounds mode is the default mode, a door, entry, portion, or some other feature of the great hall may be unlocked, allowing the user to enter (i.e. by moving a physical or virtual character to and through a door via touches) the character specific living background. Alternatively, upon recognition of a character, a virtual representation of the detected character may automatically move through a door revealing the associated living background. For example, the knight 501 may unlock a door to a knight's bedroom, the wizard 503 may unlock a door to a wizard's lab, the archer 505 may unlock a door to an archery range, and the troll 502 may unlock a door to a dungeon. Each character-specific living background may include different features and/or interactive elements for a user to play with, only relating to each other insofar as each living background is a room or setting.
  • In this particular embodiment, the “living background mode,” is the default or basic mode for vertical play. In other words, if the PED 40 is in vertical play, the PED 40 may initially enter or remain in living background mode. However, since the specific living background sub mode is dependent on detected objects, if the PED 40 has detected and identified a conductive object prior to entering living background mode, the PED 40 may present a living background corresponding to the identity of that conductive object. In some embodiments, a character-specific living background may not be provided until the playset is in the upright configuration 10 and a character is detected. In the particular embodiment shown in FIG. 16A, a knight 501 has been introduced to the PED 40 and, as such, the PED 40 is presenting the knight's room with a virtual representation of the knight 501 disposed therein. Additionally, although it is not apparent from FIG. 16 a, this particular living background may include features, such a chest, that, if opened, provides a new and interesting feature, such a sword for the virtual representation of the knight.
  • Alternatively, upon detection of a character, a user may choose to enter cannon mode with this specific character, such as via a selection or via movement of an object 60 in the movement sensor 310, as described above. In cannon mode, the gameplay is substantially the same regardless of the latest detected character, but the setting, ammo or enemies running at the user may change depending on the character that was most recently identified. For example, if the knight 501 was last detected by the PED 40, the knight 501 specific cannon game sub mode may display enemy characters 70 resembling trolls that appear to be running towards the user, as seen in FIG. 16 b. In some embodiments, each character's cannon mode may only be accessible from the character's specific living background mode.
  • As shown in FIG. 16 b, once in cannon mode, a user may use an object 60 that is inserted into receiver 312 to manipulate a target or indicator 55 displayed on the screen of PED 40 and may use the buttons 306 to “shoot” the images or characters 70 coming towards him or her. Alternatively, a user may simply tap the screen at an appropriate location in order to “shoot” the images or characters 70 coming towards him or her. In some embodiments, if the PED 40 includes a rear-facing camera or recording device, the PED 40 may present the image seen behind the play set 100 as the background and superimpose characters 70 thereon. Thus, the characters running towards the user may appear to running in the real-world background that is disposed behind the play set 100.
  • Then, when the PED 40 is moved to a flat configuration 20, the PED 40 may initially present a courtyard or other outdoor setting, as seen in FIG. 17 a, which enables a user to select or move between different sub modes of adventure mode and to enter into character-based games. Dependent on the character or virtual representation of the character detected, the PED 40 may provide different character-themed settings and areas to explore from this courtyard in the various adventure sub modes. Each of these areas may match the theme of the playset 100 in order to increase the play value of the playset 100. Additionally, the courtyard may also include areas or hotspots which may allow a user to enter into the figure-based games mode. Different hotspots may only be accessible by certain characters or may only appear upon the detection of certain characters.
  • In some embodiments, once the user moves a character or virtual representation of that character to a hotspot, the PED 40 may provide a figure-based game sub mode that is suited or tailored to a detected character, as seen in FIG. 17 b. For example, the PED 40 may present a Knight-specific game, or Knight-specific version of a game, when the knight 501 is detected at a specific hotspot (as seen in FIG. 17 b), a wizard-specific game, or wizard-specific version of a game, when the wizard 503 is detected at a specific hotspot, an archer-specific game, or archer-specific version of a game when the archer 505 is detected at a specific hotspot, and a troll game, or troll-specific version of a game when the troll 502 is detected at a specific hotspot. Similar to cannon mode, each of the character-specific sub modes of a figure-based games mode may be substantially similar, but the setting, enemies, or other aspects of the game appearance may be altered in order to make the game character-specific.
  • It is to be understood that a toy play set with multiple modes and a housing for a portable electronic device may be fabricated from any suitable material, or combination of materials, such as plastic, foamed plastic, wood, cardboard, pressed paper, metal, supple natural or synthetic materials including, but not limited to, cotton, elastomers, polyester, plastic, rubber, derivatives thereof, and combinations thereof. Suitable plastics may include high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polystyrene, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polycarbonate, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polypropylene, ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA), or the like. Suitable foamed plastics may include expanded or extruded polystyrene, expanded or extruded polypropylene, EVA foam, derivatives thereof, and combinations thereof.
  • It is also to be understood that terms such as “left,” “right,” “top,” “bottom,” “front,” “rear,” “side,” “height,” “length,” “width,” “upper,” “lower,” “interior,” “exterior,” “inner,” “outer” and the like as may be used herein, merely describe points or portions of reference and do not limit the present invention to any particular orientation or configuration. Further, the term “exemplary” is used herein to describe an example or illustration. Any embodiment described herein as exemplary is not to be construed as a preferred or advantageous embodiment, but rather as one example or illustration of a possible embodiment of the invention.
  • Although the disclosed inventions are illustrated and described herein as embodied in one or more specific examples, it is nevertheless not intended to be limited to the details shown, since various modifications and structural changes may be made therein without departing from the scope of the inventions and within the scope and range of equivalents of the claims. In addition, various features from one of the embodiments may be incorporated into another of the embodiments. Accordingly, it is appropriate that the appended claims be construed broadly and in a manner consistent with the scope of the disclosure as set forth in the following claims.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1. A toy play set comprising:
a support structure;
a first movable portion, the first movable portion defining a housing configured to receive a portable electronic device; and
a second movable portion, the first and second movable portions being movably coupled to the support structure and movable between a first configuration and a second configuration, the first movable portion being in an upright orientation in the first configuration and a flat orientation in the second configuration and the portable electronic device being configured to provide different game modes depending at least upon the orientation of the first movable portion.
2. The toy play set of claim 1, wherein the second movable portion is in a flat orientation in both the first configuration and the second configuration.
3. The toy play set of claim 1, wherein the first and second movable portions are rotatable between the flat orientation and the upright orientation with respect to the support structure.
4. The toy play set of claim 1, wherein the second movable portion further comprises:
controls electronically coupled to the portable electronic device.
5. The toy play set of claim 4, wherein the controls comprise:
at least one of a movement sensing assembly or buttons.
6. The toy play set of claim 1, wherein the game mode provided by the portable electronic device is further dependent upon the detected presence of a certain character or object.
7. The toy play set of claim 6, wherein the toy play set is operable in at least a first game mode or a second game mode when in the first configuration and a third or fourth game mode when in the second configuration, wherein the first and second game modes are only accessible when the portable electronic device is electronically coupled to the playset.
8. The toy play set of claim 7, wherein the second movable portion further comprises:
controls electronically coupled to the portable electronic device and the second game mode is played via the controls.
9. The toy play set of claim 7, wherein at least one of the first, second, third and fourth games modes includes character-specific sub modes, each of the sub modes being initiated upon detection of a character.
10. The toy play set of claim 7, wherein the support structure includes a theme and the portable electronic device displays interactive images that match the theme of the support structure when in the first and third game modes.
11. The toy play set of claim 10, wherein the support structure includes a castle theme.
12. The toy play set of claim 1, wherein the first movable portion comprises:
a top; and
a bottom, the top and bottom forming a housing for receiving the portable electronic device therebetween and the top and the bottom being selectively coupleable along at least one of their edges in order to selectively secure the portable electronic device within the housing.
13. The toy play set of claim 12, wherein the first movable portion further comprises:
at least two actuators, the top and bottom only being decoupleable along at least one of their edges when more than one of the at least two actuators are actuated simultaneously.
14. A toy play set comprising:
a support structure configured to rest atop a support surface and including at least one feature configured to receive a toy accessory; and
a housing configured to removably receive a portable electronic device, the housing being movably coupled to the support structure and movable with respect to the support structure between a flat orientation and an upright orientation.
15. The toy play set of claim 14, wherein the support structure and housing include a theme and the portable electronic device is configured to display images or games which match the theme when the portable electronic device is received within the housing.
16. The toy play set of claim 14, wherein the portable electronic device is configured to provide at least a first play mode in the flat orientation and at least a second play mode in the upright orientation, the first play mode being different from the second play mode.
17. The toy play set of claim 14, wherein the housing is a first movable portion and the toy play set further comprises:
a second movable portion, the second movable portion also being movably coupled to the support structure, the second movable portion including controls to allow a user to interact with the portable electronic device.
18. A housing for a portable electronic device comprising:
a top including at least two lateral edges;
a bottom hingedly coupled to the top at a first lateral edge and removably securable to the top via a locking mechanism at a second lateral edge, the top and bottom being configured to receive the portable electronic device therebetween;
at least two actuators, wherein more than one of the at least two actuators must be actuated simultaneously in order to release the locking mechanism and decouple the second lateral edge of the bottom from the top; and
a hinge coupled to a toy play set, wherein the hinge allows the housing for the portable electronic device to be rotatably coupled to the toy play set along the first lateral edge so that the housing is rotatable between a flat orientation and an upright orientation.
19. The housing of claim 18, wherein the housing is configured to be electronically coupled to the portable electronic device when the portable electronic device is received therein.
20. The housing of claim 18, wherein the top further comprises:
a cover biased in a first position, the first position aligning the cover to cover a home button of a portable electronic device when the portable electronic device is oriented in a first direction within the housing, wherein the cover is selectively retractable to a second position which reveals the home button; and
a slot being alignable with the home button in order to expose the home button when the portable electronic device is oriented in a second direction within the housing.
US14/147,076 2013-01-04 2014-01-03 Toy Play Set with Multiple Modes and a Housing for a Portable Electronic Device Abandoned US20140194029A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201361749030P true 2013-01-04 2013-01-04
US14/147,076 US20140194029A1 (en) 2013-01-04 2014-01-03 Toy Play Set with Multiple Modes and a Housing for a Portable Electronic Device

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14/147,076 US20140194029A1 (en) 2013-01-04 2014-01-03 Toy Play Set with Multiple Modes and a Housing for a Portable Electronic Device

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20140194029A1 true US20140194029A1 (en) 2014-07-10

Family

ID=51034968

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/147,076 Abandoned US20140194029A1 (en) 2013-01-04 2014-01-03 Toy Play Set with Multiple Modes and a Housing for a Portable Electronic Device

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20140194029A1 (en)
CN (1) CN103908780A (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140190974A1 (en) * 2013-01-04 2014-07-10 Mattel, Inc. Protective Case for Portable Electronic Device
US20150109711A1 (en) * 2012-05-18 2015-04-23 Disney Enterprises, Inc. Magnetically Movable Objects Over a Display of an Electronic Device
WO2016178256A1 (en) * 2015-05-05 2016-11-10 Xplored S.R.L. Control device for video games with controls without physical contact

Citations (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1914116A (en) * 1931-12-14 1933-06-13 Ford Thomas Collapsible electric train set
US2872753A (en) * 1956-02-20 1959-02-10 Russell S Fenton Collapsible doll house construction
US3182420A (en) * 1962-12-31 1965-05-11 Leo Miller Portable and storable doll house or display
US4233778A (en) * 1978-07-19 1980-11-18 Lemelson Jerome H Modular toy
US4342173A (en) * 1979-12-28 1982-08-03 Takara Co., Ltd. Toy medical office
US4516948A (en) * 1983-09-22 1985-05-14 Takara Co., Ltd. Reconfigurable toy assembly
US4680018A (en) * 1982-10-12 1987-07-14 Takara Co., Ltd. Reconfigurable toy assembly
US5562520A (en) * 1994-07-14 1996-10-08 Marathon Partners Collapsible structure
US5971833A (en) * 1998-01-30 1999-10-26 Hasbro, Inc. Invertible playset
US6056618A (en) * 1998-05-26 2000-05-02 Larian; Isaac Toy character with electronic activities-oriented game unit
US6227931B1 (en) * 1999-07-02 2001-05-08 Judith Ann Shackelford Electronic interactive play environment for toy characters
US6814662B2 (en) * 1998-06-01 2004-11-09 Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. Portable electronic device, entertainment system and method of operating the same
US6937152B2 (en) * 2003-04-08 2005-08-30 Shoot The Moon Products Ii, Llc Wireless interactive doll-houses and playsets therefor
US7037165B2 (en) * 2004-01-27 2006-05-02 Connector Set Limited Partnership Container for holding component parts of a construction toy
US7285034B2 (en) * 2003-12-30 2007-10-23 Mattel, Inc. Toy play set
US20080096463A1 (en) * 2006-10-18 2008-04-24 Mattel, Inc. Expandable Play Set
US7448932B2 (en) * 2004-11-10 2008-11-11 Origin Products, Ltd. Toy
US7503828B2 (en) * 2004-10-26 2009-03-17 Mattel, Inc. Remote-controlled motorcycle and method of counter-steering
US7537509B2 (en) * 2006-06-09 2009-05-26 Mattel, Inc. Toy track devices
US7607962B2 (en) * 2006-05-04 2009-10-27 Mattel, Inc. Electronic toy with alterable features
US7618301B2 (en) * 2005-06-03 2009-11-17 Mattel, Inc. Fold-out playsets with pop-up structures
US7726482B2 (en) * 2005-08-22 2010-06-01 Mattel, Inc. Display packaging for reconfigurable product
US7892068B2 (en) * 2006-05-04 2011-02-22 Mattel, Inc. Foldable vehicle playsets with moving components
US20110076909A1 (en) * 2009-09-30 2011-03-31 Mattel, Inc. Block Toy Playset with Dynamic Building Surface
US8062089B2 (en) * 2006-10-02 2011-11-22 Mattel, Inc. Electronic playset
US20120264347A1 (en) * 2011-04-15 2012-10-18 Mark Barthold Reconfigurable Play Set
US8292689B2 (en) * 2006-10-02 2012-10-23 Mattel, Inc. Electronic playset
US8298038B2 (en) * 2009-04-27 2012-10-30 Mattel, Inc. Toy
US20120309263A1 (en) * 2010-08-27 2012-12-06 Berrigan Lennon Toy vehicle play set
US8328596B2 (en) * 2007-06-02 2012-12-11 Mattel, Inc. Pop-up play set
US8371895B1 (en) * 2002-04-08 2013-02-12 People Innovate For Economy Foundation, Inc. Toy play set
US20130052910A1 (en) * 2011-08-29 2013-02-28 Patricia Chan Toy Figure Assembly with Toy Figure and Surfboard
US8465339B2 (en) * 2006-05-04 2013-06-18 Mattel, Inc. Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US20130189899A1 (en) * 2011-12-16 2013-07-25 Ruben L. Martinez Action figurine with accessories and apparatus and method for securing accessories thereto
US20130237123A1 (en) * 2012-03-12 2013-09-12 J. Austin Rucker Grappling Apparatus and Method of Operation
US8591284B2 (en) * 2008-09-25 2013-11-26 Mattel, Inc. Toy with housing having movable components
US8628373B2 (en) * 2010-08-26 2014-01-14 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle playset
US8734200B2 (en) * 2009-04-24 2014-05-27 Mattel, Inc. Toy playset with a launcher and a material dispenser
US8777690B2 (en) * 2010-08-18 2014-07-15 Mattel, Inc. Expandable playset with movable platform and doll dressing feature
US20140339766A1 (en) * 2011-10-21 2014-11-20 Adar Golad Hand-held Game Device and Game Assembly Comprising Such A Device

Patent Citations (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1914116A (en) * 1931-12-14 1933-06-13 Ford Thomas Collapsible electric train set
US2872753A (en) * 1956-02-20 1959-02-10 Russell S Fenton Collapsible doll house construction
US3182420A (en) * 1962-12-31 1965-05-11 Leo Miller Portable and storable doll house or display
US4233778A (en) * 1978-07-19 1980-11-18 Lemelson Jerome H Modular toy
US4342173A (en) * 1979-12-28 1982-08-03 Takara Co., Ltd. Toy medical office
US4680018A (en) * 1982-10-12 1987-07-14 Takara Co., Ltd. Reconfigurable toy assembly
US4516948A (en) * 1983-09-22 1985-05-14 Takara Co., Ltd. Reconfigurable toy assembly
US5562520A (en) * 1994-07-14 1996-10-08 Marathon Partners Collapsible structure
US5971833A (en) * 1998-01-30 1999-10-26 Hasbro, Inc. Invertible playset
US6056618A (en) * 1998-05-26 2000-05-02 Larian; Isaac Toy character with electronic activities-oriented game unit
US6814662B2 (en) * 1998-06-01 2004-11-09 Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. Portable electronic device, entertainment system and method of operating the same
US6227931B1 (en) * 1999-07-02 2001-05-08 Judith Ann Shackelford Electronic interactive play environment for toy characters
US8371895B1 (en) * 2002-04-08 2013-02-12 People Innovate For Economy Foundation, Inc. Toy play set
US6937152B2 (en) * 2003-04-08 2005-08-30 Shoot The Moon Products Ii, Llc Wireless interactive doll-houses and playsets therefor
US7285034B2 (en) * 2003-12-30 2007-10-23 Mattel, Inc. Toy play set
US7037165B2 (en) * 2004-01-27 2006-05-02 Connector Set Limited Partnership Container for holding component parts of a construction toy
US7503828B2 (en) * 2004-10-26 2009-03-17 Mattel, Inc. Remote-controlled motorcycle and method of counter-steering
US7448932B2 (en) * 2004-11-10 2008-11-11 Origin Products, Ltd. Toy
US7618301B2 (en) * 2005-06-03 2009-11-17 Mattel, Inc. Fold-out playsets with pop-up structures
US7726482B2 (en) * 2005-08-22 2010-06-01 Mattel, Inc. Display packaging for reconfigurable product
US7607962B2 (en) * 2006-05-04 2009-10-27 Mattel, Inc. Electronic toy with alterable features
US7892068B2 (en) * 2006-05-04 2011-02-22 Mattel, Inc. Foldable vehicle playsets with moving components
US8465339B2 (en) * 2006-05-04 2013-06-18 Mattel, Inc. Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US7537509B2 (en) * 2006-06-09 2009-05-26 Mattel, Inc. Toy track devices
US8062089B2 (en) * 2006-10-02 2011-11-22 Mattel, Inc. Electronic playset
US8292689B2 (en) * 2006-10-02 2012-10-23 Mattel, Inc. Electronic playset
US20080096463A1 (en) * 2006-10-18 2008-04-24 Mattel, Inc. Expandable Play Set
US8328596B2 (en) * 2007-06-02 2012-12-11 Mattel, Inc. Pop-up play set
US8591284B2 (en) * 2008-09-25 2013-11-26 Mattel, Inc. Toy with housing having movable components
US8734200B2 (en) * 2009-04-24 2014-05-27 Mattel, Inc. Toy playset with a launcher and a material dispenser
US8298038B2 (en) * 2009-04-27 2012-10-30 Mattel, Inc. Toy
US20110076909A1 (en) * 2009-09-30 2011-03-31 Mattel, Inc. Block Toy Playset with Dynamic Building Surface
US8777690B2 (en) * 2010-08-18 2014-07-15 Mattel, Inc. Expandable playset with movable platform and doll dressing feature
US8628373B2 (en) * 2010-08-26 2014-01-14 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle playset
US20120309263A1 (en) * 2010-08-27 2012-12-06 Berrigan Lennon Toy vehicle play set
US20120264347A1 (en) * 2011-04-15 2012-10-18 Mark Barthold Reconfigurable Play Set
US20130052910A1 (en) * 2011-08-29 2013-02-28 Patricia Chan Toy Figure Assembly with Toy Figure and Surfboard
US20140339766A1 (en) * 2011-10-21 2014-11-20 Adar Golad Hand-held Game Device and Game Assembly Comprising Such A Device
US20130189899A1 (en) * 2011-12-16 2013-07-25 Ruben L. Martinez Action figurine with accessories and apparatus and method for securing accessories thereto
US20130237123A1 (en) * 2012-03-12 2013-09-12 J. Austin Rucker Grappling Apparatus and Method of Operation

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150109711A1 (en) * 2012-05-18 2015-04-23 Disney Enterprises, Inc. Magnetically Movable Objects Over a Display of an Electronic Device
US9240268B2 (en) * 2012-05-18 2016-01-19 Disney Enterprises, Inc. Magnetically movable objects over a display of an electronic device
US20140190974A1 (en) * 2013-01-04 2014-07-10 Mattel, Inc. Protective Case for Portable Electronic Device
US9141138B2 (en) * 2013-01-04 2015-09-22 Mattel, Inc. Protective case for portable electronic device
WO2016178256A1 (en) * 2015-05-05 2016-11-10 Xplored S.R.L. Control device for video games with controls without physical contact

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
CN103908780A (en) 2014-07-09

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9197726B2 (en) Combination mobile phone case and electronic cigarette
US10159897B2 (en) Semantic gaming and application transformation
US10143929B2 (en) Portable electronic device
US20160113368A1 (en) Protective case for mobile electronic device with storage compartment and pivot stand
US10042393B2 (en) Soft display device for portable terminal
US20160080535A1 (en) Combination mobile phone case and electronic cigarette
US20190137994A1 (en) Drone controller
US20160187937A1 (en) Electronic device case and method of use
EP2662746B1 (en) Pouch and portable electronic device received therein
EP2436492B1 (en) Container assembly
CN102405139B (en) Adjustable human engineering keyboard and portable computing device
US20140273715A1 (en) Panoramic Coloring Kit
EP2733568B1 (en) Information apparatus and link mechanism of information apparatus
US6739640B2 (en) Control panel for a vehicle
CN2833706Y (en) Positioning device and mouse for command entry to main computer
CA2289205C (en) Presentation device
DE69918642T2 (en) Storage device with improvements
US8289687B2 (en) Multi-panel sliding cover for a device
US9005025B2 (en) Game controller
JP4912969B2 (en) Electronics
US7295431B2 (en) Portable disk with a protective housing
ES2469666T3 (en) Entertainment system for armchair backrest
EP2553543B1 (en) Holder for tablet computing device
US8851280B2 (en) Tablet cover
EP2392986A2 (en) A case for tablet personal computer

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: MATTEL, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:PARDI, JARED P.;ARGAUER, BRIAN JOHN, JR.;CORDIER, BRUCE ROBERT;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20140116 TO 20140123;REEL/FRAME:032517/0129

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION