US20140190971A1 - Beverage delivery can - Google Patents

Beverage delivery can Download PDF

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Publication number
US20140190971A1
US20140190971A1 US14205604 US201414205604A US2014190971A1 US 20140190971 A1 US20140190971 A1 US 20140190971A1 US 14205604 US14205604 US 14205604 US 201414205604 A US201414205604 A US 201414205604A US 2014190971 A1 US2014190971 A1 US 2014190971A1
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US
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Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
beverage
lid
plane
shoulder
waist pinch
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US14205604
Inventor
Zebulon Stevens Robbins, III
Charles James Koch
Peter D. Gladstone
Andrew S. Gavrin
Mark Jacober
Howard Chasteen
Jeewon Jung
Oivind Brockmeier
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Boston Beer Corp
Ball Metal Beverage Container Corp
Original Assignee
Boston Beer Corp
Ball Metal Beverage Container Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D7/00Containers having bodies formed by interconnecting or uniting two or more rigid, or substantially rigid, components made wholly or mainly of metal
    • B65D7/02Containers having bodies formed by interconnecting or uniting two or more rigid, or substantially rigid, components made wholly or mainly of metal characterised by shape
    • B65D7/04Containers having bodies formed by interconnecting or uniting two or more rigid, or substantially rigid, components made wholly or mainly of metal characterised by shape of curved cross-section, e.g. cans of circular or elliptical cross-section
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D17/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers specially constructed to be opened by cutting or piercing, or by tearing of frangible members or portions
    • B65D17/28Rigid or semi-rigid containers specially constructed to be opened by cutting or piercing, or by tearing of frangible members or portions at lines or points of weakness
    • B65D17/401Rigid or semi-rigid containers specially constructed to be opened by cutting or piercing, or by tearing of frangible members or portions at lines or points of weakness characterised by having the line of weakness provided in an end wall
    • B65D17/4012Rigid or semi-rigid containers specially constructed to be opened by cutting or piercing, or by tearing of frangible members or portions at lines or points of weakness characterised by having the line of weakness provided in an end wall for opening partially by means of a tearing tab
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D17/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers specially constructed to be opened by cutting or piercing, or by tearing of frangible members or portions
    • B65D17/52Attachment of opening tools, e.g. slotted keys, to containers
    • B65D17/521Attached can-cutting devices
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D71/00Bundles of articles held together by packaging elements for convenience of storage or transport, e.g. portable segregating carrier for plural receptacles such as beer cans or pop bottles; Bales of material
    • B65D71/06Packaging elements holding or encircling completely or almost completely the bundle of articles, e.g. wrappers
    • B65D71/12Packaging elements holding or encircling completely or almost completely the bundle of articles, e.g. wrappers the packaging elements, e.g. wrappers being formed by folding a single blank
    • B65D71/14Packaging elements holding or encircling completely or almost completely the bundle of articles, e.g. wrappers the packaging elements, e.g. wrappers being formed by folding a single blank having a tubular shape, e.g. tubular wrappers without end walls
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D71/00Bundles of articles held together by packaging elements for convenience of storage or transport, e.g. portable segregating carrier for plural receptacles such as beer cans or pop bottles; Bales of material
    • B65D71/40Bundles of articles held together by packaging elements for convenience of storage or transport, e.g. portable segregating carrier for plural receptacles such as beer cans or pop bottles; Bales of material comprising a plurality of articles held together only partially by packaging elements formed by folding a blank or several blanks
    • B65D71/46Bundles of articles held together by packaging elements for convenience of storage or transport, e.g. portable segregating carrier for plural receptacles such as beer cans or pop bottles; Bales of material comprising a plurality of articles held together only partially by packaging elements formed by folding a blank or several blanks formed by folding a single blank into a tubular element
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D2517/00Containers specially constructed to be opened by cutting, piercing or tearing of wall portions, e.g. preserving cans or tins
    • B65D2517/0001Details
    • B65D2517/001Action for opening container
    • B65D2517/0011Action for opening container push-down tear panel
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D2517/00Containers specially constructed to be opened by cutting, piercing or tearing of wall portions, e.g. preserving cans or tins
    • B65D2517/0001Details
    • B65D2517/001Action for opening container
    • B65D2517/0013Action for opening container pull-out tear panel, e.g. by means of a tear-tab

Abstract

A beverage delivery can may comprise various configurations, including various aperture shapes, sizes, and configurations and various shapes, textures, configurations, and dimensions of the lid and surface of the can. A beverage can may comprise various exterior shapes such as a tapered shape, a faceted shape, a pint glass shape and the like. In embodiments, the beverage may comprise various types of nucleation devices. A beverage can may comprise a vertical portion of the can, a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip, a waist pinch, and a shoulder and the like. In embodiments, various external packaging may be used with one or more beverage delivery cans.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/788,156, titled BEVERAGE DELIVERY CAN, filed Mar. 15, 2013. This application is a continuation in part of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/902,437, titled BEVERAGE DELIVERY CAN, filed May 24, 2013, which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/651,624, titled BEVERAGE DELIVERY CAN, filed May 25, 2012. This application is also a continuation in part of U.S. application Ser. No. 14/052,052, titled BEVERAGE DELIVERY CAN, filed Oct. 11, 2013, which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/712,688, titled BEVERAGE DELIVERY CAN, filed Oct. 11, 2012.
  • Each of the above applications is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND
  • 1. Field
  • The invention is related to the field of beverage delivery, and methods and systems for the creation of a beverage delivery can.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Beverage cans have traditionally been considered to be less desirable drinking vessels than other vessels, such as the glass bottle, for reasons relating in part to aesthetic and tactile qualities, limitations on liquid flow from a can, ergonomic requirements of drinking from a can, and perceptual biases among beverage consumers. Beverage cans, such as beer cans, may have less weight than bottles or glasses and therefore feel less substantial to a consumer. The aperture of a standard can may restrict liquid flow from the can and require placing the mouth on what is perceived as a sharp edge. The aperture size and location on the can may limit the aroma of the beverage from reaching the sinus of the beverage drinker. The flat lid, or top, of beverage cans may limit the angle at which the can may be lifted relative to the user's mouth due to the fact that the user's nose is pressed to the lid as the angle increases. This may be uncomfortable for the user and also force the user to bend their neck to an uncomfortable angle in order to empty the beverage can of its contents. Beverage cans may also be perceived, especially among consumers of adult beverages, such as beer, as a distribution method of lower quality beverages. Therefore there is a need for methods and systems of creating beverage delivery cans that embody improved aesthetic and tactile qualities and have improved aperture and shape to permit greater sensory enjoyment of a can's contents while consuming the contents in an ergonomically comfortable posture.
  • SUMMARY
  • Provided in this disclosure are a variety of methods, structures and systems for improving beverage cans, the manufacture of beverage cans, and the experience of drinking beverage cans. These include methods and systems for improving the aesthetic qualities of the beer can, for improving the sensory experience of drinking a beverage, and the like.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can may comprise a continuous, circumferential indentation proximal to the lid of the can, adapted to facilitate receiving the lip of a consumer of a beverage from the can, where the indentation may be characterized by a waist pinch representing the location of the smallest circumference of the indentation, the waist pinch located on a plane substantially parallel to the lid of the beverage can; an upper lip that may have a height in the range of 0.125 and 0.25 inches, wherein the upper lip may be disposed between the waist pinch and the lid of the can at an angle in the range of 45 to 85 degrees from the plane of the waist pinch; and a shoulder that may have a height in the range of 0.35 to 0.65 inches, wherein the shoulder may be disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and at an angle of less than 74 degrees, such as 62 degrees, from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can may comprise a continuous, circumferential indentation proximal to the lid of the can, adapted to facilitate receiving the lip of a consumer of a beverage from the can, where the indentation may be characterized by a waist pinch representing the location of the smallest circumference of the indentation, the waist pinch located on a plane substantially parallel to the lid of the beverage can; an upper lip that may have a height in the range of 0.125 and 0.25 inches, wherein the upper lip may be disposed between the waist pinch and the lid of the can at an angle in the range of 45 to 85 degrees from the plane of the waist pinch; and a shoulder that may have a height in the range of 0.35 to 0.65 inches, wherein the shoulder may be disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and at an angle in the range of 60 to 74 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 60 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 61 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 62 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 63 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 64 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 65 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 66 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 67 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 68 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 69 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 70 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 71 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 72 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 73 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may include a shoulder that is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch at an angle of 74 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may comprise at least one of a tapered shape, a faceted shape and a pint glass shape.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may comprise a top that is capable of being fully opened.
  • In embodiments the beverage can may comprise a concave top.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may comprise a lid that is capable of changing from opaque to transparent.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may comprise a lid comprising at least two holes capable of being opened and positioned such that they are in proximity to a user's nostrils during beverage consumption.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can my comprise a nucleation device.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may comprise a lid with a diameter of 2 and 2/16 inches, 2 and 4/16 inches, 2 and 6/16 inches, or 2 and 9/16 inches.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may comprise an aperture shaped such that a user's nose may enter the beverage can during beverage consumption.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may comprise an aperture in the lid with the shape of at least one of a bell shape, a peanut shape, a geometric shape, a converging shape, a diverging shape, a shape with curvilinear contours, a shape that resembles visual elements, and a shape that resembles a design element.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may comprise a powder-coated top cover.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may comprise a surface enhancement located at least on the outside of the upper lip. In embodiments, a surface enhancement may comprise at least one of a rough surface and a surface with a glass feel.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may comprise a score line on the lid, and the can may comprise a tab and a rim, wherein the tab may be capable of being slid along the rim to tear the score line to fully open the top of the can.
  • In embodiments, the beverage can may comprise an aperture of the lid, the aperture may comprise a tab wherein the tab may be capable of being twisted to puncture the lid of the can. In embodiments, the tab may be a slide tab and further capable of being slid to tear the lid from the can, and the tab may be capable of attaching to at least one of the side and bottom of the can. In embodiments, the tab may be capable of causing material to be removed from the can to create an opening in the lid wherein at least one of the tab and material may be capable of being attached to the can.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • FIG. 1 illustrates beverage can aperture shapes enabling improved pour and aroma release qualities.
  • FIGS. 2 A-B illustrate an example dimension of a bell-shaped aperture.
  • FIGS. 3 A-B illustrate an example bell-shaped aperture and corresponding tab apparatus.
  • FIGS. 4 A-B illustrate an example dimension of a peanut-shaped aperture.
  • FIGS. 5 A-B illustrate an example peanut-shaped aperture and corresponding tab apparatus.
  • FIG. 6 a illustrates a ceramic nucleation device in a plastic frame.
  • FIG. 6 b illustrates a snap-on top cover with a recessed score line.
  • FIG. 7 a illustrates nucleation device using a plastic disc with micro etching placed on the bottom surface of a beverage can.
  • FIG. 7 b illustrates a snap-on top cover with a folded top cover edge.
  • FIG. 8A illustrates nucleation ring placed on the bottom surface of a beverage can.
  • FIG. 8B illustrates a snap-on top cover with a folded cover edge and wide aperture.
  • FIGS. 9 A-B illustrates a tapered shape beverage delivery can.
  • FIGS. 10 A-B illustrate a faceted shape beverage delivery can.
  • FIGS. 11A-B illustrates a pint glass shape beverage delivery can.
  • FIG. 12 illustrates an example embodiment of a four-pack carrier for beverage cans.
  • FIG. 13 illustrates an example embodiment of a four-pack carrier for beverage cans that includes dust cover lids for each can.
  • FIG. 14 illustrates an example dimension of a pint glass shape beverage can.
  • FIGS. 15 A-B illustrate one embodiment of an opening method of a pint glass shape beverage can.
  • FIGS. 16 A-B illustrate an external packaging embodiment for pint shape beverage cans.
  • FIGS. 17A and B depict example measurements of a lip indentation for a beverage can.
  • FIG. 18 depicts a 12 oz. beverage can featuring a lip indentation.
  • FIG. 19 depicts laser etching in the lip indentation of a beverage can.
  • FIG. 20 depicts aroma holes placed in the lid of a beverage can.
  • FIG. 21 depicts example embodiments of end features for a beverage can.
  • FIG. 22 depicts example measurements of a lip indentation and features of a beverage can.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The present invention provides for an improved beverage can. Drinking from currently available beverage cans is generally perceived as a casual and less refined experience relative to serving or drinking the same beverage from a glass vessel, such as a bottle. Cans typically have less heft, sharper features, such as around the aperture, or opening of the can, from which the beverage is consumed, and may also lead to uncomfortable drinking ergonomics, such as requiring the consumer to physically bend one's neck to a less conformable degree than with a bottle, due in part to aperture size and shape. Currently available beverage cans are recognized as a convenient way to package and store beverages, with a less expensive production cost. Cans are fundamentally designed to store conveniently and open easily. Because current beverage can production and design are typically optimized for low cost, innovation has often been constrained to fit within the existing manufacturing operations. As a result, the look, feel, and overall sensory experience of a beverage consumed from a can may lack in taste and aroma, or be perceived by the consumer to lack such qualities, relative to other drinking vessel options. As taste is only one aspect of beverage enjoyment, the sight, feel and sound of the beverage can may influence the beverage drinking experience. The beverage can packaging, for example, may establish initial expectations, such as design and visual elements, which are then transferred by the drinker to the perceived taste of the beer. Aroma, another important factor in the drinking experience, may also be impacted by the packaging, particularly the shape and size of the container and drinking aperture, which may influence the intensity of the aroma.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, in embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of beverage can aperture shapes, sizes and configurations are presented 100. In embodiments, the beverage can may have an aperture opening for drinking the beverage that, when opened, not only allows for the flow of liquid from the can, but for the exit of the beverage aroma from the can in sufficient amount and proximity to the nose of the consumer that the drinking experience is multi-sensory to a greater degree than in the currently available can apertures. In embodiments the aperture is constructed to allow the nose of the drinker to enter the can during beverage consumption, allowing the drinking to experience the aroma of the beverage in a way that is similar to consuming the beverage from an open-top container, such as a glass. In embodiments of the present invention, the aperture may take on a plurality of shapes including, but not limited to the shapes and configurations presented in FIG. 1. Shapes may include, but are not limited to, a bell shape 202A (as shown in FIGS. 2 A-B and 3 A-B), a peanut shape 402A (as shown in FIGS. 4 A-B and 5 A-B), a geometric shape, a converging/diverging shape, a shape with curvilinear contours, or shapes that resemble design/visual elements. A design/visual element may include, for example, a design element that resembles the logo or design element of a beverage manufacturer, to reinforce the association of the brand of the manufacturer with the beverage can.
  • Each shape of aperture may have a pull back tab, a slide tab or a slightly longer tab. In embodiments, the tab, or material that is removed or displaced from a beverage can, may be enabled to be fully removed from the beverage can, such that it is no longer physically attached to the can, and placed in or on the beverage can or carrier from which the beverage can was removed. In an example embodiment, a tab or can top, after removal from the can, may be attached to the bottom of the beverage can using a snap, magnet, physical locking device, or some other means of securing the tab or top to the beverage can or the carrier from which the beverage can was removed. In another embodiment, the tab, or material that is removed or displaced from a beverage can may be secured to the carrier in which the beverage cans was packaged among a plurality of cans, such as within a “six-pack” or “four-pack.” For example, the act of physically removing a beverage can from the carrier may cause the tab or top of the can to be removed from the can and remain secured to the carrier. In another example, the act of physically removing a beverage can from the carrier may not cause the tab or top of the beverage can to be removed, but instead the carrier may be functionally fitted with an area enabled to receive and secure a beverage can tab or top, such as using the methods of securing can tabs and tops, as described herein. In another embodiment, the tab or top of the beverage can may be partially removed from the beverage can, leaving behind material that may function as a hinge, permitting the user to bend the tab or top over to the side of the can where it may be secured, such as using a snap, magnet, physical locking device or some other means of securing the tab or top to the beverage can. As shown in FIGS. 3 and 5, a beverage can constructed according to the methods and systems of the present invention may include an aperture tab 302A that may be opened by twisting the tab in order to puncture the lid of the can. Continuing the example, further twisting of the tab may cause a score line in the lid of the can to become severed, allowing the user of the can to depress the tab apparatus into the can, such as by forcing the tongue into the depression created in the lid after the score line is severed by the twisting of the tab. In embodiments this type of tab apparatus may be applied to a plurality of aperture shapes and sizes, as described herein. In other example embodiments, the tab may be completely removable from the can, or may be a slide tab that attaches to the bottom or side of the can. A geometric shape used for the aperture shape may be, but is not limited to, a triangle, square, rectangle, hexagon, octagon, pyramid, organic shape, asymmetrical shape, or some other shape type. A converging/diverging shape may diverge toward the mouth and nose and converge in the middle. A bell shape may be a wide curve near the mouth, extending up more narrowly toward the nose. Example dimensions of a bell-shaped and peanut-shaped aperture are provided in FIGS. 2 and 4, respectively. Wider apertures may permit a user's nose to enter the vessel of the beverage can, as opposed to touching the exterior surface of the top of the can. By entering the can, the user's nose is in closer proximity to the liquid in the can and better able to smell the aroma of the liquid and better sense the flavor of the liquid. This may provide the user with a more comfortable drinking experience that is more analogous to the experience of drinking from a glass or other type of vessel that does not have a lid or top. Wider apertures may also permit the liquid within the can to be better viewed by the user. For example, a beverage such as beer may have a plurality of colors depending on the beer type. By providing a wider aperture, a user may have better visibility into the can and be able to better appreciate distinctive colors, carbonation, or other beverage qualities. Wider apertures along the circumference where the beverage is to be consumed may facilitate a smoother pour from the can. The smoother pour may improve beverage flow into the mouth, such as a continuous flow as opposed to the gurgling pour present with a too-small-aperture that requires intermittent interruptions to the flow in order to permit air intake to the can. The smoother pour may also facilitate a more gentle flow from the can, allowing the beverage, such as beer, to be poured into a drinking glass with less disruption to the liquid flow, permitting a more desirable mixture of liquid beer and carbonation (i.e., “head”) in the glass once the entirety of the can is emptied into the drinking glass.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can lid or top may be transparent in order to permit viewing the contents of the can by a user or prospective buyer of the beverage. The transparent material used to make the can top may be engraved, etched or marked using some other means, including by using a second material to apply to the transparent material, for the purpose of placing an aesthetic feature on the material, such as a company logo, design, or other aesthetic element. In another embodiment, the transparent material may be engraved, etched or marked using some other means, including by using a second material to apply to the transparent material, for the purpose of placing words, information, or data on the material. For example, a transparent lid that permits viewing the beer contained in the beverage can may be etched with the words “See for yourself the amber color that won First Place in International Beer Contest X.” In another embodiment, a beverage can lid may be made to be opaque during transport and storage but, upon opening, become clear, for example, by moving a facility that is comprised of a slat, or plurality of slats that, when moved in a direction, causes the can top to convert from an opaque to a transparent state. In another embodiment, a beverage can lid or top may consist of a fan facility comprised of slats that are arrayed in 360 degrees along the plane of the beverage can top, or arrayed in 360 degrees and conforming to a shape other than a flat plane, for example, a concave, conical, or other non-flat shape. Continuing the embodiment, the fan facility may be opened and closed by a user of the fan by twisting or turning the can top so that the individual slats in the fan facility fold into one another, providing an aperture opening in the can through which the beverage may be viewed, smelled, and consumed.
  • Referring to FIGS. 6 b, 7 b, and 8 b, in embodiments, a beverage can may have a “lip feel” that is created by the shape, texture and dimension of the beverage can lid. For example, as depicted in FIG. 6 b, a beverage can lid 602B may have a snap-on top cover 604B with a deep recess. The recessed portion of the lid may have a score line and folded top cover edge 608B. The score line may be a weak point in the beverage can material that allows the can to be opened by a user action such as twisting, pushing, or manipulating the can lid in some other manner. Referring to FIG. 7 b, a beverage can lid 702B may have a snap-on top cover 704B with a lid depression that is shallower than that depicted in FIG. 6 b, with the gradated depression leading to an aperture of a different size that is depicted in FIG. 6 b. FIG. 8 b depicts another example of a snap-on top cover 802B. In this example, the removal of the snap-on top cover leaves an aperture that is nearly the entire diameter of the beverage can and in this way simulates the look and feel of a beverage glass insofar as there is virtually no lid material present that is horizontal to the can.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can may incorporate surface features that enhance the drinking experience. Such surface enhancements may impact the “lip feel” or “mouth feel” by altering the typical feeling of one's lips touching a metal can. The lip feel may be enhanced by a “Chipped Coffee Cup” application to simulate drinking from the edge of a glass. The lip feel may be included in the stamping/end cap manufacturer process or done during the post-processing phase of manufacturing. The surface of the beverage can may be given a rough texture by physically manipulating the surface, such as mechanically with a drill, file, sandpaper or some other device that is capable of roughening the beverage can surface. In embodiments, material may be added to the beverage can material to alter is smoothness or roughness, such as by covering the can with a resin, epoxy, polymer, plastic, glass, sand, silicone, fiber, or some other material (together “roughening/softening agents”) capable of adhering to, or being applied within a beverage can material, such as aluminum, steel, or plastic. For example, such roughening/softening agents may be used to create a beverage can that simulates the feel of glass to the hand and/or mouth. In another example, a rough surface in an area of the beverage can to which the mouth makes contact may “awaken” the drinker by providing an element of surprise relative to the normal feel of touching one's lips to a can, and may also provide a different stimulus to the lips that is pleasurable and/or novel. In embodiments, the material used to roughen or smooth the beverage can may be applied to a surface coating that is applied to the beverage can, such as through a spray or dip process in which the can is coated in a substance capable of receiving and adhering to a roughening/softening agent, as described herein. In embodiments, a beverage can may have its surface texture altered by first dipping the can in a substance that adheres to the can and is capable of receiving and hold particles, and a second dipping process using the same can in which the can, having been coated in the substance, is dipped into a roughening/softening agent. Other deposition techniques may be used in conjunction with roughening/softening agents including, but not limited to, vapor, temperature manipulation, or some other deposition technique. In embodiments, a beverage can may have its surface texture altered by physically or chemically etching the surface of the can. Roughening/softening agents may be used to alter the surface of both the exterior and in the interior of the can. In embodiments, a beverage can's surface may be molded to provide texture and/or form. In embodiments, roughening/softening agents may be used to mimic the look and or feel of a material other than the material from which a beverage can is made. For example, resin, polymer or actual glass may be used for the upper portion of a can where a user's mouth touches the can to provide a “glass feel” to a can that is otherwise not made of glass.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can may include a nucleation device. A beverage can may have different exterior shapes. Exterior shapes may include, but are not limited to, a tapered shape, a faceted shape, a pint glass shape, or some other exterior shape. Each shape may have internal features, construction, opening method, and external packaging, including external packaging that is used to join a plurality of cans together for the purposes of transportation.
  • The term nucleation, as used herein, refers to the process that may occur when there is a change in pressure inside a vessel, such as that caused by opening a beverage can, that may cause dissolved carbon dioxide to begin escaping from the liquid contained within the beverage can. Nucleation sites may exist on an interior surface of a glass, a bottle, or a beverage can in the form of microscopic cracks, scratches, particles adhered to the surface (e.g., fiber particles from a dish cloth), or some other surface defect, deformation, or surface feature. Nucleation sites may also be intentionally created on the interior surface of the beverage can, such as according to the methods and systems of nucleation enhancement as described herein. As carbon dioxide releases from the liquid, it may gather at a nucleation site until it reaches a critical volume when it can release into the liquid, for example in the form of a gas bubble, and rise to the liquid surface. As nucleation occurs, it may form columns of gaseous bubbles rising in the liquid and in some beverages, such as beer, cause a foam or a “head” to form at the surface of the beer. This may have the effect of increasing the sensory enjoyment of the beer, as the nucleation may increase the flavor and aroma release from the beer. Further, the foam created by the nucleation may be visually appealing to the drinker, as a proper foam or “good head” is a quality that is recognized and preferred by many beer drinkers. Increased nucleation, such as that created using the methods and systems described herein, may also be more readily seen, smelled and appreciated when occurring within a beverage can with a larger aperture that permits viewing into can and/or placing one's nose in closer proximity to the liquid than is permitted by traditional cans with smaller apertures. FIGS. 6A, 7A, and 8A depict a plurality of example nucleation devices of a beverage can according to the present invention. In embodiments the nucleation device may be, but is not limited to, a ceramic nucleator 602A, such as housed within a plastic frame (FIG. 6 a), a disk attachment facility, a ceramic facility, or a laser etching. The disc attachment nucleation facility may be, but is not limited to, a plastic disc 702A with micro etching on its surface, as shown in FIG. 7 a, which may attach to the bottom of the beverage can. The ceramic facility may be, but is not limited to, a ceramic nucleator 602A at the bottom of the beverage can in a plastic frame that extends from the bottom to the top of the beverage can, as shown in FIG. 6 a. The laser etching nucleation facility may be, but is not limited to, a nucleation ring 802A that is laser etched through the interior coating of a beverage can, as shown in FIG. 8 a. Nucleation may improve the quality, texture and carbonation of the beverage housed in the can.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can may have a plurality of exterior shapes. Shapes may include, but are not limited to, a tapered shape 902A (FIG. 9A), a faceted shape 1002A (FIG. 10A), or a pint glass shape 1102A (FIG. 11A). Referring to FIGS. 9 A-B, the feature of the tapered shape may include, but are not limited to, a powdercoated top cover 904A, flush surfaces 908A between the top and the body, heavy gauge walls 910A, bell shaped aperture 902B, deep concave surface 904B, and a wide rim 908B. The concavity of the beverage can top may serve to increase the comfort with which the beverage may be consumed insofar as the concavity may permit the contents of the beverage can to be fully consumed from a more ergonomically comfortable position for the user. By having a concave depression in the top of the can, a user's upper-lip, nose and other facial features may be able to break the horizontal plane where a typical beverage can top would be located, making the drinking experience more comfortable and analogous to drinking from a glass, such as a beer pint glass. In combination with an aperture, an increased aperture size and/or anthropomorphic shape, as described herein, the concavity of the top may serve as a chamber in which the aroma of the beverage is momentarily trapped in close proximity to the user's nose. This may increase the enjoyment and appeal of the beverage. In embodiments, in addition to the concave top including an aperture through which a user may consume the beverage, the concave top may have another opening, or plurality of openings, that enable greater aroma from the beverage to release from the can. An example of an opening may include, but may not be limited to, those depicted in FIG. 20 at 2002. In embodiments, as nucleation occurs within a beverage, such as a beer, and rises to the top of the liquid as a foam, the concavity of the top may enable the foam to remain held within the depression of the top, as opposed to pouring over the edge as it would in a typical can with a flat top. The concavity may also enable for liquid to pour back into the can, such as when a user lowers the can from the mouth, instead of having the liquid flow along the surface of the can top or down the side of the can. The concavity may also, in addition to providing an area for the foam of the beverage to gather, may also enable the foam to settle back into the beverage can over time in a manner analogous to the rise and fall of foam within, for example, a beer glass. In embodiments, the shape of the concavity may be molded. In an example, the concavity may be molded to include the logo of a beverage company or some other type of aesthetic feature. The construction details of a tapered shape may include, but are limited to, a ceramic nucleator in a plastic frame, plastic disk nucleator, or laser ring nucleator, a snap-on top cover, and a recessed score line and folded top cover edge. An example opening method of a tapered shape beverage can may include, but is not limited, to twisting the tab to puncture the lid, continuing to twist the tab to start tearing the score line, and pushing the tongue into the can to fully open the aperture. FIGS. 12 and 13 depict sample embodiments of external packaging solutions that be used on the tapered shape beverage can, which may include, but is not limited to, a four pack carrier 1202 and 1302 that protects the top of the can and openings on the front and back that shows the unique shape of the can. Similar packaging solutions may be used for other external beverage can shapes, as described herein.
  • FIGS. 10 A-B depict a beverage can with a faceted shape. Example features of the faceted shape may include, but are not limited to, a powdercoated top cover 904A, structural facets 1004A to provide stiffness, insulating paper sleeve label 1008A, peanut shaped aperture 1002B on a slightly concave surface 1004B, and a wide rim 1008B. The construction details of a faceted shape beverage can may include, but are limited to, a ceramic nucleator in a plastic frame, plastic disk nucleator, or laser ring nucleator, snap-on top cover, recessed score line, and folded top cover edge. The opening method of the faceted shape may include but is not limited to twisting the tab to puncture the lid, continuing to twist the tab to start tearing the score line, and pushing the tongue into the can to fully open the aperture.
  • FIGS. 11A-B, 14 and 15 depict a beverage can with a pint glass shape. As illustrated by FIG. 11A-B, features of the pint glass shape may include, but are not limited to, a powdercoated top cover 904A, a body shape modeled after the pint glass 1104A and a full open aperture 1102B. FIG. 14 illustrates an example of the dimensions of one embodiment of the pint glass shape beverage can 1400. The construction details of a pint glass shape, which may include, but are limited to, a ceramic nucleator in a plastic frame, plastic disk nucleator, or laser ring nucleator, a snap-on top cover, a recessed score line and folded top cover edge. FIGS. 15 A-B illustrate one embodiment of an opening method of the pint glass shape, which may include but is not limited to pulling out the lock on the edge of the top of the can 1502A, sliding the tab on the top of the can along the rim to tear the score line 1504A and continuing until the top is fully opened 1508A. FIGS. 16 A-B depict the external packaging solution, which may include, but is not limited to a four-pack carrier 1602A where each beverage can reside within a hole on the bottom of a rectangular box. A similar packaging solution may be used for other external beverage can shapes, as described herein.
  • FIGS. 17 A and B and FIG. 22 depict a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation along the circumference of the can and near the top of the can, beneath the lid, into which a user of the beverage can may place his lower lip while drinking from the can. Based at least in part on the lip indentation, the user's lip may engage a larger area of the can before and during drinking a liquid from the beverage can. This greater surface contact may enhance the user's experience of drinking from the can and may also have practical advantages over a standard straight-sided can. For example, the sensory experience of drinking from a can with the lip indentation may be enhanced by stimulating a greater number of nerve endings in the lips. Because the average consumer likely has experience drinking from standard aluminum cans that do not feature a lip indentation, the novelty of placing one's lip within the lip indentation may increase the pleasure of the experience and impart a novel pleasure to the experience of drinking a fluid within the can. Practical advantages of drinking from a can with the lip indentation may include, but are not limited to, the user having a greater width of mouth area near the aperture of the can from which the liquid within the can will pour.
  • In an embodiment of the disclosure, this lip indentation may feature an “upper lip” 1702A that is the upper portion of the indentation, a “waist pinch” 1704A that is the inner-most portion of the indentation, and a “shoulder” 1708A that is the lower-most portion of the lip indentation. In an example and referring to FIG. 17 A, the lip indentation may feature an upper lip 1702A that extends 0.15 inches in height from a plane of the lid to a plane of the waist pinch 1704A, and which slopes inward from the lid of the can towards the center of the can, to the waist pinch 1704A, at an angle of 78° (where the 78 degrees is measured between the upper lip and the plane of the waist pinch outside of the can). Continuing the example, the waist pinch 1704A may have a smaller diameter than the can lid, from which the shoulder 1708A extends downwardly and outwardly until meeting the vertical portion of the can's circumference at a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch. In this example, the shoulder extends for 0.5 inches in height from the plane of the waist pinch to the shoulder plane, and forms an angle of 63 degrees with the shoulder plane inside of the can. In embodiments, as depicted in FIG. 17 B for example, the lip 1702A have a height in the range of 0.125-0.175 inches from the plane of the lid to the plane of the waist pinch, and may slope inward towards the center of the can to the waist pinch 1704A at an angle in the range of 45°-80° from the plane of the waist pinch. In embodiments, the shoulder may have a height in the range of 0.35-0.65 inches from the plane of the waste pinch to the shoulder plane at an angle in the range of 60°-74° from the shoulder plane.
  • Further, referring to FIG. 22, the lip may have a height in the range of 0.21 inches from the plane of the lid to the plane of the waist pinch, and may slope inward towards the center of the can to the waist pinch at an angle of 81° from the plane of the waist pinch. In embodiments, the shoulder may have a height of 0.48 inches from the plane of the waist pinch to the shoulder plane an angle of 62° from the shoulder plane. In various embodiments as described herein, for example, the lip may have a height in the range of 0.125-0.25 inches from the plane of the lid to the plane of the waist pinch, and may slope inward towards the center of the can to the waist pinch at an angle in the range of 45°-85° from the plane of the waist pinch. In embodiments, the shoulder may have a height in the range of 0.35-0.65 inches from the plane of the waist pinch to the shoulder plane, forming an angle in the range of 60°-74° with the shoulder plane. The features of a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation as described herein may provide various benefits. By way of example, the user may not feel like the liquid will spill out of the sides of his/her mouth when drinking as he or she may with a traditional can. In embodiments, the user's lip may go under the can and provide for the user to open his/her mouth or open his/her mouth more than with a can without this feature. This may allow air to go into the user's nose via the user's nasal passage which may carry aroma into the user's nasal passages. In embodiments, this may specifically allow air from the user's mouth to get into the user's nose via a nasal passage and may enhance the drinking experience by allowing air and/or aroma from the beverage into the user's olfactory system. In embodiments, the user may not need to hold his/her head back when drinking. In embodiments, the beverage can having a continuous lip indentation may allow the liquid to be deposited farther back inside the user's mouth allowing for a more blended taste. For example, a user may taste sweet, sour, and bitter from the tip of the tongue to the back of the tongue respectively. By depositing the liquid farther back on the user's tongue, the user's taste buds may be stimulated at the same time causing a more blended taste.
  • In embodiments, the lip indentation, as described herein and as depicted in FIG. 17 A and B, and FIG. 18, and FIG. 22 may be combined with a plurality of lid diameter sizes, including but not limited to a 202 lid size, 204 lid size, 206 lid size, 209 lid size, or some other lid diameter size. In embodiments, a 202 lid diameter size may be 2 and 2/16 inches, a 204 lid diameter size may be 2 and 4/16 inches, a 206 lid diameter size may be 2 and 6/16 inches, and a 209 lid diameter size may be 2 and 9/16 inches. In embodiments, lid diameter sizes may include 2.11 inches, 2.23 inches, a size in between, and the like, or some other diameter size. In embodiments, and referring to FIG. 21, the aperture on the 206 lid may be 0.59 square inches and the aperture on the 202 lid may be 0.53 square inches, and the like. In some embodiments, the sizes may be reversed such that the 202 aperture is 0.59 square inches and that of the 202 may be 0.53 square inches. In embodiments, the top of the can may measure 2.330 inches across the top. In embodiments, the aperture may be located a farther distance from the edge of the can. This may allow the opening to be placed closer to the user's nose and may provide for increased smell of liquid and/or enhanced taste of the liquid consumed. In embodiments, various lid sizes as described herein may be combined with the can dimensions depicted in FIGS. 17A and B, 18, and 22 or others as described herein, for example.
  • In embodiments, the lip indentation, as described herein and as depicted in FIG. 17 A and B, and FIG. 22 may be combined with a plurality of beverage can sizes, including but not limited to a 12 oz. can, 16 oz. can, 24 oz. can, 32 oz. can, or some other can volume size. In embodiments, the lip indentation, as described herein and as depicted in FIG. 22, may be combined with a plurality of beverage can sizes, including but not limited to a 12 oz. can, 16 oz. can, 24 oz. can, 32 oz. can, or some other can volume size and may be combined with various lid sizes such as 202, 204, 206, 209 or another lid size. In embodiments, the beverage can depicted in FIG. 22 may be combined with a 206 can lid size and a 12 oz. can or various combinations of the lid sizes, can dimensions and can sizes herein. In various embodiments described herein, the beverage can may be made by one of ordinary skill in the art and an increased indent size may be achieved by pinching the lip indent area more or less depending on the desired lip indentation. In embodiments, various sizes in the ranges and as specifically noted may be employed in constructing a beverage can as described herein and may be employed in the various embodiments disclosed. While various embodiments are described below with reference to specific measurements and measurement ranges, it is understood that various ranges and measurements as disclosed herein may be combined with the specific embodiments described below and throughout this description. In embodiments, the beverage can may be a standard, two-piece, drawn and wall-ironed aluminum beverage can that is necked to a 204 diameter and expanded to create an opening to which a 206 diameter end may be attached. Variations as would be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art may also be constructed with varying sizes and dimensions as described herein. In embodiments, a machine referred to and known in the art as a “necker” may be employed to do the necking noted herein, however other tools and/or machines may be employed in various embodiments.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height in the range of 0.125-0.175 inches at an angle in the range of 45-80° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height in the range of 0.35-0.65 inches at an angle in the range of 62-74° from the shoulder plane may further comprise an aperture opening for drinking the beverage. In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height of 0.21 inches at an angle of 81° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height of 0.48 inches at an angle of 62° from the shoulder plane may further comprise an aperture opening for drinking the beverage. The aperture, when opened, may allow for flow of liquid from the can and for the exit of the beverage aroma from the can. In embodiments of the present invention, the aperture may take on a plurality of shapes including, but not limited to a bell shape a peanut shape, a geometric shape, a converging/diverging shape, a shape with curvilinear contours, shapes that resemble design/visual elements, and the like. In embodiments, the aperture may have a pull back tab, a slide tab or a slightly longer tab, and the like. In embodiments, the tab, or material that is removed or displaced from a beverage can having a continuous lip indentation, may be enabled to be fully removed from the beverage can, such that it is no longer physically attached to the can, and placed in or on the beverage can or carrier from which the beverage can was removed. In another embodiment, the tab, or material that is removed or displaced from the beverage can having a continuous lip indentation may be secured to the carrier in which the beverage cans was packaged among a plurality of cans, such as within a “six-pack” or “four-pack.” For example, the act of physically removing a beverage can from the carrier may cause the tab or top of the can to be removed from the can and remain secured to the carrier. In another example, the act of physically removing a beverage can from the carrier may not cause the tab or top of the beverage can to be removed, but instead the carrier may be functionally fitted with an area enabled to receive and secure a beverage can tab or top, such as using the methods of securing can tabs and tops, as described herein. In another embodiment, the tab or top of the beverage can having a continuous lip indentation may be partially removed from the beverage can, leaving behind material that may function as a hinge, permitting the user to bend the tab or top over to the side of the can where it may be secured, such as using a snap, magnet, physical locking device or some other means of securing the tab or top to the beverage can. In embodiments, the aperture may be opened by twisting the tab in order to puncture the lid of the can. Continuing the example, further twisting of the tab may cause a score line in the lid of the can to become severed, allowing the user of the can to depress the tab apparatus into the can, such as by forcing the tongue into the depression created in the lid after the score line is severed by the twisting of the tab. In embodiments this type of tab apparatus may be applied to a plurality of aperture shapes and sizes, as described herein. In other example embodiments, the tab may be completely removable from the can, or may be a slide tab that attaches to the bottom or side of the can.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height in the range of 0.125-0.175 inches at an angle in the range of 45-80° to a plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height in the range of 0.35-0.65 inches at an angle in the range of 62-74° from the shoulder plane may further comprise a lid or top that may be transparent in order to permit viewing the contents of the can. In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height of 0.21 inches at an angle 81° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height of 0.48 inches at an angle of 62° from the shoulder plane may further comprise may further comprise a lid or top that may be transparent in order to permit viewing the contents of the can. The transparent material used to make the can top may be engraved, etched or marked using some other means, including by using a second material to apply to the transparent material. In embodiments, a beverage can lid may be made to be opaque during transport and storage but, upon opening, become clear, for example, by moving a facility that is comprised of a slat, or plurality of slats that, when moved in a direction, causes the can top to convert from an opaque to a transparent state. In embodiments, the lid or top of a beverage can having a continuous lip indentation may consist of a fan facility comprised of slats that are arrayed in 360 degrees along the plane of the beverage can top, or arrayed in 360 degrees and conforming to a shape other than a flat plane, for example, a concave, conical, or other non-flat shape. Continuing the embodiment, the fan facility may be opened and closed by a user of the fan by twisting or turning the can top so that the individual slats in the fan facility fold into one another, providing an aperture opening in the can through which the beverage may be viewed, smelled, and consumed.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height in the range of 0.125-0.175 inches at an angle in the range of 45-80° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height in the range of 0.35-0.65 inches at an angle in the range of 62-74° from the shoulder plane may further comprise a “lip feel” that is created by the shape, texture and dimension of the beverage can lid. In embodiments, the beverage can lid may have a snap-on top cover with a deep recess. In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height of 0.21 inches at an angle 81° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height of 0.48 inches at an angle of 62° from the shoulder plane may further comprise a “lip feel” that is created by the shape, texture and dimension of the beverage can lid. In embodiments, the beverage can lid may have a snap-on top cover with a deep recess. The recessed portion of the lid may have a score line and folded top cover edge. The score line may be a weak point in the beverage can material that allows the can to be opened by a user action such as twisting, pushing, or manipulating the can lid in some other manner. In embodiments, the beverage can may have a snap-on cover with a lid depression a grated depression leading to an aperture of a different size. In embodiments, removal of the snap-on top cover may leave an aperture that is nearly the entire diameter of the beverage can and in this way simulate the look and feel of a beverage glass insofar as there is virtually no lid material present that is horizontal to the can.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height in the range of 0.125-0.175 inches at an angle in the range of 45-80° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height in the range of 0.35-0.65 inches at an angle in the range of 62-74° from the shoulder plane may further incorporate surface features that enhance the drinking experience. In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height of 0.21 inches at an angle 81° to the plane of waist pinch, a shoulder height of 0.48 inches at an angle of 62° from the shoulder plane may further incorporate surface features that enhance the drinking experience. Such surface enhancements may impact the “lip feel” or “mouth feel” by altering the typical feeling of one's lips touching a metal can. The lip feel may be enhanced by a “Chipped Coffee Cup” application to simulate drinking from the edge of a glass. The lip feel may be included in the stamping/end cap manufacturer process or done during the post-processing phase of manufacturing. The surface of the beverage can having a continuous lip indentation may be given a rough texture by physically manipulating the surface, such as mechanically with a drill, file, sandpaper or some other device that is capable of roughening the beverage can surface. In embodiments, material may be added to the beverage can material to alter is smoothness or roughness, such as by covering the can with a resin, epoxy, polymer, plastic, glass, sand, silicone, fiber, or some other material (together “roughening/softening agents”) capable of adhering to, or being applied within a beverage can material, such as aluminum, steel, or plastic. For example, such roughening/softening agents may be used to create a beverage can having a continuous lip indentation that simulates the feel of glass to the hand and/or mouth. In embodiments, the material used to roughen or smooth the beverage can may be applied to a surface coating that is applied to the beverage can, such as through a spray or dip process in which the can is coated in a substance capable of receiving and adhering to a roughening/softening agent, as described herein. In embodiments, a beverage can having a continuous lip indentation may have its surface texture altered by first dipping the can in a substance that adheres to the can and is capable of receiving and hold particles, and a second dipping process using the same can in which the can, having been coated in the substance, is dipped into a roughening/softening agent. Other deposition techniques may be used in conjunction with roughening/softening agents including, but not limited to, vapor, temperature manipulation, or some other deposition technique. In embodiments, a beverage can having a continuous lip indentation may have its surface texture altered by physically or chemically etching the surface of the can, an example of which is shown in FIG. 19, 1902. Roughening/softening agents may be used to alter the surface of both the exterior and in the interior of the can. In embodiments, a beverage can's surface may be molded to provide texture and/or form. In embodiments, roughening/softening agents may be used to mimic the look and or feel of a material other than the material from which a beverage can is made. For example, resin, polymer or actual glass may be used for the upper portion of a can where a user's mouth touches the can to provide a “glass feel” to a can that is otherwise not made of glass.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height in the range of 0.125-0.175 inches at an angle in the range of 45-80° to the plane of waist pinch, a shoulder height in the range of 0.35-0.65 inches at an angle in the range of 62-74° from the shoulder plane may include a nucleation device. In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height of 0.21 inches at an angle 81° to the plane of waist pinch, a shoulder height of 0.48 inches at an angle of 62° from the shoulder plane may further include a nucleation device. Nucleation sites may exist on an interior surface of a beverage can having a continuous lip indentation, and the sites may be in the form of microscopic cracks, scratches, particles adhered to the surface (e.g., fiber particles from a dish cloth), or some other surface defect, deformation, or surface feature. Nucleation sites may also be intentionally created on the interior surface of the beverage can having a continuous lip indentation, such as according to the methods and systems of nucleation enhancement as described herein. In embodiments the nucleation device may be, but is not limited to, a ceramic nucleator, such as housed within a plastic frame, a disk attachment facility, a ceramic facility, or a laser etching. The disc attachment nucleation facility may be, but is not limited to, a plastic disc with micro etching on its surface, which may attach to the bottom of the beverage can having a continuous lip indentation. The ceramic facility may be, but is not limited to, a ceramic nucleator at the bottom of the beverage can in a plastic frame that extends from the bottom to the top of the beverage can. The laser etching nucleation facility may be, but is not limited to, a nucleation ring that is laser etched through the interior coating of a beverage can. Nucleation may improve the quality, texture and carbonation of the beverage housed in the can having a continuous lip indentation.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height in the range of 0.125-0.175 inches at an angle in the range of 45-80° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height in the range of 0.35-0.65 inches at an angle in the range of 62-74° from the shoulder plane may have a plurality of exterior shapes. In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height of 0.21 inches at an angle 81° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height of 0.48 inches at an angle of 62° from the shoulder plane may have a plurality of exterior shapes. Shapes may include, but are not limited to, a tapered shape, a faceted shape, or a pint glass shape. In embodiments, the feature of the tapered shape may include, but are not limited to, a powdercoated top cover, flush surfaces between the top and the body, heavy gauge walls, bell shaped aperture, deep concave surface, and a wide rim. In embodiments, the top of the beverage can having a continuous lip indentation may have a concave depression. In combination with an aperture, an increased aperture size and/or anthropomorphic shape, as described herein, the concavity of the top may serve as a chamber in which the aroma of the beverage is momentarily trapped in close proximity to the user's nose. In embodiments, in addition to the concave top including an aperture through which a user may consume the beverage, the concave top may have another opening, or plurality of openings, that enable greater aroma from the beverage to release from the beverage can having a continuous lip indentation. In embodiments, the shape of the concavity may be molded. In an example, the concavity may be molded to include the logo of a beverage company or some other type of aesthetic feature. The construction details of a tapered shape may include, but are limited to, a ceramic nucleator in a plastic frame, plastic disk nucleator, or laser ring nucleator, a snap-on top cover, and a recessed score line and folded top cover edge. An example opening method of a tapered shape beverage can may include, but is not limited, to twisting the tab to puncture the lid, continuing to twist the tab to start tearing the score line, and pushing the tongue into the can to fully open the aperture. In embodiments, packaging solutions may be used on the tapered shape beverage can having a continuous lip indentation, which may include, but is not limited to, a four pack carrier that protects the top of the can and openings on the front and back that shows the unique shape of the can. Similar packaging solutions as described herein may be used for other external beverage can shapes having a continuous lip indentation.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height in the range of 0.125-0.175 inches at an angle in the range of 45-80° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height in the range of 0.35-0.65 inches at an angle in the range of 62-74° from the shoulder plane may have a faceted shape. In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height of 0.21 inches at an angle of 81° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height of 0.48 inches at an angle of 62° from the shoulder plane may have a faceted shape. Example features of the faceted shape may include, but are not limited to, a powdercoated top cover, structural facets to provide stiffness, insulating paper sleeve label, peanut shaped aperture on a slightly concave surface, and a wide rim. The construction details of a faceted shape beverage can may include, but are limited to, a ceramic nucleator in a plastic frame, plastic disk nucleator, or laser ring nucleator, snap-on top cover, recessed score line, and folded top cover edge. The opening method of the faceted shape may include but is not limited to twisting the tab to puncture the lid, continuing to twist the tab to start tearing the score line, and pushing the tongue into the can to fully open the aperture.
  • In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height in the range of 0.125-0.175 inches at an angle in the range of 45-80° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height in the range of 0.35-0.65 inches at an angle in the range of 62-74° from the shoulder plane may comprise a pint glass shape. In embodiments, a beverage can with a continuous lip indentation comprising an upper lip height of 0.21 inches at an angle 81° to the plane of the waist pinch, a shoulder height of 0.48 inches at an angle of 62° from the shoulder plane may comprise a pint glass shape. In embodiments, features of the pint glass shape may include, but are not limited to, a powdercoated top cover, a body shape modeled after the pint glass and a full open aperture. The example of the dimensions of one embodiment of the pint glass shape beverage can as illustrated in FIG. 14 may be combined with the beverage can having a continuous indentation lip. In embodiments, the construction details of a pint glass shape, may include, but are limited to, a ceramic nucleator in a plastic frame, plastic disk nucleator, or laser ring nucleator, a snap-on top cover, a recessed score line and folded top cover edge. An embodiment of an opening method of the beverage can having a continuous lip indentation and having a pint glass shape, may include but is not limited to pulling out the lock on the edge of the top of the can, sliding the tab on the top of the can along the rim to tear the score line and continuing until the top is fully opened. In embodiments, the external packaging solution, may include, but is not limited to a four-pack carrier where each beverage can reside within a hole on the bottom of a rectangular box. A similar packaging solution may be used for other external beverage can shapes, as described herein.

Claims (36)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A beverage can comprising:
    a lid;
    a continuous, circumferential indentation proximal to the lid, adapted to facilitate receiving the lip of a consumer of a beverage from the can, the indentation characterized by:
    a waist pinch representing the location of the smallest circumference of the indentation, the waist pinch located on a plane substantially parallel to the lid;
    an upper lip having a height in the range of 0.125 and 0.25 inches, wherein the upper lip is disposed between the waist pinch and the lid, and is at an angle in the range of 45 to 85 degrees from the plane of the waist pinch; and
    a shoulder having a height in the range of 0.35 to 0.65 inches, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 62 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  2. 2. The beverage can of claim 1 comprising at least one of a tapered shape, a faceted shape, and a pint glass shape.
  3. 3. The beverage can of claim 1 further comprising a top that is capable of being fully opened.
  4. 4. The beverage can of claim 1 further comprising a concave top.
  5. 5. The beverage can of claim 1 wherein the lid is capable of changing from opaque to transparent.
  6. 6. The beverage can of claim 1 wherein the lid comprises at least two holes capable of being opened and positioned such that they are in proximity to a user's nostrils during beverage consumption.
  7. 7. The beverage can of claim 1 further comprising a nucleation device.
  8. 8. The beverage can of claim 1 wherein the lid has a diameter of at least 2 and ⅛ inches.
  9. 9. The beverage can of claim 1 wherein the lid has a diameter of at least 2 and ¼ inches.
  10. 10. The beverage can of claim 1 wherein the lid has a diameter of at least 2 and ⅜ inches.
  11. 11. The beverage can of claim 1 wherein the lid has a diameter of at least 2 and 9/16 inches.
  12. 12. The beverage can of claim 1 further comprising an aperture shaped such that a user's nose will enter the beverage can during beverage consumption.
  13. 13. The beverage can of claim 1 further comprising an aperture in the lid with the shape of at least one of a bell shape, a peanut shape, a geometric shape, a converging shape, a diverging shape, a shape with curvilinear contours, a shape that resembles visual elements, and a shape that resembles a design element.
  14. 14. The beverage can of claim 1 further comprising a powder-coated top cover.
  15. 15. The beverage can of claim 1 further comprising a surface enhancement located at least on the outside of the upper lip.
  16. 16. The beverage can of claim 15 wherein the surface enhancement comprises at least one of a rough surface and a surface with a glass feel.
  17. 17. The beverage can of claim 1 further comprising a score line on the lid, the beverage can further comprising a tab and a rim, wherein the tab is capable of being slid along the rim to tear the score line to fully open the top of the can.
  18. 18. The beverage can of claim 1 further comprising an aperture of the lid, the aperture comprising a tab, wherein the tab is capable of being twisted to puncture the lid of the can.
  19. 19. The beverage can of claim 18, wherein the tab is a slide tab and further capable of being slid to tear the lid of the can, and wherein the tab is capable of attaching to at least one of the side and bottom of the can.
  20. 20. The beverage can of claim 18, wherein the tab is capable of causing material to be removed from the can to create an opening in the lid wherein at least one of the tab and material is capable of being attached to the can.
  21. 21. The beverage can of claim 1, wherein the shoulder is at an angle of 62 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  22. 22. A beverage can comprising:
    a lid;
    a continuous, circumferential indentation proximal to the lid, adapted to facilitate receiving the lip of a consumer of a beverage from the can, the indentation characterized by:
    a waist pinch representing the location of the smallest circumference of the indentation, the waist pinch located on a plane substantially parallel to the lid;
    an upper lip having a height in the range of 0.125 and 0.25 inches, wherein the upper lip is disposed between the waist pinch and the lid, and is at an angle in the range of 45 to 85 degrees from the plane of the waist pinch; and
    a shoulder having a height in the range of 0.35 to 0.65 inches, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch, and is at an angle in the range of 60-74 degrees from a shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  23. 23. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 60 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  24. 24. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 61 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  25. 25. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 63 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  26. 26. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 64 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  27. 27. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 65 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  28. 28. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 66 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  29. 29. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 67 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  30. 30. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 68 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  31. 31. The beverage can of claim 19, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 69 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  32. 32. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 70 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  33. 33. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 71 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  34. 34. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 72 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  35. 35. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 73 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
  36. 36. The beverage can of claim 22, wherein the shoulder is disposed more distal from the lid of the can than the waist pinch and is at an angle of 74 degrees from the shoulder plane that is parallel to the plane of the waist pinch.
US14205604 2012-05-25 2014-03-12 Beverage delivery can Abandoned US20140190971A1 (en)

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US201261712688 true 2012-10-11 2012-10-11
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US13902437 US9162794B2 (en) 2012-05-25 2013-05-24 Beverage delivery can
US14052052 US20140103040A1 (en) 2012-10-11 2013-10-11 Beverage delivery can
US14205604 US20140190971A1 (en) 2012-05-25 2014-03-12 Beverage delivery can

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US3704805A (en) * 1970-05-07 1972-12-05 Edward A Sheafe Beverage container having integral formed lip guard
US4494681A (en) * 1979-11-21 1985-01-22 Suntory Limited Method and dispenser for dispensing beer
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USD319580S (en) * 1989-07-24 1991-09-03 Henry J. Cassai Beverage can
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Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ROBBINS, ZEBULON STEVENS;KOCH, CHARLES JAMES;GLADSTONE, PETER D.;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20140214 TO 20140221;REEL/FRAME:032419/0280