US20140034274A1 - Air Barrier - Google Patents

Air Barrier Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20140034274A1
US20140034274A1 US14052761 US201314052761A US2014034274A1 US 20140034274 A1 US20140034274 A1 US 20140034274A1 US 14052761 US14052761 US 14052761 US 201314052761 A US201314052761 A US 201314052761A US 2014034274 A1 US2014034274 A1 US 2014034274A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
constant temperature
air
interior
structural opening
top
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US14052761
Inventor
Melvin E. Shaffer
Original Assignee
Melvin E. Shaffer
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F13/00Arrangements for modifying heat-transfer, e.g. increasing, decreasing
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E06DOORS, WINDOWS, SHUTTERS, OR ROLLER BLINDS IN GENERAL; LADDERS
    • E06BFIXED OR MOVABLE CLOSURES FOR OPENINGS IN BUILDINGS, VEHICLES, FENCES OR LIKE ENCLOSURES IN GENERAL, e.g. DOORS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, GATES
    • E06B7/00Special arrangements or measures in connection with doors or windows
    • E06B7/02Special arrangements or measures in connection with doors or windows for providing ventilation, e.g. through double windows; Arrangement of ventilation roses
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F13/00Details common to, or for air-conditioning, air-humidification, ventilation or use of air currents for screening
    • F24F13/08Air-flow control members, e.g. louvres, grilles, flaps or guide plates
    • F24F13/18Air-flow control members, e.g. louvres, grilles, flaps or guide plates specially adapted for insertion in flat panels, e.g. in door or window-pane
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F5/00Air-conditioning systems or apparatus not covered by F24F1/00 or F24F3/00, e.g. using solar heat or combined with household units such as an oven or water heater
    • F24F5/0075Systems using thermal walls, e.g. double window
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E06DOORS, WINDOWS, SHUTTERS, OR ROLLER BLINDS IN GENERAL; LADDERS
    • E06BFIXED OR MOVABLE CLOSURES FOR OPENINGS IN BUILDINGS, VEHICLES, FENCES OR LIKE ENCLOSURES IN GENERAL, e.g. DOORS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, GATES
    • E06B7/00Special arrangements or measures in connection with doors or windows
    • E06B7/02Special arrangements or measures in connection with doors or windows for providing ventilation, e.g. through double windows; Arrangement of ventilation roses
    • E06B2007/023Air flow induced by fan
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F5/00Air-conditioning systems or apparatus not covered by F24F1/00 or F24F3/00, e.g. using solar heat or combined with household units such as an oven or water heater
    • F24F5/0046Air-conditioning systems or apparatus not covered by F24F1/00 or F24F3/00, e.g. using solar heat or combined with household units such as an oven or water heater using natural energy, e.g. solar energy, energy from the ground
    • F24F2005/0057Air-conditioning systems or apparatus not covered by F24F1/00 or F24F3/00, e.g. using solar heat or combined with household units such as an oven or water heater using natural energy, e.g. solar energy, energy from the ground receiving heat-exchange fluid from a closed circuit in the ground
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F5/00Air-conditioning systems or apparatus not covered by F24F1/00 or F24F3/00, e.g. using solar heat or combined with household units such as an oven or water heater
    • F24F5/0075Systems using thermal walls, e.g. double window
    • F24F2005/0078Double windows
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02ATECHNOLOGIES FOR ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02A30/00Adapting or protecting infrastructure or their operation
    • Y02A30/20Adapting or protecting infrastructure or their operation in buildings, dwellings or related infrastructures
    • Y02A30/259Passive climatisation
    • Y02A30/26Passive climatisation using air flow into the conditioned premises or facilities
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B10/00Integration of renewable energy sources in buildings
    • Y02B10/40Geothermal heat-pumps
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B30/00Energy efficient heating, ventilation or air conditioning [HVAC]
    • Y02B30/90Passive houses; Double facade technology
    • Y02B30/92Passive houses; Double facade technology with air flow into the conditioned premises or facilities

Abstract

A heat transfer inhibitor system to minimize the heat transfer through the structural opening closures with an interior and an exterior panel such as windows, doors and skylights that are the weak links in interior insulation. By moving a stream of constant temperature air through a space between the external panel and the interior panel, the temperature differential between the exterior surface of the internal panel and the interior is minimized thus reducing the load and maintenance costs on heater/AC systems. It also reduces the required size and costs of installations. Minimizing the resistance to flow of air through the system with butted tubing joints secured with plastic straps and molded deflectors at a specific angle enhance the cost effectiveness of the system.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • 1. Field of Invention
  • The Air Barrier invention relates generally to a system for minimizing the heat transfer through structural openings in residential and commercial construction where the closures of those structural openings are formed with an interior panel, an exterior panel and an air gap in between the interior and exterior panels, such as windows with storm windows, doors with storm doors, or skylights. Minimizing the heat transfer through these closures of structural openings reduces the load on heating and cooling systems. More specifically it involves moving an almost constant temperature air through a gap between an outside panel and an inner panel. The moving air is held at a nearly constant temperature by cycling it through a heat exchanger which can be either a water to air system using well water at approximately 55 degrees Fahrenheit or an air to air heat exchanger blowing air though an underground thermally conductive tube of sufficient depth and length to offset temperature fluctuations that the moving air experiences as it travels through the closed system in tubing.
  • 2. Prior Art
  • Many attempts have been made to minimize the heat transfer through windows which typically accounts for the largest heat loss or gain in a normally insulated structure. Windows have the lowest thermal resistance or R-value of any standard building materials. Typically a 2×6 inch wall construction with R-19 fiberglass insulation has an R value of approximately 11.7 where a single pane glass window has a thermal resistance or R-value of 0.9. The addition of a second glass was tried, as in the storm window approach, to reduce that loss or inhibit that heat transfer. Two and three pane thermopane approaches were used in conjunction with storm windows with an air gap between the thermopane and the storm windows. Although static air is a good insulator, over time the temperature of trapped air inside the storm window gradually attains the temperature of the exterior air such that the temperature differential between the interior of the structure and the outside of the interior panel is the same as between the interior and the exterior temperature. The heat loss or transfer through a given opening is equal to the thermal conductivity of the materials in the closure times the area of the closure times the temperature differential between the interior and the exterior surface of the interior panel. To improve the thermal resistance of the gap between the windows, gasses with lower thermal conductivity than air such as argon, krypton and xenon were placed between the layers. These gasses are more expensive and tend to leak out over time with high replacement costs and fairly short life spans. The best Insulator for the gap is a perfect vacuum, but this puts a significant strain on the glass reducing the allowable span between supports and requires even more expensive seals. When the seal eventually fails it draws moisture into the space between windows clouding the visibility. Various coatings with different reflectivity and emissivity have also been proposed but add to the costs and some have negative impacts on visibility.
  • To date the prior art attempts to resolve this problem have been minimally effective but costly.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The Air Barrier System utilizes a constant temperature air moving through the gap between an exterior panel and an interior panel. The interior panel and the exterior panel are separated by a spacer frame on each side, top and bottom and have air flow ports toward the top of side frame and toward the bottom of the opposite side frame to supply the moving air at the top or bottom depending on the ambient temperature. If heating is required, the constant temperature air source supplies air to the top port and is drawn off through the bottom port and returned to the constant temperature air source. If cooling is desired, air flow is reversed putting constant temperature air in to the bottom port from the constant temperature source and drawing it off through the top port to return to the constant temperature source. A plurality of structural opening closures can be hooked to a closed loop system with tubing run from the constant temperature source to a deflector to the top port of each closure, until the distal closure where the constant temperature air source is terminated with a cap. The proximal end of the constant temperature return is terminated with a second cap and the successive bottom ports are connected with deflectors to tubing to the constant temperature air return source. The top and bottom ports have openings to the gap between the exterior panels and the interior panels. In order to minimize the operational costs of the system a minimal volume of air is moved through the system with the least resistance to flow. Smooth butted joints between caps, deflectors, angle fittings and feed and return lines secured by plastic straps offer the least resistance to flow. The deflector design with the take-off or feed section at a 22½ degree angle to the through section axis offers a significant and surprising reduction in flow resistance at each closure.
  • Constant temperature air may be provided by a heat exchanger outlet from either a water-to-air system or an air-to-air system or any other source that can provide a constant low velocity flow of regulated temperature air. The water to air system would consist of flowing well water through the heat exchanger, providing a nearly constant 55 degree Fahrenheit air stream to the ports. Blowing air through a sufficient length of conductive tubing buried deep enough in the ground to provide a similar constant temperature output to the ports is also possible. Also, this system can be installed as a heating assist system only using a hot water heater with a 55 degree F. set point and air conditioning can be added later with either water to air or the air to air systems.
  • DRAWINGS
  • In order that the invention is fully understood it will now be described with reference to the following drawings in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an Air Barrier System where the airflow is set for cool weather heating with a water to air heat exchanger.
  • FIG. 2 is a block diagram of an Air Barrier System where the airflow is set for warm weather cooling with a water to air heat exchanger.
  • FIG. 3 is a block diagram of an Air Barrier System where the airflow is set for warm weather cooling with an air to air heat exchanger.
  • FIG. 4 is a top section view of an exterior wall with a structural opening closed with a spacer frame containing an interior panel, an exterior panel and a space between interior and exterior panels.
  • FIG. 5 is a section view of the two panel closure taken on cutting plane 5-5 in FIG. 4.
  • FIG. 6 is a section view of the two panel closure taken on cutting plane 6-6 in FIG. 4.
  • FIG. 7 is a section view of the two panel closure taken on cutting plane 7-7 in FIG. 4.
  • FIG. 8 is an end view of an air deflector.
  • FIG. 9 is a side view of an air deflector.
  • FIG. 10 is a partial side view of a tubing joint between a cap, a deflector and a section of tubing secured with two plastic straps and a smaller section of tubing secured with a smaller plastic strap.
  • Building, power source, solar collectors, and energy storage devices are shown in broken lines, as they are not part of this invention but shown for illustrative purposes only.
  • REFERENCE NUMBERS
  • The same reference numbers will be used throughout this application for the same and like features.
  • Description:
  • In order that Air Barrier System 12 is fully understood it will now be described by way of the following example. This new invention is a convenient and easily adaptable system for inhibiting the heat transfer through closures of structural openings in a wall. Air Barrier System 12 functions by pushing and pulling a flow of constant temperature air 34 through gap 26 between an exterior panel 24 and an interior panel 28. Panels 24 and 28 can be made from various clear materials and be composed of one or more layers or panes. Air Barrier System 12 utilizes closure 18 with top port 32 and bottom port 48, with a minimum of two panels 24 and 28 separated in spacer frame 30 around the panel sandwich as shown in FIGS. 4-7. Top port 32 penetrates through side wall of frame 30 and towards the top wall of frame 30 and bottom port 48 penetrates through bottom side wall of frame 30. Ports 32 and 48 are constructed in such a manner that they open into gap 26. Constant temperature air 34 can be held at approximately 55 degrees Fahrenheit by either circulating well water through a water-to-air heat exchanger 22, circulating air that has been blown through conductive tubing 14 that is buried at a sufficient depth with sufficient length to maintain a ground temperature of approximately 55 degrees Fahrenheit through an air-to-air heat exchanger 54 or by circulating 55 degree Fahrenheit water from a hot water heater set at 55 Degrees F.
  • Pumps, fans, solar collectors, and energy storage devices are not part of this invention and are shown for illustrative purposes only. Air-to-air and water-to-air heat exchangers 54 and 22 are shown as possible sources of constant temperature air 34. It does not need to be heated or cooled to fall well below the expected maximum temperature environment of 120 degrees Fahrenheit and well above the minimum expected temperature environment of −30 degrees Fahrenheit. This minimizes the temperature differential to the interior of the structure. In prior art, with trapped stationary air insulated gaps, conduction occurs between the external air, through the exterior panel 24 and into the trapped air gap 26 until the temperature of the air adjacent to the outside of interior panel 28 balances out to the external temperature. If the internal temperature of the structure is maintained at 72 degrees Fahrenheit, the amount of heat transferred through interior panel 28 is Q=U×A×ΔT. U is the thermal conductivity of the interior panel, or the inverse of thermal resistance 1/R; A is the cross sectional area of the panel; and ΔT is the temperature differential between the external air and the inside wall of interior panel 28. In the summer, if the inside of the structure is to be maintained at 72 degrees, the ΔT can reach (120−72)=48 degrees or in the winter ΔT can reach (−30+72)=102 degrees. This compares to Air Barrier System 12 in which the temperature of the flowing air 34 is held at 55 degrees Fahrenheit, keeping the outside of interior panel 28 at approximately the same temperature vs. the internal structure temperature at 72 degrees where ΔT=(72−55)=17. It can be seen that keeping the air flowing at 55 degrees cuts the heat loss or transfer through interior panel 28 at the extremes by ratios of 17/48 and 17/102 or by approximately a ½ factor in summer and a ⅙ factor in winter.
  • Moving the constant temperature air 34 at an approximate rate of 2 to 3 cu. ft. per minute per closure between exterior panel 24 and interior panel 28 also minimizes the conductive heat transfer across air gap 26 even further reducing the above ratios.
  • In order to minimize the work required by the heat exchangers 22 or 54 to move air 34 and compensate for slight variations in temperature of flowing air 34 and maintain a flow rate through the plurality of closures 18 connected to Air Barrier System 12, the plumbing schemes shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 are utilized. A 4 inch diameter PVC pipe is preferably utilized for the main trunk lines 16 which are located in the basement or crawl space and are connected in a closed loop to a constant temperature air source or heat exchanger 22 or 54. Deflectors 42 are located under each closure 18, one in the feed line and one in the return line. Deflectors 42 are molded having a section of 4 inch diameter pipe with a take-off tap of 2 inch diameter PVC pipe at a 22½ degree angle to the axis of the 4 inch diameter section. Deflectors 42 in the feed lines are located in a basement or crawl space and 2 inch diameter feed lines 17 are taken up through the walls and penetrate the side wall of frame 30 towards the top of each closure or window 18 between interior pane 24 and exterior pane 28 at port 32. Bottom sides of each frame 30 have port 48 into gap 26 where the 2 inch diameter tubing 17 returns the air to deflector 42 in the return line and back to constant temperature source. To minimize the resistance to flow of air 34 through the closed loop system it was discovered that the 2 inch diameter section of deflectors 42 need to be angled at approximately 22½ degrees to the axis of trunk line 16. The openings 32 and 48 through frame 30 need to be a slip fit between the diameters of openings 32 and 48 and the 2 inch diameter section of deflector tubing 17. To minimize the resistance to flow though out the system joints 20 between caps 46 and deflectors 42, trunk lines 16 and tubing fittings 50, are butted together and secured in place with plastic strap 44 and joints 21 between tubing 17 and fittings 52 and fittings 52 and the two inch diameter section of deflectors 42 are butted tightly together and secured in place with plastic straps 43. These butted joints and the angled deflectors result in a low air flow resistance in the tubing system and minimize the cost to move a sufficient volume of air to heat or cool a small home. A reversible blower running 24 hours per day, seven days per week can move enough air to heat or cool a small home for approximately $10-15 per year.
  • Operation:
  • FIG. 1 shows the schematic for when heating is required. Constant temperature air 34 is supplied from heat exchanger 22 to top port 32 and drawn off at the bottom port 48 and returned to the heat exchanger 22. FIG. 2 shows the schematic for when cooling is desired. Air flow 34 is reversed, putting constant temperature air 34 in to bottom port 48 from heat exchanger 22 and drawing it off at top port 32 to return to the heat exchanger 22. This reversal of airflow can be obtained by rotating air reversal pivot plate 56 if the last sections of insulated tubing 16 are made from a flexible material or reversible high efficiency blowers can be utilized. FIG. 3 shows the flow schematic utilizing an air to air heat exchanger 54.
  • A plurality of structural opening closures 18 can be hooked to a closed loop system with tubing 16 run from the constant temperature source to deflectors 42 and then from the 2 inch diameter 22½ degree segment of deflector 42 through 2 inch diameter tubing 17 and fittings 52 to the top port 32 of each closure. After distal closure 18, the constant temperature air source is terminated with cap 46 and secured with strap 44. The proximal end of the constant temperature return is terminated with cap 46 before proximal closure 18 and successive bottom ports 48 are connected with tubing 17 through fittings 52 to deflectors 42 and then to the constant temperature air return 16 which flows back to the constant temperature source. This layout aids in balancing the flow through each gap 26. The proximal structural opening closure 18 has the highest input pressure and lowest return suction and the distal structural opening closure 18 has the lowest input pressure and the highest return suction tending to balance the flow through each gap 26.
  • Power to run the water pump or the fans to move subterranean air through conductive tubing 14 to the heat exchanger 22 and the fan to move the constant temperature air 34 though the heat exchanger 22 and through tubing 16 and 17 and deflectors 43 to the various closures 18 and back to heat exchanger 22 can be provided from any of a variety of sources. Roof mounted solar collectors 36 with energy storage facilities 38 for night or grey days are an option although they represent maturing technologies and are shown in dotted lines as they are not part of this invention.
  • The descriptions in the above specification are not intended to limit this invention to the application or the materials disclosed here. Rather, they are shown for illustration purposes only as one skilled in these arts could easily scale the invention's dimensions and materials to work with any size structural opening closure and conduit feeding constant temperature air through an air gap between panels that close a structural opening. The only limitations are as described in the attached claims.

Claims (8)

    What is claimed:
  1. 1. A heat transfer inhibitor for a structural opening closure, comprised of:
    a spacer frame that fits in said structural opening closure with a top wall, a bottom wall, two side walls, an interior side and an exterior side;
    an exterior panel;
    an interior panel, where said exterior panel and said interior panel are separated in said spacer frame forming a gap between said interior and exterior panels;
    a top port that penetrates through said side wall of said spacer frame toward said top wall that opens into said gap;
    a bottom port that penetrates through said bottom wall of said spacer frame into said gap;
    a constant temperature air source;
    a larger diameter tube connects said constant temperature air source to the proximal end of first deflector and is then terminated with a cap;
    said deflectors are molded as a larger diameter tube of matching diameter to the said larger diameter tube with a smaller diameter tube at a 22½ degree angle to said larger diameter axis;
    said smaller diameter tube section of said first deflector connects through said smaller diameter tubing and fittings to said top port;
    smaller diameter tubing and fittings connect said bottom port to 22 ½ degree section of second deflector where said second deflector is terminated on its proximal end with second cap and is connected back to said constant temperature air source with said larger diameter tubing and fittings;
    joints between said tubing, fittings and deflectors are all butted tightly against matching diameter and are secured with plastic straps; and
    said constant temperature air source and return have a flow reversing means that blows said constant temperature air into said top port when heating is required and draws return air through said bottom port, returning it to said constant temperature air source and reversing the direction of flow for cooling, blows constant temperature air into said bottom port and draws its return air from said top port.
  2. 2. A heat transfer inhibitor for a structural opening closure as in claim 1 where said constant temperature air source utilizes a water well source of constant temperature fluid to cycle through a water-to-air heat exchanger keeping the air that cycles through said structural opening closure at a constant temperature, approximately 55 degrees Fahrenheit, year round.
  3. 3. A heat transfer inhibitor for a structural opening closure as in claim 1 where said constant temperature air source utilizes a buried thermally conductive tube at sufficient depth and of a sufficient length to allow air blown through it to attain ground temperature and act as the constant temperature gas to cycle through an air-to-air heat exchanger keeping the air that cycles through said structural opening closure at a constant temperature, approximately 55 degrees Fahrenheit, year round.
  4. 4. A heat transfer inhibitor for a structural opening closure as in claim 1 where said constant temperature air source utilizes a water heater for constant temperature fluid to cycle through a water-to-air heat exchanger keeping the air that cycles through said structural opening closure at a constant temperature, approximately 55 degrees Fahrenheit, year round.
  5. 5. A heat transfer inhibitor for a plurality of structural opening closures, comprised of:
    a plurality of spacer frames that fit in said structural openings with top walls, bottom walls, side walls, interior sides and exterior sides;
    exterior panels;
    interior panels, where said exterior panels and said interior panels are separated in said spacer frames forming gaps between said interior and exterior panels;
    top ports that penetrate through said side walls of said spacer frames toward said top walls into said gaps;
    bottom ports that penetrate through bottom walls of said spacer frames into said gaps;
    a constant temperature air source;
    a larger diameter tube connects said constant temperature air source to the proximal end of first deflector and to a deflector for each closure treated and after distal deflector is terminated with a cap;
    said deflectors are molded as a larger diameter tube of matching diameter to the said larger diameter tube with a smaller diameter tube at a 22½ degree angle to said larger diameter axis;
    said smaller diameter tube sections of said deflectors connect through said smaller diameter tubing and fittings to said top ports;
    smaller diameter tubing and fittings connect said bottom ports to 22 ½ degree section of return line deflectors where said proximal deflector is terminated on its proximal end with second cap and is connected back to said constant temperature air source with said larger diameter tubing and fittings;
    joints between said tubing, fittings and deflectors are all butted tightly against matching diameters and are secured with plastic straps; and
    said constant temperature air source and return has a flow reversing means that blows said constant temperature air into said top ports when heating is required, drawing return air through said bottom ports and returning it to said constant temperature air source and reversing the direction of flow for cooling, blows constant temperature air into said bottom ports and draws its return air from said top ports.
  6. 6. A heat transfer inhibitor for a plurality of structural opening closures as in claim 5 where said constant temperature air source utilizes a water well source of constant temperature fluid to cycle through a water-to-air heat exchanger keeping the air that cycles through said plurality of structural opening closures at a constant temperature, approximately 55 degrees Fahrenheit, year round.
  7. 7. A heat transfer inhibitor for a plurality of structural opening closures as in claim 5 where said constant temperature air source utilizes a buried thermally conductive tube at sufficient depth and of a sufficient length to allow air blown through it to attain ground temperature and act as the constant temperature gas to cycle through an air-to-air heat exchanger keeping the air that cycles through said plurality of structural opening closures at a constant temperature, approximately 55 degrees Fahrenheit, year round.
  8. 8. A heat transfer inhibitor for a plurality of structural opening closures as in claim 5 where said constant temperature air source utilizes a hot water heater for constant temperature fluid to cycle through a water-to-air heat exchanger keeping the air that cycles through said plurality of structural opening closures at a constant temperature, approximately 55 degrees Fahrenheit, year round.
US14052761 2010-07-01 2013-10-13 Air Barrier Abandoned US20140034274A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12803645 US20120003913A1 (en) 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 Air barrier
US14052761 US20140034274A1 (en) 2010-07-01 2013-10-13 Air Barrier

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14052761 US20140034274A1 (en) 2010-07-01 2013-10-13 Air Barrier

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12803645 Continuation-In-Part US20120003913A1 (en) 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 Air barrier

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20140034274A1 true true US20140034274A1 (en) 2014-02-06

Family

ID=50024324

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14052761 Abandoned US20140034274A1 (en) 2010-07-01 2013-10-13 Air Barrier

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20140034274A1 (en)

Citations (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2960924A (en) * 1957-11-14 1960-11-22 Frank S Grott Air distributing conduit system for portable air conditioners
US3247894A (en) * 1964-06-03 1966-04-26 Vaughn Bldg Co Of Ohio Air conditioning system
US3638372A (en) * 1969-07-02 1972-02-01 Carl Rosenthal Window sash rebate profile with a condensate reception gutter
US3925945A (en) * 1973-11-23 1975-12-16 Walter S White Heat exchanger window
US4050443A (en) * 1975-06-27 1977-09-27 University Patents, Inc. Solar energy device and system
US4176788A (en) * 1978-04-12 1979-12-04 Holman William P Geothermal home construction
US4222436A (en) * 1978-12-21 1980-09-16 Dynatherm Corporation Heat exchange apparatus
US4331066A (en) * 1979-06-15 1982-05-25 Eltreva Ag Device for air conditioning a closed space
US4350200A (en) * 1978-07-24 1982-09-21 Mcelwain John A Solar energy collector and system
US4462459A (en) * 1980-07-22 1984-07-31 Eltreva Ag Device for air control of an energy facade wall
US4505259A (en) * 1981-08-17 1985-03-19 Ekono, Inc. Heat regulation system and method for building structure
US4523519A (en) * 1983-09-02 1985-06-18 Johnson Wilfred B Heating and cooling system using ground air
US4641466A (en) * 1983-11-09 1987-02-10 Oy Partek Ab Window
US5826441A (en) * 1997-06-06 1998-10-27 Daewoo Electronics Co., Ltd. Refrigerator having a device for generating air curtains
US6178966B1 (en) * 1998-04-16 2001-01-30 John E. Breshears Heat and moisture exchange apparatus for architectural applications
US6234892B1 (en) * 1996-03-17 2001-05-22 Siemens Duewag Schienenfahrzeuge Gmbh Device for producing hot air curtains for door openings in local transit vehicle
US6347527B1 (en) * 1997-12-02 2002-02-19 Louis J. Bailey Integrated system for heating, cooling and heat recovery ventilation
US20030034156A1 (en) * 1999-12-03 2003-02-20 Michael Gondouin Multi-function apparatus for adding a branch well sealed liner and connector to an existing cased well at low cost
US7158863B1 (en) * 2004-03-18 2007-01-02 Berner International Corporation Programmable controller for condition air curtains
US7270600B2 (en) * 2003-06-12 2007-09-18 Lidartech Co., Ltd Window having a ventilation equipment
US20070240372A1 (en) * 2006-03-29 2007-10-18 Bernhard Buhlmann Window area
US20080098759A1 (en) * 2006-10-26 2008-05-01 David Kuo Dualpower temperature regulation system
US7641545B2 (en) * 2006-07-19 2010-01-05 Purdue Research Foundation Ventilated window for indoor air quality improvement in buildings
US8087980B2 (en) * 2006-05-24 2012-01-03 American Innovative Research Corp. Positive air pressure isolation system
US20120003913A1 (en) * 2010-07-01 2012-01-05 Shaffer Melvin E Air barrier
US8397449B2 (en) * 2007-12-29 2013-03-19 Lg Hausys, Ltd. Double window having ventilation function

Patent Citations (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2960924A (en) * 1957-11-14 1960-11-22 Frank S Grott Air distributing conduit system for portable air conditioners
US3247894A (en) * 1964-06-03 1966-04-26 Vaughn Bldg Co Of Ohio Air conditioning system
US3638372A (en) * 1969-07-02 1972-02-01 Carl Rosenthal Window sash rebate profile with a condensate reception gutter
US3925945A (en) * 1973-11-23 1975-12-16 Walter S White Heat exchanger window
US4050443A (en) * 1975-06-27 1977-09-27 University Patents, Inc. Solar energy device and system
US4176788A (en) * 1978-04-12 1979-12-04 Holman William P Geothermal home construction
US4350200A (en) * 1978-07-24 1982-09-21 Mcelwain John A Solar energy collector and system
US4222436A (en) * 1978-12-21 1980-09-16 Dynatherm Corporation Heat exchange apparatus
US4331066A (en) * 1979-06-15 1982-05-25 Eltreva Ag Device for air conditioning a closed space
US4462459A (en) * 1980-07-22 1984-07-31 Eltreva Ag Device for air control of an energy facade wall
US4505259A (en) * 1981-08-17 1985-03-19 Ekono, Inc. Heat regulation system and method for building structure
US4523519A (en) * 1983-09-02 1985-06-18 Johnson Wilfred B Heating and cooling system using ground air
US4641466A (en) * 1983-11-09 1987-02-10 Oy Partek Ab Window
US6234892B1 (en) * 1996-03-17 2001-05-22 Siemens Duewag Schienenfahrzeuge Gmbh Device for producing hot air curtains for door openings in local transit vehicle
US5826441A (en) * 1997-06-06 1998-10-27 Daewoo Electronics Co., Ltd. Refrigerator having a device for generating air curtains
US6347527B1 (en) * 1997-12-02 2002-02-19 Louis J. Bailey Integrated system for heating, cooling and heat recovery ventilation
US6178966B1 (en) * 1998-04-16 2001-01-30 John E. Breshears Heat and moisture exchange apparatus for architectural applications
US20030034156A1 (en) * 1999-12-03 2003-02-20 Michael Gondouin Multi-function apparatus for adding a branch well sealed liner and connector to an existing cased well at low cost
US7270600B2 (en) * 2003-06-12 2007-09-18 Lidartech Co., Ltd Window having a ventilation equipment
US7158863B1 (en) * 2004-03-18 2007-01-02 Berner International Corporation Programmable controller for condition air curtains
US20070240372A1 (en) * 2006-03-29 2007-10-18 Bernhard Buhlmann Window area
US8087980B2 (en) * 2006-05-24 2012-01-03 American Innovative Research Corp. Positive air pressure isolation system
US7641545B2 (en) * 2006-07-19 2010-01-05 Purdue Research Foundation Ventilated window for indoor air quality improvement in buildings
US20080098759A1 (en) * 2006-10-26 2008-05-01 David Kuo Dualpower temperature regulation system
US8397449B2 (en) * 2007-12-29 2013-03-19 Lg Hausys, Ltd. Double window having ventilation function
US20120003913A1 (en) * 2010-07-01 2012-01-05 Shaffer Melvin E Air barrier

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4143640A (en) Venetian-blind solar collector
US4029258A (en) Solar energy collector
US4261330A (en) Solar heat collector
US7028685B1 (en) Air conditioning system for buildings and air-conditioned building, especially a zero energy house
US3859980A (en) Solar heater
US6959520B2 (en) Demand side management structures
US4141339A (en) Solar heat collector
US4062346A (en) Solar collector unit
US4527548A (en) Window blind type solar collector
US4212289A (en) Solar shutter or blind system for windows
US4090494A (en) Solar collector
US4038967A (en) Solar heating system and components thereof
US4126270A (en) Solar energy collection system
US4301787A (en) Solar heat collector
US4127973A (en) Solar-heated concrete slab building structure
Gratia et al. Guidelines for improving natural daytime ventilation in an office building with a double-skin facade
US4128204A (en) Inhabitable enclosure and methods relating thereto
US4679406A (en) Heat-insulating window
US20120149291A1 (en) Thermogenic Augmentation System
US20070148379A1 (en) High R-value window unit
US4098262A (en) Heating apparatus using solar energy
US4046133A (en) Solar panel assembly for fluid heating and method
US4462459A (en) Device for air control of an energy facade wall
US3910490A (en) Solar energy heat and cooling system
US4355676A (en) Movable glazing and insulation for windows