US20130298355A1 - Climbing equipment to inhibit access to climbing route and methods to use the same - Google Patents

Climbing equipment to inhibit access to climbing route and methods to use the same Download PDF

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Publication number
US20130298355A1
US20130298355A1 US13/917,494 US201313917494A US2013298355A1 US 20130298355 A1 US20130298355 A1 US 20130298355A1 US 201313917494 A US201313917494 A US 201313917494A US 2013298355 A1 US2013298355 A1 US 2013298355A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
climbing
barrier sheet
carabiner
piece
receiver
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Abandoned
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US13/917,494
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Richard Johnston
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Vertical World Inc
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Vertical World Inc
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Priority to US13/917,494 priority Critical patent/US20130298355A1/en
Publication of US20130298355A1 publication Critical patent/US20130298355A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B29/00Apparatus for mountaineering
    • A63B29/02Mountain guy-ropes or accessories, e.g. avalanche ropes; Means for indicating the location of accidentally buried, e.g. snow-buried, persons
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/0048Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for mountaineering, e.g. climbing-walls, grip elements for climbing-walls
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2225/00Miscellaneous features of sport apparatus, devices or equipment
    • A63B2225/72Means preventing unauthorised use, e.g. by lowering a tennis net
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T24/00Buckles, buttons, clasps, etc.
    • Y10T24/31Plural fasteners having intermediate flaccid connector

Abstract

A piece of equipment for climbing includes a barrier sheet, a carabiner receiver, and at least one anchor receiver. The barrier sheet has at least one lateral dimension that is sufficiently wide to effectively block access to hand holds at least at a start of a climbing route on a portion of the climbing wall when the carabiner is received by the carabiner receiver and a piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope to which the carabiner is physically coupled is under tension. Related methods of use and kits of the climbing equipment are also provided.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • 1. Technical Field
  • The present disclosure generally relates to climbing equipment, and more particularly, to climbing equipment that inhibits access to climbing routes.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Rock climbing is a popular sport that attracts climbers of all ages with various degrees of proficiency. Climbers may engage in rock climbing in an outdoor environment or in indoor gymnasiums. Outdoor environments typically include natural rock, while indoor gymnasiums typically include artificial climbing walls. The artificial walls often consist of plywood, with a textured surface, and numerous fastener openings. Climbing routes are established on an artificial wall by fastening artificial holds to the artificial wall with a threaded fastener.
  • In order to provide climbers with a safe climbing environment, precautionary techniques, commonly referred to as belaying are utilized. When manual belaying, a first climbing partner acts as an anchor and controls one end of a climbing rope while a second climbing partner tied to the other end of the climbing rope climbs. The stationary first climbing partner controls the feeding of the climbing rope as the second climbing partner ascends. During a fall, the stationary first climbing partner stops the feeding of the rope, limiting or braking the climber's fall. As a standard part of manual belaying, the climbing partners check each other's setup prior to starting to climb. Thus, each partner will check to ensure the other climber has correctly tied or physically coupled (i.e., “roped in”) into the climbing rope. This double check protocol is a key component to preventing accidents.
  • When auto-belaying, a single climber typically physically couples an end of a piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope to his or her harness (i.e., “ropes in”), for example via a carabiner. The other end of piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope is coupled to an auto-belay device. The auto-belay device is typically a mechanical device, such as an arrangement of hydraulically operated pulleys or an arrangement of spring loaded reels, for instance an inertial clutch. The auto-belay device automatically retracts climbing rope as the climber ascends, removing slack from the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope. In the event of a fall, the auto-belay device deploys or pays out webbing, cable or climbing rope at a controlled rate, thereby controlling a speed at which the climber falls. In contrast to manual belaying, when using an auto-belay device there typically is no partner to check and confirm that the climber has correctly physically coupled his or her harness to the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope. Even experience climbers may forget to “rope in” at times, and start to climb without realizing that they are not actually belayed.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY
  • In one aspect, the pieces of climbing equipment, kits, and methods are directed to inhibiting a climber's access to climbing routes, for example climbing routes that are protected by auto-belay devices in such a manner that the climber has to take some affirmative action prior to ascending.
  • One aspect of a piece of climbing equipment may be summarized as including a barrier sheet, a carabiner receiver, and at least one anchor receiver. The barrier sheet may have a top portion, a bottom portion vertically opposed across the barrier sheet from the top portion, and at least one lateral dimension.
  • The carabiner receiver may be at least proximate to the top portion, with the carbineer receiver having an opening sized and dimensioned to removably receive at least a portion of the carabiner therethrough.
  • The at least one anchor receiver may be at least proximate to the bottom portion, with each of the at least one anchor receiver having an opening sized and dimensioned to receive a stem portion of an anchor fastener therethrough and to prevent passage of a head portion of the anchor fastener therethrough, to fixedly anchor the barrier sheet to at least one of a floor or a climbing wall proximate the floor.
  • Further, the at least one lateral dimension of the barrier sheet may be sufficiently wide to effectively block access to a climbing route on a portion of the climbing wall when the carabiner is received by the carabiner receiver, and a piece of webbing, a cable or a climbing rope to which the carabiner is physically coupled is under tension.
  • In other aspects, a kit to secure climbing routes on climbing walls may be summarized as including a number of anchor fasteners and a barrier. The barrier may include a barrier sheet which is triangular in shape, a carabiner receiver, and at least one anchor receiver. The barrier sheet may have a top portion, a bottom portion, and at least one lateral dimension. The carabiner receiver may be at least proximate the top portion, with the carbineer receiver having an opening sized and dimensioned to removably receive at least a portion of the carabiner therethrough. The at least one anchor receiver may be at least proximate the bottom portion, with each of the at least one anchor receiver having an opening sized and dimensioned to receive a stem portion of an anchor fastener therethrough and to prevent passage of a head portion of the anchor fastener therethrough, to fixedly anchor the barrier sheet to at least one of a floor or a climbing wall proximate the floor. The kit may also include a tether, an additional carabiner for the tether, and additional fastener(s) for the tether.
  • Further, the at least one lateral dimension of the barrier sheet may be sufficiently wide to effectively block access to a climbing route on a portion of the climbing wall when the carabiner is received by the carabiner receiver and a piece of webbing, a cable or a climbing rope to which the carabiner is physically coupled is under tension.
  • In a further aspect, a method of use of a piece of equipment for climbing may be summarized as including positioning a barrier sheet in front of a climbing route on a climbing wall, with the barrier sheet having a top portion, a bottom portion vertically opposed across the barrier sheet from the top portion, and at least one lateral dimension. The method may include anchoring the bottom portion of the barrier sheet to at least one of a floor or the climbing wall proximate the floor in front of the climbing route. The method may further include detachably coupling the top portion of the barrier sheet to a carabiner coupled to a piece of webbing, a cable or a climbing rope that is for the climbing route.
  • In another aspect, the method may also include removing the carabiner from a carabiner receiver to gain access to the climbing route. In a still further aspect, the method may include attaching the carabiner to a climbing harness after removing the carabiner from the carabiner receiver, with the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope attached to the climbing wall via an auto-belay device; detaching the carabiner from the climbing harness after climbing; and reattaching the carabiner to the top portion of the barrier sheet after detaching the carabiner from the climbing harness to subsequently deny access to the climbing route.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • In the drawings, identical reference numbers identify similar elements. For clarity of illustration, similar elements within a figure may only be called out for a representative element of similar elements. Of course, any number of similar elements may be included in the barrier sheets, and the number of similar elements shown in a drawing is intended to be illustrative, not limiting. The sizes and relative positions of elements in the drawings are not necessarily drawn to scale. For example, the shapes of various elements and angles are not drawn to scale, and some of these elements are arbitrarily enlarged and positioned to improve drawing legibility. Further, the particular shapes of the elements as drawn have been solely selected for ease of recognition in the drawings.
  • FIG. 1A is an isometric environmental view showing a barrier sheet installed to a climbing wall and an auto-belay device, wherein the barrier sheet is inhibiting a climber's access to a climbing route.
  • FIG. 1B is an enlarged isometric view showing a threaded receiving hole in the climbing wall and a complementary anchor bolt to couple the barrier sheet to the climbing wall.
  • FIG. 1C is an enlarged isometric view showing a threaded fastener extending through a climbing hold.
  • FIG. 2 is an isometric environmental view of the barrier sheet of FIG. 1 in the uninstalled position, wherein the auto-belay device is attached to a climber's harness prior to the climber embarking on the climbing route.
  • FIG. 3 is a plan view of a barrier sheet to inhibit access to the climbing route, according to another embodiment.
  • FIG. 4 is a plan view of a barrier sheet to inhibit access to the climbing route, according to yet another embodiment.
  • FIG. 5 is a plan view of a barrier sheet to inhibit access to the climbing route, according to yet another embodiment.
  • FIG. 6 is a plan view of a barrier sheet to inhibit access to the climbing route, according to yet another embodiment.
  • FIG. 7 is a plan view of a barrier sheet to inhibit access to the climbing route, according to yet another embodiment.
  • FIG. 8 is a plan view of a barrier sheet to inhibit access to the climbing route, according to yet another embodiment.
  • FIG. 9 is a plan view of a barrier sheet to inhibit access to the climbing route, according to yet another embodiment.
  • FIG. 10 is a plan view of a barrier sheet to inhibit access to the climbing route, according to yet another embodiment.
  • FIG. 11 is a plan view of a barrier sheet to inhibit access to the climbing route, according to yet another embodiment.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The following detailed description is directed toward climbing equipment and methods to inhibit access to climbing routes, particularly where an auto-belay device is employed. The following detailed description and corresponding figures are intended to provide an individual of ordinary skill in the art with enough information to enable that individual to make and use embodiments of the invention. Such an individual, however, having read this entire detailed description and reviewed the figures, will appreciate that modifications can be made to the illustrated and described embodiments, and/or elements removed therefrom, without deviating from the spirit of the invention. It is intended that all such modifications and deviations fall within the scope of the invention, to the extent they are within the scope of the associated claims.
  • Unless the context requires otherwise, throughout the specification and claims which follow, the word “comprise” and variations thereof, such as, “comprises” and “comprising” are to be construed in an open, inclusive sense, that is, as “including, but not limited to.”
  • Reference throughout this specification to “one embodiment” or “an embodiment” means that a particular feature, structure or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least one embodiment. Thus, the appearances of the phrases “in one embodiment” or “in an embodiment” in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment. Furthermore, the particular features, structures, or characteristics may be combined in any suitable manner in one or more embodiments.
  • As used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a,” “an,” and “the” include plural referents unless the content clearly dictates otherwise. It should also be noted that the term “or” is generally employed in its sense including “and/or” unless the content clearly dictates otherwise.
  • FIG. 1A shows an indoor climbing facility 100, such as an indoor climbing gym. The indoor climbing facility 100 includes a climbing wall 110 that is oriented generally vertically with respect to a structural floor 120 of the indoor climbing facility 100 and extending to a ceiling 170. Although the climbing wall 110 shown is substantially flat, as can be appreciated by a person having ordinary skill in the relevant art, the climbing wall 110 may include a textured surface, and may also include one or more features replicating rocks, ridges, aretes, roofs, cracks, etc. While described as generally vertical, climbing walls may be angled with respect to a structural floor 120, for example sloped at a positive angle or overhanging at a negative angle.
  • The climbing wall 110 includes a plurality of threaded apertures 112 spread across the climbing wall 110. The threaded apertures are typically in a grid or two-dimensional array pattern, although such is not necessary. However, these threaded apertures 112 are provided to allow the attachment of artificial climbing holds 114 to the climbing wall 110. As best seen in FIG. 1C, a climbing hold 114 may include one or more apertures 113 (one shown) extending therethrough. A fastener 116, for example a threaded bolt, extends through this aperture 113 in order to fasten the climbing hold 114 to the climbing wall 110 via the threaded apertures 112. More particularly, the climbing holds 114 are used to define a climbing route 130. In order for a climber 132 to climb the climbing wall 110, the climber 132 uses the climbing holds 114 to grab or step on as the climber 132 ascends the climbing wall 110. Positioning the climbing holds 114 over the climbing wall 110 in a particular pattern defines the climbing route 130 taken by the climber 132.
  • With continued reference to FIG. 1A, the indoor climbing facility 100 also includes one or more auto-belay devices 150 (one shown). The auto-belay device 150 may be installed physically coupled to the climbing wall 110, or alternatively to a ceiling 170 of the indoor climbing facility 100. An upper end of a piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152 is coupled to the auto-belay device 150 with a lower end of the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152 hanging down at least to a point reachable by a climber while on the structural floor 120. Typically a carabiner 153 is coupled to the lower end of the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152. When not in use, the lower end of the climbing rope 152 is typically anchored to the climbing wall 110 or structural floor 120, the auto-belay device 150 maintaining tension in the climbing rope. When in use, the climber 132 is coupled to the lower end of the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152, typically via the carabiner 153 which is coupled to a climbing harness 142 worn by the climber 132. In use, the auto-belay device 150 retracts or reels in the climbing rope 152 to take up slack as the climber 132 ascends and/or to control the climber's 132 descent or fall.
  • To prevent a climber from accidentally forgetting to “rope in” before starting to climb, the indoor climbing facility 100 may employ a piece of equipment or barrier 140 which is the subject of this application. The piece of equipment or barrier 140 includes a barrier sheet 160. The barrier sheet 160 is positioned at least proximal to the structural floor 120 and supported such that the barrier sheet 160 blocks access to the initial hand holds 114 or lower portion of the climbing route 130.
  • The barrier sheet 160 may have at least one longitudinal dimension 142 and at least one lateral dimension 144. The longitudinal dimension 142 extends generally upward from at least proximate the structural floor 120 when the barrier sheet 160 is positioned to limit access to a climbing route 130 on the climbing wall 110. The lateral dimension 144 should be sufficiently large as to effectively prevent, limit or deter access to a start of the climbing route 130 on the climbing wall 110 when the barrier sheet 160 is positioned with the longitudinal dimension 142 extending generally upward from at least proximate the structural floor 120. The lateral dimension 144 of the barrier sheet 160 may, for example, be larger at or proximate a bottom portion 162 of the barrier sheet 160 than at or proximate a top portion 164. Although the barrier sheet 160 is illustrated in FIG. 1A as triangularly shaped, with the bottom portion 162 larger than the top portion 164, in other embodiments, the top portion 164 may be larger than the bottom portion 162. Further, the barrier sheet 160 may have any of a large variety of shapes, such as in a semi-circular fashion, rectangular fashion, circular fashion, or the like. Still further, the barrier sheet 160 may extend between a range of 3 feet to 8 feet in the lateral dimension 144 and/or the longitudinal dimension 142. A range of between 3 feet to 8 feet, moreover, would be effective in covering for the various proportions of humans, particularly with respect to reach or arm span, to effectively block access to hand holds at a start of the climbing route 130.
  • The barrier sheet 160 is fixable at each distal end of the bottom portion 162 to the climbing wall 110 or structural floor 120. For example, an aperture 161 with a respective grommet 165 may be located at each distal end of the bottom portion 162. Similarly, the top portion 164, for instance an apex point of the barrier sheet 160, is fixable to the climbing wall 110 or structural floor 120. For example, one or more apertures 171 (one shown) with a respective grommet 165 may be located at the apex or top portion 164. While illustrated as including grommets 165, alternatively, the barrier sheet 160 may employ tabs or loops which may, or may not, include rings (e.g., O-ring, D-ring) or the like in lieu of grommets 165. Grommets 165 may be adjustable to accommodate various possible spacings between the threaded apertures 112 or attachment points on the climbing wall 110 or structual floor 120.
  • The bottom portion 162 may, instead of apertures 161 only at each distal end, include a plurality of fastener points (e.g., apertures 161 and grommets 165, tabs, loops, rings) positioned at, proximate, or along the bottom portion 162 in order to couple the bottom portion 162 of the barrier sheet 160 to the climbing wall 110 or the structural floor 120. Similarly, in other embodiments, the top portion 164 may also include a plurality of fastener points (e.g., apertures 171 and grommets 165, tabs, loops, rings) positioned at, proximate, or along the top portion 164 in order to detachably couple the top portion 164 of the barrier sheet 160 to the auto-belay device 150, for instance via a carabiner.
  • As shown in FIG. 1 B, fasteners 116 may be received through each fastener point (e.g., grommet 165, tab, loop, ring) of the bottom portion 162 to couple the bottom portion 162 of the barrier sheet 160 to the climbing wall 110 via the threaded apertures 112. The fasteners 116 may have a head and a stem, the stem partially or fully threaded. The head may be an Allen head, a hex-head, or the like. More particularly, the aperture 161 is sized such that only a stem portion of the fastener 116 extends therethrough and also prevents passage of the head portion of the fastener 116 through the aperture 161. Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 1 B, the fasteners 116 may fasten the bottom portion 162 of the barrier sheet 160, to the structural floor 120 via threaded apertures 112 of the structural floor 120.
  • With reference to FIGS. 1A and 2, the fastener point (e.g., grommet 165, tab, loop, ring) at or proximate the top portion 164 of the barrier sheet 160 is sized and dimensioned to receive a carabiner 153 located at the end of the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152. Once the top portion 164 of the barrier sheet 160 is coupled to the carabiner 153, the tension in the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152 produced by the auto-belay device 150 supports the barrier sheet 160 in a generally upright stance. Thus, the barrier sheet 160 blocks access to at least hand holds that form a start of the climbing route 130. To gain access to the climbing route 130, the climber would have to uncouple the top portion 164 of the barrier sheet 160 from the carabiner 153 prior to ascending. As shown in FIG. 2, the climber 132 uncouples the top portion 164 of the barrier sheet 160 from the carabiner 153 and piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152, which results in the barrier sheet 160 being unsupported, exposing hand holds at least at the start of the climbing route 130. At this point the unsupported barrier sheet 160 may be spread out on the floor. Notably, since the barrier sheet 160 is often spread out on the floor and may be repeatedly stepped on, the barrier sheet 160 should be made of wear-resistant materials, for instance reinforced polyester or nylon. More particularly, as the climber 132 has to grab and manipulate the carabiner 153 to gain access to the climbing route 130, the climber 132 is more likely to remember to couple the carabiner 153 to the climber's harness 146, rather than ascend without coupling to the auto-belay device 150. Should the climber fail to secure the carabiner 153 to their harness, and lets go of the carabiner 153, the auto-belay device 150 will retract, pulling the end of the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152 to the top of the wall. This requires someone to climb the route without using the auto-belay device 152 to retrieve the end of the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152. Climbers typically attempt to avoid getting a caught in such an embarrassing situation. This approach at least in part may advantageously remedy the loss of the double-check protocol used in manual belay situations.
  • While not illustrated in FIG. 1A, in a typically installation one end of a tether is fastened to the climbing wall 110 via a fastener 116, with a carabiner at the other end of the tether. The carabiner is coupled to the end of the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152, preventing the climbing rope from being retracted by the auto-belay device 150 should the climber 132 unintentionally lets go of the climbing rope while roping in to climb. The climber 132 may release or untether the piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152 after securing the end of the climbing rope 152 to their own harness.
  • FIG. 3 shows an alternate embodiment of a barrier sheet 260. The barrier sheet 260 is triangularly shaped. The barrier sheet 260 extends laterally to form a bottom portion 262 and extends longitudinally with respect to the bottom portion 262 to form a top portion 264. At each distal end of the bottom portion 262, an aperture 261 is provided with a grommet 265 and disposed around the aperture 261. At an apex of the barrier sheet 260, a loop 266 is coupled to the top portion 264 with a ring 267 secured to the loop 266. The loop may take the form of webbing or some other material. The ring 267 is sized and dimensioned to receive a portion of the carabiner therethrough, to support the barrier sheet 260 via tension in a piece of webbing, cable or climbing rope 152 (FIG. 1A).
  • FIG. 4 shows another alternate embodiment of a barrier sheet 360. The barrier sheet 360 is triangularly shaped. The barrier sheet 360 extends laterally to form a bottom portion 362 and extends longitudinally with respect to the bottom portion 362 to form a top portion 364. At each distal end of the bottom portion 362, a piece of webbing 363 extends therefrom. Similarly, at an apex of the barrier sheet 360, a piece of webbing 363 is coupled to the top portion 364. Each piece of webbing 363 may have respective apertures 361, 371 with a respective grommet 365 disposed therein. The grommets may be metal grommets to provide good strength and wear characteristics, particularly where metal fasteners or metal rings will be received.
  • FIG. 5 shows yet another alternate embodiment of a barrier sheet 460. The barrier sheet 460 is triangularly shaped. The barrier sheet 460 extends laterally to form a bottom portion 462 and extends longitudinally with respect to the bottom portion 462 to form a top portion 464. At each distal end of the bottom portion 462, a piece of webbing 463 is coupled thereto. Each piece of webbing 463 includes an aperture 461 with a respective grommet 465 received therein. An aperture 471 and a respective grommet 465 are located at a position proximal to an apex of the barrier sheet 460.
  • FIG. 6 shows yet another alternate embodiment of a barrier sheet 560. The barrier sheet 560 is triangularly shaped. The barrier sheet 560 extends laterally to form a top portion 564 and extends longitudinally with respect to the top portion 564 to form a bottom portion 562. A respective cable 568 is coupled at each distal end of the top portion 564 of the barrier sheet 560. Each respective cable 568 further extends angularly to intersect at an upper apex point 566, where the respective cables 568 are coupled to a ring 567. An aperture 561 with a respective grommet 565 is located at a position proximal to a bottom apex 563 of the bottom portion 562 of the barrier sheet 560.
  • FIG. 7 shows yet another alternate embodiment of a barrier sheet 660. The barrier sheet 660 is triangularly shaped. The barrier sheet 660 extends laterally to form a top portion 664 and extends longitudinally with respect to the top portion 664 to form a bottom portion 662. At an upper edge 667 of the top portion 664, a loop 666 is disposed around the upper edge 667. The loop 666 is sized and dimensioned to receive a rod 669 therethrough in order to provide rigidity to the barrier sheet 660. The upper edge 667 further includes a piece of webbing 663 centrally positioned and coupled thereto. The piece of webbing 663 includes at least one aperture 671 with a respective grommet 665. An aperture 661 with a respective grommet 665 is located at a position proximal to an apex of the bottom portion 662.
  • FIG. 8 shows yet another alternate embodiment of a barrier sheet 760. The barrier sheet 760 is triangularly shaped. The barrier sheet 760 extends laterally to form a top portion 764 and extends longitudinally with respect to the top portion 764 to form a bottom portion 762. At an upper edge 767 of the top portion 764, a loop 766 is disposed around the upper edge 767. The loop 766 is sized and dimensioned to receive a rod 769 therethrough in order to provide rigidity to the barrier sheet 760. The upper edge 767 includes a piece of webbing 763 centrally positioned and coupled thereto. A cable 768 is coupled to the piece of webbing 763 and extends vertically therefrom, with a distal end with respect to the upper edge 767 coupled to a ring 770. An aperture 761 with a respective grommet 765 is located at a position proximal to an apex of the bottom portion 762 of the barrier sheet 760.
  • FIG. 9 shows yet another alternate embodiment of a barrier sheet 860. The barrier sheet 860 is triangularly shaped. The barrier sheet 860 extends laterally to form a top portion 864 and extends longitudinally with respect to the top portion 864 to form a bottom portion 862. A respective cable 868 is coupled at each distal end of the top portion 864. Each respective cable 868 further extends angularly to intersect at an upper apex point 866, where the respective cables 868 are coupled to a ring 867. A piece of webbing 863 extends from a position proximal to an apex of the bottom portion 862 of the barrier sheet 860. A cable 878 is coupled to the piece of webbing 863 and extends vertically therefrom, with a distal end with respect to the apex of the bottom portion 862 coupled to a ring 870.
  • FIG. 10 shows yet another alternate embodiment of a barrier sheet 960. The barrier sheet 960 is triangularly shaped. The barrier sheet 960 extends laterally to form a top portion 964 and extends longitudinally with respect to the top portion 964 to form a bottom portion 962. At an upper edge 967 of the top portion 964, a loop 966 is disposed around the upper edge 967. The loop 966 is sized and dimensioned to receive a rod 969 therethrough in order to provide rigidity to the barrier sheet 960. A piece of webbing 963 extends from the upper edge 967, centrally positioned therealong. The piece of webbing 963 includes an aperture 971 and a respective grommet 965. A piece of webbing 973 extends from a position proximal to an apex of the bottom portion 962 of the barrier sheet 960. A cable 978 is coupled to the piece of webbing 973 and extends vertically therefrom, with a distal end with respect to the apex of the bottom portion 962 coupled to a ring 970.
  • FIG. 11 shows yet another alternate embodiment of a barrier sheet 1060. The barrier sheet 1060 is triangularly shaped. The barrier sheet 1060 extends laterally to form a top portion 1064 and extends longitudinally with respect to the top portion 1064 to form a bottom portion 1062. At an upper edge 1067 of the top portion 1064, a loop 1066 is disposed around the upper edge 1067. The loop 1066 is sized and dimensioned to receive a rod 1069 therethrough in order to provide rigidity to the barrier sheet 1060. A piece of webbing 1063 extends from the upper edge 1067 of the barrier sheet 960, centrally positioned therealong. A cable 1068 is coupled to the piece of webbing 1063 and extends vertically therefrom. A ring 1070 is coupled to a distal end of the piece of webbing 1063, with respect to the upper edge 1067. A piece of webbing 1073 extends from a position proximal to an apex of the bottom portion 1062. A cable 1078 is coupled to the piece of webbing 1073 and extends vertically therefrom. A ring 1072 is coupled to a distal end of the piece of webbing 1073, with respect to the apex of the bottom portion 1062.
  • Various components described herein may advantageously provided as a kit. The kit may, for example, include a barrier sheet with anchor receivers, a set of fasteners to fasten the barrier sheet to a climbing wall or floor, one or more carabiners, and instructions. The kit may also include a tether, an additional carabiner for the tether, and additional fastener(s) for the tether.
  • Various triangular shaped embodiments of barrier sheets have been illustrated. However barrier sheets with other shapes may be employed, including square, rectangular, parallelogram, rhombus, circular, oval, U-shaped, etc.
  • Moreover, the various embodiments described above can be combined to provide further embodiments. All of the U.S. patents, U.S. patent application publications, U.S. patent applications, foreign patents, foreign patent applications and non-patent publications referred to in this specification and/or listed in the Application Data Sheet are incorporated herein by reference, in their entirety. Aspects of the embodiments can be modified, if necessary to employ concepts of the various patents, applications and publications to provide yet further embodiments.
  • These and other changes can be made to the embodiments in light of the above-detailed description. In general, in the following claims, the terms used should not be construed to limit the claims to the specific embodiments disclosed in the specification and the claims, but should be construed to include all possible embodiments along with the full scope of equivalents to which such claims are entitled. Accordingly, the claims are not limited by the disclosure.

Claims (20)

1. A piece of equipment for climbing, comprising:
a barrier sheet having a top portion, a bottom portion vertically opposed across the barrier sheet from the top portion, and at least one lateral dimension;
a carabiner receiver at least proximate the top portion, the carbineer receiver having an opening sized and dimensioned to removably receive at least a portion of a carabiner therethrough; and
at least one anchor receiver at least proximate the bottom portion, each of the at least one anchor receiver having an opening sized and dimensioned to receive a stem portion of an anchor fastener therethrough and to prevent passage of a head portion of the anchor fastener therethrough, to fixedly anchor the barrier sheet to at least one of a floor or a climbing wall proximate the floor,
the at least one lateral dimension of the barrier sheet being sufficiently wide to effectively block access to hand holds at least at a start of a climbing route on a portion of the climbing wall when the carabiner is received by the carabiner receiver, and a piece of webbing, a cable or a climbing rope to which the carabiner is physically coupled is under tension.
2. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 1 wherein the carabiner receiver is a ring.
3. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 2, further comprising:
at least one piece of webbing physically coupled to the top portion of the barrier sheet, wherein the ring is physically coupled to the barrier sheet by the at least one piece of webbing.
4. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 3 wherein the at least one anchor receiver includes a plurality of grommets.
5. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 4, further comprising:
a plurality of pieces of webbing physically coupled along a bottom edge of the barrier sheet, wherein the at least one anchor receiver is at least one respective grommet fixed in the barrier sheet by a respective one of the plurality of pieces of webbing.
6. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 3 wherein the at least one anchor receiver includes at least one grommet fixed in the barrier sheet.
7. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 1 wherein the bottom portion of the barrier sheet is laterally larger than the top portion, and the at least one anchor receiver includes a first anchor receiver located at least proximate a left lateral edge of the barrier sheet and a second anchor receiver located at least proximate a right lateral edge of the barrier sheet.
8. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 7 wherein the barrier sheet is triangular, and further comprising:
at least one reinforcement web extending about a periphery of the barrier sheet and fixed thereto.
9. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 1 wherein the top portion of the barrier sheet is laterally larger than the bottom portion, and further comprising:
at least two tension members each attached to the barrier sheet at least proximate a top edge thereof and physically coupled to the carabiner receiver.
10. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 9 wherein the barrier sheet is triangular.
11. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 1 wherein the top portion of the barrier sheet is laterally larger than the top bottom portion, and further comprising:
at least a rod supportingly coupled to the barrier sheet extending laterally across the barrier sheet at least proximate a top edge of the barrier sheet.
12. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 11 wherein the barrier sheet is triangular.
13. The piece of equipment for climbing of claim 11 wherein the at least one lateral dimension of the barrier sheet sufficiently wide to effectively block access to hand holds at least at a start of a climbing route is at least 3 feet wide.
14. A kit for securing climbing routes on climbing walls, the kit comprising:
a number of anchor fasteners; and
a barrier, the barrier comprising:
a barrier sheet which is triangular in shape, having a top portion, a bottom portion, and at least one lateral dimension;
a carabiner receiver at least proximate the top portion, the carbineer receiver having an opening sized and dimensioned to removably receive at least a portion of a carabiner therethrough; and
at least one anchor receiver at least proximate the bottom portion, each of the at least one anchor receiver having an opening sized and dimensioned to receive a stem portion of an anchor fastener therethrough and to prevent passage of a head portion of the anchor fastener therethrough, to fixedly anchor the barrier sheet to at least one of a floor or a climbing wall proximate the floor,
the at least one lateral dimension of the barrier sheet sufficiently wide to effectively block access to a climbing route on a portion of the climbing wall when the carabiner is received by the carabiner receiver and a piece of webbing, a cable or a climbing rope to which the carabiner is physically coupled is under tension.
15. The kit of claim 14 wherein the top portion is at an apex of the triangular barrier sheet and the bottom portion extends along an edge of the triangular barrier sheet, opposite the apex.
16. The kit of claim 15 wherein the carabiner receiver is a ring coupled at least proximate the apex of the triangular barrier sheet with respect to the bottom portion and the anchor receiver includes a plurality of grommets coupled at least proximate the edge of the triangular barrier sheet, opposite the apex.
17. The kit of claim 14, further comprising:
a climbing carabiner; and
a tether.
18. A method of use of a piece of equipment for climbing, the method comprising:
positioning a barrier sheet in front of a climbing route on a climbing wall, the barrier sheet having a top portion, a bottom portion vertically opposed across the barrier sheet from the top portion, and at least one lateral dimension;
anchoring the bottom portion of the barrier sheet to at least one of a floor or the climbing wall proximate the floor in front of the climbing route; and
detachably coupling the top portion of the barrier sheet to a carabiner coupled to a piece of webbing, a cable or a climbing rope that is for the climbing route.
19. The method of claim 18, further comprising:
removing the carabiner from a carabiner receiver to gain access to the climbing route.
20. The method of claim 19, further comprising:
attaching the carabiner to a climbing harness after removing the carabiner from the carabiner receiver, the piece of webbing, the cable or the climbing rope attached to the climbing wall via an auto-belay device;
detaching the carabiner from the climbing harness after climbing; and
reattaching the carabiner to the top portion of the barrier sheet after detaching the carabiner from the climbing harness to subsequently deny access to the climbing route.
US13/917,494 2013-06-13 2013-06-13 Climbing equipment to inhibit access to climbing route and methods to use the same Abandoned US20130298355A1 (en)

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Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1670936A (en) * 1923-11-24 1928-05-22 Mcintyre Malcolm Sailing craft
US2499598A (en) * 1948-04-30 1950-03-07 James A Maurer Sail construction
US20090145013A1 (en) * 2005-08-25 2009-06-11 Mccudden Lachlan Arthur Dean Banner Support System

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1670936A (en) * 1923-11-24 1928-05-22 Mcintyre Malcolm Sailing craft
US2499598A (en) * 1948-04-30 1950-03-07 James A Maurer Sail construction
US20090145013A1 (en) * 2005-08-25 2009-06-11 Mccudden Lachlan Arthur Dean Banner Support System

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