US20130264010A1 - PCB Droplet Actuator Fabrication - Google Patents

PCB Droplet Actuator Fabrication Download PDF

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Publication number
US20130264010A1
US20130264010A1 US13618322 US201213618322A US2013264010A1 US 20130264010 A1 US20130264010 A1 US 20130264010A1 US 13618322 US13618322 US 13618322 US 201213618322 A US201213618322 A US 201213618322A US 2013264010 A1 US2013264010 A1 US 2013264010A1
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metal layer
method
layer
further
droplet
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Abandoned
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US13618322
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Vijay Srinivasan
Vamsee K. Pamula
Michael G. Pollack
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Advanced Liquid Logic Inc
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Advanced Liquid Logic Inc
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K3/00Apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits
    • H05K3/40Forming printed elements for providing electric connections to or between printed circuits
    • H05K3/4038Through-connections or via connections
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L3/00Containers or dishes for laboratory use, e.g. laboratory glassware; Droppers
    • B01L3/50Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes
    • B01L3/502Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures
    • B01L3/5027Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip
    • B01L3/502707Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip characterised by the manufacture of the container or its components
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L3/00Containers or dishes for laboratory use, e.g. laboratory glassware; Droppers
    • B01L3/50Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes
    • B01L3/502Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures
    • B01L3/5027Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip
    • B01L3/502769Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip characterised by multiphase flow arrangements
    • B01L3/502784Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip characterised by multiphase flow arrangements specially adapted for droplet or plug flow, e.g. digital microfluidics
    • B01L3/502792Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip characterised by multiphase flow arrangements specially adapted for droplet or plug flow, e.g. digital microfluidics for moving individual droplets on a plate, e.g. by locally altering surface tension
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K1/00Printed circuits
    • H05K1/02Details
    • H05K1/11Printed elements for providing electric connections to or between printed circuits
    • H05K1/111Pads for surface mounting, e.g. lay-out
    • H05K1/112Pads for surface mounting, e.g. lay-out directly combined with via connections
    • H05K1/113Via provided in pad; Pad over filled via
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K3/00Apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits
    • H05K3/22Secondary treatment of printed circuits
    • H05K3/28Applying non-metallic protective coatings
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L2300/00Additional constructional details
    • B01L2300/08Geometry, shape and general structure
    • B01L2300/089Virtual walls for guiding liquids
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L2300/00Additional constructional details
    • B01L2300/12Specific details about materials
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L2400/00Moving or stopping fluids
    • B01L2400/04Moving fluids with specific forces or mechanical means
    • B01L2400/0403Moving fluids with specific forces or mechanical means specific forces
    • B01L2400/0415Moving fluids with specific forces or mechanical means specific forces electrical forces, e.g. electrokinetic
    • B01L2400/0427Electrowetting
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L3/00Containers or dishes for laboratory use, e.g. laboratory glassware; Droppers
    • B01L3/50Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes
    • B01L3/502Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures
    • B01L3/5027Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip
    • B01L3/502769Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip characterised by multiphase flow arrangements
    • B01L3/502784Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip characterised by multiphase flow arrangements specially adapted for droplet or plug flow, e.g. digital microfluidics
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K2201/00Indexing scheme relating to printed circuits covered by H05K1/00
    • H05K2201/09Shape and layout
    • H05K2201/09209Shape and layout details of conductors
    • H05K2201/095Conductive through-holes or vias
    • H05K2201/09509Blind vias, i.e. vias having one side closed
    • H05K2201/09527Inverse blind vias, i.e. bottoms outwards in multilayer PCB; Blind vias in centre of PCB having opposed bottoms
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K3/00Apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits
    • H05K3/0058Laminating printed circuit boards onto other substrates, e.g. metallic substrates
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K3/00Apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits
    • H05K3/0058Laminating printed circuit boards onto other substrates, e.g. metallic substrates
    • H05K3/0067Laminating printed circuit boards onto other substrates, e.g. metallic substrates onto an inorganic, non-metallic substrate
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K3/00Apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits
    • H05K3/40Forming printed elements for providing electric connections to or between printed circuits
    • H05K3/42Plated through-holes or plated via connections
    • H05K3/421Blind plated via connections
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K3/00Apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits
    • H05K3/40Forming printed elements for providing electric connections to or between printed circuits
    • H05K3/42Plated through-holes or plated via connections
    • H05K3/425Plated through-holes or plated via connections characterised by the sequence of steps for plating the through-holes or via connections in relation to the conductive pattern
    • H05K3/427Plated through-holes or plated via connections characterised by the sequence of steps for plating the through-holes or via connections in relation to the conductive pattern initial plating of through-holes in metal-clad substrates
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49002Electrical device making
    • Y10T29/49117Conductor or circuit manufacturing
    • Y10T29/49124On flat or curved insulated base, e.g., printed circuit, etc.
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49002Electrical device making
    • Y10T29/49117Conductor or circuit manufacturing
    • Y10T29/49124On flat or curved insulated base, e.g., printed circuit, etc.
    • Y10T29/49155Manufacturing circuit on or in base
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49002Electrical device making
    • Y10T29/49117Conductor or circuit manufacturing
    • Y10T29/49124On flat or curved insulated base, e.g., printed circuit, etc.
    • Y10T29/49155Manufacturing circuit on or in base
    • Y10T29/49165Manufacturing circuit on or in base by forming conductive walled aperture in base

Abstract

Alternative approaches to fabricating printed circuit boards for use in droplet actuator operations are provided. In one embodiment, a method of manufacturing a droplet actuator for conducting droplet operations includes positioning a dielectric material between a first metal layer configured to include an electrode and a second metal layer configured to include an interconnect pad. The method additionally includes forming a connection between the first and second metal layers. Droplet actuators and methods of fabricating and supporting printed circuit boards of droplet actuators are also provided.

Description

    1 RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This patent application is a continuation of and incorporates by reference U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/531,794, entitled “PCB Droplet Acutator Fabrication”, filed Oct. 15, 2009, which is a national stage entry of International Patent Application No. PCT/US2008/072770, filed Aug. 11, 2008, which and claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/954,841, filed on Aug. 9, 2007, entitled “PCB Droplet Actuator Fabrication,” the entire disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • 2 FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention generally relates to the field of conducting droplet operations in a droplet actuator. In particular, the present invention is directed to alternative approaches to fabricating printed circuit boards for use in droplet actuator operations.
  • 3 BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Droplet actuators are used to conduct a wide variety of droplet operations. A droplet actuator typically includes two plates separated by a gap. The plates include electrodes for conducting droplet operations. The space is typically filled with a filler fluid that is immiscible with the fluid that is to be manipulated on the droplet actuator. The formation and movement of droplets is controlled by electrodes for conducting a variety of droplet operations, such as droplet transport and droplet dispensing. One or both of the plates of the droplet actuator may be manufactured using a printed circuit board (“PCB”). As the functionality of the droplet actuator is dependent on, for example, the surface smoothness, topology, planarity, and florescence of the PCB layers that form the gap, there is a need for alternative approaches to fabricating PCBs to provide PCB droplet actuators with more desirable characteristics.
  • 4 BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to alternative approaches to fabricating printed circuit boards for use in droplet actuator operations.
  • In one embodiment, a method of manufacturing a droplet actuator for conducting droplet operations is provided. The method comprises positioning a dielectric material between a first metal layer configured to include an electrode and a second metal layer configured to include an interconnect pad. The method additionally comprises forming a connection between the first and second metal layers.
  • In another embodiment, a droplet actuator for conducting droplet operations is provided. The droplet actuator comprises a first plate that includes a first metal layer comprising an electrode, a second metal layer comprising an interconnect pad, a dielectric material positioned between the first and second metal layers, and a via connecting the electrode to the interconnect. The droplet actuator additionally comprises a second plate proximate the first plate and forming a gap therebetween that provides a fluid flow path for the droplet operations.
  • In a further embodiment, a method of fabricating and supporting a printed circuit board of a droplet actuator for conducting droplet operations is provided. The method comprises providing a core printed circuit board by positioning a dielectric material between a first metal layer configured to include an electrode and a second metal layer configured to include an interconnect pad, applying a photoresist layer onto the first metal layer and forming one or more openings in the dielectric material and the second metal layer, applying a photoresist layer onto the second metal layer and plating the one or more openings to form one or more blind vias, thereby forming a connection between the first and second metal layers. The method further comprises stripping the photoresist layer from both the first metal layer and the second metal layer, patterning the features on both the first metal layer and the second metal layer, applying an electrowetting dielectric layer to the first metal layer, and bonding a rigid support structure to the second metal layer.
  • 5 DEFINITIONS
  • As used herein, the following terms have the meanings indicated.
  • “Activate” with reference to one or more electrodes means effecting a change in the electrical state of the one or more electrodes which results in a droplet operation.
  • “Droplet” means a volume of liquid on a droplet actuator that is at least partially bounded by filler fluid. For example, a droplet may be completely surrounded by filler fluid or may be bounded by filler fluid and one or more surfaces of the droplet actuator. Droplets may take a wide variety of shapes; nonlimiting examples include generally disc shaped, slug shaped, truncated sphere, ellipsoid, spherical, partially compressed sphere, hemispherical, ovoid, cylindrical, and various shapes formed during droplet operations, such as merging or splitting or formed as a result of contact of such shapes with one or more surfaces of a droplet actuator.
  • “Droplet operation” means any manipulation of a droplet on a droplet actuator. A droplet operation may, for example, include: loading a droplet into the droplet actuator; dispensing one or more droplets from a source droplet; splitting, separating or dividing a droplet into two or more droplets; transporting a droplet from one location to another in any direction; merging or combining two or more droplets into a single droplet; diluting a droplet; mixing a droplet; agitating a droplet; deforming a droplet; retaining a droplet in position; incubating a droplet; heating a droplet; vaporizing a droplet; cooling a droplet; disposing of a droplet; transporting a droplet out of a droplet actuator; other droplet operations described herein; and/or any combination of the foregoing. The terms “merge,” “merging,” “combine,” “combining” and the like are used to describe the creation of one droplet from two or more droplets. It should be understood that when such a term is used in reference to two or more droplets, any combination of droplet operations that are sufficient to result in the combination of the two or more droplets into one droplet may be used. For example, “merging droplet A with droplet B,” can be achieved by transporting droplet A into contact with a stationary droplet B, transporting droplet B into contact with a stationary droplet A, or transporting droplets A and B into contact with each other. The terms “splitting,” “separating” and “dividing” are not intended to imply any particular outcome with respect to size of the resulting droplets (i.e., the size of the resulting droplets can be the same or different) or number of resulting droplets (the number of resulting droplets may be 2, 3, 4, 5 or more). The term “mixing” refers to droplet operations which result in more homogenous distribution of one or more components within a droplet. Examples of “loading” droplet operations include microdialysis loading, pressure assisted loading, robotic loading, passive loading, and pipette loading.
  • The terms “top” and “bottom” are used throughout the description with reference to the top and bottom substrates of the droplet actuator for convenience only, since the droplet actuator is functional regardless of its position in space.
  • When a given component, such as a layer, region or substrate, is referred to herein as being disposed or formed “on” another component, that given component can be directly on the other component or, alternatively, intervening components (for example, one or more coatings, layers, interlayers, electrodes or contacts) can also be present. It will be further understood that the terms “disposed on” and “formed on” are used interchangeably to describe how a given component is positioned or situated in relation to another component. Hence, the terms “disposed on” and “formed on” are not intended to introduce any limitations relating to particular methods of material transport, deposition, or fabrication.
  • When a liquid in any form (e.g., a droplet or a continuous body, whether moving or stationary) is described as being “on”, “at”, or “over” an electrode, array, matrix or surface, such liquid could be either in direct contact with the electrode/array/matrix/surface, or could be in contact with one or more layers or films that are interposed between the liquid and the electrode/array/matrix/surface.
  • When a droplet is described as being “on” or “loaded on” a droplet actuator, it should be understood that the droplet is arranged on the droplet actuator in a manner which facilitates using the droplet actuator to conduct droplet operations on the droplet, the droplet is arranged on the droplet actuator in a manner which facilitates sensing of a property of or a signal from the droplet, and/or the droplet has been subjected to a droplet operation on the droplet actuator.
  • 6 BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a side view of a portion of an example droplet actuator formed by a PCB fabrication process described in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 illustrates an example of a first process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator by providing a core PCB that is formed of a core dielectric layer that has metal layers on both sides, e.g., an electrode side metal layer and a non-electrode side metal layer;
  • FIG. 3 illustrates an example of a next process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator by applying a photoresist layer on the electrode side metal layer of the core PCB and forming one or more openings in the core dielectric layer and the non-electrode side metal layer;
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an example of a next process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator by applying a photoresist layer on the non-electrode side metal layer of the core PCB and plating the one or more openings, in order to form one or more blind vias;
  • FIG. 5 illustrates an example of a next process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator by stripping the photoresist layer from both the electrode side metal layer and the non-electrode side metal layer of the core PCB;
  • FIG. 6 illustrates an example of a next process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator by patterning the features on both the electrode side metal layer and the non-electrode side metal layer of the core PCB; and
  • FIG. 7 illustrates an example of a next process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator by applying an electrowetting dielectric layer to the electrode side metal layer of the core PCB and bonding a rigid support structure to the non-electrode side metal layer of the core PCB.
  • 7 DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention provides an improved PCB fabrication process for forming a PCB for a droplet actuator that has certain characteristics and properties for ensuring a desired functionality thereof. In particular, the PCB fabrication process of the invention provides PCB layers that have, for example, but not limited to, a certain surface smoothness, topology, planarity, and low florescence that are suited to ensure a desired functionality in the electrowetting process, which is used for performing droplet operations. Additionally, the invention provides a nonlimiting example of a droplet actuator that is formed by the improved PCB fabrication process of the invention.
  • 7.1 PCB Fabrication Process for Forming Droplet Actuators
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a side view of a portion of a droplet actuator 100, which is a nonlimiting example of a droplet actuator that is formed by the improved PCB fabrication process of the invention. Droplet actuator 100 includes a first plate, such as a top plate 110, and a second plate, such as a bottom plate 114.
  • Top plate 110 may be formed of a core PCB 118 that is formed of a core dielectric layer 122 that is sandwiched between a first metal layer 126 and a second metal layer 130. One side of core PCB 118 of top plate 110 is coated with an electrowetting dielectric layer 134. The opposite side of core PCB 118 is laminated to a rigid support structure 138 by use of a bonding layer 142.
  • Bottom plate 114 may be formed of a core PCB 148 that is formed of a core dielectric layer 152 that is sandwiched between a first metal layer within which is formed one or more electrodes 156 and a second metal layer within which is formed one or more interconnect pads 160. Additionally, each electrode 156 of core PCB 148 may be electrically connected to a respective interconnect pad 160 by use of a via structure 162 that is commonly known as a “blind via,” “hidden via,” or “micro-via” structure. One side of core PCB 148 of bottom plate 114 is coated with an electrowetting dielectric layer 164. The opposite side of core PCB 148 is laminated to a rigid support structure 168 by use of a bonding layer 172.
  • Top plate 110 and bottom plate 114 are arranged one to another such that there is a gap therebetween that provides a fluid flow path for conducting droplet operations. In particular, first metal layer 126 of top plate 110 that is coated with electrowetting dielectric layer 134 is oriented toward the gap and, thus, acts as the ground electrode. Additionally, the one or more electrodes 156 of bottom plate 114 that are coated with electrowetting dielectric layer 164 are oriented toward the gap and, thus, may act as transport electrodes.
  • A droplet actuator, such as droplet actuator 100, that is formed by the improved PCB fabrication process of the invention, has a certain desired surface smoothness, surface topology, surface planarity, and low florescence. By way of example, more details of the materials and the step-by-step fabrication of a bottom plate, such as bottom plate 114, by use of the improved PCB fabrication process of the invention are found with reference to FIGS. 2 through 7.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a nonlimiting example of a first process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator, such as bottom plate 114 of droplet actuator 100 of FIG. 1, by use of the improved PCB fabrication process of the invention. More specifically, a first step may include the acquisition of core PCB 148 that includes a core dielectric layer 210 that is sandwiched between a first metal layer 214 and a second metal layer 218. In one example, core PCB 148 may be acquired commercially in an assembled form, i.e., first metal layer 214 and second metal layer 218 that is bonded already to core dielectric layer 210 in an unpatterned and unprocessed state. In another example, core dielectric layer 210 may be formed of a commercially available dielectric material, such as Kapton®; liquid crystal polymer (LCP); standard FR4, which is general purpose epoxy/fiberglass woven material; and any polymer (e.g., Mylar®). Additionally, the thickness of core dielectric layer 210 is selected to permit droplet operations and in some cases may be up to about 50 microns. See section 7.2 “Fabrication Materials” for examples of materials that are suitable for the core dielectric layer of a droplet actuator PCB.
  • First metal layer 214 and second metal layer 218 are formed of any electrically conductive material, such as copper. In one example, first metal layer 214 may be the copper layer within which one or more electrodes, such as electrode 156 of FIG. 1, are formed, and may have any thickness suitable to the purpose of the droplet actuator. In one example, second metal layer 218 may be the copper layer within which one or more interconnect pads, such as interconnect pad 160 of FIG. 1, are formed, and may have a thickness suitable to the purpose of the droplet actuator. In another example, first metal layer 214 may have a thickness which is less than the thickness of second metal layer 218.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a nonlimiting example of a next process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator, such as bottom plate 114 of droplet actuator 100 of FIG. 1, by use of the improved PCB fabrication process of the invention. More specifically, a next step may include applying a photoresist layer 310 on the metal layer within which the one or more electrodes are to be formed, i.e., the electrode side of core PCB 148. In one example, photoresist layer 310 is applied to first metal layer 214 using standard processes, in order to protect first metal layer 214 during other process steps. Photoresist is a photo-sensitive material used in photolithography.
  • In this process step, FIG. 3 shows an opening 314 that is formed using standard processes in core dielectric layer 210 and second metal layer 218, but not in first metal layer 214. Opening 314 is formed as a first step in forming a blind via, such as via structure 162 of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a nonlimiting example of a next process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator, such as bottom plate 114 of droplet actuator 100 of FIG. 1, by use of the improved PCB fabrication process of the invention. More specifically, a next step may include applying a photoresist layer 414 on the metal layer within which the one or more interconnect pads are to be formed, i.e., the non-electrode side of core PCB 148. In one example, photoresist layer 414 is applied to second metal layer 218 using standard processes, in preparation for plating opening 314 as a next step in forming a blind via, such as via structure 162 of FIG. 1. More specifically, an opening in photoresist layer 414 at opening 314 allows metal plating 418 to be applied, as shown in FIG. 4, using standard processes, while protecting second metal layer 218 in all areas away from opening 314. In doing so, an electrical connection is made between first metal layer 214 and second metal layer 218.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a nonlimiting example of a next process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator, such as bottom plate 114 of droplet actuator 100 of FIG. 1, by use of the improved PCB fabrication process of the invention. More specifically, a next step may include the stripping of photoresist layer 310 and photoresist layer 414 using standard processes. The result is a full metal layer on the electrode side of core PCB 148, a full metal layer on the non-electrode side of core PCB 148, and one or more blind vias fabricated therebetween.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a nonlimiting example of a next process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator, such as bottom plate 114 of droplet actuator 100 of FIG. 1, by use of the improved PCB fabrication process of the invention. More specifically, a next step may include the “patterning” of both metal layers of core PCB 148. In one example, the metal features that form one or more electrodes 156 are patterned in first metal layer 214, using standard processes. Additionally, the metal features that form one or more interconnect pads 160 are patterned in second metal layer 218, using standard processes.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a nonlimiting example of a next process step of fabricating a bottom plate of a droplet actuator, such as bottom plate 114 of droplet actuator 100 of FIG. 1, by use of the improved PCB fabrication process of the invention. More specifically, a next step may include laminating the support mechanism to the non-electrode side of core PCB 148 and applying the electrowetting dielectric. For example, the non-electrode side of core PCB 148 is laminated to support structure 168 by use of bonding layer 172 and electrowetting dielectric layer 164 is applied atop the one or more electrodes 156. In one example, the thickness of electrowetting dielectric layer 164 is selected to facilitate use of the device for conducting droplet operations. The material that forms electrowetting dielectric layer 164 is selected for certain desired properties, such as a certain surface smoothness. In one example, electrowetting dielectric layer 164 may be formed of a commercially available polyimide of liquid photoimageable (LPI) soldermask that, when applied, has low roughness. In one example the roughness is less than about 50 nanometers. In another example, the roughness is less than less than about 10 nanometers. In yet another example, the roughness is less than less than about 1 nanometer. Because the irregular metal features are substantially on the non-electrode side of core PCB 148, the smoothness of the electrode side of core PCB 148, which is oriented in the gap of the droplet actuator, may be enhanced and held to a certain desired specification that is suitable for ensuring proper droplet operations. Furthermore, because the thickness of the metal on the electrode side of core PCB 148 is known and uniform, the electrowetting dielectric layer may me applied uniformly and planar. In this way, the electrowetting dielectric layer, upon which a droplet is manipulated, is suitably smooth and flat.
  • LPI soldermask may be applied by, for example, but not limited to, print screening, dip coating, and spin coating techniques. See section 7.2 “Fabrication Materials” for examples of materials that are suitable for forming electrowetting dielectric layer 164.
  • In one example, support structure 168 is a rigid glass plate. In one example, bonding layer 172 is a high flow material that flows easily along the topology of the non-electrode side of core PCB 148 in order to efficiently fill the volume around all metal features. Examples of high flow materials include, but are not limited to, thin FR4 Pregreg, which is partially cured epoxy, and partially cured silicone. See section 7.2 “Fabrication Materials” for examples of materials that are suitable for forming bonding layer 172.
  • Warping is avoided by use of a rigid support structure, such as glass, and a non-adhesive bonding layer, as an adhesive bonding layer is weak. The combination of the rigid support structure and the smoothness and planarity of the electrode side of the core PCB provides a gap tolerance of less than 10% of the expected droplet height. In one example, the gap tolerance may be from about 1% to about 5% of the expected droplet height. In another example, the gap tolerance may be about 1% of the expected droplet height.
  • 7.2 Fabrication Materials
  • Nonlimiting examples of materials that are suitable for forming the core dielectric layer of a PCB may include, but are not limited to, Kapton® Polyimide Film supplied by DuPont (Wilmington, Del.), liquid crystal polymer (LCP), standard FR4, and Mylar® Polyester Film supplied by DuPont (Wilmington, Del.). Furthermore, the material forming the core dielectric layer of a PCB may be a non-florescent material.
  • Nonlimiting examples of materials that are suitable for forming the electrowetting dielectric layer, such as electrowetting dielectric layer 164, may include, but are not limited to, liquid photoimageable (LPI) soldermask. Additionally, the material forming the electrowetting dielectric may be a non-florescent material.
  • Nonlimiting examples of materials that are suitable for forming the bonding layer between the PCB and the support, such as bonding layer 172, may include, but are not limited to, FR4 Pregreg. Furthermore, the material forming the bonding layer may be a non-florescent material.
  • 7.3 Droplet Actuator
  • For examples of droplet actuator architectures that are suitable for use with the present invention, see U.S. Pat. No. 6,911,132, entitled, “Apparatus for Manipulating Droplets by Electrowetting-Based Techniques,” issued on Jun. 28, 2005 to Pamula et al.; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/343,284, entitled, “Apparatuses and Methods for Manipulating Droplets on a Printed Circuit Board,” filed on filed on Jan. 30, 2006; U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,773,566, entitled, “Electrostatic Actuators for Microfluidics and Methods for Using Same,” issued on Aug. 10, 2004 and 6,565,727, entitled, “Actuators for Microfluidics Without Moving Parts,” issued on Jan. 24, 2000, both to Shenderov et al.; and Pollack et al., International Patent Application No. PCT/US 06/47486, entitled, “Droplet-Based Biochemistry,” filed on Dec. 11, 2006, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • 7.4 Fluids
  • For examples of fluids that may subjected to droplet operations using the approach of the invention, see the patents listed in section 7.3, especially International Patent Application No. PCT/US 06/47486, entitled, “Droplet-Based Biochemistry,” filed on Dec. 11, 2006. In some embodiments, the fluid includes a biological sample, such as whole blood, lymphatic fluid, serum, plasma, sweat, tear, saliva, sputum, cerebrospinal fluid, amniotic fluid, seminal fluid, vaginal excretion, serous fluid, synovial fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, pleural fluid, transudates, exudates, cystic fluid, bile, urine, gastric fluid, intestinal fluid, fecal samples, fluidized tissues, fluidized organisms, biological swabs and biological washes. In some embodiment, the fluid that is loaded includes a reagent, such as water, deionized water, saline solutions, acidic solutions, basic solutions, detergent solutions and/or buffers. In some embodiments, the fluid includes a reagent, such as a reagent for a biochemical protocol, such as a nucleic acid amplification protocol, an affinity-based assay protocol, a sequencing protocol, and/or a protocol for analyses of biological fluids.
  • 7.5 Filler Fluids
  • The gap is typically filled with a filler fluid. The filler fluid may, for example, be a low-viscosity oil, such as silicone oil. Other examples of filler fluids are provided in International Patent Application No. PCT/US 06/47486, entitled, “Droplet-Based Biochemistry,” filed on Dec. 11, 2006.
  • 7.6 Method of Processing a PCB of a Droplet Actuator
  • A method of fabricating and supporting a PCB of a droplet actuator may include, but is not limited to, one or more of the following steps: (1) providing a core PCB that is formed of a core dielectric layer that has metal layers on both sides, e.g., an electrode side metal layer and a non-electrode side metal layer; (2) applying a photoresist layer on the electrode side metal layer of the core PCB and forming one or more openings in the core dielectric layer and the non-electrode side metal layer; (3) applying a photoresist layer on the non-electrode side metal layer of the core PCB and plating the one or more openings, in order to form one or more blind vias, respectively; (4) stripping the photoresist layer from both the electrode side metal layer and the non-electrode side metal layer of the core PCB; (5) patterning the features on both the electrode side metal layer and the non-electrode side metal layer of the core PCB; (6) applying an electrowetting dielectric layer to the electrode side metal layer of the core PCB; and (7) bonding a rigid support structure to the non-electrode side metal layer of the core PCB.
  • 8 CONCLUDING REMARKS
  • The foregoing detailed description of embodiments refers to the accompanying drawings, which illustrate specific embodiments of the invention. Other embodiments having different structures and operations do not depart from the scope of the present invention.
  • This specification is divided into sections for the convenience of the reader only. Headings should not be construed as limiting of the scope of the invention.
  • It will be understood that various details of the present invention may be changed without departing from the scope of the present invention. Furthermore, the foregoing description is for the purpose of illustration only, and not for the purpose of limitation, as the present invention is defined by the claims as set forth hereinafter.

Claims (26)

    We claim:
  1. 1. A method of manufacturing a droplet actuator for conducting droplet operations, the method comprising:
    (a) positioning a dielectric material between a first metal layer configured to include an electrode and a second metal layer configured to include an interconnect pad; and
    (b) forming a connection between the first and second metal layers.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1 further comprising applying a photoresist layer onto the first metal layer.
  3. 3. The method of claim 1 further comprising stripping a photoresist layer from the first metal layer.
  4. 4. The method of claim 1, wherein forming the connection further comprises forming a via connection between the first and second metal layers.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1, wherein forming the connection further comprises forming an opening through both the dielectric material and the second metal layer through to the first metal layer.
  6. 6. The method of claim 5 further comprising applying a photoresist layer onto the second metal layer in such a manner as to leave the opening exposed.
  7. 7. The method of claim 6 further comprising applying a metal plating into the opening to form the connection.
  8. 8. The method of claim 7 further comprising stripping the photoresist layer from the second metal layer.
  9. 9. The method of claim 1 further comprising forming the electrode from the first metal layer.
  10. 10. The method of claim 1 further comprising forming the interconnect pad from the second metal layer.
  11. 11. The method of claim 1 further comprising laminating a rigid structure onto the second metal layer using a bonding layer.
  12. 12. The method of claim 1 further comprising attaching a rigid structure onto the second metal layer.
  13. 13. The method of claim 12, wherein attaching the rigid structure further comprises attaching a glass structure to the second metal layer.
  14. 14. The method of claim 1 further comprising applying an electrowetting layer onto the first metal layer.
  15. 15. The method of claim 14, wherein applying the electrowetting layer to the first metal layer further comprises applying a dielectric substance onto the first metal layer.
  16. 16. The method of claim 14, wherein applying the electrowetting layer onto the first metal layer further comprises applying at least one of a liquid photoimageable soldermask and a non-florescent material onto the first metal layer.
  17. 17. The method of claim 1 further comprising applying a photoresist layer onto the second metal layer.
  18. 18. The method of claim 1 further comprising stripping a photoresist layer from the second metal layer.
  19. 19. The method of claim 1 further comprising forming the dielectric material from non-florescent material.
  20. 20. The method of claim 1 further comprising positioning a first plate proximate a second plate comprising the first and second metal layers, the dielectric material and the connection to form a gap between the two plates that provides a fluid flow path for a droplet operations.
  21. 21. The method of 20 further comprising forming the first plate.
  22. 22. A droplet actuator for conducting droplet operations, comprising:
    (a) a first plate that includes:
    (i) a first metal layer comprising an electrode;
    (ii) a second metal layer comprising an interconnect pad;
    (iii) a dielectric material positioned between the first and second metal layers; and
    (iv) a via connecting the electrode to the interconnect; and
    (b) a second plate proximate the first plate and forming a gap therebetween that provides a fluid flow path for the droplet operations.
  23. 23. The droplet actuator of claim 22 further comprising an electrowetting layer positioned on at least one of the first and second metal layers proximate the gap.
  24. 24. The droplet actuator of claim 22, wherein the via comprises metal applied in a hole formed through the second metal layer and the dielectric material.
  25. 25. The droplet actuator of claim 24, further comprising a photoresist layer protecting the second metal layer from the applied metal.
  26. 26. A method of fabricating and supporting a printed circuit board of a droplet actuator for conducting droplet operations, the method comprising:
    (a) providing a core printed circuit board by positioning a dielectric material between a first metal layer configured to include an electrode and a second metal layer configured to include an interconnect pad;
    (b) applying a photoresist layer onto the first metal layer and forming one or more openings in the dielectric material and the second metal layer;
    (c) applying a photoresist layer onto the second metal layer and plating the one or more openings to form one or more blind vias, thereby forming a connection between the first and second metal layers;
    (d) stripping the photoresist layer from both the first metal layer and the second metal layer;
    (e) patterning the features on both the first metal layer and the second metal layer;
    (f) applying an electrowetting dielectric layer to the first metal layer; and
    (g) bonding a rigid support structure to the second metal layer.
US13618322 2007-08-09 2012-09-14 PCB Droplet Actuator Fabrication Abandoned US20130264010A1 (en)

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US13618322 US20130264010A1 (en) 2007-08-09 2012-09-14 PCB Droplet Actuator Fabrication

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