US20130263038A1 - Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters - Google Patents

Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20130263038A1
US20130263038A1 US13/918,642 US201313918642A US2013263038A1 US 20130263038 A1 US20130263038 A1 US 20130263038A1 US 201313918642 A US201313918642 A US 201313918642A US 2013263038 A1 US2013263038 A1 US 2013263038A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
characters
input
predicted
set
displayed
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
US13/918,642
Inventor
Jason Tyler Griffin
Jerome Pasquero
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
BlackBerry Ltd
Original Assignee
BlackBerry Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US13/373,356 priority Critical patent/US8490008B2/en
Application filed by BlackBerry Ltd filed Critical BlackBerry Ltd
Priority to US13/918,642 priority patent/US20130263038A1/en
Assigned to RESEARCH IN MOTION LIMITED reassignment RESEARCH IN MOTION LIMITED ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: GRIFFIN, JASON TYLER, PASQUERO, JEROME
Publication of US20130263038A1 publication Critical patent/US20130263038A1/en
Assigned to BLACKBERRY LIMITED reassignment BLACKBERRY LIMITED CHANGE OF NAME (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: RESEARCH IN MOTION LIMITED
Application status is Pending legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0487Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] using specific features provided by the input device, e.g. functions controlled by the rotation of a mouse with dual sensing arrangements, or of the nature of the input device, e.g. tap gestures based on pressure sensed by a digitiser
    • G06F3/0488Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] using specific features provided by the input device, e.g. functions controlled by the rotation of a mouse with dual sensing arrangements, or of the nature of the input device, e.g. tap gestures based on pressure sensed by a digitiser using a touch-screen or digitiser, e.g. input of commands through traced gestures
    • G06F3/04886Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] using specific features provided by the input device, e.g. functions controlled by the rotation of a mouse with dual sensing arrangements, or of the nature of the input device, e.g. tap gestures based on pressure sensed by a digitiser using a touch-screen or digitiser, e.g. input of commands through traced gestures by partitioning the screen or tablet into independently controllable areas, e.g. virtual keyboards, menus
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/02Input arrangements using manually operated switches, e.g. using keyboards or dials
    • G06F3/023Arrangements for converting discrete items of information into a coded form, e.g. arrangements for interpreting keyboard generated codes as alphanumeric codes, operand codes or instruction codes
    • G06F3/0233Character input methods
    • G06F3/0237Character input methods using prediction or retrieval techniques

Abstract

A method including receiving an input of a character from a virtual keyboard rendered on a display, generating a set of characters that includes the character, and displaying the generated set of characters at a location that is associated with the virtual keyboard and that is on the display. An electronic device including a display having a virtual keyboard rendered thereupon and a processor, the processor being configured to perform the method. Also disclosed is a keyboard, including a plurality of keys, each key corresponding to one or more different characters of a plurality of characters, wherein in response to receiving an input of a character, the keyboard is configured to generate a set of characters that includes the character, and the keyboard is further configured to cause display of the generated set of characters at a location that is associated with the virtual keyboard and that is on the display.

Description

    FIELD
  • Example embodiments disclosed herein relate generally to input methodologies for electronic devices, such as handheld electronic devices, and more particularly, to methods for receiving predictive text input and generation of a set of characters for electronic devices.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Increasingly, electronic devices, such as computers, netbooks, cellular phones, smart phones, personal digital assistants, tablets, etc., have touchscreens that allow a user to input characters into an application, such as a word processor or email application. Character input on touchscreens can be a cumbersome task due to, for example, the small touchscreen area, particularly where a user needs to input a long message.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is an example block diagram of an electronic device, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIG. 2 is a flowchart illustrating an example method for predicting a selected set of characters, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIGS. 3A, 3B, 3C, and 3D show example front views of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIGS. 4A and 4B show example front views of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIG. 5 shows an example front view of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C show example front views of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIG. 7 shows an example front view of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIGS. 8A and 8B show example front views of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIG. 9 shows an example front view of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIGS. 10A and 10B show example front views of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIGS. 11A and 11B show example front views of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIGS. 12A and 12B show example front views of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIGS. 13A and 13B show example front views of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIGS. 14A, 14B, and 14C show example front views of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIG. 15 shows an example front view of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIG. 16 shows an example front view of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIG. 17 is a flowchart illustrating an example method, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIG. 18 is a flowchart illustrating an example method, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • FIG. 19 is a flowchart illustrating an example method, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • DESCRIPTION OF EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS
  • Reference will now be made in detail to various embodiments, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Wherever possible, the same reference numbers will be used throughout the drawings to refer to the same or like parts.
  • The present disclosure relates to an electronic device, including wired communication devices (for example, a laptop computer having a touchscreen) and mobile or handheld wireless communication devices such as cellular phones, smartphones, wireless organizers, personal digital assistants, wirelessly enabled notebook computers, tablets, and similar devices. The electronic device can also be an electronic device without wireless communication capabilities, such as a handheld electronic game device, digital photograph album, digital camera, or other device.
  • Basic predictive text input solutions have been introduced for assisting with input on an electronic device. These solutions include predicting which word a user is entering and offering a suggestion for completing the word. But these solutions can have limitations, often requiring the user to input most or all of the characters in a word before the solution suggests the word the user is trying to input. Even then, a user often has to divert focus from the keyboard to view and consider the suggested word displayed elsewhere on the display of the electronic device, and thereafter, look back at the keyboard to continue typing. Refocusing of one's eyes relative to the keyboard while inputting information in an electronic device, particularly when composing large texts, can strain the eyes and be cumbersome, distracting, and otherwise inefficient. Moreover, processing cycles are lost and display power wasted as the processor is idling while the user is focusing attention to the input area, and then back at the virtual keyboard.
  • Accordingly, example embodiments described herein permit the user of an electronic device to input characters without diverting attention from the keyboard and subsequently refocusing.
  • Use of the indefinite article “a” or “an” in the specification and the claims is meant to include one or more than one of the feature that it introduces, unless otherwise indicated. Thus, the term “a set of characters” as used in “generating a set of characters” can include the generation of one or more than one set of characters. Similarly, use of the definite article “the”, or “said,” particularly after a feature has been introduced with the indefinite article, is meant to include one or more than one of the feature to which it refers (unless otherwise indicated). Therefore, the term “the generated set of characters” as used in “displaying the generated set of characters” includes displaying one or more generated set of characters.
  • In one embodiment, a method is provided that comprises receiving an input of a character from a virtual keyboard that is rendered on a display, generating a set of characters that includes the character, and displaying the generated set of characters at a location that is associated with the virtual keyboard and that is located on the display.
  • In another embodiment, an electronic device is provided that comprises a display having a virtual keyboard rendered thereupon, and a processor. The processor can be configured to receive an input of a character from the virtual keyboard, generate a set of characters that includes the character, and display the set of characters at a location that is associated with the virtual keyboard and that is on the display.
  • In another embodiment, a keyboard rendered on a display of an electronic device is provided. The keyboard can include a plurality of keys, each key corresponding to one or more different characters of a plurality of characters. In response to receiving an input of a character, the keyboard is configured to generate a set of characters that includes the character. The keyboard is further configured to cause display of the generated set of characters at a location that is associated with the virtual keyboard and that is on the display.
  • These example embodiments, as well as those described below permit the user of an electronic device to input a set of characters without diverting attention from the virtual keyboard and subsequently refocusing. Predicting and providing various options that the user is likely contemplating, and doing so at appropriate locations on the keyboard, allows the focus to remain on the keyboard, which enhances efficiency, accuracy, and speed of character input.
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram an electronic device 100, consistent with example embodiments disclosed herein. Electronic device 100 includes multiple components, such as a main processor 102 that controls the overall operation of electronic device 100. Communication functions, including data and voice communications, are performed through a communication subsystem 104. Data received by electronic device 100 is decompressed and decrypted by a decoder 106. The communication subsystem 104 receives messages from and sends messages to a network 150. Network 150 can be any type of network, including, but not limited to, a wired network, a data wireless network, voice wireless network, and dual-mode wireless networks that support both voice and data communications over the same physical base stations. Electronic device 100 can be a battery-powered device and include a battery interface 142 for receiving one or more batteries 144.
  • Main processor 102 is coupled to and can interact with additional subsystems such as a Random Access Memory (RAM) 108; a memory 110, such as a hard drive, CD, DVD, flash memory, or a similar storage device; one or more actuators 120; one or more force sensors 122; an auxiliary input/output (I/O) subsystem 124; a data port 126; a speaker 128; a microphone 130; short-range communications 132; other device subsystems 134; and a touchscreen 118.
  • Touchscreen 118 includes a display 112 with a touch-active overlay 114 connected to a controller 116. User-interaction with a graphical user interface (GUI), such as a virtual keyboard rendered on the display 112 as a GUI for input of characters, or a web-browser, is performed through touch-active overlay 114. Main processor 102 interacts with touch-active overlay 114 via controller 116. Characters, such as text, symbols, images, and other items are displayed on display 112 of touchscreen 118 via main processor 102. Characters are inputted when the user touches the touchscreen at a location associated with said character.
  • Touchscreen 118 is connected to and controlled by main processor 102. Accordingly, detection of a touch event and/or determining the location of the touch event can be performed by main processor 102 of electronic device 100. A touch event includes in some embodiments, a tap by a finger, a swipe by a finger, a swipe by a stylus, a long press by finger or stylus, or a press by a finger for a predetermined period of time, and the like.
  • While specific embodiments of a touchscreen have been described, any suitable type of touchscreen for an electronic device can be used, including, but not limited to, a capacitive touchscreen, a resistive touchscreen, a surface acoustic wave (SAW) touchscreen, an embedded photo cell touchscreen, an infrared (IR) touchscreen, a strain gauge-based touchscreen, an optical imaging touchscreen, a dispersive signal technology touchscreen, an acoustic pulse recognition touchscreen or a frustrated total internal reflection touchscreen. The type of touchscreen technology used in any given embodiment will depend on the electronic device and its particular application and demands.
  • Main processor 102 can also interact with a positing system 136 for determining the location of electronic device 100. The location can be determined in any number of ways, such as by a computer, by a Global Positioning System (GPS), either included or not included in electric device 100, through a Wi-Fi network, or by having a location entered manually. The location can also be determined based on calendar entries.
  • In some embodiments, to identify a subscriber for network access, electronic device 100 uses a Subscriber Identity Module or a Removable User Identity Module (SIM/RUIM) card 138 inserted into a SIM/RUIM interface 140 for communication with a network, such as network 150. Alternatively, user identification information can be programmed into memory 110.
  • Electronic device 100 also includes an operating system 146 and programs 148 that are executed by main processor 102 and are typically stored in memory 110. Additional applications may be loaded onto electronic device 100 through network 150, auxiliary I/O subsystem 124, data port 126, short-range communications subsystem 132, or any other suitable subsystem.
  • A received signal such as a text message, an e-mail message, or web page download is processed by communication subsystem 104 and this processed information is then provided to main processor 102. Main processor 102 processes the received signal for output to display 112, to auxiliary I/O subsystem 124, or a combination of both. A user can compose data items, for example e-mail messages, which can be transmitted over network 150 through communication subsystem 104. For voice communications, the overall operation of electronic device 100 is similar. Speaker 128 outputs audible information converted from electrical signals, and microphone 130 converts audible information into electrical signals for processing.
  • FIG. 2 is a flowchart illustrating an example method 200 for predicting a set of characters, consistent with example embodiments disclosed herein. As used herein, a predictor (such as a predictive algorithm, program or firmware) includes a set of instructions that when executed by a processor (for example, main processor 102), can be used to a disambiguate for example, received ambiguous text input and provide various options, such as a set of characters (for example, words or phrases, acronyms, names, slang, colloquialisms, abbreviations, or any combination thereof) that a user might be contemplating. A predictor can also receive otherwise unambiguous text input and predict set of characters potentially contemplated by the user based on several factors, such as context, frequency of use, and others as appreciated by those skilled in the field.
  • For example, in the predictor is a program 146 residing in memory 110 of electronic device 100. Accordingly, method 200 includes a predictor for generating a set of characters corresponding to a subsequent candidate input character based on inputted characters. It can be appreciated that while the example embodiments described herein are directed to a predictor program executed by a processor, the predictor can be executed by a virtual keyboard controller.
  • Method 200 begins at block 210, where the processor receives an input of one or more characters from a virtual keyboard displayed on a touchscreen. As used herein, however, a character can be any alphanumeric character, such as a letter, a number, a symbol, a punctuation mark, and the like. The inputted character can be displayed in an input field (for example, input field 330 further described below in FIGS. 3-9) that displays the character the user inputs using the virtual keyboard.
  • At block 220, the processor generates one or more sets of characters such as words or phrases, acronyms, names, slang, colloquialisms, abbreviations, or any combination thereof based on the input received in block 210. The set of characters includes, for example, a set of characters that are stored in a dictionary (for example, a word or an acronym) of a memory of the electronic device, a set of characters that were previously inputted by user (for example, a name or acronym), a set of characters based on a hierarchy or tree structure, a combination thereof, or any set of characters that are selected by a processor based on defined arrangement.
  • In some embodiments, the processor can use contextual data for generating a set of characters. Contextual data considers the context of characters in the input field. Contextual data can include information about, for example, set of characters previously inputted by the user, grammatical attributes of the characters inputted in the input field (for example, whether a noun or a verb is needed as the next set of characters in a sentence), or any combination thereof. For example, if the set of characters “the” has already been inputted into display, the processor can use the contextual data to determine that a noun—instead of a verb—will be the next set of characters after “the”. Likewise, if the set of characters “Guy Lafleur played in the National Hockey” was inputted, based on the context, the processor can determine the subsequent set of characters is likely “League”. Using the contextual data, the processor can also determine whether an inputted character was incorrect. For example, the processor can determine that the inputted character was supposed to be a “w” instead of an “a”, given the proximity of these characters on a QWERTY virtual keyboard.
  • Processor 102 can also include an affix as part of the set of characters, such as an adverb ending, an adjective ending, different verb tenses, and the like, or any other change to make a complete set of characters. Processor 102 can also use the received input to generate affixes, such as plural endings or plural forms. Any known predictive technique or software can be used to process the received input and the contextual data in generating set of characters at block 220.
  • In some example embodiments, the set of characters generated at block 220 can begin with the same character received as input at block 210. For example, if the characters “pl” have been received as input using a virtual keyboard, these characters will be received by the processor as the input. In these embodiments, the set of characters generated at block 220 would all begin with “pl”, such as “please” or “plot.” There is no limit on the length of a generated set of characters. Regarding affixes, if the user has input the characters “child”, for example, the affixes generated at block 230 could include “-ren”, to make the set of characters “children”, or “-ish”, to make the set of characters “childish”.
  • In some example embodiments, the set of characters generated at block 220 can simply include the same characters received as input at block 210. For example, if the received input is an “x,” the processor may generate “example” or “xylophone” as the set of characters. Such sets of characters can be generated using the contextual data.
  • In another example embodiment, if input has not been received or a delimiter (such as a <SPACE>) has been used, the generated set of characters can be placed on subsequent candidate input characters that correspond to the first letter of the generated set of characters.
  • Next, at block 230, the generated set of characters from block 220 can be ranked. The rankings reflect the likelihood that a candidate set of characters might have been intended by the user, or might be chosen by a user compared to another candidate set of characters.
  • In some embodiments, contextual data can be included in the ranking at block 230. In some embodiments, the electronic device can be configured to rank nouns or adjectives higher based on the previous inputted set of characters. If the inputted set of characters is suggestive of a noun or adjective, the processor, using the contextual data, can rank the nouns or adjectives corresponding to what the user is typing can be ranked higher at block 230. In an additional embodiment, set of characters including adjective affixes (such as “-ish” or “-ful”), phrases, plurals, or combinations thereof can also be ranked. Contextual data can increase the likelihood that the higher ranked generated set of characters are intended by a user. In some embodiment, contextual data can include information about which programs or applications are currently running or being used by a user. For example, if the user is running an email application, then set of characters associated with that user's email system, such as set of characters from the user's contact list, can be used to determine the ranking. N-grams, including unigrams, bigrams, trigrams, and the like, can be also used in the ranking of the sets of characters. Alternatively, the geolocation of the electronic device or user can be used in the ranking process. If, for example, the electronic device recognizes that a user is located at his/her office, then sets of characters generally associated with work can be ranked higher in the list. If, on the other hand, the device determines a user is at the beach, then sets of characters generally associated with the beach can be ranked higher in the list.
  • At block 240, the processor determines which of the set of characters to display based on the ranking. For example, higher ranked sets of characters are more likely to be determined that they should be displayed. A ranker (such as a ranking algorithm, program or firmware) includes a set of instructions that when executed by a processor (for example, main processor 102), can be executed to determine ranking in this regard. In some embodiments, the ranker is a program 146 residing in memory 110 of electronic device 100.
  • At block 250, the determined set of characters is displayed at a location on the keyboard corresponding to a subsequent candidate input character, predicted as the next character in a word that the user might input. For instance, if a user inputs “pl”, the word “please” would be displayed on the key for the letter “e”—the subsequent candidate input character for that word. Similarly, the word “plus” would also be displayed on the key for the letter “u”—another subsequent candidate input character. The subsequent candidate input character can be any alphanumeric character, such as a letter, number, symbol, punctuation mark, and the like.
  • In some embodiments, the generated set of characters is displayed at or near keys on the virtual keyboard associated with the subsequent candidate input characters. Its placement at or near a key can depend, for instance, on the size of the word or the number of nearby subsequent candidate input characters and the size of their associated set of characters.
  • The set of characters can be displayed in a manner that will attract the user's attention. In some embodiments, a displayed set of character's appearance can be enhanced or changed in a way that makes the set more readily visible to the user. For example, displayed sets of characters can be displayed with backlighting, highlighting, underlining, bolding, italicizing, using combinations thereof, or in any other way for making the displayed set of characters more visible.
  • When identifying the set of characters for display at block 240, the processor can limit the displayed set of characters to the top few or choose among the higher ranked sets of characters. For example, if two sets of characters are both ranked high, and these sets of characters would otherwise be displayed at the same key, the electronic device could be configured to display only the highest ranked generated set of characters. In other embodiments, both sets of characters could be displayed at or around the same key, or one set of characters is displayed at one key while the second set of characters is displayed at another key. In some example embodiments, the processor can take into account the display size to limit the number of generated sets of characters.
  • In some embodiments, the ranking could be used to choose between set of characters that, when displayed on adjacent subsequent candidate input characters, would overlap with each other (e.g., because of their respective lengths). In such a scenario, the electronic device could be configured to display the higher ranked set of characters on the keyboard. For example, if the set of characters “establishment” is ranked first in a list generated at block 240 after the letter “E” is inputted, “establishment” could be displayed at the “S” key. When displayed on a virtual keyboard, however, its length might occupy some space on the “A” key and the “D” key, potentially blocking set of characters that would be displayed on or around those keys. At block 240, it could be determined that “establishment” would be displayed fully, and no other set of characters would be placed at the “A” or “D” keys ahead of the first ranked set of characters “establishment.” An alternative to displaying only the top ranked set of characters would be to use abbreviations or recognized shortened forms of the set of characters, effectively permitting a long set of characters to be displayed within or mostly within the boundaries of a single key simultaneously with other sets of characters on adjacent keys of a virtual keyboard.
  • FIGS. 3-9 illustrate a series of example front views of the touchscreen 118 having a virtual keyboard 320, consistent with example embodiments disclosed herein. Starting with FIG. 3A, touchscreen 118 includes a virtual keyboard 320 that is touch-active. The position of the virtual keyboard 320 is variable such that virtual keyboard 320 can be placed at any location on touchscreen 118. Touchscreen 118 could be configured to detect the location and possibly pressure of one or more objects at the same time. Touchscreen 118 includes two areas: (1) an input field 330 that displays characters after a user has inputted those characters and (2) the virtual keyboard 320 that receives the input from the user. As described throughout this disclosure, virtual keyboard displays a set of characters at a location on the keyboard corresponding to a subsequent candidate input character that might be received as input from the user.
  • The examples and embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 3-9 can be implemented with any set of characters, such as words, phrases, acronyms, names, slang, colloquialisms, abbreviations, or any combination thereof.
  • As shown in FIG. 3A, touchscreen 118 displays a standard QWERTY virtual keyboard 320; however, any conventional key configuration can be displayed for use in the device, such as AZERTY, QWERTZ, or a layout based on the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) standard (ITU E.161) having “ABC” on key 2, “DEF” on key 3, and so on. Virtual keyboard 320 includes space key 350 as well as other keys that can provide different inputs, such as punctuation, letters, numbers, enter or return keys, and function keys. While virtual keyboard 320 is shown as having a square shape, it can have any other shape (such as an arch).
  • As shown in FIG. 3A, touchscreen 118 displays input field 330, which displays the characters the user inputs using virtual keyboard 320. Input field 330 includes a cursor 340, which can be an underscore (as shown) or any other shape, such as a vertical line. Cursor 340 represents the character space where a next inputted character, selected character, or selected set of characters will be inserted.
  • As shown in FIG. 3B, when a user inputs a character (in this example, “P”), this character is displayed in input field 330 and cursor 340 moves to the character space where the next inputted character or word will be inserted. After the character is inputted, a predictor (such as, a predictive algorithm or a circuit) can generate set of characters 360 (for this embodiment) that all begin with the character “P”, or characters if more than one character is input. The generated set of characters are displayed at a location on the keyboard corresponding to a subsequent candidate input character that might be received as input from the user. As mentioned, generated set of characters 360 can be displayed at or near the key corresponding to the subsequent candidate input characters (for example, under the respective A, E, H, and O keys of the virtual keyboard 320). Indeed, slightly shifting the display location of the generated set of characters can address overcrowding of subsequent candidate input characters, effectively permitting more set of characters to be displayed.
  • In the example shown in FIG. 3B, “P” is received as input and a predictor generates several set of characters 360, which are displayed at keys corresponding to each generated set of characters' subsequent candidate input character. As shown in FIG. 3B, “People” is placed at the “E” key because the next letter after “P” of “People” is “E”; “Paul” will be place at the “A” key because the next letter after “P” of “Paul” is “A”; “Phone” will be placed at the “H” key because the next letter after “P” of “Phone” is “H”; and so on. It should be noted that any of the letters in the set of characters can be upper case or lower case.
  • In the embodiment shown in FIG. 3C, “L” is next input received by touchscreen, and a predictor determines several generated set of characters 360, which are displayed at a key corresponding to subsequent candidate input characters (for example. under the respective A, E, and U keys of the virtual keyboard 320), for the current position of cursor 340, which is in the third character position, as shown in input field 330. In another embodiment, a generated set of characters 360 can be presented such as to include the subsequent candidate input character. For example, the set of characters “Please” can be displayed so that the characters “Pl” are displayed before the “E” character on the “E” key, and the characters “ase” can be placed after the “E” character on the “E” key. Further, in this or other embodiments, the displayed “E” can be presented in a manner that differs from the “Pl” and “ase”, thereby enabling the user to still recognize it as the “E” key while also making it readily visible so that the user can either input the generated set of characters “Please” or input the character “E”. The “E” can be capitalized or in lowercase. In other embodiments, an affix can be displayed at the key. Using the example of the set of characters “Please” above, the “ase” could be displayed at the “E” key so the set of characters fragment “-ease” or “-Ease” would appear.
  • If the user inputs a generated set of characters, that set of characters is placed in input field 330. This can be seen in FIG. 3D, where the user has inputted generated set of characters “Please,” resulting in its placement in the input field. A space is inserted after the set of characters if the user wants to input a new set of characters. A user could input a generated set of characters in various ways, including in a way that differs from a manner of inputting a character key. For example, to input a generated set of characters, a user could use a finger or stylus to swipe the generated set of characters. As used herein, swiping includes swiping the set of characters itself or swiping or touching near the set of characters. For the latter embodiment, the device can detect a swipe or touch near a set of characters, be it a generated set of characters or a predicted set of characters (to be described below), and through the use of a predictor, determine the set of characters the user intended to input. In another embodiment, the user could press a key for a predetermined period of time, such as a long press. That key can be, for example, the key corresponding to the subsequent candidate input character of the set of characters. So, if the set of characters “Please” is intended to be inputted instead of “E”, the electronic device 100 can be configured to require that the “E” key be pressed for a predetermined period of time to trigger the input of “Please”.
  • After a generated set of characters 360 has been determined, as shown in FIG. 3D, a predicted set of characters 380 can be displayed, shown here at space key 350. Predicted set of characters 380 can differ from generated set of characters 360 (as shown in FIGS. 3A-3C) and is the system's attempt to predict the next set of characters a user might be contemplating. A predictor is used to determine predicted set of characters 380. As with displayed generated set of characters, predicted set of characters 380 can be received as input in any number of ways, including receiving a swiping of the predicted set of characters with a finger or stylus or receiving a pressing of a key (such as the space key or another designated key) for a predetermined period of time (long press).
  • In FIG. 4A, electronic device 100 receives “C” as input from virtual keyboard 320. Again, a predictor determines generated set of characters 460 based in part on the received input. In FIG. 4B, electronic device 100 receives “O” as input from the virtual keyboard and outputs the “O” in input field 330. As shown in FIG. 4A, the set of characters “count” was displayed at the “O” key after the input of the “C” character was received. Since the “O” key was pressed in a manner to only input the “O” character, as shown in FIG. 4B, an “O” is displayed as second character of the currently inputted set of characters, and the set of characters “count” is not inputted by the user. Alternatively, if a user wanted to input the generated set of characters “count,” the user can input the “O” key in FIG. 4A in a manner different from a manner of inputting the “O” key, such as by swiping the set of characters “count” or by a long press on the “O” key, as opposed to tapping. Returning to FIG. 4B, after the “O” is inputted, generated set of characters 460 are displayed at the keys corresponding to subsequent candidate input characters, as shown in FIG. 4B.
  • FIG. 5 shows input field 330 displaying the set of characters “contact” followed by a space. In that instance, the user inputted the generated set of characters “contact” 460 as was shown in FIG. 4B at the “N” key. Referring back to FIG. 5, a <SPACE> character is now automatically inserted after the generated word in the input field. Predicted word “me” 580 is now displayed on space key 350.
  • If the predicted word “me” 580 is received as input, the word “me” 580 is then displayed in input field 330 followed by a space as shown in FIG. 6A, which then shows predicted word 680 “immediately” displayed on space key 350. The predicted word is presented after a completed word and space have been displayed in input field 330.
  • FIG. 6B shows an example where touchscreen 118 has received the “T” character as input after the user has pressed the “T” key. In this scenario, touchscreen 118 displays a “t” in input field 330. Generated set of characters 660 (for example, “Tuesday,” “today,” and “Thursday”) are displayed at the keys of the subsequent candidate input characters. FIG. 6C shows an example where electronic device 100 has received the “o” character as input after the user presses the “O” key instead of inputting generated set of characters 660 “today” as was shown in FIG. 6B. Thus, “o” is now displayed in input field 330.
  • FIG. 7 shows an example where touchscreen 118 has received the <SPACE> character as input after the user selects the space key. In this scenario, touchscreen 118 inserts a <SPACE> character, and then displays predicted set of characters “talk” 780 at space key 750.
  • FIG. 8A shows an example where touchscreen 118 has received the “d” character as input after the user presses the “D” key. In this scenario, touchscreen 118 displays a “d” in the input field 330 and displays generated set of characters “discuss,” “divide,” and “dinner” 860 on keys corresponding to subsequent candidate input characters. In this example embodiment, while the character “I” was never received as input, electronic device 100 determined that generated set of characters “discuss,” “divide,” and “dinner” 860 were the set of characters to be displayed on touchscreen. In this embodiment, because each of these set of characters has “i” as its second letter, touchscreen 118 displayed generated set of characters using a further subsequent letter in the set of characters (for example, “discuss” under the “S” key, “divide” under the “V” key, and “dinner” under the “N” key). In other embodiments, generated set of characters “discuss,” “divide,” and “dinner” 860 can be displayed at or near the “I” key.
  • In FIG. 8B shows an example where touchscreen 118 has received the set of characters “discuss” as input after the user chooses generated set of characters “discuss” 860. In this example, touchscreen 118 displays predicted set of characters “this” 880 at space key 350.
  • FIG. 9 shows an example where touchscreen 118 receives the “this” set of characters as input after user selects “this” as a desired predicted set of characters 880.
  • In this example, touchscreen 118 displays predicted set of characters “now” 980 at space key 350.
  • Touchscreen 118 can also receive punctuation as input at any time during the typing of a message. If a user decides to use punctuation after inputting either a generated set of characters or a predicted set of characters, the <SPACE> character (for example, the <SPACE> character prior to cursor 940 of FIG. 9) is deleted and the inputted punctuation is inserted.
  • FIGS. 10A and 10B show example front views of a touchscreen, consistent with embodiments disclosed herein. FIG. 10A shows an example where touchscreen 118 displays “The co” in a text bar 1030 and several generated set of characters 1060 are displayed at subsequent candidate input characters. In this example, touchscreen 118 displays generated set of characters “cottage” 1060 under the “T” key, generated set of characters “cook” 1060 under the “O” key, generated set of characters “coat” 1060 under the “A” key, and generated set of characters “coffee” 1060 under the “F” key.
  • FIG. 10B shows an example where touchscreen 118 receives the set of characters “cook” as input after the user has selected the generated set of characters 1060 “cook.” The set of characters “cook” is inserted into input field 1030 along with a <SPACE> character. In this example, set of characters include new predicted set of characters (such as words 1090, affixes 1092 (for example, “-ed” under the “E” key and “-ing” under the “I” key), and plurals 1094 (for example, “-s” under the “S” key)), all of which are displayed at subsequent candidate input characters. Each predicted word 1090, affix 1092, or plural 1094 is located on respective subsequent candidate input characters that match the first letter of the predicted word 1090, affix 1092, or plural 1094. Now the user has the added option of inputting a predicted set of characters 1090, 1092, and 1094. Input is made in the same manner as described above. In some embodiments, when touchscreen 118 receives either affix 1092 or plural 1094 as an input, the <SPACE> character between cursor 1040 and “cook” is deleted and the corresponding inputted affix or plural is added to the end of “cook.”
  • FIG. 11A shows an example where touchscreen 118 displays “Did she co” in a text bar 1130 and several generated set of characters 1160 are displayed at subsequent candidate input characters. In this example, touchscreen 118 displays generated set of characters “correct” 1160 under the “R” key, generated set of characters “copy” 1160 under the “P” key, and generated set of characters “contact” 1060 under the “N” key. While “co” is provided in the text bars of both FIG. 10A and FIG. 11A, touchscreen displays different generated set of characters based on the context of the characters in their respective text bars 1030 and 1130. For example, in FIG. 10A, the characters “co” follows “The,” which implies that a noun beginning with “co” should follow. In FIG. 11A, the characters “co” follow a pronoun, which implies that a verb beginning with “co” should follow. As stated above, contextual data can be used to determine when certain set of characters are more appropriate based on, for example, the set of characters in a text bar or previous actions by a user.
  • FIG. 11B shows an example where touchscreen 118 receives the set of characters “correct” as input after the user has selected the generated set of characters “correct” 1160. In this example, the set of characters “correct” is inserted in input field 1130 and a <SPACE> character is also inserted. Predicted set of characters (such as words 1190 and affixes 1192) are now displayed at subsequent candidate input characters. In this example, while affixes “-ing” and “-ily” both correspond to the “I” key, touchscreen 118 displays “-ing” with the “I” key and “-ily” with the “L” key. As stated above, the predicted affix may be assigned to a certain key based on a ranking, on contextual data, or a combination of both. In this embodiment, the “-ing” affix may have had a higher ranking than the “-ily” affix and was thus assigned to the “I” key. Accordingly, the “-ily” affix was assigned to the “L” key based on the corresponding “L” character being in the “-ily” affix.
  • FIG. 12A shows an example where touchscreen 118 displays “The ch” in a text bar 1230 and several generated set of characters 1260 are displayed at subsequent candidate input characters. In this example, generated set of characters 1260 include both “child” and “chimp.” In this embodiment, while the third letter in both “child” and “chimp” are the same, touchscreen displays “child” under the “I” key and displays “chimp” under the “C” key. The determination on which generated set of characters goes under which candidate input key can be based on a ranking (as specified above). As illustrated in this embodiment, touchscreen 118 can display a generated set of characters (in this case, “chimp”) on a key even though that key may not be associated with any subsequent characters of the characters in text bar 1240.
  • FIG. 12B shows an example where touchscreen 118 receives the set of characters “child” as input after the user has selected the generated set of characters “child” 1260. The set of characters “child” is inserted in input field 1230 and, in this example, a <SPACE> character is not inserted. Predicted set of characters (such as words 1290 and affixes 1292) are now displayed at subsequent candidate input characters. In this example, while affixes “-ing” and “-ily” both correspond to the “I” key, touchscreen 118 displays “-ing” with the “I” key and “-ily” with the “L” key. As stated above, the predicted affix may be assigned to a certain key based on a ranking, on conventional data, or a combination of both. In this embodiment, the “-ing” affix may have had a higher ranking than the “-ily” affix and was thus assigned to the “I” key. Accordingly, the “-ily” affix was assigned to the “L” key based on the corresponding “L” character being in the “-ily” affix.
  • FIG. 13A shows an example where touchscreen 118 displays “The texture and” in a text bar 1330 and several predicted set of characters (for example, words 1390) are displayed at subsequent candidate input characters. FIG. 13B shows an example where touchscreen 118 received the set of characters “taste” as input after the user had selected the predicted set of characters “taste.” In this example, a <SPACE> character was inserted after “taste.” Consequently, predicted set of characters (such as, words 1390 and affixes 1392) are displayed at subsequent candidate input characters.
  • FIG. 14A shows an example where touchscreen 118 displays “The hospital staff c” in a text bar 1430 and several generated set of characters 1460 are displayed at subsequent candidate input characters. FIG. 14B shows an example where touchscreen 118 received the set of characters “care” as input after the user had chosen the generated set of characters “care.” Generated set of characters “care” is now placed in input field 1430 along with a <SPACE> and predicted set of characters (such as, words 1490 and affixes 1492) are displayed at subsequent candidate input characters. FIG. 14C shows an example where touchscreen 118 received the affix “-ful” as input (thereby modifying the set of characters “care” to “careful”) after the user had chosen the predicted affix “-ful.” Thus, the set of characters “careful” is now inserted into input field 1430. Note, in some embodiments, inputting a word or affix can modify the input word or word fragment. For example, if “spicy” was input by a user, and “ness” is a predicted affix and is inputted, “spicy” would change to “spiciness,” dropping the “y” and adding “mess”. In other embodiments, “happy” could change to “happiness” or “conceive” could change to “conceivable”.
  • FIG. 15 shows an example of an ambiguous keyboard 1520, which can have multiple characters assigned to a key (for example, such as a telephone keypad where “A.” “B,” and “C” are assigned to key 2; “D.” “E,” and “F” are assigned to key 23, and so on). For example, the characters “Q” and “W” can be assigned one key, and the characters “E” and “R” assigned to another key. In this example, the user has input the characters “Ol” by pressing the “op” key followed by the “L” key. Using a predictor, generated set of characters 1560 are displayed at subsequent candidate input characters. Since the first pressed key can input either an “O” or a “P” and the second pressed key inputs an “L”, generated set of characters 1560 will begin with “OL” or “PL”, such as shown by generated set of characters 1560 in FIG. 15.
  • FIG. 16 shows another example of an ambiguous keyboard 1620. In this example, generated sets of characters “plum” and “olive” 1660 are displayed near the “ui” key. The sets of characters could also have been displayed at or on the “ui” key. Here, both sets of characters correspond to a particular input corresponding to a key, namely the third letter of plum is a “u” and the third letter of olive is an “i.” Touchscreen 118 (via main processor 102) can differentiate between the input of either set of characters based on the user's action. For example, the user can swipe at or near the right of the “ui” key to input “olive”, or swipe at or near the left of the “ui” key to input “plum”.
  • The examples and embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 17, 18, and 19 can be implemented with any set of characters such as words, phrases, acronyms, names, slang, colloquialisms, abbreviations, or any combination thereof.
  • FIG. 17 shows in flowchart form a method 1700 in accordance with some embodiments. Method 1700 can be implemented with a processor, such as main processor 102, and stored on a tangible computer readable medium, such as hard drives, CDs, DVDs, flash memory, and the like. At block 1710, the processor receives an input of a character. At block 1720, the processor displays a generated set of characters at or near keys of subsequent candidate input characters on the touchscreen, such as described above.
  • At block 1730, the processor receives an input of the generated set of characters chosen by a user. If the user does not choose a generated set of characters displayed at or near keys of subsequent candidate input characters, the method restarts at block 1710, where the touchscreen can receive an input of another character. If a generated set of characters is received as input, at block 1740 the generated set of characters and a <SPACE> character is inserted in an input field (for example, input field 330 of FIGS. 3-9) As mentioned previously, the user can choose the generated set of characters, for example, by swiping at or near it or by long pressing a key corresponding to the subsequent candidate input character.
  • Continuing at block 1750, if the processor detects that punctuation is not to be inserted, the method restarts at block 1710. If punctuation is to be inserted, the method continues to block 1760 where the <SPACE> character is deleted and the appropriate punctuation is added to the input field. After block 1760, the method starts over at block 1710.
  • FIG. 18 is a flowchart illustrating example method 1800 in accordance with some embodiments. Method 1800 can be implemented with a processor, such as main processor 102, and stored on a tangible computer readable medium, such as hard drives, CDs, DVDs, flash memory, and the like. At block 1810, the processor receives an input of a character.
  • At block 1820, the processor displays a generated set of characters at or near a location on the keyboard corresponding to a subsequent candidate input character on a touchscreen. At block 1830, the processor receives an input of a generated set of characters chosen by a user. If the user does not choose a generated set of characters displayed at or near keys of subsequent candidate input characters, the method restarts at block 1810, where the processor can receive an input of another character. If a generated set of characters is received as input, at block 1840 the generated set of characters and a <SPACE> character is inserted in an input field (for example, input field 330 of FIGS. 3-9). As mentioned previously, the user can choose the generated set of characters, for example, by swiping at or near it or by pressing a key corresponding to the subsequent candidate input character for a predetermined period of time.
  • At block 1850, a predicted set of characters, different from the generated set(s) of characters, is displayed on a space key of the keyboard after the input of the generated set of characters in block 1830. The predicted set of characters displayed in block 1850 is determined by using a predictor. In some embodiments, the one or more predicted sets of characters can be placed on one or more keys other than the space key.
  • At block 1860, the processor can determine whether it has received an input of the predicted set of characters based on a user input. If the touchscreen has not received an input of the predicted set of characters because the user has not chosen the predicted set of characters, the method restarts at block 1810. If the processor has received the input of the predicted set of characters, the method continues to block 1870, where the chosen predicted set of characters and a <SPACE> character is inserted in the input field. From here, method 1800 can return to either block 1810 or block 1850.
  • Even though method 1800 does not display the punctuation illustration as shown in method 1700, the punctuation illustration, as shown in blocks 1750 and 1760, can likewise be applied to method 1800.
  • FIG. 19 is a flowchart illustrating an example method 1900 in accordance with some embodiments. At box 1910, predicted set of characters is displayed at corresponding subsequent candidate input characters. In these embodiments, an input has not been received or a delimiter has been activated, such as inputting a <SPACE>. Here, one or more predicted set of characters (such as, words, affixes, or a combination thereof) are placed on subsequent candidate input characters that correspond to the first letter of the generated set of characters. Moving to box 1920, it is determined whether the touchscreen receives an input of the set of characters (such as, word or affix) based on a user's selection. If an input is received, the method moves to block 1930 where the predicted set of characters and a <SPACE> character are inserted into an input field. Then the method starts over at block 1910. If the touchscreen does not receive an input of the set of characters, the touchscreen is available to receive an input of a character (as described by block 1710 of FIG. 17 or block 1810 of FIG. 18) and proceed through methods (such as methods 1700 of FIG. 17 or 1800 of FIG. 18 or even method 1900 of FIG. 19).
  • Other embodiments of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from consideration of the specification and practice of the invention disclosed herein. It is intended that the specification and examples be considered as examples only, with a true scope and spirit of the invention being indicated by the following claims.

Claims (18)

1-17. (canceled)
18. A method comprising:
receiving an input of one or more characters from a virtual keyboard, wherein the virtual keyboard comprises a plurality of character keys and at least some the keys are configured for displaying characters;
displaying one or more first predicted words, each of the first predicted words being displayed at one or more first select locations within the virtual keyboard; and
in response to receiving an input reflecting selection of one of the first predicted words, displaying one or more predicted sets of characters at one or more second select locations within the virtual keyboard, the one or more second select locations being selected using one or more subsequent candidate input characters corresponding to the one or more predicted sets of characters.
19. The method of claim 18, wherein each of the predicted sets of characters is positioned adjacent the one or more corresponding subsequent candidate input characters corresponding to the one or more predicted sets of characters.
20. The method of claim 18, wherein each of the predicted sets of characters is positioned in a manner that does not overlap with any other key on the virtual keyboard.
21. The method of claim 18, wherein each of the predicted sets of characters comprises at least one of a word or an affix.
22. The method of claim 21, wherein each affix corresponds to the selected one of the first predicted words.
23. The method of claim 18, wherein the one or more first select locations are selected using one or more subsequent candidate input characters corresponding to the one or more first predicted words.
24. The method of claim 18, wherein at least one of the predicted sets of characters is displayed on a space key of the keyboard.
25. The method of claim 18, wherein the displayed predicted sets of characters is displayed in a form that enhances visibility of each of the predicted sets of characters.
26. The method of claim 18, further comprising:
receiving an input reflecting a selection of one of the displayed predicted sets of characters in an input field.
27. The method of claim 26, wherein in response to receiving the input reflecting the selection of the one of the displayed predicted sets of characters, displaying one or more additional predicted sets of characters at one or more third select locations within the virtual keyboard, the one or more third select locations being selected using one or more subsequent candidate input characters corresponding to the one or more additional predicted sets of characters.
28. The method of claim 27, wherein each of the additional predicted sets of characters comprises at least one of a word or an affix.
29. The method of claim 28, wherein each affix corresponds to the displayed one or more predicted sets of characters.
30. The method of claim 18, wherein one of the one or more displayed predicted sets of characters is selected for display in an input field by detecting a swipe at or near said one of the one or more predicted sets of characters or a pressing of a key for a predetermined period of time.
31. The method of claim 30, wherein the inputted one or more first predicted words is displayed adjacent the selected one or more predicted sets of characters in the input field.
32. The method of claim 31, wherein a space is displayed between the one or more first predicted words and the selected one or more predicted sets of characters.
33. An electronic device comprising:
a display having a virtual keyboard rendered thereupon, and a processor;
the processor configured to perform:
receiving an input of one or more characters from the virtual keyboard, wherein the virtual keyboard comprises a plurality of character keys and at least some the keys are configured for displaying characters;
displaying one or more first predicted words, each of first predicted words being displayed at one or more first select locations within the virtual keyboard; and
in response to receiving an input reflecting selection of one of the first predicted words, displaying one or more predicted sets of characters at one or more second select locations within the virtual keyboard, the one or more second select locations being selected using one or more subsequent candidate input characters corresponding to the one or more predicted sets of characters.
34. A keyboard rendered on a display of an electronic device, the keyboard comprising:
a plurality of keys, each key corresponding to one or more different characters of a plurality of characters,
wherein in response to receiving an input of one or more characters, the electronic device is configured to:
display one or more first predicted words, each of the first predicted words being displayed at one or more first select locations within the virtual keyboard; and
in response to receiving an input reflecting selection of one of the first predicted words, display one or more predicted sets of characters at one or more second select locations within the virtual keyboard, the one or more second select locations being selected using one or more subsequent candidate input characters corresponding to the one or more predicted sets of characters.
US13/918,642 2011-11-10 2013-06-14 Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters Pending US20130263038A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/373,356 US8490008B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2011-11-10 Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters
US13/918,642 US20130263038A1 (en) 2011-11-10 2013-06-14 Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/918,642 US20130263038A1 (en) 2011-11-10 2013-06-14 Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/373,356 Continuation US8490008B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2011-11-10 Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20130263038A1 true US20130263038A1 (en) 2013-10-03

Family

ID=48281885

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/373,356 Active US8490008B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2011-11-10 Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters
US13/563,182 Active 2032-04-03 US9032322B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2012-07-31 Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters
US13/918,642 Pending US20130263038A1 (en) 2011-11-10 2013-06-14 Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/373,356 Active US8490008B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2011-11-10 Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters
US13/563,182 Active 2032-04-03 US9032322B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2012-07-31 Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US8490008B2 (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9032322B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2015-05-12 Blackberry Limited Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters
US9063653B2 (en) 2012-08-31 2015-06-23 Blackberry Limited Ranking predictions based on typing speed and typing confidence
US9116552B2 (en) 2012-06-27 2015-08-25 Blackberry Limited Touchscreen keyboard providing selection of word predictions in partitions of the touchscreen keyboard
US9122672B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2015-09-01 Blackberry Limited In-letter word prediction for virtual keyboard
US9152323B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2015-10-06 Blackberry Limited Virtual keyboard providing an indication of received input
US9201510B2 (en) 2012-04-16 2015-12-01 Blackberry Limited Method and device having touchscreen keyboard with visual cues
US9207860B2 (en) 2012-05-25 2015-12-08 Blackberry Limited Method and apparatus for detecting a gesture
US9310889B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2016-04-12 Blackberry Limited Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters
US9524290B2 (en) 2012-08-31 2016-12-20 Blackberry Limited Scoring predictions based on prediction length and typing speed
US9557913B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2017-01-31 Blackberry Limited Virtual keyboard display having a ticker proximate to the virtual keyboard
US9652448B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2017-05-16 Blackberry Limited Methods and systems for removing or replacing on-keyboard prediction candidates
US9715489B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2017-07-25 Blackberry Limited Displaying a prediction candidate after a typing mistake
US9910588B2 (en) 2012-02-24 2018-03-06 Blackberry Limited Touchscreen keyboard providing word predictions in partitions of the touchscreen keyboard in proximate association with candidate letters

Families Citing this family (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8904309B1 (en) * 2011-11-23 2014-12-02 Google Inc. Prediction completion gesture
EP2812777A4 (en) * 2012-02-06 2015-11-25 Michael K Colby Character-string completion
US9489128B1 (en) * 2012-04-20 2016-11-08 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Soft keyboard with size changeable keys for a smart phone
US20130285916A1 (en) * 2012-04-30 2013-10-31 Research In Motion Limited Touchscreen keyboard providing word predictions at locations in association with candidate letters
US9354805B2 (en) 2012-04-30 2016-05-31 Blackberry Limited Method and apparatus for text selection
US8884881B2 (en) * 2012-05-11 2014-11-11 Blackberry Limited Portable electronic device and method of controlling same
US20130346904A1 (en) * 2012-06-26 2013-12-26 International Business Machines Corporation Targeted key press zones on an interactive display
US9152319B2 (en) * 2012-07-16 2015-10-06 Avaya Inc. Method for simplifying a Swype based touch-screen keypad for fast text entry
US9021380B2 (en) 2012-10-05 2015-04-28 Google Inc. Incremental multi-touch gesture recognition
US8782549B2 (en) 2012-10-05 2014-07-15 Google Inc. Incremental feature-based gesture-keyboard decoding
US8843845B2 (en) 2012-10-16 2014-09-23 Google Inc. Multi-gesture text input prediction
US8701032B1 (en) 2012-10-16 2014-04-15 Google Inc. Incremental multi-word recognition
US8850350B2 (en) 2012-10-16 2014-09-30 Google Inc. Partial gesture text entry
US8819574B2 (en) 2012-10-22 2014-08-26 Google Inc. Space prediction for text input
US9996213B2 (en) * 2012-12-24 2018-06-12 Nokia Technology Oy Apparatus for a user interface and associated methods
USD735238S1 (en) 2012-12-26 2015-07-28 Lookout, Inc. Display screen with graphical user interface with interleaved rows of text and reduced error key layout short reach
US9367240B2 (en) 2012-12-26 2016-06-14 Lookout, Inc. Graphical user interface for improved text character entry
CN103064530B (en) * 2012-12-31 2017-03-08 华为技术有限公司 Input processing method and apparatus
BR302013003228S1 (en) * 2013-01-09 2014-06-10 Samsung Electronics Co Ltd Ornamental pattern applied to GUI
US8832589B2 (en) 2013-01-15 2014-09-09 Google Inc. Touch keyboard using language and spatial models
DE102013004246A1 (en) * 2013-03-12 2014-09-18 Audi Ag A vehicle device associated with Buchstabiereinrichtung - Completion labeling
DE102013004239A1 (en) * 2013-03-12 2014-09-18 Audi Ag A vehicle device associated with Buchstabiereinrichtung Completion proposal
US9081500B2 (en) 2013-05-03 2015-07-14 Google Inc. Alternative hypothesis error correction for gesture typing
USD767618S1 (en) * 2013-10-11 2016-09-27 Microsoft Corporation Display screen with graphical user interface
USD767617S1 (en) * 2013-10-11 2016-09-27 Microsoft Corporation Display screen with graphical user interface
USD810115S1 (en) 2013-11-22 2018-02-13 Apple Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD818470S1 (en) * 2014-05-14 2018-05-22 Touchtype Ltd. Electronic display with a graphical user interface
USD819041S1 (en) * 2014-05-14 2018-05-29 Touchtype Ltd. Electronic device display with a keyboard graphical user interface
US9671956B2 (en) 2014-06-18 2017-06-06 Lenovo Enterprise Solutions (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Presenting search term suggestions on graphical user interfaces
US20160041754A1 (en) * 2014-08-08 2016-02-11 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Electronic device and method for processing letter input in electronic device
USD791783S1 (en) * 2014-11-14 2017-07-11 Touchtype Limited Electronic device display with a keyboard graphical user interface
KR101656518B1 (en) * 2015-05-14 2016-09-09 이상백 User device for providing elastic button, method for performing specific function thereof and user interface
US9952764B2 (en) * 2015-08-20 2018-04-24 Google Llc Apparatus and method for touchscreen keyboard suggestion word generation and display
USD820854S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-19 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with transitional keyboard graphical user interface
USD820274S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with transitional keyboard graphical user interface
USD820273S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD820277S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD820276S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with transitional keyboard graphical user interface
USD820275S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD820853S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-19 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD820280S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with transitional keyboard graphical user interface
USD820278S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with transitional keyboard graphical user interface
USD820281S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with transitional keyboard graphical user interface
USD820282S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with transitional keyboard graphical user interface
USD820279S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with transitional keyboard graphical user interface
USD820271S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with transitional keyboard graphical user interface
USD820272S1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2018-06-12 Bing-Yang Yao Display screen or portion thereof with transitional keyboard graphical user interface

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030182279A1 (en) * 2002-03-19 2003-09-25 Willows Kevin John Progressive prefix input method for data entry
US20060026566A1 (en) * 2004-07-27 2006-02-02 Texas Instruments Incorporated Method and system for thread abstraction
US20060265668A1 (en) * 2005-05-23 2006-11-23 Roope Rainisto Electronic text input involving a virtual keyboard and word completion functionality on a touch-sensitive display screen
US20070015297A1 (en) * 2002-11-27 2007-01-18 Lsi Logic Corporation Failure analysis vehicle for yield enhancement with self test at speed burnin capability for reliability testing
US20070152979A1 (en) * 2006-01-05 2007-07-05 Jobs Steven P Text Entry Interface for a Portable Communication Device
US7318019B1 (en) * 2000-11-17 2008-01-08 Semantic Compaction Systems Word output device and matrix keyboard for use therein
US20090259962A1 (en) * 2006-03-17 2009-10-15 Marc Ivor John Beale Character Input Method
WO2010003557A1 (en) * 2008-07-11 2010-01-14 Frauenhofer- Gesellschaft Zur Förderung Der Angewandten Forschung E. V. Apparatus and method for generating a bandwidth extended signal
US7694231B2 (en) * 2006-01-05 2010-04-06 Apple Inc. Keyboards for portable electronic devices
US20130004654A1 (en) * 2004-11-08 2013-01-03 Nitto Denko Corporation Reactive polymer-supported porous film for for battery separator, method for producing the porous film, method for producing battery using the porous film, and electrode/porous film assembly
US20130046544A1 (en) * 2010-03-12 2013-02-21 Nuance Communications, Inc. Multimodal text input system, such as for use with touch screens on mobile phones

Family Cites Families (313)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3872433A (en) 1973-06-07 1975-03-18 Optical Business Machines Optical character recognition system
DE2915673A1 (en) 1979-04-18 1980-10-30 Olympia Werke Ag Text processing device with a display means
US5261009A (en) 1985-10-15 1993-11-09 Palantir Corporation Means for resolving ambiguities in text passed upon character context
US5963671A (en) 1991-11-27 1999-10-05 International Business Machines Corporation Enhancement of soft keyboard operations using trigram prediction
US5416895A (en) 1992-04-08 1995-05-16 Borland International, Inc. System and methods for improved spreadsheet interface with user-familiar objects
US5523775A (en) 1992-05-26 1996-06-04 Apple Computer, Inc. Method for selecting objects on a computer display
JP3546337B2 (en) 1993-12-21 2004-07-28 ゼロックス コーポレイションXerox Corporation User interface devices and graphic keyboard usage for computing system
US5574840A (en) 1994-08-29 1996-11-12 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for selecting text utilizing a plurality of text using switchable minimum granularity of selection
JPH10154144A (en) 1996-11-25 1998-06-09 Sony Corp Document inputting device and method therefor
US6073036A (en) 1997-04-28 2000-06-06 Nokia Mobile Phones Limited Mobile station with touch input having automatic symbol magnification function
GB2335822B (en) 1998-03-25 2003-09-10 Nokia Mobile Phones Ltd Context sensitive pop-up window for a portable phone
US6421453B1 (en) 1998-05-15 2002-07-16 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus and methods for user recognition employing behavioral passwords
KR100306277B1 (en) 1998-05-29 2001-08-07 윤종용 Method for registering and confirming a password in character recognition portable phone
US6064340A (en) 1998-07-02 2000-05-16 Intersil Corporation Electrostatic discharge locating apparatus and method
US7679534B2 (en) 1998-12-04 2010-03-16 Tegic Communications, Inc. Contextual prediction of user words and user actions
US8583440B2 (en) 2002-06-20 2013-11-12 Tegic Communications, Inc. Apparatus and method for providing visual indication of character ambiguity during text entry
US6226299B1 (en) 1999-01-20 2001-05-01 Emulex Corporation Sanitizing fibre channel frames
US7506252B2 (en) 1999-01-26 2009-03-17 Blumberg Marvin R Speed typing apparatus for entering letters of alphabet with at least thirteen-letter input elements
GB2347240A (en) 1999-02-22 2000-08-30 Nokia Mobile Phones Ltd Communication terminal having a predictive editor application
US6411283B1 (en) 1999-05-20 2002-06-25 Micron Technology, Inc. Computer touch screen adapted to facilitate selection of features at edge of screen
EP1192716B1 (en) 1999-05-27 2009-09-23 Tegic Communications, Inc. Keyboard system with automatic correction
US7030863B2 (en) 2000-05-26 2006-04-18 America Online, Incorporated Virtual keyboard system with automatic correction
US6573844B1 (en) 2000-01-18 2003-06-03 Microsoft Corporation Predictive keyboard
US6621424B1 (en) 2000-02-18 2003-09-16 Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories Inc. Method for predicting keystroke characters on single pointer keyboards and apparatus therefore
US6646572B1 (en) 2000-02-18 2003-11-11 Mitsubish Electric Research Laboratories, Inc. Method for designing optimal single pointer predictive keyboards and apparatus therefore
US6922810B1 (en) 2000-03-07 2005-07-26 Microsoft Corporation Grammar-based automatic data completion and suggestion for user input
US7107204B1 (en) 2000-04-24 2006-09-12 Microsoft Corporation Computer-aided writing system and method with cross-language writing wizard
US7145554B2 (en) 2000-07-21 2006-12-05 Speedscript Ltd. Method for a high-speed writing system and high -speed writing device
US20050195173A1 (en) 2001-08-30 2005-09-08 Mckay Brent User Interface for Large-Format Interactive Display Systems
CA2323856A1 (en) 2000-10-18 2002-04-18 602531 British Columbia Ltd. Method, system and media for entering data in a personal computing device
US6891551B2 (en) 2000-11-10 2005-05-10 Microsoft Corporation Selection handles in editing electronic documents
US6577296B2 (en) 2000-11-14 2003-06-10 Vega Vista, Inc. Fixed cursor
US6696985B2 (en) 2001-04-24 2004-02-24 International Business Machines Corporation Reformable keyboard with variable key design
US20050024341A1 (en) 2001-05-16 2005-02-03 Synaptics, Inc. Touch screen with user interface enhancement
US20090040184A9 (en) 2001-10-04 2009-02-12 Infogation Corporation Information entry mechanism
GB2380583A (en) 2001-10-04 2003-04-09 Ilam Samson Touch pad/screen for electronic equipment
FI115254B (en) 2001-12-20 2005-03-31 Nokia Corp Using the touch screen pointing means
US7394346B2 (en) 2002-01-15 2008-07-01 International Business Machines Corporation Free-space gesture recognition for transaction security and command processing
JP4073215B2 (en) 2002-01-28 2008-04-09 富士通株式会社 Character input device
FI20021655A (en) 2002-06-19 2003-12-20 Nokia Corp Method for unlocking a portable electronic device, and
US7259752B1 (en) 2002-06-28 2007-08-21 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for editing electronic ink
CA2410057C (en) 2002-07-03 2008-04-29 2012244 Ontario Inc. Apparatus and method for input of ideographic korean syllables from reduced keyboard
AU2003234515A1 (en) 2002-07-12 2004-02-02 Dana Suess Modified-qwerty letter layout for rapid data entry
US20040111475A1 (en) 2002-12-06 2004-06-10 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for selectively identifying misspelled character strings in electronic communications
JP2004213269A (en) 2002-12-27 2004-07-29 Toshiba Corp Character input device
US7194699B2 (en) 2003-01-14 2007-03-20 Microsoft Corporation Animating images to reflect user selection
US7382358B2 (en) 2003-01-16 2008-06-03 Forword Input, Inc. System and method for continuous stroke word-based text input
US7098896B2 (en) 2003-01-16 2006-08-29 Forword Input Inc. System and method for continuous stroke word-based text input
US20040153963A1 (en) 2003-02-05 2004-08-05 Simpson Todd G. Information entry mechanism for small keypads
US7136047B2 (en) 2003-04-09 2006-11-14 Microsoft Corporation Software multi-tap input system and method
WO2005008899A1 (en) 2003-07-17 2005-01-27 Xrgomics Pte Ltd Letter and word choice text input method for keyboards and reduced keyboard systems
US7533351B2 (en) 2003-08-13 2009-05-12 International Business Machines Corporation Method, apparatus, and program for dynamic expansion and overlay of controls
US7499040B2 (en) 2003-08-18 2009-03-03 Apple Inc. Movable touch pad with added functionality
KR100537280B1 (en) 2003-10-29 2005-12-16 삼성전자주식회사 Apparatus and method for inputting character using touch screen in portable terminal
WO2005069159A1 (en) 2004-01-14 2005-07-28 Aroop Kumar Banerjee Method of data entry for indic languages
JP2005202527A (en) 2004-01-14 2005-07-28 Fujitsu Component Ltd Input device and user authentication method
US8042056B2 (en) 2004-03-16 2011-10-18 Leica Geosystems Ag Browsers for large geometric data visualization
US20090240949A9 (en) 2004-04-23 2009-09-24 Kitchens Fred L Identity authentication based on keystroke latencies using a genetic adaptive neural network
US7439959B2 (en) 2004-07-30 2008-10-21 Research In Motion Limited Key arrangement for a keyboard
US20060033724A1 (en) 2004-07-30 2006-02-16 Apple Computer, Inc. Virtual input device placement on a touch screen user interface
US7614008B2 (en) 2004-07-30 2009-11-03 Apple Inc. Operation of a computer with touch screen interface
US8479122B2 (en) 2004-07-30 2013-07-02 Apple Inc. Gestures for touch sensitive input devices
US20060176283A1 (en) 2004-08-06 2006-08-10 Daniel Suraqui Finger activated reduced keyboard and a method for performing text input
WO2006036887A2 (en) 2004-09-28 2006-04-06 Yost David A Improved system of gui text cursor, caret, and selection
US7561145B2 (en) 2005-03-18 2009-07-14 Microsoft Corporation Systems, methods, and computer-readable media for invoking an electronic ink or handwriting interface
GB0505941D0 (en) 2005-03-23 2005-04-27 Patel Sanjay Human-to-mobile interfaces
US7680333B2 (en) 2005-04-21 2010-03-16 Microsoft Corporation System and method for binary persistence format for a recognition result lattice
US7487461B2 (en) 2005-05-04 2009-02-03 International Business Machines Corporation System and method for issuing commands based on pen motions on a graphical keyboard
US20090193334A1 (en) 2005-05-18 2009-07-30 Exb Asset Management Gmbh Predictive text input system and method involving two concurrent ranking means
US8036878B2 (en) 2005-05-18 2011-10-11 Never Wall Treuhand GmbH Device incorporating improved text input mechanism
US7886233B2 (en) 2005-05-23 2011-02-08 Nokia Corporation Electronic text input involving word completion functionality for predicting word candidates for partial word inputs
US9019209B2 (en) 2005-06-08 2015-04-28 3M Innovative Properties Company Touch location determination involving multiple touch location processes
KR100709320B1 (en) 2005-06-17 2007-04-20 삼성전자주식회사 Method and system for printing
JP4619882B2 (en) 2005-07-12 2011-01-26 株式会社東芝 Mobile phone and the remote control method
US7443316B2 (en) 2005-09-01 2008-10-28 Motorola, Inc. Entering a character into an electronic device
US7539472B2 (en) 2005-09-13 2009-05-26 Microsoft Corporation Type-ahead keypad input for an input device
EP1934691A1 (en) 2005-09-14 2008-06-25 Nokia Corporation A device, method, computer program and user interface for enabling a user to vary which items are displayed to the user
CN101292213B (en) 2005-10-21 2014-09-24 三洋电机株式会社 Input device for inputting password or the like and mobile telephone having the input device
CN101317147B (en) 2005-12-13 2011-09-07 国际商业机器公司 Autocompletion method and system
US7657849B2 (en) 2005-12-23 2010-02-02 Apple Inc. Unlocking a device by performing gestures on an unlock image
US7877685B2 (en) 2005-12-29 2011-01-25 Sap Ag Persistent adjustable text selector
US20100045705A1 (en) 2006-03-30 2010-02-25 Roel Vertegaal Interaction techniques for flexible displays
KR100686165B1 (en) 2006-04-18 2007-02-15 엘지전자 주식회사 Portable terminal having osd function icon and method of displaying osd function icon using same
KR100771626B1 (en) 2006-04-25 2007-10-31 엘지전자 주식회사 Terminal device and method for inputting instructions thereto
US20070256029A1 (en) 2006-05-01 2007-11-01 Rpo Pty Llimited Systems And Methods For Interfacing A User With A Touch-Screen
JP2007299291A (en) 2006-05-01 2007-11-15 Sony Computer Entertainment Inc Character input device, character input method, and program
US20070263932A1 (en) 2006-05-12 2007-11-15 Waterloo Maple Inc. System and method of gesture feature recognition
US20070271466A1 (en) 2006-05-18 2007-11-22 Genevieve Mak Security or authentication system and method using manual input measurements, such as via user manipulation of a computer mouse
US7661068B2 (en) 2006-06-12 2010-02-09 Microsoft Corporation Extended eraser functions
US20080141125A1 (en) 2006-06-23 2008-06-12 Firooz Ghassabian Combined data entry systems
US20080033713A1 (en) 2006-07-10 2008-02-07 Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications Ab Predicting entered text
US7934156B2 (en) 2006-09-06 2011-04-26 Apple Inc. Deletion gestures on a portable multifunction device
US7941760B2 (en) 2006-09-06 2011-05-10 Apple Inc. Soft keyboard display for a portable multifunction device
US8564544B2 (en) 2006-09-06 2013-10-22 Apple Inc. Touch screen device, method, and graphical user interface for customizing display of content category icons
US7856605B2 (en) 2006-10-26 2010-12-21 Apple Inc. Method, system, and graphical user interface for positioning an insertion marker in a touch screen display
US8022934B2 (en) 2006-10-31 2011-09-20 Research In Motion Limited Handheld electronic device with text disambiguation and selective disabling of frequency learning
US7900145B2 (en) 2006-11-08 2011-03-01 Yahoo! Inc. System and method for synchronizing data
KR20080041856A (en) 2006-11-08 2008-05-14 팅크웨어(주) Method for displaying menu
WO2008057785A2 (en) 2006-11-08 2008-05-15 Cubic Design Studios Llc Asymmetric shuffle keyboard
US7692629B2 (en) 2006-12-07 2010-04-06 Microsoft Corporation Operating touch screen interfaces
US8125312B2 (en) 2006-12-08 2012-02-28 Research In Motion Limited System and method for locking and unlocking access to an electronic device
US8115658B2 (en) 2006-12-29 2012-02-14 Research In Motion Limited Handheld electronic device providing confirmation of input, and associated method
DE602006019893D1 (en) 2006-12-29 2011-03-10 Research In Motion Ltd A portable electronic device comprising input acknowledgment and corresponding method
US8074172B2 (en) 2007-01-05 2011-12-06 Apple Inc. Method, system, and graphical user interface for providing word recommendations
US7978176B2 (en) 2007-01-07 2011-07-12 Apple Inc. Portrait-landscape rotation heuristics for a portable multifunction device
US8665225B2 (en) 2007-01-07 2014-03-04 Apple Inc. Portable multifunction device, method, and graphical user interface for interpreting a finger gesture
US8607144B2 (en) 2007-01-08 2013-12-10 Apple Inc. Monitor configuration for media device
US20090213081A1 (en) 2007-01-10 2009-08-27 Case Jr Charlie W Portable Electronic Device Touchpad Input Controller
US8311530B2 (en) 2007-01-26 2012-11-13 Research In Motion Limited Touch entry of password on a mobile device
US8225203B2 (en) 2007-02-01 2012-07-17 Nuance Communications, Inc. Spell-check for a keyboard system with automatic correction
US8201087B2 (en) 2007-02-01 2012-06-12 Tegic Communications, Inc. Spell-check for a keyboard system with automatic correction
US7912700B2 (en) 2007-02-08 2011-03-22 Microsoft Corporation Context based word prediction
CA2581824A1 (en) 2007-03-14 2008-09-14 602531 British Columbia Ltd. System, apparatus and method for data entry using multi-function keys
CN101021762A (en) 2007-03-26 2007-08-22 宇龙计算机通信科技(深圳)有限公司 Touch screen locking device and method
CN101641944A (en) 2007-04-10 2010-02-03 诺基亚公司 Improvements in or relating to electronic devices
CN101641665B (en) 2007-04-12 2013-02-06 诺基亚公司 Keypad
US20080266261A1 (en) 2007-04-25 2008-10-30 Idzik Jacek S Keystroke Error Correction Method
US8130202B2 (en) 2007-05-01 2012-03-06 International Business Machines Corporation Infrared touch screen gated by touch force
CA2686592A1 (en) 2007-05-07 2008-11-13 Fourthwall Media Context-dependent prediction and learning with a universal re-entrant predictive text input software component
US8018441B2 (en) 2007-06-11 2011-09-13 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Character input apparatus and method for automatically switching input mode in terminal having touch screen
JP4775332B2 (en) 2007-06-14 2011-09-21 ブラザー工業株式会社 Image selection device and image selection method
US7970438B2 (en) 2007-06-19 2011-06-28 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal and keypad control method
US8059101B2 (en) 2007-06-22 2011-11-15 Apple Inc. Swipe gestures for touch screen keyboards
US8065624B2 (en) 2007-06-28 2011-11-22 Panasonic Corporation Virtual keypad systems and methods
US8009146B2 (en) 2007-06-28 2011-08-30 Nokia Corporation Method, apparatus and computer program product for facilitating data entry via a touchscreen
US8127254B2 (en) 2007-06-29 2012-02-28 Nokia Corporation Unlocking a touch screen device
US8365282B2 (en) 2007-07-18 2013-01-29 Research In Motion Limited Security system based on input shortcuts for a computer device
US20090044124A1 (en) 2007-08-06 2009-02-12 Nokia Corporation Method, apparatus and computer program product for facilitating data entry using an offset connection element
US20090058823A1 (en) 2007-09-04 2009-03-05 Apple Inc. Virtual Keyboards in Multi-Language Environment
US8661340B2 (en) 2007-09-13 2014-02-25 Apple Inc. Input methods for device having multi-language environment
CN100592249C (en) 2007-09-21 2010-02-24 上海汉翔信息技术有限公司 Method for quickly inputting related term
US8125458B2 (en) 2007-09-28 2012-02-28 Microsoft Corporation Detecting finger orientation on a touch-sensitive device
EP2045700A1 (en) 2007-10-04 2009-04-08 LG Electronics Inc. Menu display method for a mobile communication terminal
US20090125848A1 (en) 2007-11-14 2009-05-14 Susann Marie Keohane Touch surface-sensitive edit system
WO2009066289A2 (en) 2007-11-20 2009-05-28 Avi Elazari Character input system for limited keyboards
US7870164B2 (en) 2007-11-20 2011-01-11 Microsoft Corporation Database part creation, merge and reuse
US20090144667A1 (en) 2007-11-30 2009-06-04 Nokia Corporation Apparatus, method, computer program and user interface for enabling user input
JP2009139544A (en) 2007-12-05 2009-06-25 Denso Corp Input device
CN101464741B (en) 2007-12-19 2011-12-07 联想(北京)有限公司 Touchpad, touch pad and use a laptop with a touchpad
US8610671B2 (en) 2007-12-27 2013-12-17 Apple Inc. Insertion marker placement on touch sensitive display
TWI420344B (en) 2007-12-31 2013-12-21 Htc Corp Method for switching touch keyboard and handheld electronic device and storage medium using the same
US8232973B2 (en) 2008-01-09 2012-07-31 Apple Inc. Method, device, and graphical user interface providing word recommendations for text input
US8201109B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2012-06-12 Apple Inc. Methods and graphical user interfaces for editing on a portable multifunction device
US8650507B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2014-02-11 Apple Inc. Selecting of text using gestures
US8289283B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2012-10-16 Apple Inc. Language input interface on a device
US8358277B2 (en) 2008-03-18 2013-01-22 Microsoft Corporation Virtual keyboard based activation and dismissal
US8473843B2 (en) 2008-03-28 2013-06-25 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Correcting data inputted into a mobile communications device
JP2009245239A (en) 2008-03-31 2009-10-22 Sony Corp Pointer display device, pointer display/detection method, pointer display/detection program and information apparatus
US20090254818A1 (en) 2008-04-03 2009-10-08 International Business Machines Corporation Method, system and user interface for providing inline spelling assistance
EP2109046A1 (en) 2008-04-07 2009-10-14 ExB Asset Management GmbH Predictive text input system and method involving two concurrent ranking means
TWI361613B (en) 2008-04-16 2012-04-01 Htc Corp Mobile electronic device, method for entering screen lock state and recording medium thereof
CN101266520B (en) 2008-04-18 2013-03-27 上海触乐信息科技有限公司 System for accomplishing live keyboard layout
US8949743B2 (en) 2008-04-22 2015-02-03 Apple Inc. Language input interface on a device
US20090271731A1 (en) 2008-04-27 2009-10-29 Htc Corporation Electronic device and user interface display method thereof
JP2009288873A (en) 2008-05-27 2009-12-10 Ntt Docomo Inc Mobile terminal and character input method
US9355090B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2016-05-31 Apple Inc. Identification of candidate characters for text input
CN101604216B (en) 2008-06-10 2012-11-21 鸿富锦精密工业(深圳)有限公司 Password protection method
US8683582B2 (en) 2008-06-16 2014-03-25 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and system for graphical passcode security
JP4632102B2 (en) 2008-07-17 2011-02-23 ソニー株式会社 The information processing apparatus, information processing method and information processing program
US20100020033A1 (en) 2008-07-23 2010-01-28 Obinna Ihenacho Alozie Nwosu System, method and computer program product for a virtual keyboard
US20100020036A1 (en) 2008-07-23 2010-01-28 Edward Hui Portable electronic device and method of controlling same
US20100026650A1 (en) 2008-07-29 2010-02-04 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and system for emphasizing objects
US20100070908A1 (en) 2008-09-18 2010-03-18 Sun Microsystems, Inc. System and method for accepting or rejecting suggested text corrections
JP2010079441A (en) 2008-09-24 2010-04-08 Sharp Corp Mobile terminal, software keyboard display method, and software keyboard display program
US20100079413A1 (en) 2008-09-29 2010-04-01 Denso Corporation Control device
WO2010035574A1 (en) 2008-09-29 2010-04-01 シャープ株式会社 Input device, input method, program, and recording medium
WO2010041092A1 (en) 2008-10-07 2010-04-15 Tiki'labs Method and device for controlling an inputting data
KR20100042976A (en) 2008-10-17 2010-04-27 엘지전자 주식회사 Terminal and method for controlling the same
JP5371371B2 (en) 2008-10-29 2013-12-18 京セラ株式会社 The mobile terminal and the character display program
CN101533403B (en) 2008-11-07 2010-12-01 广东国笔科技股份有限公司 Derivative generating method and system
US9501694B2 (en) 2008-11-24 2016-11-22 Qualcomm Incorporated Pictorial methods for application selection and activation
US8671357B2 (en) 2008-11-25 2014-03-11 Jeffrey R. Spetalnick Methods and systems for improved data input, compression, recognition, correction, and translation through frequency-based language analysis
KR20100060192A (en) 2008-11-27 2010-06-07 삼성전자주식회사 Apparatus and method for controlling locking function with a direction sensor in a portable device
US9041660B2 (en) 2008-12-09 2015-05-26 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Soft keyboard control
US20100161538A1 (en) 2008-12-22 2010-06-24 Kennedy Jr Thomas William Device for user input
US8451236B2 (en) 2008-12-22 2013-05-28 Hewlett-Packard Development Company L.P. Touch-sensitive display screen with absolute and relative input modes
US8686952B2 (en) 2008-12-23 2014-04-01 Apple Inc. Multi touch with multi haptics
EP2400426B1 (en) 2009-01-30 2013-03-13 Research In Motion Limited System and method for access control in a portable electronic device
US8326358B2 (en) 2009-01-30 2012-12-04 Research In Motion Limited System and method for access control in a portable electronic device
US20100199176A1 (en) 2009-02-02 2010-08-05 Chronqvist Fredrik A Electronic device with text prediction function and method
EP2394208A1 (en) 2009-02-04 2011-12-14 Systems Ltd. Keyless Data entry system
US8605039B2 (en) 2009-03-06 2013-12-10 Zimpl Ab Text input
US20100235734A1 (en) 2009-03-16 2010-09-16 Bas Ording Methods and Graphical User Interfaces for Editing on a Multifunction Device with a Touch Screen Display
US8294680B2 (en) 2009-03-27 2012-10-23 Sony Mobile Communications Ab System and method for touch-based text entry
GB0905457D0 (en) 2009-03-30 2009-05-13 Touchtype Ltd System and method for inputting text into electronic devices
US8539382B2 (en) 2009-04-03 2013-09-17 Palm, Inc. Preventing unintentional activation and/or input in an electronic device
US9213477B2 (en) 2009-04-07 2015-12-15 Tara Chand Singhal Apparatus and method for touch screen user interface for handheld electric devices part II
US20100259482A1 (en) 2009-04-10 2010-10-14 Microsoft Corporation Keyboard gesturing
US8300023B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2012-10-30 Qualcomm Incorporated Virtual keypad generator with learning capabilities
KR101537706B1 (en) 2009-04-16 2015-07-20 엘지전자 주식회사 A mobile terminal and a control method
US20100265181A1 (en) 2009-04-20 2010-10-21 ShoreCap LLC System, method and computer readable media for enabling a user to quickly identify and select a key on a touch screen keypad by easing key selection
CN101876878A (en) 2009-04-29 2010-11-03 深圳富泰宏精密工业有限公司;奇美通讯股份有限公司 Word prediction input system and method
US8739055B2 (en) 2009-05-07 2014-05-27 Microsoft Corporation Correction of typographical errors on touch displays
US20100293475A1 (en) 2009-05-12 2010-11-18 International Business Machines Corporation Notification of additional recipients of email messages
JP5158014B2 (en) 2009-05-21 2013-03-06 ソニー株式会社 Display control device, display control method, and computer program
US20100313158A1 (en) 2009-06-08 2010-12-09 Lg Electronics Inc. Method for editing data in mobile terminal and mobile terminal using the same
US8856649B2 (en) 2009-06-08 2014-10-07 Business Objects Software Limited Aggregation level and measure based hinting and selection of cells in a data display
US20100315266A1 (en) 2009-06-15 2010-12-16 Microsoft Corporation Predictive interfaces with usability constraints
US8458485B2 (en) 2009-06-17 2013-06-04 Microsoft Corporation Image-based unlock functionality on a computing device
CN102461133A (en) 2009-06-26 2012-05-16 诺基亚公司 Method, apparatus and computer program code handling a user input
US20100333027A1 (en) 2009-06-26 2010-12-30 Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications Ab Delete slider mechanism
WO2011008861A2 (en) 2009-07-14 2011-01-20 Eatoni Ergonomics, Inc Keyboard comprising swipe-switches performing keyboard actions
US20110018812A1 (en) 2009-07-21 2011-01-27 Cisco Technology, Inc. Fast Typographical Error Correction for Touchscreen Keyboards
US20110029862A1 (en) 2009-07-30 2011-02-03 Research In Motion Limited System and method for context based predictive text entry assistance
EP2282252A1 (en) 2009-07-31 2011-02-09 France Telecom Method of and apparatus for converting a character sequence input
US20110041056A1 (en) 2009-08-14 2011-02-17 Research In Motion Limited Electronic device with touch-sensitive display and method of facilitating input at the electronic device
US8531410B2 (en) 2009-08-18 2013-09-10 Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd. Finger occlusion avoidance on touch display devices
WO2011025200A2 (en) 2009-08-23 2011-03-03 (주)티피다시아이 Information input system and method using extension key
US9262063B2 (en) 2009-09-02 2016-02-16 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Touch-screen user interface
TW201109990A (en) 2009-09-04 2011-03-16 Higgstec Inc Touch gesture detecting method of a touch panel
US20110060984A1 (en) 2009-09-06 2011-03-10 Lee Yung-Chao Method and apparatus for word prediction of text input by assigning different priorities to words on a candidate word list according to how many letters have been entered so far by a user
US20110063231A1 (en) 2009-09-14 2011-03-17 Invotek, Inc. Method and Device for Data Input
US8516367B2 (en) 2009-09-29 2013-08-20 Verizon Patent And Licensing Inc. Proximity weighted predictive key entry
US8812972B2 (en) 2009-09-30 2014-08-19 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Dynamic generation of soft keyboards for mobile devices
US9122393B2 (en) 2009-09-30 2015-09-01 At&T Mobility Ii Llc Predictive sensitized keypad
WO2011044663A1 (en) 2009-10-14 2011-04-21 Research In Motion Limited Touch-input determination based on relative sizes of contact areas
WO2011056610A2 (en) 2009-10-26 2011-05-12 Google Inc. Predictive text entry for input devices
US8627224B2 (en) 2009-10-27 2014-01-07 Qualcomm Incorporated Touch screen keypad layout
EP2320312A1 (en) 2009-11-10 2011-05-11 Research In Motion Limited Portable electronic device and method of controlling same
KR101595029B1 (en) 2009-11-18 2016-02-17 엘지전자 주식회사 A mobile terminal and a control method
TW201122890A (en) 2009-12-18 2011-07-01 Best Solution Technology Inc Touch-control lock operated according to gesture or figure.
KR20120107110A (en) 2009-12-20 2012-09-28 키리스 시스템즈 리미티드 Features of data entry system
KR20110071612A (en) 2009-12-21 2011-06-29 삼성전자주식회사 Image forming apparatus and character input method of document thereof
US20110171617A1 (en) 2010-01-11 2011-07-14 Ideographix, Inc. System and method for teaching pictographic languages
US20110179355A1 (en) 2010-01-15 2011-07-21 Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications Ab Virtual information input arrangement
US8782556B2 (en) 2010-02-12 2014-07-15 Microsoft Corporation User-centric soft keyboard predictive technologies
US20110202835A1 (en) 2010-02-13 2011-08-18 Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications Ab Item selection method for touch screen devices
JP5556270B2 (en) 2010-03-17 2014-07-23 富士通株式会社 Method candidate display device and a candidate display
US9292161B2 (en) 2010-03-24 2016-03-22 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Pointer tool with touch-enabled precise placement
CN102202130A (en) 2010-03-25 2011-09-28 鸿富锦精密工业(深圳)有限公司 Electronic device with unlocking and locking functions and unlocking and locking method thereof
US20110242138A1 (en) 2010-03-31 2011-10-06 Tribble Guy L Device, Method, and Graphical User Interface with Concurrent Virtual Keyboards
US8502856B2 (en) 2010-04-07 2013-08-06 Apple Inc. In conference display adjustments
KR101642725B1 (en) 2010-04-14 2016-08-11 삼성전자 주식회사 Method and apparatus for managing lock function in mobile terminal
EP2381384B1 (en) 2010-04-21 2019-02-27 BlackBerry Limited Method of providing security on a portable electronic device having a touch-sensitive display
DE102010020474A1 (en) 2010-05-14 2011-11-17 Deutsche Telekom Ag Touch screen display with function lock
WO2011146740A2 (en) 2010-05-19 2011-11-24 Google Inc. Sliding motion to change computer keys
US20110302518A1 (en) 2010-06-07 2011-12-08 Google Inc. Selecting alternate keyboard characters via motion input
US20110305494A1 (en) 2010-06-11 2011-12-15 Chulho Kang Portable and ease-of-use ergonomic keyboard
KR101694154B1 (en) 2010-06-29 2017-01-09 엘지전자 주식회사 Mobile terminal and operation control method thereof
JP5573457B2 (en) 2010-07-23 2014-08-20 ソニー株式会社 The information processing apparatus, information processing method and information processing program
US20120030566A1 (en) 2010-07-28 2012-02-02 Victor B Michael System with touch-based selection of data items
US8918734B2 (en) 2010-07-28 2014-12-23 Nuance Communications, Inc. Reduced keyboard with prediction solutions when input is a partial sliding trajectory
US8799815B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2014-08-05 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for activating an item in a folder
US20120030624A1 (en) 2010-07-30 2012-02-02 Migos Charles J Device, Method, and Graphical User Interface for Displaying Menus
JP5510185B2 (en) 2010-08-20 2014-06-04 ソニー株式会社 The information processing apparatus, a program and a display control method
US8904311B2 (en) 2010-09-01 2014-12-02 Nokia Corporation Method, apparatus, and computer program product for implementing a variable content movable control
US9122318B2 (en) 2010-09-15 2015-09-01 Jeffrey R. Spetalnick Methods of and systems for reducing keyboard data entry errors
US20120068937A1 (en) 2010-09-16 2012-03-22 Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications Ab Quick input language/virtual keyboard/ language dictionary change on a touch screen device
KR101178294B1 (en) 2010-09-20 2012-08-29 진병욱 keyboard comprising delete key or backspace key of sliding type
JP5657973B2 (en) 2010-09-24 2015-01-21 Necエンベデッドプロダクツ株式会社 The information processing apparatus, the selected character display method and program
US8516386B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2013-08-20 Apple Inc. Scrolling virtual music keyboard
KR101688944B1 (en) 2010-10-01 2016-12-22 엘지전자 주식회사 Keyboard controlling apparatus and method thereof
US9027117B2 (en) 2010-10-04 2015-05-05 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Multiple-access-level lock screen
JP5782699B2 (en) 2010-10-15 2015-09-24 ソニー株式会社 The information processing apparatus, an input control method, and a program of an information processing apparatus
US20120102401A1 (en) 2010-10-25 2012-04-26 Nokia Corporation Method and apparatus for providing text selection
US9104306B2 (en) 2010-10-29 2015-08-11 Avago Technologies General Ip (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Translation of directional input to gesture
US8547354B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2013-10-01 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for manipulating soft keyboards
GB2485999A (en) 2010-11-30 2012-06-06 St Microelectronics Res & Dev Optical keyboard each key recognising multiple different inputs
US20120167009A1 (en) 2010-12-22 2012-06-28 Apple Inc. Combining timing and geometry information for typing correction
US20120200514A1 (en) 2011-02-07 2012-08-09 Allen James M Graphical Caregiver Interface With Swipe to Unlock Feature
US20120223959A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2012-09-06 Apple Inc. System and method for a touchscreen slider with toggle control
US20120249595A1 (en) 2011-03-31 2012-10-04 Feinstein David Y Area selection for hand held devices with display
US10222974B2 (en) 2011-05-03 2019-03-05 Nokia Technologies Oy Method and apparatus for providing quick access to device functionality
US8656315B2 (en) 2011-05-27 2014-02-18 Google Inc. Moving a graphical selector
US9092130B2 (en) 2011-05-31 2015-07-28 Apple Inc. Devices, methods, and graphical user interfaces for document manipulation
CN105955617B (en) 2011-06-03 2019-07-12 谷歌有限责任公司 For selecting the gesture of text
US20130007606A1 (en) 2011-06-30 2013-01-03 Nokia Corporation Text deletion
US9746995B2 (en) 2011-07-14 2017-08-29 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Launcher for context based menus
US20130050222A1 (en) 2011-08-25 2013-02-28 Dov Moran Keyboard with embedded display
US20130067411A1 (en) 2011-09-08 2013-03-14 Google Inc. User gestures indicating rates of execution of functions
US9262076B2 (en) 2011-09-12 2016-02-16 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Soft keyboard interface
US9785251B2 (en) 2011-09-14 2017-10-10 Apple Inc. Actuation lock for a touch sensitive mechanical keyboard
US20130080962A1 (en) 2011-09-26 2013-03-28 Mahmoud Razzaghi Touch screen alpha numeric keyboard
US20130104068A1 (en) 2011-10-20 2013-04-25 Microsoft Corporation Text prediction key
US9715489B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2017-07-25 Blackberry Limited Displaying a prediction candidate after a typing mistake
US8490008B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2013-07-16 Research In Motion Limited Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters
US20130120268A1 (en) 2011-11-10 2013-05-16 Research In Motion Limited Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters
US9310889B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2016-04-12 Blackberry Limited Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters
CA2820997C (en) 2012-07-13 2016-10-18 Research In Motion Limited Methods and systems for removing or replacing on-keyboard prediction candidates
US9122672B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2015-09-01 Blackberry Limited In-letter word prediction for virtual keyboard
US9652448B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2017-05-16 Blackberry Limited Methods and systems for removing or replacing on-keyboard prediction candidates
US9557913B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2017-01-31 Blackberry Limited Virtual keyboard display having a ticker proximate to the virtual keyboard
EP2618248B1 (en) 2012-01-19 2017-08-16 BlackBerry Limited Virtual keyboard providing an indication of received input
GB2503968A (en) 2012-02-24 2014-01-15 Blackberry Ltd Touchscreen keyboard providing word predictions in partitions of the touchscreen keyboard in proximate association with candidate letters
EP2631768B1 (en) 2012-02-24 2018-07-11 BlackBerry Limited Portable electronic device including touch-sensitive display and method of controlling same
US9223497B2 (en) 2012-03-16 2015-12-29 Blackberry Limited In-context word prediction and word correction
US9201510B2 (en) 2012-04-16 2015-12-01 Blackberry Limited Method and device having touchscreen keyboard with visual cues
US20130271385A1 (en) 2012-04-16 2013-10-17 Research In Motion Limited Method of Changing Input States
CA2812457C (en) 2012-04-16 2017-03-21 Research In Motion Limited Method and device having touchscreen keyboard with visual cues
EP2653955B1 (en) 2012-04-16 2017-02-08 BlackBerry Limited Method and device having touchscreen keyboard with visual cues
CA2813393A1 (en) 2012-04-30 2013-10-30 Research In Motion Limited Touchscreen keyboard providing word predictions at locations in association with candidate letters
EP2660696B1 (en) 2012-04-30 2014-06-11 BlackBerry Limited Method and apparatus for text selection
US20130285916A1 (en) 2012-04-30 2013-10-31 Research In Motion Limited Touchscreen keyboard providing word predictions at locations in association with candidate letters
US9292192B2 (en) 2012-04-30 2016-03-22 Blackberry Limited Method and apparatus for text selection
US9354805B2 (en) 2012-04-30 2016-05-31 Blackberry Limited Method and apparatus for text selection
US20130285927A1 (en) 2012-04-30 2013-10-31 Research In Motion Limited Touchscreen keyboard with correction of previously input text
CA2832392A1 (en) 2012-04-30 2013-11-07 Jerome Pasquero Touchscreen keyboard with correction of previously input text
GB2506956A (en) 2012-04-30 2014-04-16 Blackberry Ltd Method and apparatus for text selection
US10025487B2 (en) 2012-04-30 2018-07-17 Blackberry Limited Method and apparatus for text selection
EP2660727B1 (en) 2012-04-30 2016-10-26 BlackBerry Limited Method and apparatus for text selection
EP2660699A1 (en) 2012-04-30 2013-11-06 BlackBerry Limited Touchscreen keyboard with correction of previously input text
EP2660697B1 (en) 2012-04-30 2017-03-01 BlackBerry Limited Method and apparatus for text selection
US9207860B2 (en) 2012-05-25 2015-12-08 Blackberry Limited Method and apparatus for detecting a gesture
US20130342452A1 (en) 2012-06-21 2013-12-26 Research In Motion Limited Electronic device including touch-sensitive display and method of controlling a position indicator
EP2680120B1 (en) 2012-06-27 2018-03-21 BlackBerry Limited Touchscreen keyboard providing selection of word predictions in partitions of the touchscreen keyboard
US9116552B2 (en) 2012-06-27 2015-08-25 Blackberry Limited Touchscreen keyboard providing selection of word predictions in partitions of the touchscreen keyboard
EP2703956B1 (en) 2012-08-31 2014-11-26 BlackBerry Limited Ranking predictions based on typing speed and typing confidence
EP2703955B1 (en) 2012-08-31 2014-11-26 BlackBerry Limited Scoring predictions based on prediction length and typing speed
US9524290B2 (en) 2012-08-31 2016-12-20 Blackberry Limited Scoring predictions based on prediction length and typing speed
US9063653B2 (en) 2012-08-31 2015-06-23 Blackberry Limited Ranking predictions based on typing speed and typing confidence
US20140063067A1 (en) 2012-08-31 2014-03-06 Research In Motion Limited Method to select word by swiping capacitive keyboard
EP2703957B1 (en) 2012-08-31 2018-06-06 BlackBerry Limited Method to select word by swiping capacitive keyboard
KR101380430B1 (en) 2012-12-20 2014-04-01 주식회사 팬택 Portable terminal for providing convenience information during call and method for providing convenience information during call in portable terminal

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7318019B1 (en) * 2000-11-17 2008-01-08 Semantic Compaction Systems Word output device and matrix keyboard for use therein
US20030182279A1 (en) * 2002-03-19 2003-09-25 Willows Kevin John Progressive prefix input method for data entry
US20070015297A1 (en) * 2002-11-27 2007-01-18 Lsi Logic Corporation Failure analysis vehicle for yield enhancement with self test at speed burnin capability for reliability testing
US20060026566A1 (en) * 2004-07-27 2006-02-02 Texas Instruments Incorporated Method and system for thread abstraction
US20130004654A1 (en) * 2004-11-08 2013-01-03 Nitto Denko Corporation Reactive polymer-supported porous film for for battery separator, method for producing the porous film, method for producing battery using the porous film, and electrode/porous film assembly
US20060265668A1 (en) * 2005-05-23 2006-11-23 Roope Rainisto Electronic text input involving a virtual keyboard and word completion functionality on a touch-sensitive display screen
US20070152979A1 (en) * 2006-01-05 2007-07-05 Jobs Steven P Text Entry Interface for a Portable Communication Device
US7694231B2 (en) * 2006-01-05 2010-04-06 Apple Inc. Keyboards for portable electronic devices
US20090259962A1 (en) * 2006-03-17 2009-10-15 Marc Ivor John Beale Character Input Method
WO2010003557A1 (en) * 2008-07-11 2010-01-14 Frauenhofer- Gesellschaft Zur Förderung Der Angewandten Forschung E. V. Apparatus and method for generating a bandwidth extended signal
US20130046544A1 (en) * 2010-03-12 2013-02-21 Nuance Communications, Inc. Multimodal text input system, such as for use with touch screens on mobile phones

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9310889B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2016-04-12 Blackberry Limited Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters
US9715489B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2017-07-25 Blackberry Limited Displaying a prediction candidate after a typing mistake
US9652448B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2017-05-16 Blackberry Limited Methods and systems for removing or replacing on-keyboard prediction candidates
US9122672B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2015-09-01 Blackberry Limited In-letter word prediction for virtual keyboard
US9032322B2 (en) 2011-11-10 2015-05-12 Blackberry Limited Touchscreen keyboard predictive display and generation of a set of characters
US9152323B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2015-10-06 Blackberry Limited Virtual keyboard providing an indication of received input
US9557913B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2017-01-31 Blackberry Limited Virtual keyboard display having a ticker proximate to the virtual keyboard
US9910588B2 (en) 2012-02-24 2018-03-06 Blackberry Limited Touchscreen keyboard providing word predictions in partitions of the touchscreen keyboard in proximate association with candidate letters
US9201510B2 (en) 2012-04-16 2015-12-01 Blackberry Limited Method and device having touchscreen keyboard with visual cues
US9207860B2 (en) 2012-05-25 2015-12-08 Blackberry Limited Method and apparatus for detecting a gesture
US9116552B2 (en) 2012-06-27 2015-08-25 Blackberry Limited Touchscreen keyboard providing selection of word predictions in partitions of the touchscreen keyboard
US9524290B2 (en) 2012-08-31 2016-12-20 Blackberry Limited Scoring predictions based on prediction length and typing speed
US9063653B2 (en) 2012-08-31 2015-06-23 Blackberry Limited Ranking predictions based on typing speed and typing confidence

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US9032322B2 (en) 2015-05-12
US8490008B2 (en) 2013-07-16
US20130125034A1 (en) 2013-05-16
US20130125036A1 (en) 2013-05-16

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9172789B2 (en) Contextual search by a mobile communications device
KR101265431B1 (en) The input method for a device with the language environment
US8407603B2 (en) Portable electronic device for instant messaging multiple recipients
US9954996B2 (en) Portable electronic device with conversation management for incoming instant messages
CN101063920B (en) Terminal device and method for inputting instructions thereto
US9600174B2 (en) Portable electronic device for instant messaging
US10235034B2 (en) Haptic feedback to abnormal computing events
US20110167350A1 (en) Assist Features For Content Display Device
CN101593080B (en) Identification of candidate characters for text input
US7694231B2 (en) Keyboards for portable electronic devices
US20140351760A1 (en) Order-independent text input
AU2008100006A4 (en) Method, system, and graphical user interface for providing word recommendations
CN103038728B (en) E.g. using a touch screen on the multi-mode mobile telephone text input system
US8605039B2 (en) Text input
US7574672B2 (en) Text entry interface for a portable communication device
JP5166255B2 (en) Data input system
US8812972B2 (en) Dynamic generation of soft keyboards for mobile devices
US7860536B2 (en) Telephone interface for a portable communication device
US10191654B2 (en) System and method for inputting text into electronic devices
US20070152980A1 (en) Touch Screen Keyboards for Portable Electronic Devices
US20090187846A1 (en) Method, Apparatus and Computer Program product for Providing a Word Input Mechanism
US20120019446A1 (en) Interaction with ime computing device
US20070040811A1 (en) Navigational interface providing auxiliary character support for mobile and wearable computers
US20100161538A1 (en) Device for user input
US8289283B2 (en) Language input interface on a device

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: RESEARCH IN MOTION LIMITED, CANADA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:GRIFFIN, JASON TYLER;PASQUERO, JEROME;REEL/FRAME:030618/0944

Effective date: 20111207

AS Assignment

Owner name: BLACKBERRY LIMITED, ONTARIO

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:RESEARCH IN MOTION LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:033987/0576

Effective date: 20130709

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: FINAL REJECTION MAILED