US20130167024A1 - Embedded document within an application - Google Patents

Embedded document within an application Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20130167024A1
US20130167024A1 US11567111 US56711106A US2013167024A1 US 20130167024 A1 US20130167024 A1 US 20130167024A1 US 11567111 US11567111 US 11567111 US 56711106 A US56711106 A US 56711106A US 2013167024 A1 US2013167024 A1 US 2013167024A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
document
application
portion
external module
system
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11567111
Inventor
Rupen Chanda
Pruthvish Shankarappa
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Adobe Systems Inc
Original Assignee
Adobe Systems Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/08Payment architectures
    • G06Q20/14Payment architectures specially adapted for billing systems
    • G06Q20/145Payments according to the detected use or quantity
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F17/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific functions
    • G06F17/20Handling natural language data
    • G06F17/21Text processing
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F17/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific functions
    • G06F17/20Handling natural language data
    • G06F17/21Text processing
    • G06F17/211Formatting, i.e. changing of presentation of document
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F17/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific functions
    • G06F17/20Handling natural language data
    • G06F17/21Text processing
    • G06F17/211Formatting, i.e. changing of presentation of document
    • G06F17/212Display of layout of document; Preview
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q30/00Commerce, e.g. shopping or e-commerce
    • G06Q30/04Billing or invoicing, e.g. tax processing in connection with a sale
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/04Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications adapted for terminals or networks with limited resources or for terminal portability, e.g. wireless application protocol [WAP]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/34Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications involving the movement of software or configuration parameters

Abstract

Data structures, methods, program products and systems for creating and executing an executable file for the Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless (BREW) where the file is capable of causing presentation of a document embedded in the file on a BREW system.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • This invention relates to software development, and more particularly to content distribution.
  • It can be difficult for content publishers to create engaging experiences for new mobile phones and other consumer electronics devices since such devices typically have proprietary hardware interfaces and lack mature software development tools. Moreover, content developed for one device may not be compatible with other devices. To overcome this issue, content publishers may need to create custom presentation software for each device to which they publish content. However, this makes publishing content to different devices cumbersome at best.
  • SUMMARY
  • In general, one aspect of the subject matter described in this specification can be embodied in a data structure within a computer memory. The data structure comprises an application for the Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless (BREW), the application includes an executable portion and a document portion. The executable portion is capable of signaling an external module to cause presentation of the document by the external module.
  • These and other aspects can optionally include one or more of the following features. The document can be one of: a Flash document, a Shockwave document, or a Portable Document Format (PDF) document. The document can be compressed, encrypted or both. The external module can be a BREW extension. The external module is compiled separately from the application.
  • In general, another aspect of the subject matter described in this specification can be embodied in a data structure within a computer memory. The data structure comprises an executable module for BREW. The executable module includes an executable portion and a Flash content portion, where the executable portion is capable of causing the presentation of the Flash content on a mobile device.
  • These and other aspects can optionally include one or more of the following features. The document can be compressed, encrypted or both. The external module can be a BREW extension. The external module can be compiled separately from the application.
  • In general, another aspect of the subject matter described in this specification can be embodied in a method that includes identifying an executable module for BREW capable of causing presentation of a document by signaling an external module. The document is identified and incorporated into the executable module. Other embodiments of this aspect include corresponding systems, apparatus, and computer program products.
  • These and other aspects can optionally include one or more of the following features. The document can be one of: a Flash document, a Shockwave document, or a Portable Document Format (PDF) document. The document can be compressed, encrypted or both. The external module can be a BREW extension. The external module can be compiled separately from the application.
  • In general, another aspect of the subject matter described in this specification can be embodied in a method that includes identifying an application for BREW. The application includes an executable portion and a document portion. The executable portion is executed, where the execution causes presentation of the document portion by signaling an external module capable of causing the presentation of the document. Other embodiments of this aspect include corresponding systems, apparatus, and computer program products.
  • These and other aspects can optionally include one or more of the following features. The document can be one of: a Flash document, a Shockwave document, or a Portable Document Format (PDF) document. The external module can be a BREW extension. The external module can be compiled separately from the application. An account can be debited or credited based on the identifying, the executing or the signaling. An account to be debited or credited based on receiving the application and the external module.
  • In general, another aspect of the subject matter described in this specification can be embodied in a method that includes receiving a BREW application that contains a document. An external module is received and the application is executed, where the executing causes presentation of the document by signaling the external module. An account is debited or credited based on the receiving, the executing or the signaling. Other embodiments of this aspect include corresponding systems, apparatus, and computer program products.
  • These and other aspects can optionally include one or more of the following features. The document can one of: a Flash document, a Shockwave document, or a Portable Document Format (PDF) document. The external module can be a BREW extension. The external module can be compiled separately from the application.
  • Particular embodiments of the subject matter described in this specification can be implemented to realize one or more of the following advantages. Documents can be easily packaged for presentation in a BREW environment. Document distribution and presentation can automatically tie into a revenue generation system. Necessary presentation software can be automatically downloaded on the target device when the document is first presented to a user. Since the content is part of a binary package the package provides implicit security to the content. Since content is part of the binary module and the binary module is loaded by the system no additional run time memory may be required to load the content.
  • The details of one or more embodiments of the invention are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features, objects, and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the description and drawings, and from the claims.
  • DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of the creation and distribution of an escort application.
  • FIG. 2 is a flow chart of the creation and distribution of an escort application.
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram illustrating the execution of an escort application.
  • FIG. 4A is a flow chart of the execution of an escort application.
  • FIG. 4B is another flow chart of the execution of an escort application.
  • FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of a client.
  • Like reference symbols in the various drawings indicate like elements.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram 100 of the creation and distribution of an application program 102 b created for the Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless (BREW), available from Qualcomm Incorporated of San Diego, California. BREW is an application development platform created by Qualcomm for wireless devices. The wireless device 112, hereafter referred to as a “client”, can be a cellular phone, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a Blackberry, a laptop computer, a Pocket PC, an electronic gaming device, a media player, or combinations of these. In some implementations, the client 112 does not have wireless connectivity. An advantage of the BREW platform is that it hides specifics of the underlying device from applications which allows applications to be easily ported to different devices.
  • A so-called “escort” application program (e.g., 102 b) encapsulates a document (e.g., 104) such as, for example, an Adobe Flash document, and enables the document to be downloaded to and presented on clients that support BREW (e.g., 112). Flash and Flash Player are available from Adobe Systems Incorporated of San Jose, California. Adobe Flash is an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) for developing Flash documents that support, for instance, rich content, user interfaces, and web applications. Adobe Flash Player is a multiple-platform virtual machine used to present Flash documents. Flash is commonly used to create interactive web page content such as advertisements, integrate video into web pages, and create rich, client-side applications, for example.
  • A BREW system includes a set of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) 106 for running software on clients (e.g., 112). The APIs 106 allow application software (e.g., 102 b) to be independent of client's native software 114. The BREW APIs 106 provide applications access to a client's communication systems, input systems (e.g., microphones, cameras), and output systems (e.g., displays, speakers). Moreover, the BREW APIs 106 also allow applications to take advantage of an automatic billing model which can automatically charge a user for downloading an application or parts of an application, running an application, or combinations of these.
  • To create the escort application 102 b, a software developer 108 first creates or identifies a document 104 for presentation on the client device 112. The document 104 can include text, graphics, sound, animation, other multimedia content, and combinations of these. The document 104 is not limited to a particular content format and can contain interactive content. For example, the document 104 can be formatted as a Shockwave (from Adobe Systems Incorporated), Portable Document Format (PDF), Flash, Flash Lite (from Adobe Systems Incorporated), a sound or music file, an electronic game executable, a movie or animation file, or graphic file, etc. The document 104 can additionally be compressed, encrypted or both.
  • The developer 108 uses a software development tool to combine a document loader portion 102 a with the document 104 to create the BREW escort application 102 b. The document loader portion 102 a is a BREW application. In some implementations, the software development tool can insert the document 104 contents into a data segment of the document loader portion 102 a. The new escort application 102 b can be uploaded to a BREW Distribution System (BDS) as an item within a BDS catalog 110. The BDS catalog 110 is a system in which BREW applications are made available over a wireless service provider to end users through a wireless service provider's Application Download Server (ADS). A wireless service provider, also known as a wireless carrier, mobile phone operator, or cellular provider, is a company that provides communication services for its subscribers' wireless devices.
  • A client user can browse a wireless service provider's ADS to locate BREW applications available within the BDS catalog 110, such as the escort application 102 b, for download to the client 112. Once the escort application 102 b is downloaded to the client 112, a user can choose to execute the escort application 102 b or the escort application 102 b can automatically execute. Execution of the escort application 102 b causes execution of the document loader portion 102 a which, in turn, causes presentation of the document 104 on the client 112, as will be described in more detail below.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a flow chart of a method 200 for the creation and distribution of an escort application (e.g., 102 b). A document (e.g., 104) is identified for eventual presentation on a client (e.g., 112; step 202). For example, the document can be a Flash document or a PDF document. A document loader portion (e.g., 102 a) is identified which contains instructions capable of causing presentation of the document on a client (e.g. 112; step 204). In some implementations, the document loader portion is specific to the type of document. In addition, the document loader portion can be specific to the type of client user billing desired (e.g. pay-per-download, pay-per-play, etc.).
  • The document and the document loader portion are then incorporated into an escort application (e.g. 102 b; step 206). A software development tool, for example a compiler product, can bundle a document with a document loader into an escort application. The development tool can also compress and/or encrypt the document. The escort application is then published in an application catalog such as the BDS catalog, for example (step 208). This makes the escort application available to users for downloading into their clients. In some implementations, a client device's wireless service provider provides client access to the catalog and facilitates downloading of the escort application from its servers.
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram 300 illustrating the execution of an escort application. The client 112 can communicate with a wireless service provider network 304 in order to communicate with other clients, such as by sending/receiving instant messages and placing/recieving telephone calls, for example. Additionally, the client 112 can download applications (e.g., escort applications) selected from the BDS catalog 110, or other catalog, by way of the wireless service provider network 304, for example. The server 302 provides access to BREW applications stored in the catalog 110.
  • The escort application 102 b is dependent on one or more external modules which are needed to present the document 104. An external module is compiled separately from the escort application 102 b. In some implementations, an external module is a BREW extension. Extensions are module software that can be downloaded once and shared by a number of applications, similar to Dynamic Link Libraries (DLL) in the Microsoft Windows and Unix operating systems. During or after the escort application 102 b has been downloaded to the client 112, one or more external modules (e.g., 306 and 308) which are needed by the escort application 102 b are automatically downloaded from a server (e.g., 302) by the BREW system if they are have not already been downloaded.
  • The escort application 102 b can begin to execute automatically after the download process has completed, or the escort application 102 b can be explicitly invoked by the user. The escort application 102 b interacts with the public extension 308 by way of one or more APIs, for example, to cause the public extension 308 to present the document 104 bundled within the escort application 102 b. For example, a public extension 308 API function call could take as arguments the location of the document 104 within the escort application 102 b, the document 104's type, the document's 104 length, and other suitable parameters. With this information, the public extension 308 can obtain and present the document 104, such as by providing the document or a reference to the document to a Flash player or a PDF viewer.
  • In some implementations, the means for presenting the document 104 is incorporated into the public extension 308. In other implementations, the means is incorporated into a private extension 306 so that the escort application 102 does not interact directly with the private extension 306. Instead, the public extension 308 interacts with the private extension 306 on behalf of the escort application 102 b. The private extension 306 can include a fine level of granularity in its API which can be taken advantage of by the public extension 308 for controlling the presentation of the document 104. The private extension 306 API can be hidden from applications such that, in some implementations, only through the public extension 308 can an application interact with the private extension 306. This has the advantage of providing a simpler API to applications by hiding more complex APIs behind the public extension 308.
  • FIG. 4A is a flow chart of a method 400 for the execution of an escort application. The client (e.g., 112) identifies an escort application for execution (e.g., 102 b; step 402). For example, such identification can be caused by a user invoking the escort application from a graphical user interface on the client. The client executes the executable portion of the escort application (e.g., 102 a; step 404). The escort application signals an external module capable (e.g., 308) capable of causing presentation of the document portion of the BREW application (step 406). The document (e.g., 104) is then presented on the client.
  • FIG. 4B is another flow chart of a method 400 for the execution of an escort application. A BREW application containing a document is received (e.g., by a client; step 403). An external module (e.g., 306, 308) is received (step 405). The application is then executed, where the execution causes presentation of the document by signaling the received external module (step 407). An account associated with the client is debited or credited based on the first receiving, the second receiving, the executing or the signaling (step 409).
  • A revenue generation system is built into the BREW environment that allows an account to be automatically charged for downloading files, executing applications, or combinations of these, according to a billing model. In one implementation, the BREW application performs calls to one or more BREW extensions to verify access to the application. For example, a previously downloaded application can require additional payment in order to run because the monthly license for content access has expired. In this circumstance, a BREW extension can be used to enact a debit to the user's wireless service provider service account. In another implementation, a BREW extension can be used to trigger a credit to a user's wireless service provider service account.
  • FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of a generic client 500, such as a cell phone, a smart phone, an electronic game device, a personal digital assistance, a digital media player, other devices, and combinations of these. The system 500 can be used for practicing operations described in association with the flow diagrams 400 and 401. The system 500 can include a processor 510, a memory 520, a storage device 530, and input/output devices 540. Each of the components 510, 520, 530, and 540 are interconnected using a system bus 550. The processor 510 is capable of processing instructions for execution within the system 500. Such executed instructions can implement one or more components of system 300, for example. In one implementation, the processor 510 is a single-threaded processor. In another implementation, the processor 510 is a multi-threaded processor. The processor 510 is capable of processing instructions stored in the memory 520 or on the storage device 530 to display graphical information for a user interface on the input/output device 540.
  • The memory 520 is a computer readable medium such as volatile or non volatile that stores information within the system 500. The memory 520 could store data structures representing one or more applications 102 b, a private extension 306 and a public extension 308, for example. The storage device 530 is capable of providing persistent storage for the system 500. The storage device 530 can be a floppy disk device, a hard disk device, an optical disk device, a flash drive, or a tape device, or other suitable persistent storage means. The input/output devices 540 provide input/output operations for the system 500. In one implementation, the input/output device 540 includes a keyboard, stylus and/or pointing device. In another implementation, the input/output device 540 includes a display unit for displaying graphical user interfaces.
  • The input/output device 540 can provide input/output operations for the application 102 b. The application 102 b can be, for example, an application containing a document 104 formatted in Shockwave, Portable Document Format (PDF), Flash or Flash Lite document format available from Adobe Systems, Incorporated of San Jose, CA, or another document format or executable format for presentation on a wireless device. The BREW application can include external modules required for its presentation. Examples of such external module software components include private extension 306 and public extension 308. BREW APIs 106 provide translation between the BREW application 102 software and the device-specific software 114 such as the software used for accessing the input/output device 540. Such software components 102, 104, 106, 306, and 308 can be persisted in storage device 530, memory 520 or can be obtained over a network connection, to name a few examples.
  • Embodiments of the subject matter and the functional operations described in this specification can be implemented in digital electronic circuitry, or in computer software, firmware, or hardware, including the structures disclosed in this specification and their structural equivalents, or in combinations of one or more of them. Embodiments of the subject matter described in this specification can be implemented as one or more computer program products, i.e., one or more modules of computer program instructions encoded on a computer-readable medium for execution by, or to control the operation of, data processing apparatus. The computer-readable medium can be a machine-readable storage device, a machine-readable storage substrate, a memory device, a composition of matter effecting a machine-readable propagated signal, or a combination of one or more of them.
  • The term “data processing apparatus” encompasses all apparatus, devices, and machines for processing data, including by way of example a programmable processor, a computer, or multiple processors or computers. The apparatus can include, in addition to hardware, code that creates an execution environment for the computer program in question, e.g., code that constitutes processor firmware, a protocol stack, a database management system, an operating system, or a combination of one or more of them. A propagated signal is an artificially generated signal, e.g., a machine-generated electrical, optical, or electromagnetic signal, that is generated to encode information for transmission to suitable receiver apparatus.
  • A computer program (also known as a program, software, software application, script, or code) can be written in any form of programming language, including compiled or interpreted languages, and it can be deployed in any form, including as a stand-alone program or as a module, component, subroutine, or other unit suitable for use in a computing environment. A computer program does not necessarily correspond to a file in a file system. A program can be stored in a portion of a file that holds other programs or data (e.g., one or more scripts stored in a markup language document), in a single file dedicated to the program in question, or in multiple coordinated files (e.g., files that store one or more modules, sub-programs, or portions of code). A computer program can be deployed to be executed on one computer or on multiple computers that are located at one site or distributed across multiple sites and interconnected by a communication network.
  • The processes and logic flows described in this specification can be performed by one or more programmable processors executing one or more computer programs to perform functions by operating on input data and generating output. The processes and logic flows can also be performed by, and apparatus can also be implemented as, special purpose logic circuitry, e.g., an FPGA (field programmable gate array) or an ASIC (application-specific integrated circuit).
  • Processors suitable for the execution of a computer program include, by way of example, both general and special purpose microprocessors, and any one or more processors of any kind of digital computer. Generally, a processor will receive instructions and data from a read-only memory or a random access memory or both. The essential elements of a computer are a processor for performing instructions and one or more memory devices for storing instructions and data. Generally, a computer will also include, or be operatively coupled to receive data from or transfer data to, or both, one or more mass storage devices for storing data, e.g., magnetic, magneto-optical disks, or optical disks. However, a computer need not have such devices. Moreover, a computer can be embedded in another device, e.g., a mobile telephone, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a mobile audio player, a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, to name just a few. Computer-readable media suitable for storing computer program instructions and data include all forms of non-volatile memory, media and memory devices, including by way of example semiconductor memory devices, e.g., EPROM, EEPROM, and flash memory devices; magnetic disks, e.g., internal hard disks or removable disks; magneto-optical disks; and CD-ROM and DVD-ROM disks. The processor and the memory can be supplemented by, or incorporated in, special purpose logic circuitry.
  • To provide for interaction with a user, embodiments of the subject matter described in this specification can be implemented on a computer having a display device, e.g., a CRT (cathode ray tube) or LCD (liquid crystal display) monitor, for displaying information to the user and a keyboard and a pointing device, e.g., a mouse or a trackball, by which the user can provide input to the computer. Other kinds of devices can be used to provide for interaction with a user as well; for example, feedback provided to the user can be any form of sensory feedback, e.g., visual feedback, auditory feedback, or tactile feedback; and input from the user can be received in any form, including acoustic, speech, or tactile input.
  • Embodiments of the subject matter described in this specification can be implemented in a computing system that includes a back-end component, e.g., as a data server, or that includes a middleware component, e.g., an application server, or that includes a front-end component, e.g., a client computer having a graphical user interface or a Web browser through which a user can interact with an implementation of the subject matter described is this specification, or any combination of one or more such back-end, middleware, or front-end components. The components of the system can be interconnected by any form or medium of digital data communication, e.g., a communication network. Examples of communication networks include a local area network (“LAN”) and a wide area network (“WAN”), e.g., the Internet.
  • The computing system can include clients and servers. A client and server are generally remote from each other and typically interact through a communication network. The relationship of client and server arises by virtue of computer programs running on the respective computers and having a client-server relationship to each other.
  • While this specification contains many specifics, these should not be construed as limitations on the scope of the invention or of what can be claimed, but rather as descriptions of features specific to particular embodiments of the invention. Certain features that are described in this specification in the context of separate embodiments can also be implemented in combination in a single embodiment. Conversely, various features that are described in the context of a single embodiment can also be implemented in multiple embodiments separately or in any suitable subcombination. Moreover, although features can be described above as acting in certain combinations and even initially claimed as such, one or more features from a claimed combination can in some cases be excised from the combination, and the claimed combination can be directed to a subcombination or variation of a subcombination.
  • Similarly, while operations are depicted in the drawings in a particular order, this should not be understood as requiring that such operations be performed in the particular order shown or in sequential order, or that all illustrated operations be performed, to achieve desirable results. In certain circumstances, multitasking and parallel processing can be advantageous. Moreover, the separation of various system components in the embodiments described above should not be understood as requiring such separation in all embodiments, and it should be understood that the described program components and systems can generally be integrated together in a single software product or packaged into multiple software products.
  • Thus, particular embodiments of the invention have been described. Other embodiments are within the scope of the following claims. For example, the actions recited in the claims can be performed in a different order and still achieve desirable results.

Claims (40)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A system comprising computer memory encoded with a data structure, said data structure comprising:
    an application for an environment that allows porting of the application to different types of wireless devices, the application including:
    an executable portion; and
    a document portion,
    wherein the executable portion is capable of signaling an external module to cause presentation of the document portion by the external module and wherein the document portion, encapsulated in the application, is provided to a client that supports the environment.
  2. 2. The system of claim 1 where:
    the document is one of: a Flash document, a Shockwave document, or a Portable Document Format (PDF) document.
  3. 3. The system of claim 1 where:
    the document is compressed, encrypted or both.
  4. 4. The system of claim 1 where:
    the external module is a BREW extension.
  5. 5. The system of claim 1 where:
    the external module is compiled separately from the application.
  6. 6. A system comprising computer memory encoded with a data structure, the data structure comprising:
    an executable module for an environment that allows porting of an application to different types of wireless devices where the executable module includes:
    an executable portion and a Flash content portion, where the executable portion is capable of causing the presentation of the Flash content on a mobile device and wherein the Flash content portion, encapsulated in the executable module, is provided to the mobile device.
  7. 7. The system of claim 6 where:
    the document is compressed, encrypted or both.
  8. 8. The system of claim 6 where:
    the external module is a BREW extension.
  9. 9. The system of claim 6 where:
    the external module is compiled separately from the application.
  10. 10. (canceled)
  11. 11. (canceled)
  12. 12. (canceled)
  13. 13. (canceled)
  14. 14. (canceled)
  15. 15. A computer-implemented method, comprising:
    identifying, by a client device, an application for an environment that allows porting of the application to different types of wireless devices, the application including an executable portion and a document portion, wherein the document portion, encapsulated in the application, is provided to the client device; and
    executing the executable portion, where the execution causes presentation of the document portion by signaling an external module capable of causing the presentation of the document.
  16. 16. The method of claim 15 where:
    the document is one of: a Flash document, a Shockwave document, or a Portable Document Format (PDF) document.
  17. 17. The method of claim 15 where:
    the external module is a BREW extension.
  18. 18. The method of claim 15 where:
    the external module is compiled separately from the application.
  19. 19. The method of claim 15, further comprising:
    causing an account to be debited or credited based on the identifying, the executing or the signaling.
  20. 20. The method of claim 15, further comprising:
    first receiving the application;
    second receiving the external module; and
    causing an account to be debited or credited based on the first receiving or the second receiving.
  21. 21. (canceled)
  22. 22. (canceled)
  23. 23. (canceled)
  24. 24. (canceled)
  25. 25. (canceled)
  26. 26. A computer program product, encoded on a computer-readable medium, operable to cause data processing apparatus to perform operations comprising:
    identifying an application for an environment that allows porting of the application to different types of wireless devices, the application including an executable portion and a document portion, wherein the document portion is provided, encapsulated in the application, to the data processing apparatus; and
    executing the executable portion, where the execution causes presentation of the document portion by signaling an external module capable of causing the presentation of the document.
  27. 27. (canceled)
  28. 28. (canceled)
  29. 29. (canceled)
  30. 30. (canceled)
  31. 31. A system comprising:
    a display for presenting a document to a user;
    one or more interfaces configured to receive input from the user; and
    processor electronics configured to perform operations comprising:
    identifying an application for an environment that allows porting of the application to different types of wireless devices, the application including an executable portion and a document portion, wherein the document portion is provided, encapsulated in the application, to the processor electronics; and
    executing the executable portion, where the execution causes presentation of the document portion by signaling an external module capable of causing the presentation of the document.
  32. 32. The system of claim 31 where:
    the document is one of: a Flash document, a Shockwave document, or a Portable Document Format (PDF) document.
  33. 33. The system of claim 31 where:
    the external module is a BREW extension.
  34. 34. The system of claim 31 where:
    the external module is compiled separately from the application.
  35. 35. The system of claim 1, wherein the executable portion signals the external module by way of one or more application programming interfaces.
  36. 36. The system of claim 6, wherein the executable portion signals an external module to cause presentation of the Flash content.
  37. 37. The system of claim 36, wherein the executable portion signals the external module by way of one or more application programming interfaces.
  38. 38. The method of claim 15, wherein signaling the external module is facilitated through one or more application programming interfaces.
  39. 39. The computer program product of claim 26, wherein signaling the external module is facilitated through one or more application programming interfaces.
  40. 40. The system of claim 31, wherein the executable portion signals the external module by way of one or more application programming interfaces.
US11567111 2006-12-05 2006-12-05 Embedded document within an application Abandoned US20130167024A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11567111 US20130167024A1 (en) 2006-12-05 2006-12-05 Embedded document within an application

Applications Claiming Priority (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11567111 US20130167024A1 (en) 2006-12-05 2006-12-05 Embedded document within an application
US13620522 US9164963B2 (en) 2006-12-05 2012-09-14 Embedded document within an application
US14844750 US9582478B2 (en) 2006-12-05 2015-09-03 Embedded document within an application
US15371870 US20170091734A1 (en) 2006-12-05 2016-12-07 Embedded Document Within an Application

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13620522 Division US9164963B2 (en) 2006-12-05 2012-09-14 Embedded document within an application

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20130167024A1 true true US20130167024A1 (en) 2013-06-27

Family

ID=48655506

Family Applications (4)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11567111 Abandoned US20130167024A1 (en) 2006-12-05 2006-12-05 Embedded document within an application
US13620522 Active 2028-01-30 US9164963B2 (en) 2006-12-05 2012-09-14 Embedded document within an application
US14844750 Active US9582478B2 (en) 2000-01-03 2015-09-03 Embedded document within an application
US15371870 Pending US20170091734A1 (en) 2006-12-05 2016-12-07 Embedded Document Within an Application

Family Applications After (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13620522 Active 2028-01-30 US9164963B2 (en) 2006-12-05 2012-09-14 Embedded document within an application
US14844750 Active US9582478B2 (en) 2000-01-03 2015-09-03 Embedded document within an application
US15371870 Pending US20170091734A1 (en) 2006-12-05 2016-12-07 Embedded Document Within an Application

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (4) US20130167024A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20130166439A1 (en) * 2006-12-05 2013-06-27 Adobe Systems Incorporated Embedded Document Within an Application

Families Citing this family (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9697150B2 (en) * 2013-09-04 2017-07-04 Jory Schwach Real-time embedded system
US9891910B1 (en) * 2017-09-14 2018-02-13 Secret Location Inc. Systems and methods for pre-processing and runtime distribution of interactive content

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20020161796A1 (en) * 2001-03-23 2002-10-31 Sylthe Olav A. Systems and methods for content delivery over a wireless communication medium to a portable computing device
US20050266884A1 (en) * 2003-04-22 2005-12-01 Voice Genesis, Inc. Methods and systems for conducting remote communications
US20070038931A1 (en) * 2005-08-12 2007-02-15 Jeremy Allaire Distribution of content
US7634559B2 (en) * 2003-09-11 2009-12-15 Standard Chartered (Ct) Plc System and method for analyzing network software application changes

Family Cites Families (94)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6732358B1 (en) 1994-03-24 2004-05-04 Ncr Corporation Automatic updating of computer software
US5797098A (en) 1995-07-19 1998-08-18 Pacific Communication Sciences, Inc. User interface for cellular telephone
US6381468B1 (en) 1996-11-22 2002-04-30 Nokia Mobiel Phones Limited User interface for a hand-portable phone
CA2483488A1 (en) 1997-02-19 1998-08-19 Gallium Software Inc. User interface and method for maximizing the information presented on a screen
GB2322513B (en) 1997-02-21 2001-12-19 Nokia Mobile Phones Ltd A phone displaying alternative functionality menu
US6025841A (en) 1997-07-15 2000-02-15 Microsoft Corporation Method for managing simultaneous display of multiple windows in a graphical user interface
US6169911B1 (en) 1997-09-26 2001-01-02 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Graphical user interface for a portable telephone
US6188401B1 (en) 1998-03-25 2001-02-13 Microsoft Corporation Script-based user interface implementation defining components using a text markup language
GB2346291B (en) 1999-01-26 2004-01-21 Ericsson Telefon Ab L M Handling menu information
US6729929B1 (en) 1999-03-17 2004-05-04 Cisco Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling wireless networks
US7003327B1 (en) 1999-07-23 2006-02-21 Openwave Systems Inc. Heuristically assisted user interface for a wireless communication device
US6292099B1 (en) 1999-09-20 2001-09-18 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Event management system utilizing dynamic adaptation for external devices
US6928468B2 (en) 1999-10-29 2005-08-09 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. System for broadcasting software applications and portable data communications device for use in such a system
US6892067B1 (en) 1999-12-30 2005-05-10 Nokia Corporation Script based interfaces for mobile phones
US6757372B1 (en) 2000-01-10 2004-06-29 Cisco Technology, Inc. User interface for a network-enabled telephone
US7099685B2 (en) 2000-04-26 2006-08-29 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for providing multimedia service in a mobile terminal
US7299289B1 (en) 2000-04-28 2007-11-20 Accordent Technologies, Inc. Method, system, and article of manufacture for integrating streaming content and a real time interactive dynamic user interface over a network
WO2002005586A1 (en) 2000-07-07 2002-01-17 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Personal mobile internet
US7152203B2 (en) 2000-09-11 2006-12-19 Appeon Corporation Independent update and assembly of web page elements
US7007239B1 (en) 2000-09-21 2006-02-28 Palm, Inc. Method and apparatus for accessing a contacts database and telephone services
US6976217B1 (en) 2000-10-13 2005-12-13 Palmsource, Inc. Method and apparatus for integrating phone and PDA user interface on a single processor
US6907244B2 (en) 2000-12-14 2005-06-14 Pulse-Link, Inc. Hand-off between ultra-wideband cell sites
US6964061B2 (en) 2000-12-28 2005-11-08 International Business Machines Corporation Squeezable rebroadcast files
US6931598B2 (en) 2001-03-30 2005-08-16 Intel Corporation Dynamic web list display
US7000008B2 (en) 2001-04-16 2006-02-14 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Method, system, and program for providing data updates to a page including multiple regions of dynamic content
US6928648B2 (en) 2001-04-20 2005-08-09 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Method and apparatus for a mobile multimedia java framework
US20020161634A1 (en) 2001-04-27 2002-10-31 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Electronic document with an automatically updated portion
US6983421B1 (en) 2001-06-22 2006-01-03 I2 Technologies Us, Inc. Using connectors to automatically update graphical user interface elements at a client system according to an updated state of a configuration
EP1410181A1 (en) 2001-07-16 2004-04-21 Yuqing Ren Embedded software update system
US20030167318A1 (en) 2001-10-22 2003-09-04 Apple Computer, Inc. Intelligent synchronization of media player with host computer
US7158788B2 (en) 2001-10-31 2007-01-02 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ) Method and apparatus for auto-configuration for optimum multimedia performance
FI114832B (en) 2001-11-05 2004-12-31 Elisa Matkapuhelinpalvelut Oy A method and system for collecting traffic data
US8132236B2 (en) 2001-11-12 2012-03-06 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. System and method for providing secured access to mobile devices
JP2003152855A (en) 2001-11-13 2003-05-23 Nec Corp Communication system for mobile telephone set and its user interface revision method
JP2005513621A (en) 2001-12-14 2005-05-12 アクティブスカイ,インコーポレイテッドActiveSky,Incorporated Publishing systems for multimedia, wireless devices for the media player and publishing systems,
US7310784B1 (en) 2002-01-02 2007-12-18 The Jellyvision Lab, Inc. Methods for identifying cells in a path in a flowchart and for synchronizing graphical and textual views of a flowchart
JP3761505B2 (en) 2002-03-04 2006-03-29 株式会社東芝 Communication system, a wireless communication terminal and the wireless communication device
US6775362B1 (en) 2002-03-06 2004-08-10 Alcatel Graphical telephone system
US7165099B2 (en) 2002-03-15 2007-01-16 Qualcomm Inc. Dynamically downloading and executing system services on a wireless device
US7275243B2 (en) 2002-03-22 2007-09-25 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Mobile download system
US7187948B2 (en) 2002-04-09 2007-03-06 Skullcandy, Inc. Personal portable integrator for music player and mobile phone
US6928619B2 (en) 2002-05-10 2005-08-09 Microsoft Corporation Method and apparatus for managing input focus and z-order
US20050246193A1 (en) 2002-08-30 2005-11-03 Navio Systems, Inc. Methods and apparatus for enabling transaction relating to digital assets
FI114602B (en) 2002-06-18 2004-11-15 Nokia Corp A method and apparatus for programming of the network entity updating data to the mobile station
US7275217B2 (en) 2002-09-09 2007-09-25 Vijay Anand Saraswat System and method for multi-modal browsing with integrated update feature
US7319862B1 (en) 2002-09-26 2008-01-15 Exphand, Inc. Block-based encoding and decoding information transference system and method
US7316003B1 (en) 2002-12-18 2008-01-01 Oracle International Corp. System and method for developing a dynamic web page
US7308689B2 (en) 2002-12-18 2007-12-11 International Business Machines Corporation Method, apparatus, and program for associating related heterogeneous events in an event handler
US7299409B2 (en) 2003-03-07 2007-11-20 International Business Machines Corporation Dynamically updating rendered content
US20040215652A1 (en) 2003-03-27 2004-10-28 Joseph Muller Wireless information system and method
JP4370802B2 (en) 2003-04-22 2009-11-25 富士通株式会社 Data processing method and data processing apparatus
US7729992B2 (en) 2003-06-13 2010-06-01 Brilliant Digital Entertainment, Inc. Monitoring of computer-related resources and associated methods and systems for disbursing compensation
US20050131837A1 (en) 2003-12-15 2005-06-16 Sanctis Jeanne D. Method, system and program product for communicating e-commerce content over-the-air to mobile devices
US7103388B2 (en) 2003-12-16 2006-09-05 Research In Motion Limited Expedited communication graphical user interface system and method
US20050172154A1 (en) 2004-01-29 2005-08-04 Chaoticom, Inc. Systems and methods for providing digital content and caller alerts to wireless network-enabled devices
EP1569102B1 (en) 2004-02-27 2010-04-28 Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson (publ) Flash memory programming
US7706782B1 (en) 2004-03-01 2010-04-27 Adobe Systems Incorporated System and method for developing information for a wireless information system
US7478158B1 (en) 2004-03-01 2009-01-13 Adobe Systems Incorporated Bandwidth management system
US20050215238A1 (en) 2004-03-24 2005-09-29 Macaluso Anthony G Advertising on mobile devices
US7403209B2 (en) 2004-03-24 2008-07-22 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Rendering images containing video
KR100896245B1 (en) 2004-04-28 2009-05-08 후지쯔 가부시끼가이샤 Task computing
EP1763766A4 (en) 2004-05-04 2009-04-01 Robert M Price System and method for communicating with electronic devices
US7120455B1 (en) 2004-05-20 2006-10-10 Cellco Partnership Method and system for mobile instant messaging using multiple interfaces
US7917932B2 (en) 2005-06-07 2011-03-29 Sling Media, Inc. Personal video recorder functionality for placeshifting systems
US7672532B2 (en) 2004-07-01 2010-03-02 Exphand Inc. Dithered encoding and decoding information transference system and method
US7159500B2 (en) 2004-10-12 2007-01-09 The Telerobotics Corporation Public network weapon system and method
US20060165104A1 (en) 2004-11-10 2006-07-27 Kaye Elazar M Content management interface
US20060123360A1 (en) 2004-12-03 2006-06-08 Picsel Research Limited User interfaces for data processing devices and systems
US20060200815A1 (en) 2004-12-08 2006-09-07 Wu-Cheng Li Electronic Device and Method for Updating Related Programs
EP1829224A4 (en) 2004-12-21 2009-03-11 Mobilemax Inc Plug-in device for enabling mobile telephone to execute applications
US7593782B2 (en) 2005-01-07 2009-09-22 Apple Inc. Highly portable media device
US7395508B2 (en) 2005-01-14 2008-07-01 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for providing an interactive presentation environment
US20060184968A1 (en) 2005-02-11 2006-08-17 Clayton Richard M Automatic content update for a target device
US8145912B2 (en) 2005-03-01 2012-03-27 Qualcomm Incorporated System and method for using a visual password scheme
US20060224943A1 (en) 2005-04-01 2006-10-05 Entriq Inc. Method and system to automatically publish media assets
WO2006114878A1 (en) 2005-04-21 2006-11-02 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Computer, method for controlling access to compute resource, and access control program
US20060265508A1 (en) 2005-05-02 2006-11-23 Angel Franklin J System for administering a multiplicity of namespaces containing state information and services
US20060250578A1 (en) 2005-05-06 2006-11-09 Pohl Garrick G Systems and methods for controlling, monitoring, and using remote applications
US7283841B2 (en) 2005-07-08 2007-10-16 Microsoft Corporation Transforming media device
US7720439B2 (en) 2005-07-28 2010-05-18 D-Link Systems, Inc. Wireless media device cradle
EP1917798A4 (en) 2005-08-25 2010-01-06 Nokia Corp Method and device for embedding event notification into multimedia content
US7480422B2 (en) 2005-10-14 2009-01-20 Disney Enterprises, Inc. Systems and methods for information content delivery relating to an object
US7639943B1 (en) 2005-11-15 2009-12-29 Kalajan Kevin E Computer-implemented system and method for automated image uploading and sharing from camera-enabled mobile devices
US7779403B2 (en) 2005-11-22 2010-08-17 Institute For Information Industry Method and system for discovering communication device capabilities
US20070140116A1 (en) 2005-12-16 2007-06-21 Microsoft Corporation Interactive Codec Selection
US20070155426A1 (en) 2005-12-31 2007-07-05 Govind Balakrishnan Application access to cellular telephone settings
US20080077956A1 (en) 2006-09-12 2008-03-27 James Morrison Interactive digital media services
US20130167024A1 (en) * 2006-12-05 2013-06-27 Adobe Systems Incorporated Embedded document within an application
US20080147671A1 (en) 2006-12-18 2008-06-19 Lampdesk Corporation System for Running Web Applications Offline and Providing Access to Native Services
WO2008092104A3 (en) 2007-01-25 2008-09-25 Skyfire Labs Inc Dynamic client-server video tiling streaming
US7743339B1 (en) 2007-02-01 2010-06-22 Adobe Systems Incorporated Rendering text in a brew device
US8589779B2 (en) 2007-03-08 2013-11-19 Adobe Systems Incorporated Event-sensitive content for mobile devices
US8250534B2 (en) 2007-08-09 2012-08-21 Infonovus Technologies, Llc Method and system for constructing a software application from a complete and consistent specification in a software development process
US8612469B2 (en) * 2008-02-21 2013-12-17 Globalenglish Corporation Network-accessible collaborative annotation tool

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20020161796A1 (en) * 2001-03-23 2002-10-31 Sylthe Olav A. Systems and methods for content delivery over a wireless communication medium to a portable computing device
US20050266884A1 (en) * 2003-04-22 2005-12-01 Voice Genesis, Inc. Methods and systems for conducting remote communications
US7634559B2 (en) * 2003-09-11 2009-12-15 Standard Chartered (Ct) Plc System and method for analyzing network software application changes
US20070038931A1 (en) * 2005-08-12 2007-02-15 Jeremy Allaire Distribution of content

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
"BSquare Delivers PDF Viewing Capabilities for Windows Powered Devices", Business Wire, October 16, 2000, pp. 1-2. *

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20130166439A1 (en) * 2006-12-05 2013-06-27 Adobe Systems Incorporated Embedded Document Within an Application
US9164963B2 (en) * 2006-12-05 2015-10-20 Adobe Systems Incorporated Embedded document within an application
US9582478B2 (en) 2006-12-05 2017-02-28 Adobe Systems Incorporated Embedded document within an application

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US9582478B2 (en) 2017-02-28 grant
US20170091734A1 (en) 2017-03-30 application
US20130166439A1 (en) 2013-06-27 application
US9164963B2 (en) 2015-10-20 grant
US20150378964A1 (en) 2015-12-31 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6560618B1 (en) On-demand generation, packaging, and delivery of archive files
B'far Mobile computing principles: designing and developing mobile applications with UML and XML
US8200962B1 (en) Web browser extensions
Gandhewar et al. Google Android: An emerging software platform for mobile devices
US20090043657A1 (en) System and methods for selecting advertisements based on caller identifier information
US20110041140A1 (en) Event-Triggered Server-Side Macros
US20070264987A1 (en) System for serving advertisements over mobile devices
US20050021935A1 (en) Method and system for downloading configurable user interface elements over a data network
US20050003810A1 (en) Method and system for optimizing software program start-up time
US8584114B2 (en) Method of generating and distributing a computer application
US20110040824A1 (en) Shared Server-Side Macros
US8151004B1 (en) File processing to accelerate image viewer initialization
US20070174490A1 (en) System and methods for managing content in pre-existing mobile applications
US20080222599A1 (en) Web services mashup designer
Steele et al. The Android developer's cookbook: building applications with the Android SDK
US20050275566A1 (en) System and method for transferring content
US20080127170A1 (en) Software installation and support
US20080127169A1 (en) Software installation using template executables
US20050202385A1 (en) Digital content preview user interface for mobile devices
US20110154305A1 (en) System and method for remotely compiling multi-platform native applications for mobile devices
US20110041141A1 (en) Virtual Object Indirection in a Hosted Computer Environment
Meier Professional Android 4 application development
US20080126932A1 (en) GUI modeling of knowledge base in a modeling environment
US20060271449A1 (en) Wireless subscriber application and content distribution and differentiated pricing
US20080222572A1 (en) Look and feel of a web services mashup designer

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CHANDA, RUPEN;REEL/FRAME:018681/0740

Effective date: 20061204

AS Assignment

Owner name: ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SHANKARAPPA, PRUTHVISH;REEL/FRAME:019830/0386

Effective date: 20070618