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Surgical Device with Articulation and Wrist Rotation

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Publication number
US20130012958A1
US20130012958A1 US13543931 US201213543931A US2013012958A1 US 20130012958 A1 US20130012958 A1 US 20130012958A1 US 13543931 US13543931 US 13543931 US 201213543931 A US201213543931 A US 201213543931A US 2013012958 A1 US2013012958 A1 US 2013012958A1
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US
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Prior art keywords
articulation
assembly
disc
end
portion
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13543931
Inventor
Stanislaw Marczyk
Russell Pribanic
Kenneth W. Horton, JR.
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Covidien LP
Original Assignee
Covidien LP
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/28Surgical forceps
    • A61B17/29Forceps for use in minimally invasive surgery
    • A61B17/2909Handles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/28Surgical forceps
    • A61B17/29Forceps for use in minimally invasive surgery
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/00234Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for minimally invasive surgery
    • A61B2017/00292Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for minimally invasive surgery mounted on or guided by flexible, e.g. catheter-like, means
    • A61B2017/003Steerable
    • A61B2017/00318Steering mechanisms
    • A61B2017/00323Cables or rods
    • A61B2017/00327Cables or rods with actuating members moving in opposite directions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/28Surgical forceps
    • A61B17/29Forceps for use in minimally invasive surgery
    • A61B17/2909Handles
    • A61B2017/291Handles the position of the handle being adjustable with respect to the shaft
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/28Surgical forceps
    • A61B17/29Forceps for use in minimally invasive surgery
    • A61B2017/2926Details of heads or jaws
    • A61B2017/2927Details of heads or jaws the angular position of the head being adjustable with respect to the shaft
    • A61B2017/2929Details of heads or jaws the angular position of the head being adjustable with respect to the shaft with a head rotatable about the longitudinal axis of the shaft

Abstract

A surgical instrument comprising a handle assembly, an elongated shaft, an end effector, a rotation mechanism, and an articulation mechanism is disclosed. The rotation mechanism is disposed in mechanical cooperation with the handle assembly and effects rotation of the end effector about the second longitudinal axis. The articulation mechanism is disposed in mechanical cooperation with the handle assembly and effects movement of the end effector from a first position where the first longitudinal axis is substantially aligned with the second longitudinal axis to a second position where the second longitudinal axis is displaced from the first longitudinal axis. The articulation mechanism comprises a first articulation control disposed in mechanical cooperation with the handle assembly, a first cable and a second cable. Actuation of the first articulation control in a first direction causes the first cable to move distally and causes the second cable to move proximally.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/505,604, filed Jul. 8, 2011, the entire disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    The present disclosure relates to a device for surgically manipulating tissue. More particularly, the present disclosure relates to a device for surgically joining and/or cutting tissue utilizing an elongated, generally flexible and articulating shaft.
  • Technical Field
  • [0003]
    Various types of surgical instruments used to surgically join tissue are known in the art, and are commonly used, for example, for closure of tissue or organs in transection, resection, anastomoses, for occlusion of organs in thoracic and abdominal procedures, and for electrosurgically fusing or sealing tissue.
  • [0004]
    One example of such a surgical instrument is a surgical stapling instrument, which may include an anvil assembly, a cartridge assembly for supporting an array of surgical staples, an approximation mechanism for approximating the cartridge and anvil assemblies, and a firing mechanism for ejecting the surgical staples from the cartridge assembly.
  • [0005]
    Using a surgical stapling instrument, it is common for a surgeon to approximate the anvil and cartridge members. Next, the surgeon can fire the instrument to emplace staples in tissue. Additionally, the surgeon may use the same instrument or a separate instrument to cut the tissue adjacent or between the row(s) of staples.
  • [0006]
    Another example of a surgical instrument used to surgically join tissue is an electrosurgical forceps, which utilize both mechanical clamping action and electrical energy to effect hemostasis by heating the tissue and blood vessels to coagulate, cauterize and/or seal tissue. As an alternative to open forceps for use with open surgical procedures, many modern surgeons use endoscopes and endoscopic instruments for remotely accessing organs through smaller, puncture-like incisions. As a direct result thereof, patients tend to benefit from less scarring and reduced healing time.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0007]
    The present disclosure relates to a surgical instrument comprising a handle assembly, an elongated shaft, an end effector, a rotation mechanism, and an articulation mechanism. The rotation mechanism is disposed in mechanical cooperation with the handle assembly and effects rotation of the end effector about the second longitudinal axis. The articulation mechanism is disposed in mechanical cooperation with the handle assembly and effects movement of the end effector from a first position where the first longitudinal axis is substantially aligned with the second longitudinal axis to a second position where the second longitudinal axis is displaced from the first longitudinal axis. The articulation mechanism comprises a first articulation control disposed in mechanical cooperation with the handle assembly, a first cable and a second cable. Actuation of the first articulation control in a first direction causes the first cable to move distally and causes the second cable to move proximally.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0008]
    Various embodiments of the presently disclosed surgical instrument are described herein with reference to the drawings wherein:
  • [0009]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an endoscopic forceps depicting a handle assembly, a flexible shaft, an articulation assembly, a rotation assembly, and an end effector assembly according to the present disclosure;
  • [0010]
    FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the handle assembly, the articulation assembly and a portion of the rotation assembly taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 3 is a partial perspective, partial cross-sectional view of the features shown in FIG. 2;
  • [0012]
    FIGS. 4 and 5 are perspective views of the articulation assembly of FIGS. 1-3;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a portion of the articulation assembly and a portion of the rotation assembly taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 1;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 7 is an assembly view of the forceps of FIG. 1;
  • [0015]
    FIGS. 8 and 9 are perspective views of a portion of the articulation assembly of the present disclosure;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 10 is an assembly view of the portion of the articulation assembly of FIGS. 8 and 9;
  • [0017]
    FIGS. 11-14 are perspective views of another portion of the articulation assembly;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 15 is a perspective view of a slider of the articulation mechanism of the present disclosure;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 16 is a perspective view of the area of detail illustrated in FIG. 1;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 17 is an assembly view of a portion of the articulation assembly of the present disclosure;
  • [0021]
    FIGS. 18-20 are cross-sectional views of portions of the articulation assembly and the rotation assembly of the present disclosure;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 21 is a perspective view of the forceps of the present disclosure;
  • [0023]
    FIGS. 22 and 23 are views of a portion of the articulation assembly of the present disclosure;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 24 illustrates an articulated distal end of the forceps of the present disclosure;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 25 is a perspective view of a handle portion of a second embodiment of the disclosed forceps;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 26 is a perspective view of the handle portion of FIG. 25 with portions of the handle assembly removed;
  • [0027]
    FIG. 27 is a perspective view of forceps according to a third embodiment of the present disclosure; and
  • [0028]
    FIG. 28 is a perspective view of the handle portion of FIG. 27 with portions of the handle assembly removed.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0029]
    Referring initially to FIG. 1, one embodiment of an endoscopic vessel sealing forceps is depicted generally as 10. In the drawings and in the descriptions which follow, the term “proximal,” as is traditional, will refer to the end of the forceps 10 which is closer to the user, while the term “distal” will refer to the end which is farther from the user. The forceps 10 comprises a housing 20, an end effector assembly 100 and an elongated shaft 12 extending therebetween to define a longitudinal axis A-A. A handle assembly 200, an articulation assembly 300 including two articulation controls 310 and 320, and a rotation assembly 600 are operable to control the end effector assembly 100 to grasp, seal and divide tubular vessels and vascular tissue. Although the forceps 10 is configured for use in connection with bipolar surgical procedures, various aspects of the present disclosure may also be employed for monopolar surgical procedures. Additionally, while the figures depict a certain type of a forceps, other types of forceps and other endoscopic surgical instruments are encompassed by the present disclosure. Further details of endoscopic forceps are described in commonly-owned U.S. Patent Publication No. 2010/0179540 to Marczyk et al., and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/718,143 to Marczyk et al., the entire contents of each of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein
  • [0030]
    Further details of an endoscopic surgical stapling instrument including surgical fasteners are described in commonly-owned U.S. Pat. No. 6,953,139 to Milliman et al., the entire contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • [0031]
    Generally, handle assembly 200 includes a fixed handle 210 and a movable handle 220. The fixed handle 210 is integrally associated with the housing 20, and the movable handle 220 is movable relative to fixed handle 210 to induce relative movement between a pair of j aw members of the end effector assembly 100. The movable handle 220 is operatively coupled to the end effector assembly 100 via a drive rod or a flexible drive rod (not explicitly shown in the accompanying figures), which extends through the elongated shaft 12, and reciprocates to induce movement in the jaw members. The movable handle 220 may be approximated with fixed handle 210 to move the jaw members from an open position wherein the jaw members are disposed in spaced relation relative to one another, to a clamping or approximated position wherein the jaw members cooperate to grasp tissue therebetween. Electrosurgical energy may be transmitted through tissue grasped between jaw members to effect a tissue seal. Further details of these components and various other components of the disclosed forceps are disclosed in the references that have incorporated in detail above.
  • [0032]
    Elongated shaft 12 of forceps 10 includes a distal end 16 dimensioned to mechanically engage the end effector assembly 100 and a proximal end 14, which mechanically engages the housing 20. The elongated shaft 12 includes two portions: a proximal portion 12 a defining a proximal shaft axis B-B and a distal portion 12 b defining a distal shaft axis C-C.
  • [0033]
    The proximal portion 12 a of the shaft 12 may exhibit various constructions. For example, the proximal portion 12 a may be formed from a substantially rigid tube, from flexible tubing (e.g., plastic), or the proximal portion 12 a may be formed as a composite of a flexible tube and a rigidizing element, such as a tube of braided steel, to provide axial (e.g., compressional) and rotational strength. In other embodiments, the proximal portion 12 a may be constructed from a plastically deformable material.
  • [0034]
    The distal portion 12 b of shaft 12 includes an exterior casing or insulating material disposed over a plurality of links 14 a, 14 b, etc. (see FIGS. 16 and 24; hereinafter “links 14”). The links 14 are configured to pivot relative to one another to permit the distal portion 12 b of the shaft 12 to articulate relative to the proximal shaft axis B-B. In one embodiment, the links 14 are nestingly engaged with one another to permit pivotal motion of the distal portion 12 b in two orthogonal planes in response to movement of articulation controls 310 and 320. The links 14 may be shaped to permit the distal portion 12 b of the shaft 12 to be self-centering, or to have a tendency to return to an unarticulated configuration.
  • [0035]
    Articulation assembly 300 sits atop housing 20 and is operable via articulation controls 310 and 320 to move the end effector assembly 100 (and the articulating distal portion 12 b of the shaft 12) in the direction of arrows “U, D” and “R, L” relative to axis proximal shaft axis B-B as explained in more detail below.
  • [0036]
    The links 14 each include a central lumen extending longitudinally therethrough. The central lumen permits passage of various actuators, including a drive rod, a knife rod and four steering cables 901, 902, 903 and 904 (e.g., FIG. 4) through the elongated shaft 12.
  • [0037]
    The four steering cables 901-904 may be substantially elastic and slideably extend through elongated shaft 12. A distal end of the each of the steering cables 901-904 is mechanically engaged with the end effector 100. Proximal ends of the steering cables 901-904 are operatively coupled to the articulation controls 310, 320 as described below.
  • [0038]
    Referring now to FIGS. 2-6 the articulation assembly 300 permits selective articulation of the end effector assembly 100 to facilitate the manipulation and grasping of tissue. More particularly, the two controls 310 and 320 include selectively rotatable wheels, 311 and 321, respectively, that sit atop the housing 20. Each wheel, e.g., wheel 311, is independently moveable relative to the other wheel, e.g., 321, and allows a user to selectively articulate the end effector assembly 100 in a given plane of articulation relative to the longitudinal axis A-A. For example, rotation of wheel 311 articulates the end effector assembly 100 along arrows R, L (or right-to-left articulation) by inducing a differential tension and a corresponding motion in steering cables 902 and 903. Similarly, rotation of wheel 321 articulates the end effector assembly along arrows U, D (or up-and-down articulation) by inducing a differential tension and a corresponding motion in steering cables 901 and 904.
  • [0039]
    The articulation assembly 300 and the rotation assembly 600, comprise the articulating-rotating mechanism and include wheels 311 and 321, and a rotation knob 610 to effect articulation and/or rotation of the end effector 100. Details regarding the various components of the articulating-rotating mechanism are described in detail below.
  • [0040]
    Distal ends of cables 901-904 are disposed in mechanical engagement with end effector 100, and travel proximally through shaft 12, as described above. Proximal ends of cables 901-904 are disposed in mechanical cooperation with post assemblies 330 a-300 d, respectively. Each post assembly 330 includes a sleeve 332, which is disposed at least partially around a post 334 (see FIGS. 9 and 10). It is envisioned that the sleeves 332 and the posts 334 are threadably engaged with each other to allow the tension of the cables to be adjusted.
  • [0041]
    With particular reference to FIGS. 9 and 10, an outer disc 350 and an inner disc 360 comprise a disc assembly 362. Each post 334 is connected to outer disc 350 via pins 336, 338 and a ball joint 340. The interaction between the posts 334 and the outer disc 350 allow the posts 334 to swivel about pins 336, 338 with respect to outer disc 350. Outer disc 350 radially surrounds inner disc 360 and is rotatable around inner disc 360. That is, a series of bearings 352 and clips 354 are disposed between inner disc 360 and outer disc 350 to enable outer disc 350 to rotate with respect to inner disc 360. Additionally, as shown in FIG. 6, an outer portion of pins 338 engages a groove 612 in rotation knob 610. Thus, as rotation knob 610 rotates, outer disc 350, post assemblies 330, and cables 901-904 also rotate, which causes end effector 100 to rotate around longitudinal axis A-A (or around the w-axis as discussed below with reference to FIG. 24).
  • [0042]
    The inner disc 360 is connected to housing 20 via a connector 370. More particularly, inner disc 360 is connected to a distal portion of connector 370 via a ball joint connection 372, and connector 370 is stationary with respect to housing 20. Additionally, connector 370 is hollow, such that portions of elongated mechanisms (e.g., firing rod, knife rod, etc.) can be advanced between housing 20 and shaft 12. Such elongated mechanisms are not illustrated in the accompanying figures in the interest of visual clarity.
  • [0043]
    A pin 380 engages both ball joint-connection 372 and inner disc 360. An outer potion of pin 380 engages inner disc 360, and an inner portion of pin 380 engages a slot 374 within ball-joint connection 372 (see FIG. 6). This connection results in inner disc 360 being able to rotate with respect to the X- and Z-axes, but unable to rotate with respect to the longitudinal axis A-A. The orientation of inner disc 360 and outer disc 350 results in outer disc 350 rotating with inner disc 360 around the X- and Z-axes. Additionally, as discussed above, outer disc 350 is also able to rotate around the longitudinal axis A-A when driven by rotation knob 610.
  • [0044]
    Referring now to FIG. 17, for example, articulation assembly 300 also includes a block 400, a first disc 410, a second disc 420, a first slider 430, and a second slider 440. First articulation control 310 is connected to first disc 410 via a first post 470; second articulation control 320 is connected to second disc 420 via a second post 480. More particularly, an upper portion 472 of first post 470 is mechanically coupled to first articulation control 310 (e.g., via a pin), and a lower portion 474 of first post 470 is mechanically coupled to first disc 410. An upper portion 482 of second post 480 is mechanically coupled to second articulation control 320 (e.g., via a pin), and a lower portion 484 of second post 480 is mechanically coupled to second disc 420. As shown in FIG. 17, lower portions 474, 484 of posts 470, 480 may include a polygonal-shape (e.g. a square) that is dimensioned to fit within a corresponding recess 411 in the corresponding disc 410, 420 (the lower portion of first disc 410 is not shown). Additionally, an outer diameter of first post 470 is smaller than an inner diameter of second post 480, thus enabling first post 470 to extend through second post 480. First post 470 also extends through an opening 401 in block 400 and an opening 322 in first disc 320. As such, rotation of first articulation control 310 causes rotation of first disc 410, and rotation of second articulation control 320 causes rotation of second disc 420.
  • [0045]
    Each disc 410, 420 has at least one arcuate slot 412, 422 therein. In the illustrated embodiments, discs 410, 420 each include two slots. In this embodiment, discs 410, 420 are identical to each other (and flipped about the Z-axis (FIG. 6) with respect to each other), e.g., to facilitate manufacturing. Following pins 414, 424 extend through respective slots 412, 422, and are coupled to respective sliders 430, 440. The location of following pins 414, 424 can be adjusted within respective sliders 430, 440 by the mechanisms illustrated in FIGS. 15 and 17. More particularly, sliders 430, 440 each include a slidable block 432, 442 connected to respective pins 414, 424, and which are slidable within a cavity 434, 444. Proximal screws 435, 445 threadably engage sliders 430, 440, and each abut a respective distal screw 436, 446. Distal screws 436, 446 extend through and threadably engage respective slidable blocks 432, 442, such that rotation of proximal screws 435, 445 causes translation of respective slidable blocks 432, 442, and thus pins 414, 424.
  • [0046]
    Additionally, sliders 430, 440 slidingly engage longitudinal slots 402, 404, respectively, in block 400. As such, rotation of articulation control 310 causes rotation of first disc 410, which causes following pin 414 to move along arcuate slot 412, which causes slider 430 to move longitudinally through longitudinal slot 402 in block 400. Likewise, rotation of articulation control 320 causes longitudinal translation of slider 440 with respect to block 400.
  • [0047]
    Sliders 430, 440 are connected to inner disc 360 via a first connecting arms 500, 510 and second connecting arms 520, 530. First connecting arms 500, 510 downwardly depend from respective sliders 430, 440 and are connected to second connecting arms 520, 530, respectively, via ball joints 540, 550. Second connecting arms 520, 530 include proximal portions 522, 532 and distal portions 524, 534, which are longitudinally translatable (e.g., threaded) with respect to one another to allow the length of second connecting arms 520, 530 to be adjusted. Second connecting arms 520, 530 are connected to inner disc 360 via ball joints 560, 570. The ball joint 560, 570 connections allow three-dimensional movement (i.e., about the longitudinal axis A-A and the Y- and Z-axes) of disc assembly 362. Additionally, as shown in FIG. 5, for example, first connecting arm 520 is radially offset 90° from second connecting arm 530. That is, in the illustrated embodiment, first connecting arm 520 engages inner disc 360 at a top portion thereof (i.e., in a 12:00 position in FIG. 5), and second connecting arm 530 engages inner disc 360 at a lateral portion thereof (i.e., in a 9:00 position in FIG. 5).
  • [0048]
    In use, rotation of first articulation control 310 causes first slider 430 to longitudinally translate, which causes a top portion of disc assembly 362 to move distally/proximally. Such movement by the top portion of disc assembly 362 causes upper cable 904 and lower cable 901 to in opposite directions from one another (i.e., one cable moves distally, the other cable moves proximally). When upper cable 904 is moved distally (i.e., produces slack) and lower cable 901 is moved proximally (i.e., produces tension), end effector 100 articulates downwardly, in the substantial direction of arrow “D” in FIG. 1. When upper cable 904 is moved proximally and lower cable 901 is moved distally, end effector 100 articulates upwardly, in the substantial direction of arrow “U” in FIG. 1. As can be appreciated, rotation of second articulation control 302 causes translation of cables 902, 903 (see FIG. 23), which causes end effector 100 to articulate in the directions of arrows “R” and “L” in FIG. 1.
  • [0049]
    Further, with particular reference to FIG. 24, when the end effector 100 is articulated in a particular direction and amount (e.g., “R” in FIG. 24), and when coordinate system {u, v, w} is associated with the end effector 100. FIG. 24 illustrates that rotation of rotation knob 610 about longitudinal axis A-A, causes the end effector 100 to rotate about axis “w”; end effector 100 does not rotate around longitudinal axis A-A. Thus, the end effector 100 maintains its articulation (i.e., its “R” position in FIG. 24) while being able to rotate about the w-axis.
  • [0050]
    Additionally, in the illustrated embodiments, first disc 410 and second disc 420 include serrations along perimeters thereof. A member 490, as shown in FIG. 17, includes a distal end 492 that is biased into each disc 410, 420 via a spring 494, such that rotation of articulation control 310 and/or 320 causes distal end 492 of member 490 to contact successive serrations, which produces an audible sound to facilitate use.
  • [0051]
    Another forceps 10′ according to an embodiment of the present disclosure is illustrated in FIGS. 25 and 26. This embodiment includes a single articulation control 310, a single disc 410, and a single slider 430. In this embodiment, a user can rotate articulation control 310 in addition to the housing 20 for full articulation control of end effector 100.
  • [0052]
    FIGS. 27 and 28 illustrate another embodiment of a forceps 10″ having housing 20′, which is usable with the articulation assembly 300 and rotation assembly 600 of the present disclosure. As illustrated, housing 20′ lacks a movable handle. Here, it is envisioned that any type of actuation mechanism, including powered actuation, is usable with forceps 10″.
  • [0053]
    While several embodiments of the disclosure have been depicted in the drawings, it is not intended that the disclosure be limited thereto, as it is intended that the disclosure be as broad in scope as the art will allow and that the specification be read likewise. Therefore, the above description should not be construed as limiting, but merely as exemplifications of particular embodiments. Those skilled in the art will envision other modifications within the scope and spirit of the claims appended hereto.

Claims (10)

1. A surgical instrument, comprising;
a handle assembly;
an elongated shaft extending distally from the handle assembly and defining a first longitudinal axis;
an end effector disposed in mechanical cooperation with a distal portion of the elongated shaft, the end effector defining a second longitudinal axis;
a rotation mechanism disposed in mechanical cooperation with the handle assembly for effecting rotation of the end effector about the second longitudinal axis; and
an articulation mechanism disposed in mechanical cooperation with the handle assembly for effecting movement of the end effector from a first position where the first longitudinal axis is substantially aligned with the second longitudinal axis to a second position where the second longitudinal axis is displaced from the first longitudinal axis, the articulation mechanism comprising:
a first articulation control disposed in mechanical cooperation with the handle assembly;
a first cable, a distal portion of the first cable being in mechanical cooperation with the end effector, a proximal portion of the first cable being in mechanical cooperation with the first articulation control;
a second cable, a distal portion of the second cable being in mechanical cooperation with the end effector, a proximal portion of the second cable being in mechanical cooperation with the first articulation control;
actuation of the first articulation control in a first direction causes the first cable to move distally and causes the second cable to move proximally.
2. The surgical instrument of claim 1, wherein the articulation mechanism comprises a second articulation control, a third cable and a fourth cable, the second articulation control being disposed in mechanical cooperation with the handle assembly, a distal portion of the third and fourth cables being in mechanical cooperation with the end effector, a proximal portion of the third and fourth cables being in mechanical cooperation with the second articulation control, wherein actuation of the second articulation control in a first direction causes the third cable to move distally and causes the fourth cable to move proximally.
3. The surgical instrument of claim 1, wherein actuation of the rotation mechanism causes the first cable and the second cable to rotate about the first longitudinal axis.
4. The surgical instrument of claim 1, wherein a proximal portion of the first cable and the second cable are coupled to an outer disc, the outer disc being rotatable about the first longitudinal axis.
5. The surgical instrument of claim 4, wherein the outer disc is rotatable around an inner disc.
6. The surgical instrument of claim 5, wherein the inner disc defines a passageway between the housing and the elongated shaft.
7. The surgical instrument of claim 5, further comprising a link mechanism, the link mechanism connecting the first articulation control to the inner disc.
8. The surgical instrument of claim 2, wherein a proximal portion of the first cable, the second cable, the third cable and the fourth cable are coupled to an outer disc, the outer disc being rotatable about the first longitudinal axis, the outer disc being rotatable around an inner disc, and further comprising a link mechanism, the link mechanism connecting the first articulation control and the second articulation control to the inner disc.
9. The surgical instrument of claim 1, wherein the articulation mechanism further comprises a first disc and a first slider, the first disc being disposed in mechanical cooperation with the first articulation control, and the first slider being disposed in mechanical cooperation with the first disc, actuation of the first articulation control rotates the first disc, rotation of the first disc causes longitudinal translation of the first slider, which causes longitudinal translation of the first cable and the second cable.
10. The surgical instrument of claim 1, wherein actuation of the rotation mechanism does not change the second position of the end effector.
US13543931 2011-07-08 2012-07-09 Surgical Device with Articulation and Wrist Rotation Abandoned US20130012958A1 (en)

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WO2015041845A3 (en) * 2013-09-17 2015-07-02 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Articulation features for ultrasonic surgical instrument
WO2016052784A1 (en) * 2014-10-02 2016-04-07 주식회사 리브스메드 Surgical instrument
US20160367245A1 (en) * 2015-06-18 2016-12-22 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Push/pull articulation drive systems for articulatable surgical instruments
US9629689B2 (en) 2008-04-11 2017-04-25 Flexdex, Inc. Attachment apparatus for remote access tools
US9675370B2 (en) 2008-04-11 2017-06-13 The Regents Of The University Of Michigan Minimal access tool
US9814451B2 (en) 2015-10-02 2017-11-14 Flexdex, Inc. Handle mechanism providing unlimited roll
US9869339B2 (en) 2008-04-11 2018-01-16 Flexdex, Inc. End-effector jaw closure transmission systems for remote access tools

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