US20130005423A1 - Blackjack variation with automatically eliminated card - Google Patents

Blackjack variation with automatically eliminated card Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20130005423A1
US20130005423A1 US13/539,113 US201213539113A US2013005423A1 US 20130005423 A1 US20130005423 A1 US 20130005423A1 US 201213539113 A US201213539113 A US 201213539113A US 2013005423 A1 US2013005423 A1 US 2013005423A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
dealer
hand
card
operation
player
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13/539,113
Inventor
Geoff Hall
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
CUSTOMIZED CASINO GAMES Ltd
Original Assignee
Geoff Hall
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201161448193P priority Critical
Priority to US201161448189P priority
Priority to US201161448642P priority
Priority to US13/219,697 priority patent/US8398084B2/en
Application filed by Geoff Hall filed Critical Geoff Hall
Priority to US13/539,113 priority patent/US20130005423A1/en
Publication of US20130005423A1 publication Critical patent/US20130005423A1/en
Assigned to CUSTOMIZED CASINO GAMES LIMITED reassignment CUSTOMIZED CASINO GAMES LIMITED ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: HALL, GEOFF
Assigned to CUSTOMIZED GAMES LIMITED reassignment CUSTOMIZED GAMES LIMITED CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT THE ASSIGNEE PREVIOUSLY RECORDED AT REEL: 031862 FRAME: 0849. ASSIGNOR(S) HEREBY CONFIRMS THE ASSIGNMENT. Assignors: HALL, GEOFF
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00157Casino or betting games
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3202Hardware aspects of a gaming system, e.g. components, construction, architecture thereof
    • G07F17/3216Construction aspects of a gaming system, e.g. housing, seats, ergonomic aspects
    • G07F17/322Casino tables, e.g. tables having integrated screens, chip detection means
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/326Game play aspects of gaming systems
    • G07F17/3272Games involving multiple players
    • G07F17/3276Games involving multiple players wherein the players compete, e.g. tournament
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3286Type of games
    • G07F17/3293Card games, e.g. poker, canasta, black jack
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • A63F2001/003Blackjack; Twenty one
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00157Casino or betting games
    • A63F2003/00164Casino tables

Abstract

A method to implement a blackjack variation where when the dealer is resolving the dealer's hand, if the dealer's point total is a preset total then the dealer would automatically burn a card in the dealer's hand (such as the last card dealt to the dealer). The preset total can be 21, so that whenever the dealer's point total (after the dealer is done resolving the dealer's hand) is 21 the dealer would burn a card in the dealer's hand and thus the dealer would typically have to draw another card which could result in a better outcome for the player (e.g., the dealer's could bust or end up with a point total less than 21).

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation in part of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/219,697 (which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety), which: A) claims benefit to U.S. provisional application 61/448,189, filed on Mar. 1, 2011, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety; and B) claims benefit to U.S. provisional application 61/448,193, filed on Mar. 1, 2011, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety; and C) also claims benefit to U.S. provisional application 61/448,642, filed on Mar. 2, 2011, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present general inventive concept is directed to a method, apparatus, and computer readable storage medium directed to a blackjack variation that can be played in a casino or on the Internet.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • The casino game of blackjack is well known, for example see U.S. Patent publication 2003/0155715 which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • FIG. 1 is a flowchart illustrating a method of implementing the known game of blackjack.
  • Points totals are computed by adding the standard rank value of each card, with face valued cards (tens, jacks, queens, kings) being given a value of 10, and aces being given a value of 1 or 11, whichever results in a better hand. A soft point total is where at least one ace is given the value of 11. A hard point total is a hand with all aces counting as 1.
  • In operation 100, the player makes a main wager by placing chips on a table. Then, in operation 102, the dealer deals two initial cards to each player (either face up or face down) and two initial cards to the dealer, typically one face down (“hole-card”), and one face up (the “up-card”). Then the player can decide whether to hit, stand, double, or split. If the player decides to hit, then the method proceeds to operation 106, which deals an additional card to a player. If a determination 108 determines that the player has busted (the player's hard point total is over 21), then the player loses the game and thus loses the main wager in operation 110, which ends the game. If the determination 108 determines that the player has not busted, then the method returns to operation 104, where the player can make another decision whether to hit or stand. In operation 104, the player can also double (not pictured) by place an additional wager of up to the main wager, but the player is limited to drawing only one additional card before the player must stand.
  • If the player stands and has not busted out (either stands on his or her initial two cards or draws cards but has a point total under 22 and then stands), then the method proceeds to operation 112, which reveals all dealer's cards (e.g., turns the hole-card face up) and which then plays out the dealer's hand according to predetermined rules. In operation 114, if the dealer's total is greater than a predetermined amount (typically 17), then the dealer stands (proceeds to operation 122). If the dealer's total is not greater than the predetermined amount, the method proceeds to operation 116 which deals an additional card to the dealer. If it is then determined 118 that the dealer has not busted (has a point total over 21), the method returns to operation 114. If the dealer has busted, then the player wins the game and the main wager in operation 120 (this assumes the player has not also busted; if the player has already busted then the player would have lost in operation 110).
  • In operation 122, both the player and the dealer have played out their hand and neither have busted. Thus, their respective point totals (adding the numerical values of each card in the hand) are compared. If the dealer's point total is determined in operation 124 to be lower than the player's point total, then the player wins the game and the main wager in operation 120. Otherwise, if the dealer's point total is determined 128 to be greater than the player's point total, then the player loses the game and the main wager in operation 130. If the player's point total ties the dealer's point total, then that results in a “push” in operation 126 in which the player doesn't win or lose the main wager (the main wager bet is a wash).
  • If a player is initially dealt two identically ranked cards in operation 102, players can also split in operation 104 by placing an additional split wager equal in value to the main wager, and the player's two initial cards are separated and the dealer deals an additional card on each. The player then plays out each of the two separate hands, each from operation 104. Depending on house rules, players may or may not be allowed to resplit cards.
  • One disadvantage of the prior art game of blackjack is that players get upset when the dealer is initial dealt a good hand (such as a point total of 20). What is needed is a new and entertaining version of blackjack which minimizes players' frustration by the dealer receiving good hands.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • It is an aspect of the present invention to provide an exciting casino game.
  • The above aspects can be obtained by a method that comprises (a) providing a physical gaming table and a physical deck(s) of cards; (b) receiving a wager from a player; (c) dealing a player's hand and a dealer's hand; (d) enabling the player to play out the player's hand; (e) providing dealer hand resolution rules that comprise: A) if a point total of the dealer's hand is greater than a predetermined point total then proceed to operation B otherwise dealing an additional card to the dealer's hand and return to operation A; B) if a point total of the dealer's hand is a preset total then burning a card in the dealer's hand and return to operation A); (f) implementing the dealer hand resolution rules; and (g) resolving the wager according to the predetermined blackjack rules.
  • The above aspects can also be obtained by an apparatus that includes (a) physical casino with a (b) physical gaming table with a felt layout on top of the gaming table which includes a plurality of betting circles imprinted into the felt layout; (b) one or more physical decks of cards; (c) physical chips; (d) a mechanical card shuffler; (e) a set of rules comprising: (i) the player places a wager in the form of one or more physical chips in a player's betting circle out of the plurality of betting circles; (ii) the dealer deals, using the one or more physical decks of cards, a player's hand and a dealer's hand; (iii) the player plays out the player's hand; (iv) the dealer resolves the dealer's hand according to dealer hand resolution rules that comprise: A) if a point total of the dealer's hand is greater than a predetermined point total then proceed to operation B otherwise dealing an additional card to the dealer's hand and return to operation A; B) if a point total of the dealer's hand is a preset total then burning a card in the dealer's hand and return to operation A); and (v) the wager is resolved according to the predetermined blackjack rules. The set of rules would be printed on a rule card which is distributed at the table to players.
  • These together with other aspects and advantages which will be subsequently apparent, reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Further features and advantages of the present invention, as well as the structure and operation of various embodiments of the present invention, will become apparent and more readily appreciated from the following description of the preferred embodiments, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings of which:
  • FIG. 1 is a flowchart illustrating a method of implementing the known game of blackjack;
  • FIG. 2 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a dealer burn procedure, according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 3A is a drawing illustrating a gaming table, according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 3B is a block diagram illustrating an electronic player tracking system associated with each gaming table, according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 4A is a block diagram illustrating exemplary hardware that can be used to implement an electronic version of the methods described herein;
  • FIG. 4B is a block diagram illustrating an exemplary network configuration to implement a player playing an online version of the methods described herein;
  • FIG. 5 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of burning a dealer's card when the dealer's final total is a preset total, according to an embodiment; and
  • FIG. 6 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of burning a dealer's card when the dealer's final total is a preset total and the dealer's hand is form using more than two cards, according to an embodiment.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Reference will now be made in detail to the presently preferred embodiments of the invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like elements throughout.
  • The present inventive concept relates to a method, apparatus, and computer readable storage medium to implement a blackjack side bet.
  • FIG. 1 is a flowchart illustrating a method of implementing the known game of blackjack.
  • In general, casino blackjack is played by one or more players at a gaming table against a dealer using one or more decks of cards (each deck can be a standard 52 card deck). The idea is for the player to make a point total closest to 21 without going over 21 (busting). Each player (after making a main wager) is dealt two initial cards (typically face up) and the dealer is also dealt two cards (one face up—the upcard, and one face down—the hole card). The player can stand on his or her initial two cards, or continuously hit (take another card) until the player stands or the player's point total is over 21 (upon which the player automatically loses). If the player has not busted, then after the player stands the dealer will play out the dealer's hand according to predetermined rules. One set of dealer predetermined rules is as follows: the dealer will continuously hit until the dealer's point total is greater than 16. Once the dealer has resolved the dealer's hand, the wager is resolved. If the player has busted then the player loses (the main wager). If the player has not busted but the dealer has busted (the dealer's point total is over 21) then the player wins (wins even money on the main wager). If both the player and the dealer have not busted, then if the player's point total is higher than the dealer's point total then the player wins (wins even money on the main wager). If both the player and the dealer have no busted, then if the dealer's point total is higher than the player's point total then the dealer wins (the player loses the main wager). If the player's point total equals the dealer's point total, then the main wager pushes (neither wins nor loses). Other options the player may have at his or her disposal is to double down or split. Cards are given their standard numerical value (i.e., aces count as 1 or 11 (whichever makes the best hand), 2's-10's count as their respective face value, jacks, queens, and kings all count as 10).
  • The present inventive concept is a blackjack game that incorporates a “dealer burn procedure” in which a dealer will automatically burn the dealer's initial hand (initial two cards dealt) if the two cards are both 10-valued cards. The dealer will burn these two cards by removing the two dealer's cards and placing them into the discard rack, and then dealing the dealer two new cards (an up-card and a hole-card face down), and then the game is continued. In this manner, the dealer would be unlikely to have a point total of 20 (the only ways the dealer would have a point total of 20 is if the dealer has achieved the point total of 20 using more than two cards (e.g., 7, 8, 5), if the dealer burns two 10 cards (both the dealer's up-card and hole-card are 10-valued cards) only to receive another two card point total of 20, or if the dealer is dealt an ace and a 9).
  • Players would typically find this version of blackjack attractive because players do not like when the dealer receives a point total of 20 (because this means the dealer has a very strong hand. Thus, the dealer would be unlikely to have a point total of 20 and thus players would typically find the game less stressful when the player has a 10-showing. In addition, this would change the player strategy and provide the player more opportunities to double down and split since the dealer would have a point total of 20 with much less frequency than the prior art version of blackjack.
  • In FIG. 1, operations 104 to 110 are where the player plays out the player's hand (e.g., hits, stands, doubles, splits, etc.) Operations 112 to 118 are where the dealer plays out the dealer's hand (e.g., continues to hit until the dealer's point total reaches a predetermined amount).
  • FIG. 2 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a dealer burn procedure, according to an embodiment.
  • In a first embodiment, operations 200-206 can be performed in between operations 102-104 of FIG. 1 (i.e., insert FIG. 2 in between operations 102 and 104).
  • The dealer burn procedure would start with operation 200, which determines if the dealer's up-card is a 10-valued card (10, jack, queen, or king, with suits being irrelevant) and only a 10-valued card. Since up-cards are dealt up, this can be determined by visual inspection. If not, then the method proceeds to operation 206 which continues the game as if nothing has happened.
  • If in operation 200, the dealer's up-card is a 10-valued card, then the method proceeds to operation 202, which determines if the dealer's hole-card is a 10-valued card (and only a 10-valued card). The dealer can peek at the dealer's hole-card. This can be done in a number of ways. The dealer can physically peek at the hole-card by crimping the card and looking under without revealing the card to the players. Or, the dealer can use a mechanical (or electronic) hole-card reader which can determine if the hole-card is a 10-valued card (or other programmed value) without the dealer knowing the value of the card (unless the hole-card is a 10). Such a device is described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,681,039, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. If the dealer's hole-card is not a 10-valued card, then the method proceeds to operation 206, which continues the game as if nothing has happened.
  • If in operation 202, it is determined that the dealer's hole card is a 10-valued card (meaning the dealer has a two-card point total of 20), then the method proceeds to operation 204, which burns the dealer's two cards (both the dealer's up-card and the dealer's hole-card) and deals (also known as “redealing”) the dealer two new cards, one face up (upcard) and one face down (hole-card). These two new cards are then used as a compete replacement to the original dealer's two cards. The term “burn” generally means to discard the cards and not use them further when completing the game. What actually happens to the burned cards (e.g., whether they are placed in the discard rack or elsewhere is not important). The method then proceeds to operation 206. In an alternate embodiment, operation 204 would not burn and redeal both the dealer's initial two cards (as described above), but only one (either the up-card or the hole-card while keeping the other). Thus, for example, if the dealer had an up-card of 10 and a hole-card of 10, the dealer would burn the hole-card and redeal the hole card (e.g., a new card is dealt as the hole-card face down but the original up-card is kept, or alternatively a new card is dealt as the up-card while the same hole-card is kept). In this manner, the dealer keeps one 10-valued card but not both (although of course the redealed card could also be a 10 valued card).
  • From operations 200, 202, or 204 (depending on what happened during the procedure), the method continues to operation 206 which continues the blackjack game (e.g., the next operations in FIG. 1 can be performed such as operation 104).
  • It is noted that the method described above with regard to FIG. 2 is performed in between operations 102 and 104, so that if the dealer had two 10-valued cards as the up-card/hole-card) then they were both replaced with newly dealt random cards (a new up-card and a new hole-card). Note that if the dealer has an ace and 9 as the two initial cards, this would be a point total of 20 but would not be subjected to the burn/replacement (operation 204). Thus, the player will face a dealer's point total of 20 much less frequently than standard blackjack.
  • In a second embodiment of the game, operations 200-206 of FIG. 2 would be performed in between operations 112 to 114 of FIG. 1 (instead of in between operations 102 to 104 as described in the first embodiment). In this embodiment, the player would also face a dealer point total of 20 less frequently than standard blackjack, however, the player would have already made his or her playing decisions. Thus, for example, if the player had busted (achieved a point total greater than 21), then the player would still be out of the game regardless of whether the dealer burned the dealer's two cards or not. In this embodiment, it would not be necessary for the dealer to have to peek at the hole card (without the players seeing it) since the dealer's cards have already been revealed (in operation 112).
  • It is noted that FIG. 2 illustrates the concept of burn conditions. If the dealer's cards meet the burn conditions, then the dealer would burn the dealer's cards in operation 204. If the dealer's cards do not meet the burn conditions, then the dealer would not burn the dealer's cards. The burn conditions can remain constant throughout the game or they can change (e.g., after a first burn then the burn condition changes). Of course, after each game is over and a new game is dealt, the burn conditions are reset (in other words if a burn is performed in one game, it has no effect on a subsequent game).
  • The second embodiment could be applied to the “European hole card rule”, wherein the dealer is not dealt a hole card but only an up-card in operation 102. After all of the players at the table have played out their respective hands, then the dealer deals himself/herself a second card face up in operation 112 (this would serve as the hole-card but there is no need now to deal it face down since all players have made their decisions). After the dealer's second card is dealt, then operations 200-206 are performed, and then the game can continue with operation 114.
  • In a further embodiment, from operation 204, the method would return to operation 200 (instead of proceeding to operation 206). In this manner, if the dealer burned two 10-cards (cards with a value of 10, e.g., any 10, jack, queen, and king) and the dealer again received two 10-cards, the dealer would burn the second two 10-cards (and all future two 10-cards) until the dealer was dealt two initial cards (up-card, hole-card) that was not two 10-cards (or does not meet the burn condition). In this embodiment, it would be impossible for the dealer to have an initial point total of 20 using two cards (unless the two cards are an ace and 9), although of course the dealer would still be able to achieve a point total of 20 using three or more cards). In a further variation of this embodiment, the dealer may burn a predetermined number of two 10 cards (e.g., two or three) before keeping the next two 10-cards. For example, a predetermined house rule may provide that the dealer will burn at most two two-10 cards (two different sets of initially dealt 10-cards), for example: if the dealer were dealt a first two 10 cards, burned that and dealt himself/herself another two 10-cards, the dealer would burn that one as well, and then if the dealer dealt himself/herself a third two 10-cards, the dealer would not burn that one but would have to keep it (because the dealer has reached the limit). This cap on burning hands avoids a potential “infinite loop” of continuing to burn cards from the shoe/deck.
  • It is noted that when implementing a subsequent burn procedure (as described above) wherein after an initial burn another burn procedure is implemented (going from operation 204 back to operation 200), the criterion for burning would remain the same. However, in an alternative embodiment, the criterion for burning in a subsequent burn can be different than the initial burn. For example, the criteria for an initial burn can be that the dealer's two initial cards are two 10-valued cards, and then the criteria for a subsequent burn is that the dealer's two new cards (after a burn the two new cards dealt to the dealer (not dealer's draw cards)) will be burned if both cards form a blackjack (one card is a 10 and the other card is an ace or vice-versa). Thus, for example, consider a game where the initial burn condition is that both dealer's initial cards are each 10-valued cards, and the subsequent burn condition is that both dealer's new cards are both 10-valued cards or form a blackjack. Thus, if the dealer is initially dealt an ace up and a 10 in the hole card, this would not be burned and play would continue normally. However, if the dealer is initially dealt a king and a jack (two 10-valued cards), then these would be burned and if the dealer is now dealt an ace up-card and a 10 in hole-card, these would be burned also and another new pair of dealer cards (up-card, hole-card) would be dealt to the dealer. Typically, all subsequent burn procedures (not including the initial burn procedure) would have the same burn conditions, although it is not required.
  • In another embodiment, the game can have a dealer burn condition which will burn the dealer's cards when either: a) both of the dealer's cards are 10-valued cards; or b) if the dealer's up-card is an 10-valued card and the dealer's hole-card is a suited ace (which matches the suit of the 10-valued up card) then these cards will be burned also. If the hole-card is not a suited ace (or a 10-valued card) then there would be no burn.
  • In yet a further embodiment, operation 200 would determine if the dealer's up-card is either a 10-valued card or an ace (instead of just a 10-valued card). In this embodiment, if the dealer has an ace-up blackjack (the dealer's hole-card is a 10-valued card) this would trigger a burn and deal (operation 204), thus reducing the frequency the dealer receives blackjack.
  • In yet a further embodiment, operation 200 would determine if the dealer's up-card is either 10-valued card or an ace (instead of just a 10-valued card) and operation 202 would: A) if the dealer's up-card is an ace—determine if the hole-card is 10-valued card; B) if the dealer's up-card is a 10-valued card—determine if the hole-card is either a 10-valued card or an ace. Another way of phrasing operations 200-202 would be to determine whether the dealer's initial two cards is either a blackjack or comprises two 10-cards. Only if one of these conditions is met (the dealer's initial two cards are either a blackjack or are two 10-cards) then operation 204 is performed. In this embodiment, it would not be possible for the dealer to be dealt a blackjack or two 10-cards without triggering a burn and deal (operation 204).
  • In a less preferred embodiment, operation 200 could check the dealer's hole-card and operation 202 could check the dealer's up-card.
  • The methods described herein provide the player with an advantage over standard blackjack in that the number of times the dealer receives an initial hand of 20 is reduced. Therefore, if a player were to play optimal strategy for this game, the player would have an advantage over the house. Thus, in order for the casino to profit from this game, an equalizing element must be added to the game in order so that the house advantage is maintained. One way this can be done is by implementing the game with a “push on 22” feature. This feature is described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,435,172, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. In this embodiment, when the player has not busted and the dealer busts (“yes” from operation 118) with a dealer's point total of 22 (but not 23 or higher), the player's wager (made in operation 100) would push (instead of winning as in operation 120). Other dealer point totals besides 22 (e.g., 23, 24, 25, or 26) can be used to push the player's wager. This feature gives the house an additional advantage (since players would win more by winning instead of pushing). Alternatively, instead of using the “push on 22” feature as the equalizing element, other equalizing elements can be used as well. Some other known equalizing elements are paying even money on blackjacks, using a Spanish deck (a standard deck with all 10's removed), etc.
  • Table I below illustrates one sample set of rules. Of course any combination of rule changes can be used.
  • TABLE I
    1.   The game is played using six standard 52-card decks.
    2.   To begin, the player makes a wager.
    3.   The dealer deals two cards face up to the player. He deals to himself, one card
    face up and one card face down.
    4.   If the dealer's up card is any 10, the dealer will peek at his hole card and burn
    both cards if he has either a suited blackjack or 20 points. The dealer will then deal two
    new cards to himself, one face up and one face down. After a first burn, with an ace or 10
    up card, the dealer will peek at his hole card and burn both cards if he has either a
    blackjack (suited or off suit) or any two 10's. This process will continue until the dealer's
    hand does not consist of a blackjack or any two 10's.
    5.   The game then proceeds using the following blackjack rules:
         a) Blackjacks pay 3 to 2.
         b) Players may double down on any two cards, including after splitting.
         c) Players may re-split pairs any number of times, excluding aces.
         d) Aces may be split once and receive one card only.
         e) The dealer stands on soft 17's.
         f) A dealer total of 22 points is considered a push against any player total of 21 or
         less. A player blackjack will still beat a dealer 22.
         g) If the dealer's up card is an ace, players may take insurance for up to half of
         their wager. Insurance pays 2 to 1 if the dealer has blackjack.
  • Any combination/set of rule variation can be used, possible rule variations include (but not limited) to: number of decks used (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or continuous shuffling machine); blackjack pays 6:5 vs. 3:2 vs. 1:1; dealer hits soft 17's (vs. stands on soft 17's ); the player is allowed to double on any number of cards (vs. being allowed to double on only the first two cards); the player is allowed to re-split aces (vs. not being allowed to re-split aces); the player is allowed to re-split pairs any number of times (vs. only being allowed to split pairs one, twice, three times, or other number); the player is allowed to surrender (except when the dealer has blackjack) their first to cards in exchange for receiving 50% of their bet back (vs. not being allowed to surrender); a dealer bust on 22 could push the player's live bets (instead of pay them) vs. any other mechanism to give the house an advantage.
  • It is noted that if the criteria for burning is that the two dealer's cards are each 10-valued cards, then an ace and a 9 would not be burned (because this is not two 10-valued cards, even though it totals 20). However, in an alternative embodiment, a condition for burning can be used where the first two dealer's cards total 20 (regardless of their composition), and in this embodiment, all 20's would be burned (even using an ace and a 9).
  • Table II below is an example of a set of burn conditions (both initial for the first two dealer's cards and subsequent for after the dealer's first burn) that can be used. Of course, numerous such conditions can be devised and implemented. In some embodiments, there would be no subsequent burn conditions because all subsequent burn conditions would be the same as the initial burn conditions. In one embodiment, the dealer's cards can be burned a maximum of one time. In another embodiment, the dealer's card can be burned a maximum of a predetermined number of times (e.g., 3). In another embodiment, there is no limit to the number of times the dealer's cards can be burned (of course as long as the dealer's cards keep meeting the required burn conditions).
  • TABLE II
    Initial burn condition:
      a) if both dealer's cards are 10-valued cards; or
      b) if the dealer's up-card is a 10-valued card and the dealer's
    hole-card is a suited ace; subsequent burn condition:
      c) if both the dealer's cards are 10-valued cards; or
      d) if both the dealer's cards form any blackjack.
  • Table III below illustrates a set of complete rules for one embodiment of the game. Of course any rule variation/combination can be used. In addition, initial and subsequent burn conditions (what triggers a burn) can be identical or different and can comprise any of the conditions described herein (or any others not described herein). If the dealer's cards do not meet the burn conditions then the dealer does not perform a burn and play continues using blackjack rules. Note that even though a dealer total of 22 pushes all live bets on the table (where the dealer did not bust), player blackjacks still win. While the below rules state that aces can be split only once, in other embodiments aces can be split more than once (and up to four times in an embodiment). Dealers can also stand on soft 17 in another embodiment. Note also that if the dealer does not have a predetermined up-card which triggers a dealer peek at the dealer's hole-card then the dealer would not peek at the dealer's hole-card (because the dealer would have no reason to peek because a burn would be impossible). “Suited ace” in Table III refers to the same suit as the 10-up card.
  • TABLE III
    On the initial deal: with a 10-up, dealer peeks and only burns: another
    10 or a suited ace;
    After a first burn: with a 10-up, dealer peeks and only burns: another
    10 or any ace;
    After a first burn: with an ace-up, dealer peeks and only burns: any 10.
    Player are allowed to double on any number of cards
    One card to resplit aces
    Aces split only once
    Blackjacks pay 3/2
    Players are allowed to double after splitting
    Players are allowed to take Insurance against a dealer Ace
    Dealer will hit soft 17
    Dealer will push all bets on a total of 22 (except player blackjacks
    will still win)
  • FIG. 3A is a drawing illustrating a gaming table, according to an embodiment.
  • A physical gaming table (typically made of wood with felt on top with the layout imprinted on it) is used to play the game in a physical real world casino. One example of a table that can be used in a physical casino is illustrated in U.S. Design patent D263,975 which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. The layout on top of the felt has imprinted on it seven betting circles as illustrated in FIG. 3A, each betting circle is where the respective player can place their chips (wager). The felt can be green and the imprinted betting circles can be white, although of course any color scheme can be used. Such a table can accommodate any number of players (such as seven as illustrated) or any other number (e.g. 2-10). All players play simultaneously against the dealer as known in the art. A player's hand 302 and a dealer's hand 301 are shown. A player's wager 303 is shown in the form of a chip or chips and is placed inside the player's betting circle. The dealer's area can also accommodate a physical card reader for reading the dealer's hole card as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,681,039, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety for all purposes. The physical card reader can be an electronic card reader which electronically scans a face down card and lights up a particular light (e.g., LED, etc.) if the face down card is a 10 or ace (which would give the dealer blackjack when the dealer's up-card is an ace or 10 respectively) otherwise a different light (e.g., a “green light”) lights up telling the dealer that the hole-card does not give the dealer blackjack and thus the dealer can continue dealing.
  • While not shown, the game can also be offered with any type of additional side bet in order to generate more action for the casino and more excitement for the players. Also not pictured in FIG. 3A is an electronic mechanical shuffler such as that described in U.S. Pat. No. 8,025,294 which is incorporated by reference here in its entirety which can optionally be used by the dealer to shuffle the deck or decks of cards. Also not pictured in FIG. 3A is an optional shoe which the cards can be placed into and dealt out of by the dealer, such as the shoe described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,457,512 which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • FIG. 3B is a block diagram illustrating an electronic player tracking system associated with each gaming table, according to an embodiment.
  • When players play casino table games the casino can typically track the player so that the casino knows how much gaming action a player is giving the casino and hence how much to reward each player with complimentaries (free or discounted rooms, food, etc.) Such a system is described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,836,817, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety for all purposes. Each player can have their own players card which is a plastic card that has their name imprinted on it and computer readable indicia (e.g., a magnetic stripe) which stores an identification number of the player's card (and hence the identification number of the player who owns the card). The player's card can be swiped through an electronic card readers 323, 325, 326 which can be electronic read and the data therein transmitted to the associated computer.
  • A gaming table A 320 (which can be used to play any method described herein) and a gaming table B 321 (which can be used to play any method described herein) can be associated with a pit 322 (which has its own computer) which has a card reader 323 to read the electronically encoded information on a player's card (the card reader can also be located at the tables themselves) and transmit the information to an associated computer which can communicate information contained on the player's card (e.g., an identification number of the player associated with the card) to the electronic database 324 along with play data relating to the player who owns the player's card. Table A 320 has its own card reader 325 and associated computer (the one next to card reader 325 which receives information from the card reader 325) and table B 321 also has its own card reader 326 and associated computer (the one next to card reader 326 which receives information from the card reader 326). The computers at table A 320 and table B 321 are connected to the electronic database 324. Casino employees can enter data regarding each player's play (for those players that present a players card) into a computer at the table or at the pit which transmits the play data (e.g., average bet amount, time of play, etc.) to the electronic casino database 524 that stores playing history information for players at the casino. The computers illustrated in FIG. 3B can all have the structure as illustrated in FIG. 4A.
  • FIG. 4A is a block diagram illustrating hardware that can be used to implement electronic versions of the wagering methods described herein, according to an embodiment. The hardware can be, for example, an electronic gaming machine (EGM) used in casinos. The hardware can also be a personal computer, playing the game using the Internet at an Internet casino for real money. The hardware can also be a digital casino table, for example the kind described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,775,887, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. The hardware can also be any computing device, such as a cellular phone, tablet, etc., and the methods described herein can be installed as software (e.g., an app) on the device. The hardware can also be any other type of device, working individually or in conjunction with other devices.
  • A processing unit 400 (such as a microprocessor and any associated components) is connected to an output device 401 (such as an LCD monitor, touch screen, CRT, etc.) and an input device 402 (e.g., buttons, a touch screen, a keyboard, mouse, etc.) All methods described herein can be performed by the processing unit 400 by loading and executing respective instructions. The processing unit 400 can also be connected to a network connection 403, which can connect the electronic gaming device to a computer communications network such as the Internet, a LAN, WAN, etc. The processing unit 400 is also connected to a RAM 404 and a ROM 405. The processing unit 400 is also connected to a storage device 406 which can be a DVD-drive, CD-ROM, flash memory, etc. Multiple such processing units can also work in collaboration with each other (in a same or different physical location). A computer readable storage medium 407 can store a program which can control the electronic device to perform any of the methods described herein. The processing unit 400 can also be connected to a financial apparatus 408 which can receive cash and convert the received cash into playable credits for use by the player when playing the electronic device. When the player decides to cash out any remaining credits, the financial apparatus 408 can issue coins or a cashless ticket (voucher) for the remaining credits which is redeemable by the player.
  • FIG. 4B is a block diagram illustrating an exemplary network configuration to implement a player playing an online version of the methods described herein. All the methods described herein can be implemented on an online casino for real money (or non-cash value credits). A player uses a computer 410 (e.g., cell phone, tablet, PC, etc.) can connect to a server 411 using a computer communications network such as the Internet. The server 411 hosts an online casino which determines the outcomes of the game and serves the outcomes to the computer 410 so the computer 410 displays the outcomes to the player. The configuration of online casinos is well known in the art.
  • An example of the game will now be presented to help illustrate the game. Bob bets (operation 100) $1 and is dealt (operation 102) a 5-diamonds/ace-spades (note that typically in standard blackjack the suits are not relevant). The dealer is dealt (operation 102) an up-card of 9-hearts and a face down hole-card. Since the up-card is not a 10-valued card, the game continues normally. Bob hits (operation 106) and receives a 3-hearts. The dealer turns over the hole-card (operation 112) which is a 9-spades. Since Bob's point total of 19 beats the dealer's point total of 18, Bob wins (operation 120) and is paid $1 and Bob's original $1 wager remains (thus Bob can remove $2 from the table for a net profit of $1).
  • As another example, Sara bets (operation 100) $1 and is dealt (operation 102) a 2-clubs/8-diamonds, and the dealer is dealt (operation 102) an up-card of 10-hearts and a face down hole-card. Since it is determined (operation 200) that the up-card is a 10-valued card, the dealer peeks (operation 202) at the hole-card (operation 202) and determines (operation 202) that the hole-card is a 10-clubs. Since the dealer has an initial hand of two 10-cards, the dealer turns over (operation 204, part of the burn) the hole-card to reveal to all of the players the dealer's hand, then the dealer burns (operation 204) the two card hand of 20 (typically by placing these two cards in the discard rack), and the dealer now deals (operation 204) the dealer a new up-card (of 5-diamonds) and hole-card. Sara now decides to double (operation 104, doubling not pictured) and places another $1 wager up and is dealt a 5-clubs. The dealer now reveals (operation 112) the hole-card to be a 10-spades and the dealer hits and receives a 5-spades. Since the dealer's total of 20 is higher than Sara's total of 15, Sara loses (operation 130) both $1 wagers (for a total of $2) and these $2 in wagers are taken by the dealer and kept by the house.
  • It is further noted that other card values for the determinations in operations 200 and 202 can be used (other than those described above). For example, card values can be checked for different values (individual values or a set of different values) in combination with suits, colors, etc.
  • In a further embodiment, if the dealer's final total is a preset total then the dealer would automatically burn a card and continue resolving the dealer's hand. For example, if the dealer's total is a 21 (a preset total) then the dealer would burn (remove a card and continue dealing). Thus, a dealer's 21 (which is bad for the players) could be turned into another dealer's hand (which may be better for the players).
  • FIG. 5 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of burning a dealer's card when the dealer's final total is a preset total, according to an embodiment.
  • In FIG. 5, FIG. 1 is constructively inserted into FIG. 5. Operation 114 in FIG. 5 is the same operation 114 as in FIG. 1. Instead of operation 114 proceeding to operation 122 in case of a “YES”, operation 114 now proceeds to operation 500 in case of a “YES”.
  • In operation 500, it is determined if the dealer's total (the dealer's final point total) equals a preset total. The preset total is a single point total (typically from 18 to 21) that is predetermined before the start of the game (and forms part of the public game rules). In a further embodiment, operation 500 can compare if the dealer's total equals one of a set of preset totals (e.g., 17-18, 17 and 19, etc.)
  • If in operation 500, the dealer's total does not equal the preset total then the method proceeds to operation 122, wherein the game proceeds normally.
  • If in operation 500, the dealer's total equals the preset total, then the method proceeds to operation 501, which burns a dealer's card in the dealer's hand. The card burned can be the last card dealt to the dealer. In another embodiment, the card burned can be the dealer's hole card. In another embodiment, the card burned can be the dealer's up-card. The burned card is removed from the dealer's hand and does not count in the dealer's point total, and then the method returns to operation 114. In another embodiment, from operation 501 the method proceeds to operation 116.
  • In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5, the decision to burn a dealer's card does not depend on how many cards are in the dealer's hand. This embodiment may be very strong for the player, since if the dealer is initially dealt (the two initial dealer's cards) the preset total, one of the cards would be burned. For example, if the preset total is 21, and the dealer is initially dealt two face cards or a blackjack, then this would qualify as being the preset total and a dealer's card would be burned and then the method would continue to deal a replacement card to the dealer in operation 116.
  • FIG. 6 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of burning a dealer's card when the dealer's final total is a preset total and the dealer's hand is form using more than two cards, according to an embodiment.
  • In FIG. 6, FIG. 1 is constructively inserted into FIG. 6. Operation 114 in FIG. 6 is the same operation 114 as in FIG. 1. Instead of operation 114 proceeding to operation 122 in case of a “YES”, operation 114 now proceeds to operation 600 in case of a “YES”.
  • In operation 600, it is determined whether the number of cards in the dealer's hand is greater than 2. If the number of cards in the dealer's hand is not greater than 2 (the dealer is standing on the dealer's initially dealt hand such as if the dealer was initially dealt a point total of 17-21), then the method proceeds to operation 122 and the game continues normally. This is because in this embodiment, one of the dealer's cards is burned only if the dealer draws to the preset total (if the dealer was initially dealt the preset total then a dealer's card would not be burned and the game would proceed normally to operation 122). If the number of dealer's cards is greater than 2, then the method proceeds to operation 601. For example, if the dealer was initially dealt a 10 and a 5 and the dealer drew a 6, this would be three dealer's cards (greater than 2). In operation 601, it is determined if the dealer's total equals the preset total. The preset total is a single point total (typically from 18 to 21) that is predetermined before the start of the game (and forms part of the public game rules). In a further embodiment, operation 500 can compare if the dealer's total equals one of a set of preset totals (e.g., 17-18, 17 and 19, etc.) If in operation 601, the dealer's total is not equal to the preset total then the method proceeds to operation 122 wherein no dealer's card is burned and the game continues normally.
  • If in operation 601, it is determined that the dealer's total equals the preset total then the method proceeds to operation 602 which burns a dealer's card in the dealer's hand. The card burned can be the last card dealt to the dealer. In another embodiment, the card burned can be the dealer's hole card. In another embodiment, the card burned can be the dealer's up-card. The burned card is removed from the dealer's hand and does not count in the dealer's point total, and then the method returns to operation 114. In another embodiment, from operation 602 the method proceeds to operation 116.
  • In the embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6, the dealer would continuously burn cards as needed in accordance with the flowchart. In a further embodiment, the dealer would only burn a card one time. Thus, if the dealer burned a card (in operations 501 or 602), the dealer would not burn another card in the same game. Thus, in FIG. 5, operation 500 would determine whether A) the dealer's total equals the preset total and B) operation 501 had not already been performed in this game. Thus, in operation 500 if operation 501 had already been performed (a dealer's card had already been burned during the same game) then thereafter operation 500 would always proceed to operation 122 (no further dealer's cards would be burned). In FIG. 6, operation 600 would determine whether A) the number of dealer's cards is greater than 2 and B) the operation 602 had not already been performed in the same game. Thus, in operation 600 if operation 602 had already been performed (a dealer's card had already been burned during the same game) then thereafter operation 600 would always proceed to operation 122 (no further dealer's cards would be burned). In another embodiment, instead of only allowing one card to be burned, another predetermined amount of cards would be the limit to be burned. For example, the dealer would burn a maximum of 2 (or 3, etc.) cards in the same game before the dealer would no longer burn any cards and stay on their hand (even though it would be the preset total).
  • Some examples of the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 6 will now be presented (with the preset total being 21). In a first example, Bart places a $1 wager. The dealer deals Bart a 10-spades and 5-hearts (player's hand) and the dealer is dealt a dealer's hand of 8-hearts and hole-card (face down). Bart decides to hit and receives a 4-spades for a total of 19, and then Bart stands. The dealer then reveals the dealer's hole-card to be a 5 for a point total of 13. Since 13 is less than 17, the dealer hits and deals a 8-spades for a point total of 21. Since the dealer's point total of 21 equals the preset total (21) then the dealer burns the last card dealt (the 8-spades) by discarding the 8-spades which no longer counts as part of the dealer's point total and the dealer deals himself a third card of 5-spades for a point total of 18. Since the dealer's point total of 18 is higher than 17 (operation 114) the dealer does not need to deal himself any additional cards and thus the dealer stands. Since Bart's point total of 19 is higher than the dealer's point total of 18, Bart wins the blackjack game and wins a $1 payout (so Bart now has $2 in chips on the table he can keep). Note that if the dealer's point total of 21 was achieved on a number of dealer cards greater than three, the procedure would still be the same (the dealer would burn the last card dealt and continue resolving the dealer's hand).
  • In a further example, Homer places a $1 wager. The dealer deals home a 10-spades/10-hearts. The dealer deals himself a 10-hearts (upcard) and a hole-card face down. Homer stands. The dealer then reveals the hole-card to be an ace, for a point total of 21. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 6 (which requires more than two dealer cards to initiate a burn), the dealer would not burn a card (even though the dealer's point total equals the preset total of 21) because the dealer's hand is not made of more than 2 cards. Thus, the dealer wins and Homer loses the $1 wager. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5 (in which a dealer would burn a card regardless of how many cards are in the dealer's hand), two outcomes could possibly result depending on the embodiment. In one embodiment, a dealer blackjack (an initially dealt hand of ace and ten) always wins (unless the player is also dealt a blackjack in which the result is a push) and thus Homer would lose the $1 wager. In a second embodiment of FIG. 5, the dealer would burn the last card (either the hole-card or the up-card) and deal a new card to the dealer and the dealer continues to play out the dealer's hand resuming at operation 114.
  • In yet another example, Marge places a $1 bet. The dealer deals Marge a 2-spades/9-hearts. The dealer deals himself a 9-clubs and a hole-card. Marge doubles and places another $1 bet and is dealt a 8-spades for a point total of 19. The dealer now reveals the hole-card to be a 2-clubs. Since the dealer's point total of 11 is less than 17, the dealer hits and draws a 10-spades for a point total of 21. Since 21 is the preset total, the dealer burns the last card (10-spades) and now deals another third card of 3-diamonds for a total of 14. The dealer now hits again (since 14 is less than 17) and deals himself a 7-diamonds for a point total of 21. In a first embodiment, the dealer would not burn a second time in the same game and thus the dealer's hand of 21 is final and beats Marge's point total of 19 (thus Marge loses the $2 in wagers). In a second embodiment, the dealer would burn a second time in the same game and thus the dealer would burn the last card of 7-diamonds and now deals a 10-diamonds which gives the dealer a point total of 24 which is a bust and thus Marge wins (operation 120) $2 (she now has $4 in chips on the table she can keep) and the game ends. Note that in one variation of this second embodiment, the dealer can burn as many times as needed in the same game. In another variation of this second embodiment, the dealer has an upper limit of how many burns the dealer is permitted to perform in the same game (e.g., 3) before the dealer will no longer burn and will rest with the final total equal to the preset total.
  • It is noted that the methods described herein can be played with any number of standard decks of 52 cards (e.g., 1 deck to 10 decks). A standard deck is a collection of cards comprising an Ace, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, jack, queen, king, for each of four suits (comprising spades, diamonds, clubs, hearts) totaling 52 cards. Cards can be shuffled or a continuous shuffling machine (CSM) can be used. A standard deck of 52 cards can be used, as well as other kinds of decks, such as Spanish decks, decks with wild cards, etc. The operations described herein can be performed in any sensible order. Furthermore, numerous different variants of house rules can be applied.
  • Methods described herein can also be played on a physical table using physical cards and physical chips used to place wagers. Such physical chips can be directly redeemable for cash. When a player wins (dealer loses) the player's wager, the dealer will pay that player a respective payout amount. When a player loses (dealer wins) the player's wager, the dealer will take (collect) that wager from the player and typically place those chips in the dealer's chip rack. All rules, embodiments, features, etc. of a game being played are typically communicated to the player (e.g., verbally or on a written rule card) before the game begins.
  • Initial cash deposits can be made into the electronic gaming machine which converts cash into electronic credits. Wagers can be placed in the form of electronic credits, which can be cashed out for real coins or a ticket (e.g., ticket-in-ticket-out) which can be redeemed at a casino cashier or kiosk for real cash and/or coins.
  • Any description of a component or embodiment herein also includes hardware, software, and configurations which already exist in the prior art and may be necessary to the operation of such component(s) or embodiment(s).
  • Further, the operations described herein can be performed in any sensible order. Any operations not required for proper operation can be optional. Further, all methods described herein can also be stored on a computer readable storage to control a computer. All variations and features described herein can be combined with any other features described herein without limitation.
  • The many features and advantages of the invention are apparent from the detailed specification and, thus, it is intended by the appended claims to cover all such features and advantages of the invention that fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation illustrated and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

Claims (20)

1. A method for implementing a blackjack game in a physical casino, the method comprising:
providing the physical casino with a physical gaming table with a felt layout on top of the gaming table which includes a plurality of betting circles imprinted into the felt layout;
providing one or more physical decks of cards;
receiving a wager from a player in the form of one or more physical chips in a player's betting circle out of the plurality of betting circles;
dealing, using the one or more physical decks of cards, a player's hand and a dealer's hand;
enabling the player to play out the player's hand;
providing dealer hand resolution rules that comprise: A) if a point total of the dealer's hand is greater than a predetermined amount then proceed to operation C otherwise deal an additional card to the dealer's hand; B) if the point total of the dealer's hand is greater than 21 then the dealer busts and the dealer hand resolution ends otherwise return to operation A), C) if a number of cards in the dealer's hand is not greater than 2 then the dealer hand resolution ends otherwise proceed to operation D, D) if the point total of the dealer's hand does not equal a preset total then the dealer hand resolution ends otherwise burn a card in the dealer's hand and continue to resolve the dealer's hand;
implementing the dealer hand resolution rules; and
resolving the wager according to predetermined blackjack rules.
2. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the preset total is 21.
3. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the dealer hand resolution rules further comprise that the continue to resolve the dealer's hand returns to operation A with no limit to a number of dealer's cards that are potentially burned.
4. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the dealer hand resolution rules further comprise that the continue to resolve the dealer's hand returns to operation A with a predetermined maximum number of dealer's cards that can be burned whereupon operation D then ends the dealer hand resolution.
5. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the dealer hand resolution rules further comprise that when a dealer's card is burned another dealer's card is dealt automatically.
6. The method as recited in claim 5, wherein the dealer hand resolution rules further comprise that the continue to resolve the dealer's hand returns to operation A with no limit to a number of dealer's cards that are potentially burned.
7. The method as recited in claim 5, wherein the dealer hand resolution rules further comprise that the continue to resolve the dealer's hand returns to operation A with a predetermined maximum number of dealer's cards that can be burned whereupon operation D then ends the dealer hand resolution.
8. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the card burned in the dealer's hand is a last card dealt to the dealer.
9. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the card burned in the dealer's hand is a dealer's up-card.
10. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the card burned in the dealer's hand is a dealer's hole-card.
11. An electronic apparatus for implementing a blackjack game, the apparatus comprising:
a processing unit in communication with an input device and an output device, the processing unit configured to execute instructions to:
receive a wager from a player;
deal a player's hand and a dealer's hand;
enable the player to play out the player's hand;
provide dealer hand resolution rules that comprise: A) if a point total of the dealer's hand is greater than a predetermined amount then proceed to operation C otherwise deal an additional card to the dealer's hand; B) if the point total of the dealer's hand is greater than 21 then the dealer busts and the dealer hand resolution ends otherwise return to operation A), C) if a number of cards in the dealer's hand is not greater than 2 then the dealer hand resolution ends otherwise proceed to operation D, D) if the point total of the dealer's hand does not equal a preset total then the dealer hand resolution ends otherwise burn a card in the dealer's hand and continue to resolve the dealer's hand;
implement the dealer hand resolution rules; and
resolve the wager according to predetermined blackjack rules.
12. The apparatus as recited in claim 11, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the preset total is 21.
13. The apparatus as recited in claim 11, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the dealer hand resolution rules further comprise that the continue to resolve the dealer's hand returns to operation A with no limit to a number of dealer's cards that are potentially burned.
14. The apparatus as recited in claim 11, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the dealer hand resolution rules further comprise that the continue to resolve the dealer's hand returns to operation A with a predetermined maximum number of dealer's cards that can be burned whereupon operation D then ends the dealer hand resolution.
15. The apparatus as recited in claim 11, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the dealer hand resolution rules further comprise that when a dealer's card is burned another dealer's card is dealt automatically.
16. The apparatus as recited in claim 15, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the dealer hand resolution rules further comprise that the continue to resolve the dealer's hand returns to operation A with no limit to a number of dealer's cards that are potentially burned.
17. The apparatus as recited in claim 15, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the dealer hand resolution rules further comprise that the continue to resolve the dealer's hand returns to operation A with a predetermined maximum number of dealer's cards that can be burned whereupon operation D then ends the dealer hand resolution.
18. The apparatus as recited in claim 11, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the card burned in the dealer's hand is a last card dealt to the dealer.
19. A method for implementing a blackjack game, the method comprising:
enabling the following operations to be performed on an electronic computer connected to an electronic output device:
placing a wager by a player using the electronic computer;
viewing, by the player on the electronic output device, a player's hand and a dealer's hand;
playing out, by the player, the player's hand;
watching, by the player, the dealer resolve the dealer's hand according to dealer hand resolution rules that comprise: A) if a point total of the dealer's hand is greater than a predetermined amount then proceed to operation C otherwise deal an additional card to the dealer's hand; B) if the point total of the dealer's hand is greater than 21 then the dealer busts and the dealer hand resolution ends otherwise return to operation A), C) if a number of cards in the dealer's hand is not greater than 2 then the dealer hand resolution ends otherwise proceed to operation D, D) if the point total of the dealer's hand does not equal a preset total then the dealer hand resolution ends otherwise burn a card in the dealer's hand and continue to resolve the dealer's hand;
watching, by the player, a resolution of the wager according to predetermined blackjack rules.
20. The method as recited in claim 19, wherein the before the enabling, the method further comprises connecting, by the player, the computer to an online casino using the Internet.
US13/539,113 2011-03-01 2012-06-29 Blackjack variation with automatically eliminated card Abandoned US20130005423A1 (en)

Priority Applications (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201161448193P true 2011-03-01 2011-03-01
US201161448189P true 2011-03-01 2011-03-01
US201161448642P true 2011-03-02 2011-03-02
US13/219,697 US8398084B2 (en) 2011-03-01 2011-08-28 Blackjack variation with automatically burned cards
US13/539,113 US20130005423A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2012-06-29 Blackjack variation with automatically eliminated card

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/539,113 US20130005423A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2012-06-29 Blackjack variation with automatically eliminated card
US14/865,628 US20160008702A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2015-09-25 Blackjack variation with automatically eliminated card
US15/927,784 US20180207512A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2018-03-21 Blackjack variation with burn of dealer draw card

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/219,697 Continuation-In-Part US8398084B2 (en) 2011-03-01 2011-08-28 Blackjack variation with automatically burned cards

Related Child Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/865,628 Continuation US20160008702A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2015-09-25 Blackjack variation with automatically eliminated card
US15/927,784 Continuation US20180207512A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2018-03-21 Blackjack variation with burn of dealer draw card

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20130005423A1 true US20130005423A1 (en) 2013-01-03

Family

ID=47391176

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/539,113 Abandoned US20130005423A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2012-06-29 Blackjack variation with automatically eliminated card
US14/865,628 Pending US20160008702A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2015-09-25 Blackjack variation with automatically eliminated card
US15/927,784 Pending US20180207512A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2018-03-21 Blackjack variation with burn of dealer draw card

Family Applications After (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/865,628 Pending US20160008702A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2015-09-25 Blackjack variation with automatically eliminated card
US15/927,784 Pending US20180207512A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2018-03-21 Blackjack variation with burn of dealer draw card

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US20130005423A1 (en)

Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060151954A1 (en) * 2005-01-13 2006-07-13 Silverman Bruce D Method and apparatus for playing blackjack with active working wagers

Family Cites Families (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4836553A (en) * 1988-04-18 1989-06-06 Caribbean Stud Enterprises, Inc. Poker game
US5377973B1 (en) * 1988-04-18 1996-12-10 D & D Gaming Patents Inc Methods and apparatus for playing casino card games including a progressive jackpot
US5275415A (en) * 1991-04-05 1994-01-04 Wisted Roger L Card game
US5275400A (en) * 1992-06-11 1994-01-04 Gary Weingardt Pari-mutuel electronic gaming
US5288081A (en) * 1993-02-25 1994-02-22 Shuffle Master, Inc. Method of playing a wagering game
US5586766A (en) * 1994-05-13 1996-12-24 Casinovations, Inc. Blackjack game system and methods
US5685774A (en) * 1994-07-22 1997-11-11 Webb; Derek J. Method of playing card games
US6237916B1 (en) * 1994-07-22 2001-05-29 Shuffle Master Gaming Method and apparatus for playing card games
US5407208A (en) * 1994-07-25 1995-04-18 Keller; Kris Card game kit
US5431408A (en) * 1994-09-23 1995-07-11 Dd Stud, Inc. Card game with travelling wild card
US5718430A (en) * 1995-01-24 1998-02-17 Aramapakul; Paiboon Method of playing a card game
US5538252A (en) * 1995-01-30 1996-07-23 Green; John R. Method of playing a card game
US5645281A (en) * 1995-05-16 1997-07-08 Helix Information Services, Inc. Method of playing a card game
US5651548A (en) * 1995-05-19 1997-07-29 Chip Track International Gaming chips with electronic circuits scanned by antennas in gaming chip placement areas for tracking the movement of gaming chips within a casino apparatus and method
US5597162A (en) * 1995-12-27 1997-01-28 Franklin; Thomas L. Poker game where players are given two chances at receiving replacement cards
US6070873A (en) * 1997-03-14 2000-06-06 Perkins; Thomas Francis Card game and method of playing card game
US5810663A (en) * 1997-04-12 1998-09-22 Mambo Gaming Company, Llc Method of playing a high/low card game
US5984310A (en) * 1998-04-20 1999-11-16 English; Toby J. Method for playing a wagering type card game
US6267671B1 (en) * 1999-02-12 2001-07-31 Mikohn Gaming Corporation Game table player comp rating system and method therefor
US6270078B1 (en) * 1999-02-16 2001-08-07 Anthony Leone Method of playing an improved version of the game of Pai Gow Poker
US6170827B1 (en) * 1999-06-04 2001-01-09 Paul A Lombardo Card game
US6299171B1 (en) * 1999-09-20 2001-10-09 Peter & Paul, Inc. Method of playing a baccarat-type card game
US6406024B1 (en) * 1999-10-05 2002-06-18 Thomas Francis Perkins In-between card game and method of playing
US6585588B2 (en) * 2001-03-22 2003-07-01 Shuffle Master, Inc. Multiple play high card game with insurance bet
US7128650B2 (en) * 2001-09-12 2006-10-31 Igt Gaming machine with promotional item dispenser
US8337296B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2012-12-25 SHFL entertaiment, Inc. Method and apparatus for using upstream communication in a card shuffler
US7780525B2 (en) * 2003-10-17 2010-08-24 Igt Systems and methods for determining a level of reward
US7080839B2 (en) * 2004-06-29 2006-07-25 Michael Shackleford Blackjack variations
US7874920B2 (en) * 2004-10-01 2011-01-25 Vms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with unilateral player selection for developing a group
US7648140B2 (en) * 2005-09-29 2010-01-19 Applied Gaming Dynamics, Llc Method and apparatus for playing a blackjack game with side wagers
GB0525496D0 (en) * 2005-12-15 2006-01-25 Hall Geoffrey W Power blackjack
US20090045576A1 (en) * 2007-08-16 2009-02-19 Andrianakos Ioannis E Twenty-one game with card redraw bet
US8226469B2 (en) * 2010-09-29 2012-07-24 Igt Gaming system, gaming device, and method for providing a poker game with a bonus gaming session having re-draw option

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060151954A1 (en) * 2005-01-13 2006-07-13 Silverman Bruce D Method and apparatus for playing blackjack with active working wagers

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20160008702A1 (en) 2016-01-14
US20180207512A1 (en) 2018-07-26

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US7022016B2 (en) Video poker game with bonus award for matching designated hands
US7086943B2 (en) System and method for playing blackjack
US8172660B2 (en) Gaming system with blackjack primary game and poker secondary game
AU764668B2 (en) Higher frequency wild card game
US6179291B1 (en) Casino game method of play
US9569924B2 (en) Systems and methods for play of casino table card games
US6386973B1 (en) Card revelation system
US6802510B1 (en) Card game
US7993191B2 (en) Gaming system, gaming device and method for providing draw poker game
US20030050107A1 (en) Stud poker games
US20030075869A1 (en) Bet withdrawal casino game with wild symbol
US7914368B2 (en) Methods and systems for playing baccarat jackpot with an option for insurance betting
US8308543B2 (en) Reshuffle timing
US20050253338A1 (en) Blackjack side bet using community cards
US7431648B2 (en) Method of conducting a wagering game with continuous depletion
US20020103017A1 (en) Electronic card game and method
US6869076B1 (en) Casino low ball game and method of dealing cards therein
US8695984B2 (en) Gaming system, gaming device and method for providing draw poker game
US7309066B2 (en) Double Black Jacks, a Blackjack type game
US20100090405A1 (en) Automated House Way Indicator and Activator
US6406024B1 (en) In-between card game and method of playing
US9129486B2 (en) Gaming system and method providing a card game associated with a supplemental pool funded upon an occurrence of a designated outcome and winnable by a player or a dealer
US8287346B2 (en) Late game series information change
US6237917B1 (en) Method of playing a baccarat game
US7494410B2 (en) System and method for skill based games of chance

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: CUSTOMIZED CASINO GAMES LIMITED, UNITED KINGDOM

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HALL, GEOFF;REEL/FRAME:031862/0849

Effective date: 20130806

AS Assignment

Owner name: CUSTOMIZED GAMES LIMITED, UNITED KINGDOM

Free format text: CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT THE ASSIGNEE PREVIOUSLY RECORDED AT REEL: 031862 FRAME: 0849. ASSIGNOR(S) HEREBY CONFIRMS THE ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:HALL, GEOFF;REEL/FRAME:034086/0762

Effective date: 20130806