US20120279241A1 - Heat pump control - Google Patents

Heat pump control Download PDF

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Publication number
US20120279241A1
US20120279241A1 US13/101,521 US201113101521A US2012279241A1 US 20120279241 A1 US20120279241 A1 US 20120279241A1 US 201113101521 A US201113101521 A US 201113101521A US 2012279241 A1 US2012279241 A1 US 2012279241A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
heat pump
control
compressor
sensed
condenser coil
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Abandoned
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US13/101,521
Inventor
Randy T. Ruiz
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Emerson Electric Co
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Emerson Electric Co
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Publication date
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Priority to US13/101,521 priority Critical patent/US20120279241A1/en
Assigned to EMERSON ELECTRIC CO. reassignment EMERSON ELECTRIC CO. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: RUIZ, RANDY T.
Publication of US20120279241A1 publication Critical patent/US20120279241A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B30/00Heat pumps
    • F25B30/02Heat pumps of the compression type
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B49/00Arrangement or mounting of control or safety devices
    • F25B49/02Arrangement or mounting of control or safety devices for compression type machines, plant or systems
    • F25B49/022Compressor control arrangements
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B13/00Compression machines, plant or systems with reversible cycle
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B2500/00Problems to be solved
    • F25B2500/29High ambient temperatures
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B2500/00Problems to be solved
    • F25B2500/31Low ambient temperatures
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B2600/00Control issues
    • F25B2600/02Compressor control
    • F25B2600/025Compressor control by controlling speed
    • F25B2600/0251Compressor control by controlling speed with on-off operation
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B2600/00Control issues
    • F25B2600/25Control of valves
    • F25B2600/2507Flow-diverting valves
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B2700/00Sensing or detecting of parameters; Sensors therefor
    • F25B2700/21Temperatures
    • F25B2700/2106Temperatures of fresh outdoor air
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B2700/00Sensing or detecting of parameters; Sensors therefor
    • F25B2700/21Temperatures
    • F25B2700/2116Temperatures of a condenser

Abstract

A control is provided that includes a sensor that provides an output indicative of a sensed temperature of a condenser coil of the heat pump, and a controller for controlling activation of at least a compressor of the heat pump. The controller is configured to compare the output of the sensor to a representation of sensed ambient temperature to determine whether the reversing valve is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil. The controller is further configured to deactivate at least the compressor of the heat pump when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation.

Description

    FIELD
  • The present disclosure relates to climate control systems for providing conditioned air to a space, and more specifically to control of a heat pump system utilizing a reversing valve.
  • BACKGROUND
  • This section provides background information related to the present disclosure which is not necessarily prior art.
  • It is well known to use cycle reversing valves to control the operation of heat pumps. These valves, often referred to as “four way valves” or “reversing valves”, are used to reverse the refrigerant line connections to a compressor, such that the heat pump can either pump heat into or out from a building (e.g., a house).
  • Cycle reversing valves for use in heat pumps typically are provided with an actuation means such as a solenoid coil for switching the valve to reverse the refrigerant line connections to the compressor. However, where failure of the actuation means occurs in switching the reversing valve between heat and cool mode, ineffective compressor operation may result from a reversing valve mode that is inconsistent with heat pump operation. Known reversing valve controls do not sufficiently address the failure that may occur by a reversing valve in a heat pump.
  • SUMMARY
  • This section provides a general summary of the disclosure, and is not a comprehensive disclosure of its full scope or all of its features.
  • Various embodiments of a control are provided for a heat pump having a reversing valve that is switchable between a heat mode and a cool mode corresponding to heating operation and cooling operation of the heat pump. One embodiment of a control includes a sensor that provides an output indicative of a sensed temperature of a condenser coil of the heat pump, and a controller for controlling activation of at least a compressor of the heat-pump. The controller is configured to compare the output of the sensor to a representation of sensed ambient temperature to determine whether the reversing valve is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil. The controller is further configured to deactivate at least the compressor of the heat pump when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation.
  • In the some embodiments of the present disclosure, the control includes a first sensor that provides an output indicative of a sensed temperature of a condenser coil of the heat pump, and a second sensor that provides an output indicative of an ambient temperature of air adjacent the condenser coil. The control includes a controller for controlling activation of at least a compressor of the heat-pump. The controller is configured to compare the outputs of the first and second sensors to determine whether the reversing valve is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil. The controller is further configured to deactivate at least the compressor of the heat pump when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heating operation or cooling operation of the heat pump.
  • Further areas of applicability will become apparent from the description provided herein. The description and specific examples in this summary are intended for purposes of illustration only and are not intended to limit the scope of the present disclosure.
  • DRAWINGS
  • The drawings described herein are for illustrative purposes only of selected embodiments and not all possible implementations, and are not intended to limit the scope of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 1 is a cut away view of a space showing one embodiment of control system for a heat pump unit, in accordance with the principles of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic of one embodiment of a control for a heat pump unit, in accordance with the principles of the present disclosure.
  • Corresponding reference numerals indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Example embodiments will now be described more fully with reference to the accompanying drawings.
  • According to one aspect of the present disclosure, various embodiments of a control are provided for a heat pump having a reversing valve that is switchable between a heat mode and a cool mode corresponding to heating operation and cooling operation of the heat pump. The control includes a sensor that provides an output indicative of a sensed temperature of a condenser coil of the heat pump, and a controller for controlling activation of at least a compressor of the heat-pump. The controller is configured to compare the output of the sensor to a representation of sensed ambient temperature to determine whether the reversing valve is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil. The controller is further configured to deactivate at least the compressor of the heat pump when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation.
  • In the some embodiments of the present disclosure, the control includes a first sensor that provides an output indicative of a sensed temperature of a condenser coil of the heat pump, and a second sensor that provides an output indicative of an ambient temperature of air adjacent the condenser coil. The control includes a controller for controlling activation of at least a compressor of the heat-pump. The controller is configured to compare the outputs of the first and second sensors to determine whether the reversing valve is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil. The controller is further configured to deactivate at least the compressor of the heat pump when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heating operation or cooling operation of the heat pump, as explained below.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, a residential climate control system for a space 10 is shown that utilizes a heat pump 20 having a reversing valve 26 that is switchable between a heat mode and a cool mode corresponding to heating operation and cooling operation of the heat pump 20. The heat pump 20 (or alternatively an outdoor condenser unit) includes at least a condenser coil 24, a compressor 22 and a condenser fan. The heat pump 20 may comprise a switch or contactor 28 that switches alternating current to a motor (see 142 in FIG. 2) for the compressor 22 of the heat pump 20. A control 100 activates the contactor 28 and the compressor 22 in response to an activation signal from a thermostat 30. The thermostat 30 senses temperature within the space 10 and responsively sends an activation signal to the control 100 to initiate operation of at least the compressor 22 of the heat pump 20.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, the control 100 includes a sensor 102 that provides an output indicative of a sensed temperature of a condenser coil 24 of the heat pump 20. The control 100 may further include a second sensor 104 that provides an output indicative of an ambient temperature of air adjacent the condenser coil 24. The control 100 includes a controller (e.g., controller 160 shown in FIG. 2) for controlling activation of at least the compressor 22 of the heat pump 20. The controller 160 is configured to compare the output of the sensor 102 to a representation of sensed ambient temperature to determine whether the reversing valve 26 is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24. The control 100 may, for example, be associated with or incorporated in a defrost controller. Alternatively, the control 100 may be a unitary control that is configured to directly connect an alternating current voltage source to the compressor 22, as explained below.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, a schematic of one embodiment of a control 100 is shown. The control 100 may be powered via a 24 volt alternating current power source connected at R and C, which may supply a half wave regulated 5 volt power supply (not shown) comprising a diode in series with a transistor and a regulating capacitor and zener diode for gating the transistor. The power supply may also be a small transformer and zener diode circuit. The control 100 preferably comprises a controller 160, which may be a microprocessor, for example. The control 100 further includes a plurality of switching means 162, 164 for controlling the switching of line voltage 166, 168 to the compressor motor 142 of the compressor 22 (shown in FIG. 1) and to a motor 140 for the condenser fan (shown in FIG. 1). The switching means preferably comprise relays such as an A20500P2 relay manufactured by American Zettler. The condenser fan motor relay 162 and at least one compressor motor relay 164 are also in connection with the controller 160. The control 100 also receives input from a plurality of sensors 172, 174, 176, 178, 180, 188 and 190 for monitoring operating various parameters of the heat pump components. These sensors may include current sensors 172, 174 and 176 for sensing the current level in the start winding and run winding of the compressor motor 142 of the compressor 22 (shown in FIG. 1), and a sensor 178 for sensing the current in the motor 140 of the condenser fan (shown in FIG. 1). Other sensors may include a sensor 180 for sensing the magnitude of the line voltage.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the control 100 further includes a plurality of switching means for controlling voltage to a reversing valve 26, for actuating and/or switching the reversing valve 26 between a heat mode and a cool mode, in response to an input signal at terminal ‘O’ from the thermostat 30. Accordingly, the controller 160 is capable of controlling application of a voltage for switching the reversing valve 26 to a heat or cool mode that corresponds to the selected heating operation or cooling operation of the heat pump 20. However, applying a voltage for switching the reversing valve 26 may be ineffective where a failure of the reversing valve 26 to switch between modes occurs.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the control 100 also receives input from a temperature sensor 102 that provides an output indicative of the temperature of the condenser coil 24 (shown in FIG. 1), and may receive an input from a temperature sensor 104 that provides an output indicative of the outside ambient temperature. The control 100 includes a controller 160, which may be a 28 pin PIC16F microprocessor manufactured by Microchip, for example. The microprocessor may include a plurality of Analog to Digital data inputs for receiving information from various data inputs in connection with the control 100, such as sensor 102 that provides an output indicative of a sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24 of the heat pump 20 (shown in FIG. 1). The controller 160 is configured to compare the output of the sensor 102 to a representation of sensed ambient temperature to determine whether the reversing valve 26 is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24 (shown in FIG. 1), or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24 (shown in FIG. 1). One particular control in which the above may be implemented is the 49H20 Unitary Control manufactured by White-Rodgers, a Division of Emerson Electric Co, which is configured to control activation of at least the compressor motor 142. Accordingly, the control 100 may be a unitary control having a controller 160 for controlling operation of at least the compressor motor 142 of a heat pump in response to a thermostat activation signal.
  • In the above embodiment, the controller 160 of the control 100 is configured to determine a representation of sensed ambient temperature by obtaining an output of the condenser coil sensor 102 before the compressor 22 is activated, which output is indicative of ambient temperature. This is because when the compressor 22 is not operating, any difference between the temperature of the ambient air and the temperature of the condenser coil 24 will eventually diminish, such that the output of the sensor 102 for sensing condenser coil temperature will be representative of the sensed temperature of the ambient air adjacent the condenser coil 24. The controller 160 is preferably configured to compare, after a predetermined time following activation of the compressor 22, the representation of sensed ambient temperature (obtained from sensor 102 prior to activation) to an output of the sensor 102 that indicative of the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24 after a minimum period of operation of the compressor 22. Thus, the controller 160 is configured to compare a first output of the sensor 102 before the compressor 22 is activated to a second output of sensor 102 after a predetermined time following activation of the compressor 22, which second output is indicative of the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24 during operation of the heat pump 20. The controller 160 is configured to determine whether the reversing valve 26 is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24. The controller 160 is further configured to deactivate at least the compressor 22 of the heat pump 20 when the reversing valve 26 is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation.
  • Alternatively, the controller 160 may be configured to determine a representation of sensed ambient temperature by obtaining an output of the second sensor 104 that provides an output indicative of an ambient temperature of air adjacent the condenser coil 24. The controller 160 is configured to compare the output of the second sensor 104 to the output of sensor 102 after a predetermined time following activation of the compressor 22, which is indicative of the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24 after a predetermined time following activation of the compressor 22. The controller 160 is configured to compare the output of the second sensor 104 to the output of the first sensor 102 to determine whether the reversing valve 26 is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24. The controller 160 is further configured to deactivate at least the compressor 22 of the heat pump 20 when the reversing valve 26 is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation.
  • Accordingly, in the some embodiments of the present disclosure, the control 100 includes a first sensor 102 that provides an output indicative of a sensed temperature of a condenser coil 24 of the heat pump 20, and a second sensor 104 that provides an output indicative of an ambient temperature of air adjacent the condenser coil 24. The control includes a controller 160 for controlling activation of at least a compressor 22 of the heat pump 20. The controller 160 is configured to compare the outputs of the first and second sensors 102, 104 to determine whether the reversing valve 26 is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24. The controller 160 is further configured to deactivate at least the compressor 22 of the heat pump 20 when the reversing valve 26 is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heating operation or cooling operation of the heat pump 20.
  • In an alternate embodiment, the control 100 may not directly control the compressor 22 of heat pump 20. Instead, the control 100 includes a controller that wirelessly communicates with the thermostat 30. The controller compares a representation of sensed ambient temperature to the output of the sensor 102 that is indicative of a temperature of the condenser coil 24 to determine whether the reversing valve 26 is in heat mode where the ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24, or in cool mode where the ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24, and responsively transmits a wireless signal to a thermostat 30 indicating a valve malfunction when the reversing valve 26 is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation. The thermostat 30 would then be able to shut off the heat pump 20 and alert an occupant of the malfunction of the reversing valve 26.
  • In yet another alternate embodiment, the control 100 may be a thermostat 30 that is in wireless communication with at least a first sensor 102 that provides an output indicative of sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24. The first sensor 102 preferably provides an output indicative of sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24 to a communication control (control 100 shown in FIG. 1), which is configured to wireless transmit information indicative of sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24 to the thermostat 30. The thermostat 30 is configured to compare a first output of the sensor 102 before the compressor 22 is activated (which is representative of ambient temperature) to a second output of sensor 102 after a predetermined time following activation of the compressor 22 to determine whether the reversing valve 26 is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24. The thermostat 30 is further configured to deactivate at least the compressor 22 of the heat pump 20 when the reversing valve 26 is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heating operation or cooling operation of the heat pump 20.
  • Alternatively, the thermostat 30 may be in wireless communication with at least the first sensor 102 that provides an output indicative of sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24, and a second sensor 104 that provides an output indicative of ambient air temperature. The first sensor 102 and second sensor 104 preferably provide an output to a communication control (control 100 shown in FIG. 1), which is configured to wireless transmit information indicative of ambient temperature and the temperature of the condenser coil 24 to the thermostat 30. The thermostat 30 is configured to compare the outputs of the first sensor 102 and second sensor 104 after a predetermined time following activation of the compressor 22, to determine whether the reversing valve 26 is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil 24. The thermostat 30 is further configured to deactivate at least the compressor 22 of the heat pump 20 when the reversing valve 26 is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heating operation or cooling operation of the heat pump 20. Accordingly, it should be understood that the above control system for controlling a heat pump 20 having a reversing valve 26 may be employed in a number of configurations in different control devices.
  • The foregoing description of the embodiments has been provided for purposes of illustration and description. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the disclosure. Individual elements or features of a particular embodiment are generally not limited to that particular embodiment, but, where applicable, are interchangeable and can be used in a selected embodiment, even if not specifically shown or described. The same may also be varied in many ways. Such variations are not to be regarded as a departure from the disclosure, and all such modifications are intended to be included within the scope of the disclosure.
  • Example embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will be thorough, and will fully convey the scope to those who are skilled in the art. Numerous specific details are set forth such as examples of specific components, devices, and methods, to provide a thorough understanding of embodiments of the present disclosure. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that specific details need not be employed, that example embodiments may be embodied in many different forms and that neither should be construed to limit the scope of the disclosure. In some example embodiments, well-known processes, well-known device structures, and well-known technologies are not described in detail.
  • The terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular example embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting. As used herein, the singular forms “a,” “an,” and “the” may be intended to include the plural forms as well, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. The terms “comprises,” “comprising,” “including,” and “having,” are inclusive and therefore specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps, operations, elements, and/or components, but do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, operations, elements, components, and/or groups thereof. The method steps, processes, and operations described herein are not to be construed as necessarily requiring their performance in the particular order discussed or illustrated, unless specifically identified as an order of performance. It is also to be understood that additional or alternative steps may be employed.
  • When an element or layer is referred to as being “on,” “engaged to,” “connected to,” or “coupled to” another element or layer, it may be directly on, engaged, connected or coupled to the other element or layer, or intervening elements or layers may be present. In contrast, when an element is referred to as being “directly on,” “directly engaged to,” “directly connected to,” or “directly coupled to” another element or layer, there may be no intervening elements or layers present. Other words used to describe the relationship between elements should be interpreted in a like fashion (e.g., “between” versus “directly between,” “adjacent” versus “directly adjacent,” etc.). As used herein, the term “and/or” includes any and all combinations of one or more of the associated listed items.
  • Although the terms first, second, third, etc. may be used herein to describe various elements, components, regions, layers and/or sections, these elements, components, regions, layers and/or sections should not be limited by these terms. These terms may be only used to distinguish one element, component, region, layer or section from another region, layer or section. Terms such as “first,” “second,” and other numerical terms when used herein do not imply a sequence or order unless clearly indicated by the context. Thus, a first element, component, region, layer or section discussed below could be termed a second element, component, region, layer or section without departing from the teachings of the example embodiments.
  • Spatially relative terms, such as “inner,” “outer,” “beneath,” “below,” “lower,” “above,” “upper,” and the like, may be used herein for ease of description to describe one element or feature's relationship to another element(s) or feature(s) as illustrated in the figures. Spatially relative terms may be intended to encompass different orientations of the device in use or operation in addition to the orientation depicted in the figures. For example, if the device in the figures is turned over, elements described as “below” or “beneath” other elements or features would then be oriented “above” the other elements or features. Thus, the example term “below” can encompass both an orientation of above and below. The device may be otherwise oriented (rotated 90 degrees or at other orientations) and the spatially relative descriptors used herein interpreted accordingly.

Claims (20)

1. A control for a heat pump having a reversing valve that is switchable between a heat mode and a cool mode corresponding to heating operation and cooling operation of the heat pump, the control comprising:
a sensor that provides an output indicative of a sensed temperature of a condenser coil of the heat pump; and
a controller for controlling activation of at least a compressor of the heat pump, the controller being configured to compare the output of the sensor to a representation of sensed ambient temperature to determine whether the reversing valve is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, wherein the controller is configured to cause deactivation of at least the compressor of the heat pump when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation.
2. The control of claim 1, wherein the representation of sensed ambient temperature is obtained from the output of the sensor before the compressor is activated, which output is indicative of ambient temperature.
3. The control of claim 2, wherein the controller is configured to compare the representation of sensed ambient temperature to the output of the sensor after a predetermined time following activation of the compressor, which is indicative of the sensed temperature of the condenser coil after a minimum period of operation.
4. The control of claim 1, wherein the controller is configured to compare a first output of the sensor before the compressor is activated, which is representative of ambient temperature, to a second output of the sensor after a predetermined time following activation of the compressor, which second output is indicative of the sensed temperature of the condenser coil.
5. The control of claim 2, wherein the representation of sensed ambient temperature is obtained from a second sensor that provides an output indicative of an ambient temperature of air adjacent the condenser coil.
6. The control of claim 5, wherein the controller is configured to compare the representation of sensed ambient temperature obtained from the second sensor to the sensed temperature of the condenser coil after a predetermined time following activation of the compressor.
7. The control of claim 1, wherein the controller is a processor of a unitary control for controlling operation of at least a compressor of a heat pump in response to an activation signal from a thermostat.
8. The control of claim 1, wherein the control is a communication control for communicating a malfunction of the reversing valve to a thermostat when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation, wherein the thermostat responsively switches off the compressor to cause deactivation of at least the compressor of the heat pump.
9. The control of claim 1, wherein the controller is a processor of a thermostat that is configured to wirelessly receive information indicative of the temperature of the condenser coil and of ambient temperature, the thermostat being configured to determine whether the reversing valve is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, and to cause deactivation of at least the compressor of the heat pump when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation.
10. A control for a heat pump having a reversing valve that is switchable between a heat mode and a cool mode corresponding to heating operation and cooling operation of the heat pump, the control comprising:
a sensor that provides an output indicative of a sensed temperature of a condenser coil of the heat pump; and
a controller for controlling activation of at least a compressor of the heat pump, the controller being configured to compare a first output of the sensor indicative of a first sensed temperature of the condenser coil before the compressor is activated to a second output of the sensor indicative of a second sensed temperature of the condensor coil after the compressor is activated to determine whether the reversing valve is in heat mode where the first sensed temperature of the condenser coil exceeds the second sensed temperature of the condenser coil, or in cool mode where the first sensed temperature of the condenser coil is less than the second sensed temperature of the condenser coil, wherein the controller is configured to deactivate at least the compressor of the heat pump when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation.
11. The control of claim 10, wherein the first output of the sensor that is obtained before the compressor is activated is a representation of sensed ambient temperature of air adjacent the condenser coil.
12. The control of claim 10, wherein the controller is configured to obtain the second output of the sensor after a predetermined time following activation of the compressor.
13. The control of claim 10, wherein the controller is a processor of a unitary control for controlling operation of at least a compressor of a heat pump in response to an activation signal from a thermostat.
14. The control of claim 10, wherein the control is a communication control for communicating a malfunction of the reversing valve to a thermostat when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation, wherein the thermostat responsively switches off the compressor to cause deactivation of at least the compressor of the heat pump.
15. The control of claim 10, wherein the controller is a processor of a thermostat that is configured to wirelessly receive information indicative of the temperature of the condenser coil and of ambient temperature, the thermostat being configured to determine whether the reversing valve is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, and to cause deactivation of at least the compressor of the heat pump when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation.
16. A control for a heat pump having a reversing valve that is switchable between a heat mode and a cool mode corresponding to heating operation and cooling operation of the heat pump, the control comprising:
a first sensor that provides an output indicative of a sensed temperature of a condenser coil of the heat pump;
a second sensor that provides an output indicative of a sensed ambient temperature of air adjacent the condenser coil; and
a controller for controlling activation of at least a compressor of the heat pump, the controller being configured to compare the outputs of the first and second sensors to determine whether the reversing valve is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, wherein the controller is configured to deactivate at least the compressor of the heat pump when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation.
17. The control of claim 16, wherein the controller is configured to compare the output of the second sensor to the output of the first sensor indicative of the sensed temperature of the condenser coil after a predetermined time following activation of the compressor.
18. The control of claim 16, wherein the controller is a processor of a unitary control for controlling operation of at least a compressor of a heat pump in response to an activation signal from a thermostat.
19. The control of claim 16, wherein the control is a communication control for communicating a malfunction of the reversing valve to a thermostat when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation, wherein the thermostat responsively switches off the compressor to cause deactivation of at least the compressor of the heat pump.
20. The control of claim 16, wherein the controller is a processor of a thermostat that is configured to wirelessly receive information indicative of the temperature of the condenser coil and of ambient temperature, the thermostat being configured to determine whether the reversing valve is in heat mode where the sensed ambient temperature exceeds the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, or in cool mode where the sensed ambient temperature is less than the sensed temperature of the condenser coil, and to cause deactivation of at least the compressor of the heat pump when the reversing valve is determined to be in a mode that is inconsistent with the heat pump's heating operation or cooling operation.
US13/101,521 2011-05-05 2011-05-05 Heat pump control Abandoned US20120279241A1 (en)

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US13/101,521 US20120279241A1 (en) 2011-05-05 2011-05-05 Heat pump control
CA2834428A CA2834428C (en) 2011-05-05 2012-04-13 Heat pump control
EP12779344.6A EP2705311B1 (en) 2011-05-05 2012-04-13 Heat pump control
CN201280021888.6A CN103502752B (en) 2011-05-05 2012-04-13 The heat pump control device
PCT/US2012/033558 WO2012151037A1 (en) 2011-05-05 2012-04-13 Heat pump control

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CA2834428C (en) 2016-05-24
EP2705311B1 (en) 2019-06-12
WO2012151037A1 (en) 2012-11-08
CA2834428A1 (en) 2012-11-08
CN103502752B (en) 2016-08-17
EP2705311A1 (en) 2014-03-12
EP2705311A4 (en) 2014-10-22
CN103502752A (en) 2014-01-08

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