US20120115652A1 - Method and apparatus for basketball defense training, football interception training, and physical therapy - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for basketball defense training, football interception training, and physical therapy Download PDF

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Publication number
US20120115652A1
US20120115652A1 US13289781 US201113289781A US2012115652A1 US 20120115652 A1 US20120115652 A1 US 20120115652A1 US 13289781 US13289781 US 13289781 US 201113289781 A US201113289781 A US 201113289781A US 2012115652 A1 US2012115652 A1 US 2012115652A1
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Prior art keywords
baton
player
foam
head
coach
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Abandoned
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US13289781
Inventor
Bradford Charles Young
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Bradford Charles Young
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/0071Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for basketball
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/0002Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for baseball
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/002Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for football
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/0073Means for releasably holding a ball in position; Balls constrained to move around a fixed point, e.g. by tethering
    • A63B69/0091Balls fixed to a movable, tiltable or flexible arm

Abstract

This invention discloses a method and multiple batons intended for sports training and physical therapy. First and second embodiment batons are intended, primarily, as a basketball defensive drill training device. The first embodiment baton is intended, secondarily, as a football hand-coordination training device. The third embodiment baton is intended, primarily, as a football and rugby hand-coordination training device. The second embodiment baton is further intended for use as a hand-coordination or foot-coordination device for other sports using spherical balls, such as soccer and volleyball. Finally, any of the four disclosed batons, and primarily, the first embodiment baton, are further intended to be used by physical therapists in rehabilitation exercises where eye-hand coordination and peripheral vision improvements are targeted, such as is the case with stroke or accident patients.(133)

Description

  • [0001]
    This application has a priority date of Nov. 4, 2011 based on the filing, by the same inventor, of Provisional Patent Application No. 61/409,975, titled METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR BASKETBALL DEFENSE TRAINING, FOOTBALL INTERCEPTION TRAINING, AND PHYSICAL THERAPY.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0003]
    The present invention relates to methods and devices intended to improve hand-eye coordination and motor skills for ball-centered sports, as well as for physical therapy and, more particularly, to handheld devices which can be manipulated by a trainer or physical therapist so as to evoke a coordinated hand-eye response involving motor skills by a trainee or patient.
  • [0004]
    2. Description of the Prior Art
  • [0005]
    U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2004/0116187 A1 discloses a hand-held flexible baton, for use as a tapotement device, having an external shell fabricated from a pliant material which covers an internal core fabricated from a soft batting material. The flexible baton's external shell provides a low impact force when struck against tissue such that no damage is inflicted to tissue, but a stinging sensation can be felt. The baton is intended for use as a training and disciplinary device for domestic animals, such as dogs, and children.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0006]
    The present invention provides four batons which may be used in combination with drills intended to improve hand-eye coordination for ball-centered sports. The first embodiment baton has a foam-filled cylindrical head, which can be used to simulate a ball for a number of sports. The second, embodiment baton has a foam-filled spherical head, the size of a regulation basketball, which is used to simulate a basketball for drills associated with that sport. The third embodiment baton has a foam-filled prolate spheroid head, shaped and sized like a regulation football, which is used to simulate a football for drills associated with that sport. The fourth embodiment baton has a foam-filled spherical head the size of a regulation baseball. By having a handle extending from the head, head speeds may be accelerated dramatically from that which would be possible if no handle were present, thereby enabling the approximation of a thrown ball with a mere flick of the wrist. In addition, the integration of the handle with the head provides structural rigidity to the head so that it can be moved rapidly without bending.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0007]
    FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a length of tubing and end plugs;
  • [0008]
    FIG. 2 is an isometric view of the length of tubing after it has been wrapped with grip tape and plugged on both ends;
  • [0009]
    FIG. 3 is an isometric view of a cylindrically-shaped body of plastic foam having a cylindrical aperture coaxial with the central axis of the blank and extending the entire length thereof;
  • [0010]
    FIG. 4 is an isometric view of a resilient textured wrapper for the plastic foam blank;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 5 is an isometric view of an assembly consisting of the resilient textured wrapper adhesively bonded to and sewn around the cylindrically-shaped plastic foam body;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 6 is an isometric view of a first embodiment baton assembled from the tubing, the end plugs, the plastic foam blank, the textured wrapper and a wrapping of grip tape;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 7 is an elevational view of a second embodiment baton having a foam-filled sphere with the same diameter as a regulation basketball;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 8 is an elevational view of a third embodiment baton having a foam-filled prolate spheroid resilient shell shaped like a football;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 9 is an elevational view of a fourth embodiment baton having a foam-filled sphere with the same diameter as a regulation baseball;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 10 is an illustration showing a coach interacting with a player while practicing a quick hands exercise using a single baton;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 11 is an illustration showing a coach interacting with a player while practicing a quick hands exercise using double batons;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 12 is an illustration showing a coach interacting with a player while practicing a defensive stance, dribble in motion steal exercise;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 13 is an illustration showing a coach interacting with a player while practicing a passing lane block exercise;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 14 is an illustration showing a coach interacting with a player while practicing a passing lane steal exercise;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 15 is an illustration showing a coach interacting with a player while practicing a crossover dribble-steal exercise;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 16 is an illustration showing a coach interacting with a player while practicing a shot close-out exercise;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 17 is an illustration showing a coach interacting with a player while practicing a shot close-out with shot block exercise; and
  • [0024]
    FIG. 18 is an illustration showing a coach interacting with a player while practicing a behind the back steal exercise.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0025]
    The invention will now be described with reference to the attached drawing figures. Although an attempt has been made to provide drawings that are to scale, it should be understood that the drawings are meant to be merely illustrative of the invention.
  • [0026]
    Four apparatuses are shown which may be used in combination with drills intended to improve hand-eye coordination for ball-centered sports. They may also be used by physical therapists to treat injuries which have impaired hand-eye coordination. The first, the fabrication of which is covered by FIGS. 1 through 6, is a first embodiment baton, having a foam-filled cylindrical head, which can be used to simulate a ball for a number of sports. The second, which is covered by FIG. 7, is a second embodiment baton having a foam-filled spherical head, having the size of a regulation basketball, which is used to simulate a basketball for drills associated with that sport. The third, which is covered by FIG. 8, is a third embodiment baton having a foam-filled prolate spheroid head shaped and sized like a regulation football, which is used to simulate a football for drills associated with football. A foam-filled prolate speroid head shaped and sized like a regulation rugby ball can also be made and used to simulate a rugby ball for drills associated with rugby. The fourth, which is covered by FIG. 9, is a fourth embodiment baton having a foam-filled spherical head the size of a regulation baseball, which is used to simulate a baseball for drills associated with that sport.
  • [0027]
    Referring now to FIG. 1, a length of rigid PVC pipe 101 is shown with end plugs 102A and 102B. For a presently preferred embodiment of the invention, the pipe 101 is about 53 cm (20.87 inches) in length. The end plugs 102A and 102B are designed for an interference fit within the ends of the pipe 101.
  • [0028]
    Referring now to FIG. 2, a length of grip tape 201 has been wrapped around a lower portion of the length of pipe 101, beginning a distance from the free end, and extra grip tape has been stuffed into a lower end of the length of pipe 101, followed by the insertion of end plug 102A into the lower end of the length of pipe 101, thereby preventing the grip tape 201 from unwrapping. End plug 102B has also been inserted in an upper end of the length of pipe 101. The result is a complete handle 200. Alternatively, caps may be used in place of plugs. Such substitution results in an equivalent product.
  • [0029]
    Referring now to FIG. 3, a cylindrically-shaped body of plastic foam 301 about 24 cm (9.45 inches) in length and about 6 cm (2.36 inches) in diameter has a cylindrical aperture 302, which is coaxial with the central axis of the body, and extends the entire length thereof. For a preferred embodiment of the invention, the foam from which the body 301 is made is resilient, low-density, and preferably of closed-cell construction. Polyethylene foam or ethylene vinyl acetate foam are two such materials.
  • [0030]
    Referring now to FIG. 4, a laminar cover wrap 401 is made of resilient polymeric compound, leather, or other similar compound. Its dimensions are such that it can be wrapped and folded around the plastic foam body 301.
  • [0031]
    Referring now to FIG. 5, the laminar cover wrap 401 has been sewn around plastic foam body 301 using one longitudinal seam 501, a bottom end seam 502, and a top end seam 503, resulting in a head assembly 500. The laminar cover wrap 401 can be optionally adhesively bonded to the plastic foam body 301.
  • [0032]
    Referring now to FIG. 6, the completed handle 200 has been adhesively bonded within the cylindrical aperture 302 of the covered plastic foam head assembly 504, resulting in a first embodiment baton 600. Alternatively, the plastic foam head can be injection molded to the handle 200 and the cover wrap 401 can be sewn to the completed injection molded assembly. The preferred weight of the first embodiment baton 600 is about 170 grams (roughly 6 U.S. ounces). The low mass of the baton 600 minimizes the inertial of the device. Thus, the foam head 504 can be rapidly accelerated to realistic play speeds with a mere flick of the wrist
  • [0033]
    Referring now to FIG. 7, a second embodiment baton 700 has been fabricated by adhesively bonding a completed handle 200 within a cylindrical aperture in a spherical body 701 or by injection molding a spherical foam body to the handle 200. The spherical body 701 is made from a polyethylene or polypropylene shell that is filled with low-density, resilient foam. Although the body 701 has the shape and size of a regulation basketball, fabrication of the body 701 using a thin spherical shell and a low-density foam fill results in a low-mass body having little inertia. Thus, the body 701 can be moved rapidly while holding the handle grip with, for example the mere flick of the wrist.
  • [0034]
    Referring now to FIG. 8, a third embodiment baton 800 has been fabricated by adhesively bonding a completed handle 200 within a cylindrical aperture in prolate spheroid body 801 that is shaped like a football or rugby ball or by injection molding a prolate spheroid foam head on the handle 200. As with the first and second embodiment batons 600 and 700, respectively, the spherical body 801 is made from a polyethylene or polypropylene shell that is filled with low-density, resilient foam. Although the body 801 has the shape and size of a regulation football or rugby ball, fabrication of the body 801 using a thin spherical shell and a low-density foam fill results in a low-mass body having little inertia. Thus, the body 801 can be moved rapidly while holding the handle grip with, for example the mere flick of the wrist.
  • [0035]
    Referring now to FIG. 9, a fourth embodiment baton 900 has been fabricated by adhesively bonding a completed handle 200 within a cylindrical aperture in a spherical body 901 or by injection molding a spherical foam body to a handle 200. The spherical body 901 is made from a polyethylene or polypropylene shell that is filled with low-density, resilient foam. Although the body 901 has the shape and size of a regulation baseball or regulation softball, fabrication of the body 901 using a thin spherical shell and a low-density foam fill results in a low-mass body having little inertia. Thus, the body 901 can be moved rapidly while holding the handle grip with, for example the mere flick of the wrist.
  • [0036]
    The first and second embodiment batons 600 and 700, respectively, are designed primarily for use with drills associated with basketball. A number of representative drills, associated with basketball and depicted in FIGS. 10 through 18, will now be disclosed. The drills, which are designed to improve hand-eye coordination, are performed in a one-on-one interaction between a coach and a player, with the coach holding and moving at least one baton, and the player interacting with the baton(s) held by the coach.
  • Drill #1: Quick Hands—Single Baton
  • [0037]
    Referring now to FIG. 10, the coach moves the baton 500 or 600 up and down about 18 inches (roughly 0.46 meter) in front of the player, alternating between the player's head and knees. The player quickly reaches and taps the tip of the baton at the top, middle, and bottom of this rotation (from the head to knees, and back to the head). After tapping the baton, the player quickly retracts his hand to his side until the baton reaches the next point of intercept (top, middle or bottom). The player completes three sets of this exercise with each hand.
  • [0038]
    Alternatively, this drill will be used by football players to improve defensive eye-hand coordination speed and also for improved catching of passes by offensive football players.
  • [0039]
    Finally, physical therapists will use this exercise to help improve peripheral visions and eye-hand coordination for patients recovering from strokes or accidents which have impaired a person's vision or motor skills.
  • Drill #2: Quick Hands—Double Baton
  • [0040]
    Referring now to FIG. 11, this drill is similar to the “Quick Hands—Single Baton” drill. For this drill the coach moves both batons up and down 18 inches (roughly 0.46 meter) in front of the player, alternating between the player's head and knees. One baton is moving up, while the other baton is moving down. The player quickly reaches and alternatively taps the tip of the baton on his right side with his right hand, and the baton on his left side with his left hand. This is done at the top, middle, and bottom of this rotation (from the head to knees, and back to the head). After tapping the baton, the player quickly retracts his hand to his side until the baton reaches the next point of intercept (top, middle or bottom). The player completes six rotations while simultaneously alternating hands and tapping the training baton on his left and right sides.
  • [0041]
    Alternatively, this drill will be used by football players to improve defensive eye-hand coordination speed and for improved catching of passes by football offensive players.
  • [0042]
    Finally, physical therapists will use this exercise to help improve peripheral visions and eye-hand coordination for patients recovering from strokes or accidents which have impaired a person's vision or motor skills.
  • Drill #3: Defensive Stance—Steal Dribble in Motion
  • [0043]
    Referring now to FIG. 12, the player first sets himself in a basketball defensive stance. The player moves quickly approximately eight feet from side to side while shuffling his feet in the basketball defensive stance—first moving from the left to right, and then back from the right to the left.
  • [0044]
    The coach moves the baton into reach (approximately 18 inches or 0.46 meter in front of the player) as the player moves from side to side in the basketball defensive stance. As the coach puts the baton within reach of the player, the player quickly reaches and taps the tip of the baton, and then retracts his hands to his side. The coach will then retract the baton, and then quickly place the baton again within reach of the player. This is repeated three to four times during each eight foot side to side movement of the player while in the defensive stance.
  • [0045]
    The basketball player completes three sets of this exercise with each hand while shuffling eight feet side to side in the defensive stance motion and ending each sequence with drill #4 (Passing Lane—Block) shown below.
  • [0046]
    The basketball player then completes three more sets of this exercise with each hand while shuffling eight feet side to side in the defensive stance motion and ending each sequence with drill #5 (Passing Lane—Steal) shown below.
  • [0047]
    Finally, physical therapists will use this drill to help improve peripheral visions and eye-hand-foot coordination for patients recovering from strokes or accidents which have impaired a person's vision and motor skills.
  • Drill #4: Passing Lane—Block
  • [0048]
    Referring now to FIG. 13, at the end of Drill #3, “Defensive Stance—Steal Dribble in Motion,” the coach holds the baton to the side of the player which simulates the basketball moving into a passing position. The player holds a hand in front of the baton as if blocking the passing lane for the basketball. This improves simultaneous eye-hand-foot coordination.
  • Drill #5: Passing Lane—Steal
  • [0049]
    Referring now to FIG. 14, at the end of Drill #3, “Defensive Stance—Steal Dribble in Motion,” the coach holds the baton to the side of the basketball player which simulates the basketball moving into a passing position. The player reaches a hand and quickly taps the tip of the baton as if stealing the pass of the basketball. This improves simultaneous eye-hand-foot coordination.
  • Drill #6: Crossover Dribble—Steal
  • [0050]
    Referring now to FIG. 15, the player first sets himself in a basketball defensive stance. The coach then swings the baton in a “U” shaped motion (from the player's left and to their right side) with the bottom of the “U” being about one foot from the floor and about 18 inches (roughly 0.46 meter) in front of the player.
  • [0051]
    At the base of the “U” shaped motion, the basketball player quickly reaches out and taps the tip of the baton with his right hand as the baton moves from their left to their right. This exercise is completed ten times with the right hand.
  • [0052]
    The player first sets himself in a basketball defensive stance. The coach then swings the baton in a “U” shaped motion (from the player's right and to his left side) with the bottom of the “U” being about one foot from the floor and about 18 inches (roughly 0.46 meter) in front of the player.
  • [0053]
    At the base of the “U” shaped motion, the basketball player quickly reaches out and taps the tip of the baton with his left hand as the baton moves from his right to his left. This exercise is completed ten times with the left hand.
  • Drill #7: Shot Close-Out
  • [0054]
    Referring now to FIG. 16, the player first sets himself in a basketball defensive stance. The coach then swings the baton into a position directly in front of the player (about 18 inches or 0.46 meter from the player), and over the player's head. The player quickly “closes out on the shot” by stepping forward and putting both arms straight up as if to disrupt a basketball shot. This exercise is completed 5-10 times.
  • [0000]
    Drill #8: Shot Close-Out with Shot Block
  • [0055]
    Referring now to FIG. 17, this drill starts like Drill #7 (Shot Close-out). The player first sets himself in a basketball defensive stance. The coach then swings the baton into a position directly in front of the player (about 18 inches or 0.46 meter from the player), and over the player's head. The player quickly “closes out on the shot” by stepping forward and putting both arms straight up as if to disrupt a basketball shot.
  • [0056]
    Additionally, after closing out on the shot, the player quickly reaches forward, and taps the end of the baton as if to block the shot. This exercise is completed 5-10 times.
  • Drill #9: Behind the Back—Steal
  • [0057]
    Referring now to FIG. 18, the player first sets himself in a basketball defensive stance about 18 inches (0.46 meter) behind the coach's back. The exercise will simulate a basketball player stealing the ball from behind their opponent's back.
  • [0058]
    With the player standing behind the coach, the coach then puts the baton to his side and within the reach of the player. The baton is presented to the player just to the side of the coach's right knee. The player quickly reaches and taps the tip of the baton from behind the coach. The player taps the baton with his right hand without making contact with the coach.
  • [0059]
    The coach then moves the baton to various positions while the player repeats tapping the baton with his right hand and without making contact with the coach. First the player is presented the baton by the coach's right knee, waist, shoulder, and then immediately over the coach's head.
  • [0060]
    The sequence is then repeated with the coach presenting the baton by his left knee, waist, shoulder and then immediately over the coach's head, while the player taps the tip of the baton with his left hand.
  • [0061]
    The player completes three sets of this exercise with each hand.
  • [0062]
    Although only several embodiments of the invention have been disclosed herein, it will be obvious to those having ordinary skill in the art that changes and modifications may be made thereto without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as hereinafter claimed.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A baton for use in combination with drills intended to improve hand-eye coordination for ball-centered sports, said baton comprising:
    a cylindrical handle having a hand grip;
    a resilient foam head secured to an end of said cylindrical handle; and
    a cover which encloses the foam head.
  2. 2. The baton of claim 1, wherein the foam of said foam head is preferably a resilient, low-density foam of closed-cell construction that is selected from the group consisting of polyethylene foam and ethylene vinyl acetate foam.
  3. 3. The baton of claim 1, wherein said foam head is cylindrically shaped and coaxial with the handle.
  4. 4. The baton of claim 2, which has a total weight of about 170 grams, thereby enabling the foam head to be accelerated to realistic play speeds with a flick of the wrist.
  5. 5. The baton of claim 1, wherein said foam head is spherically shaped.
  6. 6. The baton of claim 1, wherein said foam head is a prolate spheroid having the shape of a regulation-size football.
  7. 7. The baton of claim 3, wherein said foam head is of a length about equal to the diameter of a regulation-size basketball.
  8. 8. The baton of claim 5, wherein said foam head has a diameter about equal that of a regulation-size basketball.
  9. 9. The baton of claim 5, wherein said foam head has a diameter about equal that of a regulation-size baseball.
  10. 10. The baton of claim 5, wherein said foam head has a diameter about equal that of a regulation-size softball.
  11. 11. The baton of claim 1, wherein the handle extends from the foam head about 30 cm.
  12. 12. In combination with the baton of FIG. 1, a series of repetitive physical exercises wherein the baton is used to represent a basketball for the purpose of improving hand-eye coordination.
  13. 13. The combination of claim 12, wherein said series of repetitive physical exercises is used to improve reaction time and to teach and improve ball catching, stealing, and blocking skills.
  14. 14. The combination of claim 12, wherein the series of repetitive physical exercises are performed in a one-on-one interaction between a coach and a player, with the coach holding and moving at least one baton, and the player interacting with said at least one baton held by the coach.
  15. 15. The combination of claim 12, wherein the series of repetitive physical exercises are performed in a one-on-one interaction between a physical therapist and a recovering patient who has suffered neurological damage from a variety of causes, including strokes and accidents.
  16. 16. A series of repetitive physical exercises intended to improve hand-eye coordination of basketball players, said exercises being performed in a one-on-one interaction between a coach and a player, with the coach holding and moving a baton, a head of which simulates a basketball, said baton having:
    a cylindrical handle with a hand grip;
    a resilient foam head secured to an end of said cylindrical handle; and
    a cover which encloses the foam head.
  17. 17. The series of repetitive physical exercises of claim 16, wherein said foam head is cylindrical in shape, about 6 cm in diameter and about 24 cm in length.
  18. 18. The series of repetitive physical exercises of claim 17, wherein total weight of the baton is about 170 grams.
  19. 19. The series of physical exercises of claim 16, wherein said interaction between the coach and the player is used to improve reaction time.
  20. 20. The series of repetitive physical exercises of claim 16, wherein said interaction between the coach and the player is used to teach and improve ball catching, stealing, and blocking skills.
US13289781 2010-11-04 2011-11-04 Method and apparatus for basketball defense training, football interception training, and physical therapy Abandoned US20120115652A1 (en)

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US20130023361A1 (en) * 2011-07-18 2013-01-24 Michael Jacobs Soccer juggling training and rehabilation device
USD798408S1 (en) * 2015-03-09 2017-09-26 David Glenn Grill Mitt trainer

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