US20120094600A1 - Platform for patient monitoring - Google Patents

Platform for patient monitoring Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20120094600A1
US20120094600A1 US12/907,873 US90787310A US2012094600A1 US 20120094600 A1 US20120094600 A1 US 20120094600A1 US 90787310 A US90787310 A US 90787310A US 2012094600 A1 US2012094600 A1 US 2012094600A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
data
device
gateway device
user
server
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/907,873
Inventor
James J. DelloStritto
Atanu Roy Chowdhury
Harrish Mugundhan
Adam P. Vallee
Laleh Rabieirad
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Welch Allyn Inc
Original Assignee
Welch Allyn Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Welch Allyn Inc filed Critical Welch Allyn Inc
Priority to US12/907,873 priority Critical patent/US20120094600A1/en
Assigned to WELCH ALLYN, INC. reassignment WELCH ALLYN, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: DELLOSTRITTO, JAMES J, MUGUNDHAN, HARRISH, RABIEIRAD, LALEH, ROY CHOWDHURY, ATANU, VALLEE, ADAM P.
Publication of US20120094600A1 publication Critical patent/US20120094600A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04QSELECTING
    • H04Q9/00Arrangements in telecontrol or telemetry systems for selectively calling a substation from a main station, in which substation desired apparatus is selected for applying a control signal thereto or for obtaining measured values therefrom
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/0002Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network
    • A61B5/0015Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network characterised by features of the telemetry system
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F16/00Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor
    • G06F16/20Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor of structured data, e.g. relational data
    • G06F16/22Indexing; Data structures therefor; Storage structures
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F16/00Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor
    • G06F16/90Details of database functions independent of the retrieved data types
    • G06F16/95Retrieval from the web
    • G06F16/951Indexing; Web crawling techniques
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F16/00Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor
    • G06F16/90Details of database functions independent of the retrieved data types
    • G06F16/95Retrieval from the web
    • G06F16/955Retrieval from the web using information identifiers, e.g. uniform resource locators [URL]
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F19/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific applications
    • G06F19/30Medical informatics, i.e. computer-based analysis or dissemination of patient or disease data
    • G06F19/34Computer-assisted medical diagnosis or treatment, e.g. computerised prescription or delivery of medication or diets, computerised local control of medical devices, medical expert systems or telemedicine
    • G06F19/3418Telemedicine, e.g. remote diagnosis, remote control of instruments or remote monitoring of patient carried devices
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H10/00ICT specially adapted for the handling or processing of patient-related medical or healthcare data
    • G16H10/60ICT specially adapted for the handling or processing of patient-related medical or healthcare data for patient-specific data, e.g. for electronic patient records
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H15/00ICT specially adapted for medical reports, e.g. generation or transmission thereof
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H40/00ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices
    • G16H40/60ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices for the operation of medical equipment or devices
    • G16H40/63ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices for the operation of medical equipment or devices for local operation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/12Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications adapted for proprietary or special purpose networking environments, e.g. medical networks, sensor networks, networks in a car or remote metering networks
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/0002Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/0002Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network
    • A61B5/0015Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network characterised by features of the telemetry system
    • A61B5/0022Monitoring a patient using a global network, e.g. telephone networks, internet
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/0002Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network
    • A61B5/0026Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network characterised by the transmission medium

Abstract

A gateway device includes a transceiver in electrical communication with a processor, the transceiver being configured to communicate over a wireless network to both receive data from at least one body-worn sensor and transmit the data, and a plurality of indicator lights in electrical communication with the processor. A first of the indicator lights indicates successful power-on of the gateway device. A second of the indicator lights indicates establishment of a Bluetooth connection with a body-worn sensor. A third of the indicator lights indicates successful creation of a WiFi connection. A fourth of the indicator lights indicate successful creation of a cellular connection.

Description

    STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY FUNDED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • These inventions were made with government support under Contract Nos. W81XWH-10-C-0159 and W81XWH-07-01-608 awarded by the United States Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity. The government may have certain rights in these inventions.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Healthcare practitioners can be constrained by the inability of devices used to monitor and collect physiological data from patients to communicate with electronic health records, existing infrastructure, and other devices. The medical device research community has responded by creating next generation devices that are small, wireless, and wearable. New devices may incorporate a display, processor, and multitude of companion sensors. There are one or more problems associated with patient monitoring devices that interface between wearable sensors and a network and/or external computing device. Such problems can include size, simplicity of operation, interface connectivity, and power supplies, among others.
  • SUMMARY
  • In one aspect, a gateway device includes a transceiver in electrical communication with a processor, the transceiver being configured to communicate over a wireless network to both receive data from at least one body-worn sensor and transmit the data, and a plurality of indicator lights in electrical communication with the processor. A first of the indicator lights indicates successful power-on of the gateway device. A second of the indicator lights indicates establishment of a Bluetooth connection with a body-worn sensor. A third of the indicator lights indicates successful creation of a WiFi connection. A fourth of the indicator lights indicate successful creation of a cellular connection.
  • In another aspect, a system for storing data collected by a body-worn sensor includes: a central processing unit (CPU) that is configured to control operation of a gateway device; and one or more computer readable data storage media storing software instructions that, when executed by the CPU, cause the gateway device to: receive a MAC address of a new sensor and a protocol version associated with the new sensor from a server; attempt to contact the new sensor using the protocol version and the MAC address; when a response is received, sending the response to the server for validation; when the response is validated by the server, establishing communications with the new sensor; and forwarding data from the new sensor to a second server.
  • In yet another aspect, a method for storing data from one or more body-worn sensors includes: receiving data from a gateway device, the gateway device being worn by a user associated with one or more body-worn sensors generating the data; identifying the user associated with the data; allowing a super application associated with the user to identify a database for storage of the data based on the user and a type of body-worn sensor that generated the data; and forwarding the data to the database for storage.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • FIG. 1 shows an example system for collecting data associated with physiological parameters of patients.
  • FIG. 2 shows an example schematic view of a gateway device of the system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 shows a view of the gateway device of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 4 shows another view of the gateway device of FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 5 shows another view of the gateway device of FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 6 shows another view of the gateway device of FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 7 shows a first portion of an example method for collecting physiological data using the gateway device of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 8 shows a second portion of the method of FIG. 7.
  • FIG. 9 shows an example system for updating the gateway device of FIG. 1 to communicate with a new sensor device.
  • FIG. 10 shows another view of the system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 11 shows a view of the server of the system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 12 shows an example user interface for accessing data associated with the system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 13 shows another example user interface for accessing data associated with the system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 14 shows another example user interface for accessing data associated with the system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 15 shows another example user interface for accessing data associated with the system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 16 shows another example user interface for accessing data associated with the system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 17 shows another example user interface for accessing data associated with the system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 18 shows another example user interface for accessing data associated with the system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 19 shows another example user interface for accessing data associated with the system of FIG. 1.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The present disclosure relates to systems and methods that allow data from a plurality of sensor devices to be collected, processed, and displayed.
  • One embodiment includes a computer platform including a gateway device which wirelessly communicates with body-worn sensors. The gateway can be positioned on the patient or be located adjacent to the patient. The gateway device receives data from the body-worn sensors and communicates the data to a central server.
  • The example gateway device can include a power source, a transceiver in electrical communication with the processor, the transceiver being configured to communicate over a wireless network to both receive data from at least one sensor and transmit data, a plurality of indicator lights in electrical communication with the processor, and data storage including program instructions that, when executed by the processor, cause the gateway device to signal at least one of the plurality of indicator lights upon successful transmission of the data by the transceiver.
  • In one example, the gateway device includes a communications unit with one or more radios, including an uplink radio and a downlink radio, wherein the downlink, short range radio is configured to communicate with physiological sensors such as wireless wearable sensors to acquire data based on such protocols as Bluetooth or Zigbee, and the uplink radio is configured to wirelessly transmit data to a network based on such protocols as WiFi, 3G, and/or 4G. In another embodiment, the downlink and uplink radio maybe the same hardware multiplexing to service the downlink and uplink channels.
  • The gateway device can include on-board memory (such as SD card) configured to store data, such as patient medical history, to be used in emergencies or other data captured through the downlink, including data unable to complete the path to the network because of temporary uplink inaccessibility. The data storage can be further configured to store an operating system (e.g., Linux with Python support) and associated software to operate and control transmission of data, as well as employ various power saving techniques to increase battery life of the device for prolonged use.
  • Referring now to FIG. 1, a block diagram illustrates an example system 100 for collecting, processing, and displaying physiological data. In this example, the system 100 includes a plurality of sensor devices 110, a gateway device 120, a wall unit 130, networks 140, 150, a server 170, and a computing device 180.
  • The networks 140, 150 can be one or more electronic communication networks that facilitate communication between the sensor devices 110 and the gateway device 120 and the server 170. The networks 140, 150 can include a set of computing devices and links between the computing devices. The computing devices in the networks 140, 150 use the links to enable communication among the computing devices in the network.
  • The networks 140, 150 can include routers, switches, mobile access points, bridges, hubs, storage devices, standalone server devices, blade server devices, sensors, desktop computers, firewall devices, laptop computers, handheld computers, mobile telephones, and other types of computing devices. In various embodiments, the networks 140, 150 include various types of links. For example, the networks 140, 150 can include wired and/or wireless links. The networks 140, 150 can be implemented as one or more local area networks (LANs), metropolitan area networks, subnets, wide area networks (such as the Internet), or can be implemented at another scale.
  • In the example shown, the network 140 is a cellular network, and the network 150 is the Internet. Other configurations are possible.
  • The gateway device 120 is a computing system that allows for storage and forwarding of data collected by one or more of the sensor devices 110. As used herein, a computing system is a system of one or more computing devices. A computing device is a physical, tangible device that processes data. Example types of computing devices include personal computers, standalone server computers, blade server computers, mainframe computers, handheld computers, smart phones, special purpose computing devices, and other types of devices that process data.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the gateway device 120 can include at least one central processing unit (“CPU” or “processor”) 212, a system memory 211, and a system bus 213 that couples the system memory 211 to the CPU 212.
  • In one example, the CPU 212 is a 266 MHz ARM926EJ-S core (16 KB I-Cache, 16 KB D-Cache) processor. The CPU 212 consumes approximately 1.8 volts and includes 32 MB Flash and 64 MB SDRAM onboard. Other configurations are possible.
  • The system memory 211 is one or more physical devices that can include a random access memory (“RAM”) and a read-only memory (“ROM”). A basic input/output system containing the basic routines that help to transfer information between elements within the gateway device 120, such as during startup, is stored in the ROM. The system memory 211 of the gateway device 120 further includes a mass storage device. The mass storage device is able to store software instructions and data.
  • The mass storage device and its associated computer-readable data storage media provide non-volatile, non-transitory storage for the gateway device 120. Although the description of computer-readable data storage media contained herein refers to a mass storage device, such as a hard disk or CD-ROM drive, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that computer-readable data storage media can be any available non-transitory, physical device or article of manufacture from which the gateway device 120 can read data and/or instructions.
  • Computer-readable data storage media include volatile and non-volatile, removable and non-removable media implemented in any method or technology for storage of information such as computer-readable software instructions, data structures, program modules or other data. Example types of computer-readable data storage media include, but are not limited to, RAM, ROM, EPROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other solid state memory technology, CD-ROMs, digital versatile discs (“DVDs”), other optical storage media, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or any other medium which can be used to store the desired information and which can be accessed by the gateway device 120.
  • The system memory 211 of the gateway device 120 can store software instructions and data. The software instructions include an operating system suitable for controlling the operation of the gateway device 120. The system memory 211 also stores software instructions, that when executed by the CPU 212, cause the gateway device 120 to provide the functionality of the gateway device 120 discussed herein.
  • For example, the mass storage device and/or the RAM can store software instructions that, when executed by the CPU 212, cause the gateway device 120 to store and forward data that is provided by the sensor devices 110.
  • As noted previously, the gateway device 120 can operate in a networked environment using logical connections to remote network devices through the networks 140, 150, such as a local network, the Internet, or another type of network. The gateway device 120 connects to the networks 140, 150 through a network interface unit, such as the radio uplinks 222, 224 and the radio downlinks 218, 220.
  • In one example, the gateway device 120 communicates using GSM, including one or more of: HSDPA 7.2 Mbps, UMTS/HSDPA 2100 MHz, Quad-band EGSM 850/900/1800/1900, GPRS multi-slot class 12, and EDGE multi-slot class 12. The gateway device 120 also communicates through WiFi, using 802.11b/g with data rates up to 54 Mbps, IEEE 802.11i encryption, 64/128-bit WEP, TKIP and AES, WPA and WPA2 security. The gateway device 120 also communicates through Bluetooth using Bluetooth v2.1+EDR compliant, CSR BlueCore 6 ROM, 2.40-2.480 GHz FHSS Radio, Max Data Rate 3 Mbps, Bluetooth Co-existence Support with 802.11. The gateway device 120 also communicates through RF, using a TI EZ2500 802.15.4 radio with a frequency range of 2400-2483.5 MHz and 1.2-500 kBaud data rate.
  • The gateway device 120 also includes a wired connection 216, such as a USB port for connection to a wired network and/or for connection to other processing and display units for integration, configuration and inter-operability purposes.
  • The gateway device 120 also includes a bank of indicator lights 230, such as LEDs 231-235. As described further below, such lights can be LEDs that indicate a status of the gateway device 120.
  • The gateway device 120 also includes a power source 214. In one example, the power source 214 is a 1500-1950 mAh Li-Po battery. Other configurations are possible.
  • In example embodiments, the gateway device 120 utilizes power management techniques that optimize power usage and battery life. For example, when not in use, the gateway device 120 enters a sleep state that involves no active power consumption. Upon waking, the OS of the gateway device 120 is optimized to allow for fast booting to an operating state.
  • Referring again to FIG. 1, in this example, each of the sensor devices 110 collects data from one or more patients. Such data can include, without limitation, physiological data like temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, etc.
  • In some examples, each of the sensor devices 110 is a computing device that is worn by the individual. Such sensor devices 110 typically include a system memory, a processing unit, a physiological sensor, a radio device, a housing, a printed circuit board, and a power source. Additional details regarding such example sensor devices are described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/827,817 filed on Jun. 30, 2010, the entirety of which is hereby incorporated by reference. Other sensor devices, such as a weight scale, can also be used to measure physiological data.
  • In this example, an optional wall unit 130 is shown. The wall unit 130 is a computing device positioned in an examination room of a doctor's office or hospital. The wall unit 130 can also be located in other places as well, such as public places like malls or in the patient's home.
  • The wall unit 130 includes a transceiver that communicates with the gateway device 120 using known techniques, such as Bluetooth and/or WiFi. The wall unit 130 can forward data from the gateway device 120 to the server 170 using the networks 140, 150. In addition, the wall unit 130 can process and display data associated with the data from the gateway device 120, such as text and graphical representations of the data (e.g., blood pressure, temperature, etc.).
  • The wall unit 130 is optional, in that the gateway device 120 can communicate directly with the server 170 through one or both of the networks 140, 150 when not in range of the wall unit 130. For example, the gateway device 120 can communicate directly with the network 140 using GSM or CDMA, and/or the gateway device 120 can communicate directly with the network 150 using 802.11b/g. Other configurations are possible.
  • In some examples, the sensor devices 110, the gateway device 120, and the server 170 all communicate using a protocol such as the Welch Allyn Communications Protocol (WACP). WACP uses a taxonomy as a mechanism to define information and messaging. Taxonomy can be defined as description, identification, and classification of a semantic model. Taxonomy as applied to a classification scheme may be extensible. Semantic class-based modeling utilizing taxonomy can minimize the complexity of data description management by limiting, categorizing, and logically grouping information management and operational functions into families that contain both static and dynamic elements.
  • Referring now to FIG. 3-6, the gateway device 120 is shown.
  • A housing 210 of the gateway device 120 is provided in a single color, and all writing on the housing 210 is provided in a contrasting color that is easy to read. In the example shown, the housing is black, and all writing on the housing (e.g., the icons identifying the indicator lights 230) is white. In this manner, it is easy for the user to identify and read the writing when using the gateway device 120. Other configurations, such as Braille to assist users with vision impairment, can also be provided on the housing 210.
  • The gateway device 120 includes a power button 221 that turns power on and off for the gateway device 120. When powered on, the gateway device 120 communicates with the sensor devices 110, as well as the optional wall unit 130 and/or the networks 140, 150.
  • In the example shown, the power button 221 is slid along the longitudinal axis of the housing 210 to turn the gateway device 120 on and off. In this example, the power button 221 is recessed within the housing 210 so that the possibility of the power button 221 being accidently actuated is reduced.
  • The power button 221 can be configured in other manners to reduce inadvertent actuation. For example, the power button could be spring biased into the off position. To turn on, the power button would be slid against the spring force into an on position for a certain period of time (e.g., two seconds) for power on. Other configurations are possible.
  • The gateway device 120 also includes a port 240 sized to receive a removable storage medium. Examples of such media include SD cards and memory sticks.
  • The indicator lights 230 are positioned along the housing 210 of the gateway device 120 so that the user can easily view the lights and ascertain the status of the gateway device 120. In some examples, the indicator lights 230 are each a specific color to readily identify the status of the gateway device 120. For example, as shown, the indicator lights are as follows: red LED 235—power up; blue LED 233—connection existing through Bluetooth; yellow LED 231—connection existing through RF radio; white LED 324—connection established through either WIFI radio; and green LED 232—connection established through either 3G radio.
  • Icons are positioned adjacent to each of the LEDs 231-235 to allow the user to easily determine the status of the gateway device 120. For each, when the LED 232 is lit, the user knows that the Bluetooth radio is actively connected to another device, such as the sensor devices 110. The icons are colored white to contrast with the black of the housing 210 to assist in patient recognition.
  • In this example, the indicator lights 230 provide the interface for the user. The gateway device 120 does not include any other display or user interface beyond the markings on the housing 210 and the indicator lights 230. In this manner, the gateway device 120 provides a simple interface that can be readily interpreted by the user.
  • The housing 210 of the gateway device 120 is sized to allow the gateway device 120 to be easily carried by the user. In one example, the housing 210 is approximately 8.6 cm in length by 5.4 cm in width by 0.635 cm in height. Such a size (approximately that of a typical credit card) allows the gateway device 120 to be readily carried in a pocket or wallet/purse. This allows the gateway device 120 to continuously receive data from the body-worn sensor devices 110 and to forward that data to the server 170 as the patient moves. Other configurations and sizes are possible.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 7 and 8, an example method 250 for collecting physiological data using the gateway device is shown.
  • Initially, at operation 252, the gateway device is powered on. Next, at operation 254, a determination is made regarding whether or not to illuminate the green power light. If the gateway device powers on normally, the green light is lit to indicate power on was successful, and control is passed to operation 262.
  • Alternatively, if power on is not successful, control is passed to operation 256, and a determination is made regarding whether or not the battery of the gateway device is too low or has failed. If so, the method 250 ends. Otherwise, if not, control is passed to operation 258, and a determination is made regarding whether or not a service connection to the network has been established. If not, the method 250 ends.
  • If so, control is passed to operation 260, and the power light is illuminated in a manner to allow the user to know that an error has occurred with establishing a connection to the network. For example, the power light can flash and/or be colored differently, such as amber, to indicate the failure. Control is then passed to operation 262.
  • At operation 262, the sensor is powered on. Next, at operation 264, a determination is made by the gateway device regarding whether or not a reading from the sensor has been received. If not, control is passed back to operation 262 so that the power on the sensor can be cycled.
  • If so, control is passed to operation 266, and the blue light on the gateway is illuminated to indicate that a Bluetooth link has been established with the sensor.
  • Next, at operation 268 (see FIG. 8), a determination is made regarding whether the data from the sensor should be stored or forwarded. If the data is to be stored on the local memory of the gateway for future forwarding (e.g., if the link to the network is currently unavailable), the method 250 ends.
  • If not, control is passed to operation 270, and the gateway device attempts to establish a link through the network to the server. Next, at operation 272, a determination is made regarding whether or not the link was established. If not, the method 250 ends. If so, control is passed to operation 274, and the appropriate light on the gateway device (e.g., the white WiFi light is lit), and the data is uploaded by the gateway device to the server.
  • Referring now to FIG. 9, in some examples, the gateway device 120 can be programmed to communicate with new sensor devices 110 while in the field, such as in use by the patient.
  • Such a process is initiated by the user connecting to an update server 320 using a computing device 180. For example, the user can browse to a specific web site using a browser. See, e.g., FIG. 17. The user then enters a sensor ID provided on the product packaging or other literature associated with the new sensor device 110. The ID is an encoded number based on various parameters, such as the original equipment manufacturer and device type.
  • Once entered, the ID is sent to the update server 320. At this point the ID is resolved to a device class, and the manufacturer's information is identified. The update server 320 thereupon queries a manufacturer portal 340 associated with the manufacturer of the sensor device 110 to determine the MAC address of the sensor device 110 and the protocol version. Once obtained by the update server 320, the MAC address and protocol information (e.g., the message exchange sequences and the respective message formats) is passed to the gateway device 120.
  • The gateway device 120 thereupon attempts to establish communication with the sensor device 110 using the MAC address and protocol encoding received from the update server 320 and requests the sensor device 110 to send a reading. If a response is received from the sensor device 110, the gateway device 120 strips out the expected value fields from the received message and transmits those fields back to the update server 320. The update server 320 validates the response against the expected values for that class of sensors and notifies the results on the user's computing device 180. If successful, the gateway device 120 can begin communicating with the new sensor device 110 to collect and forward data to the server 170.
  • Referring now to FIG. 10, additional details regarding the server 170 are shown.
  • The server 170 includes one or more computing devices. The server 170 executes a super application 410 that is specific for each user of the system 100. For example, as depicted, the user has two body-worn sensor devices 110A, 110B. Each of these sensor devices 110A, 110B communicates with the gateway device 120. The gateway device 120, in turn, forwards the data from the sensor devices 110A, 110B to the server 170.
  • Upon receipt, the data is routed to the super application 410 associated with the user based on a unique user identifier that is communicated with the data from the gateway device 120. The super application 410 maintains meta information regarding each sensor device that generates the data for the user. Upon receipt of the data, the super application 410 determines, based on the meta information, where the data should be stored.
  • For example, in this embodiment, there are device-specific repositories 420, 422 for each of the sensor devices 110A, 110B. When the super application 410 receives data from the gateway device 120 that originates from the sensor device 110A, that data is forwarded by the super application 410 to the database specific to that device (e.g., database 420) for storage. On a similar note, when the super application 410 receives data from the gateway device 120 that originates from the sensor device 110B, that data is forwarded by the super application 410 to the database 422 for storage.
  • The super application 410 controls all access to the data stored for the user. For example, the super application 410 retains the meta information about where the data is stored, and the super application 410 requires authentication before the super application 410 provides access to the data.
  • The super application 410 allows data movement between application suites that are installed for a particular user. The super application 410 also facilitates data movement across user profiles. The super application 410 has the authority to act as a proxy on behalf of the user and negotiate data exchange transactions with other super application entities.
  • To initiate a data exchange, the requesting entity sends out a message comprising of an authentication token, the type of data requested (e.g., weight readings), and the number of data items requested. On receiving this sequence, the super application 410 validates the token against a white list of acceptable tokens. If the token in invalid, it generates a notification for the user informing them about this request.
  • On receipt of a valid token, the super application 410 proceeds to locate a database containing the type of data requested. Notifications are sent out if such a database is not found and the incoming request is denied. Otherwise, the requested number of items is fetched from the relevant database and the request is serviced. Thus this framework eliminates the need for applications to know about the specific details of the databases, especially when the databases are residing in another user's profile.
  • For example, a third party application 430 (see FIGS. 15 and 16) can request data for a patient from the server 170. Such a request is routed to the super application 410 for that particular user. The super application 410 first determines whether or not the third party application 430 can provide the proper credentials to obtain the data. For example, the super application 410 can require a username and password for authentication before access is given.
  • If the proper credentials are provided, the super application 410 queries the proper database 420, 422 (for example, if the third party application 430 requests data from the sensor device 110A, the super application 410 would query the database 420) to obtain the data. Once obtained, the super application 410 sends the data to the third party application 430.
  • Referring now to FIG. 11, the server 170 is shown in more detail.
  • In this example, the server 170 is programmed to provide automatic and configurable medical device data notifications, the parameters of which can be determined by the patient or clinician.
  • For example, the server 170 includes an analyzer module 510 that communicates with the super application 410 to obtain data about the patient. The analyzer module 510 can be invoked by the reception of a new value from the gateway device 120. Exemplary devices and/or values can include blood pressure readings, temperature reading, blood glucose levels, weight, blood oxygen saturation, blood hemoglobin levels, blood hematacrit levels, ECG readings, heart rate, and any subjective reading communicated or provided by the patient.
  • The analyzer module 510 is configured to communicate with a notification module 520 based on received data and logical analysis of database parameters. Once invoked, the notification module 520 communicates with the super application 410 to retrieve the data from the databases 420, 422. The analyzer module 510 instructs the notification module 520 to provide notifications based on the configuration set by the doctor, nurse, and/or patient. The notifications can be provided in a variety of formats, including voice and data (e.g., SMS, MMS, e-mail, phone call or any other personal communication medium) and can be configured regarding to whom the notifications are provided (e.g., care provider, doctor, patient, and/or relative). See FIG. 12.
  • Other parameters are also configurable, such as frequency of notification, follow-up if receipt is not confirmed, and content of notification based on recipient type (doctor versus family member, e.g.). Further, a web-based portal can be used to fully configure the analysis and/or notification modules 510, 520.
  • In one embodiment, the notification module 520 maintains a user account table. For each user, a table of active applications is used to define the applications the user has activated. See FIGS. 15 and 16 regarding the various applications that are provided to the user. For each user application combination, a table is used to point to one or many analyzer scripts that may or may not be invoked in the analyzer module 510 on reception of a new result. For each analyzer script, a database table parameter is used to point to a notification group, which can be a single individual or multiple individuals. For each notification group defined in the notification module 520, there are one to many phone numbers and emails configured to receive the results of the clinical analyzer.
  • For example, the following data table defines the structure of configuration for facilitating this ability.
  • Apps
    AppKey Type
    1 weight
    2 pain
    3 glucose
    4 bloodpressure
  • User Account
    Accountkey USERNAME AcntDetail1 AcntDetail2
    1 jimdello@myemail.com 12 Maple st NY
    2 harrishmugun@mymail.com 14 Walnut st NY
  • Account Apps
    UserApp AccountKey AppKey Share DefaultText
    1 1 1 True ‘user’ has taken a weight
    reading of ‘value’
    2 1 2 True ‘user’ has record a pain level
    ‘value1’ in the ‘value2’
    3 2 1 True ‘user’ has taken a weight
    reading of ‘value’
  • Apps Clinical Analyzer(s)
    ClinAnalysisKey AccountKey AppKey Analyzer Active Share NotificationGroup
    1 1 1 CHFWeight.js True True 1-1
    2 1 1 WeightLoss.js False True 1-2
    3 1 2 CHFPain.js True False 1-3
    4 2 1 WeightLoss.js True True 2-1
  • Clinical Analysis Notification
    NotificationKey Group MMS SMS EMAIL Number Email Type
    1 1-1 False True False 315-555-1234 Null PVT
    2 1-1 False True True 315-555-5555 psoderberg@doctor.com MD
    3 1-1 False False True null janedello@mymail.com REL
    4 1-2 False True False 315-555-1234 Null REL
    5 1-2 False True True 315-555-5555 psoderberg@doctor.com MD
    6 1-3 False True True 315-444-4321 marydello@mymail.com REL
    7 2-1 False True True 315-555-5555 psoderberg@doctor.com MD
    8 2-1 False True True 213-234-5678 janemugun@mymail.com REL
    9 2-1 False True False 789-555-1234 Null PVT
  • In the tables: ACT=the account holder (the patient); MD=the doctor(s) or medical professional; REL=network relation or family member.
  • In another embodiment, additional analyzer scripts are included in the “application” or suite packages that can be selected by the patient or caregiver. See FIGS. 15 and 16. These analyzers can be specific depending on the types of sensor devices being used. For example, there may be an application associated with the congestive heart failure (CHF) suite of devices that can be configured to automatically engage the notification module 520 when a patient's weight scale readings deviate from the previous reading by a specified amount. The analyzer module 510 can be further configured to predict disease states and/or suggest a new application and/or medical device and transmit associated analysis to the care provider.
  • Over time, multiple new and varied analysis types might be added expanding the clinical advice or decision support that can be offered to the clinician or provider. Upon analysis of a device reading by one or many configured analysis packages, the result of one or many results may or may not invoke one or many configurable notification systems that can send one or many types of messages to a one or many individuals mobile phone via SMS text or MMS pictures, email text and pictures, a pager, or any other personal communication medium.
  • Such a notification system is advantageous for several reasons. For example, different levels can be defined which have different types of notifications to customize the notifications. Further, the number of people to whom notifications are sent and types (format and pattern) of messages being sent are fully configurable.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 12-19, an example interface 500 for accessing data stored on the server 170 is shown. The interface 500 can be accessed over the Internet using a browser on the computing device 180. The interface 500 can be configured for use by the caregiver, the patient, or another interested party such as a relative.
  • The configuration for the interface 500 can be tailored based on the user's goals. For example, a patient can find, store, and review data about the patient's health, while a caregiver can review data from a plurality of patients.
  • In FIG. 12, the interface 500 includes a profile screen that displays aspects of the user's profile. For patients, the interface 500 includes a toolbar 501 that allows the patient to access different functionality, including applications associated with the user's profile, details about sensor devices associated with the patient, and profile information.
  • The interface 500 also includes an identification menu 511 including bibliographic information like the patient's name and picture. The menu 511 also provides a list of connections to others on the system 100, such as friends, caregivers, patients, etc. Messages can be passed between users that are connected to one another, such as inspirational messages between patients or medical information from a doctor to a patient. See FIG. 14. Additional information, such as contact information and health-related information, can also be accessed.
  • The interface 500 further includes a notebook or file portion 502 that is configured to display different information to the user depending on the user selection. In this example, the notebook portion 502 includes a first section 512 including a plurality of “sticky” notes 513 populated with comments from the patient. The notes 513 can include any content desired by the patient, such as feelings and inspirational sayings.
  • The notes 513 can be moved around and placed at different spots on the notebook portion 502, can be overlapped on one another, and can be deleted. A second section 514 of the notebook portion 502 also includes notes and other information populated by the user and the user's connections.
  • In FIG. 13, the first section 512 includes a plurality of readings 521 associated with the patient. The readings 521 can include any physiologic readings associated with the patient such as, for example, weight readings collected using the sensor devices 110 and the gateway device 120.
  • In FIG. 14, the first section 512 of the interface 500 includes messages that have been exchanged between the user and the user's connections on the system 100. In addition, the messages can include notifications from the notification module 520. The messages are displayed as sticky notes that can be moved and deleted as desired.
  • In some examples, the messages are color-coded for easy recognition. For example, the notes that are blue are from the doctor or other clinical professionals. If the user clicks a pile of message 519 located on the second section 514 that is blue, all of the blue messages from the doctor are shown on the first section 512. Other example colors include: orange for medical device or subjective symptoms; green for comment threads started by the patient; and yellow for messages from relatives and friends. Other schemes can be used.
  • In some examples, the population and placement of the notes on the first and second sections 512 is automated. This process includes verification of the authenticity of an incoming request for a particular page for the notebook portion 502. If the request is from a valid user in a valid session, the screen geometry that is available for displaying the messages is analyzed. This information is retrieved from a message database, which acts as a persistent store for all messages intended for the user. For each message, a suitable template is selected based on the message type and screen geometry. This template is populated with the corresponding message and a visual object is created. On completion, a matrix including the location information for each visual object, relative to the screen real estate, as well as the object type is returned.
  • Each note can contain a plurality of information, including a signature of an application generating the note or a picture of a user if the note is a message. The note can also include recorded values and timestamps defining the time the values were recorded and the time the note was posted in the notebook. Other configurations are possible.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 15-17, the user can access a plurality of applications listed on the second section 514. These applications, when selected, can be used to manipulate the data collected by the system 100 and to provide the user with more information based on the data. For example, applications including topics like pulse, respiratory rate, temperature, etc., can be selected by the user.
  • Once selected, the user can manage the applications in the section 514. See FIG. 16. The selected applications can be deleted or privacy policies for each application defined. For example, in FIG. 17, an interface 530 is provided that allows the user to define the privacy policies for each selected application. The interface 530 allows the user to define how the application communicates with the user, including through SMS, email, and/or a feed. By checking the boxes associated with each mode of communication, the user authorizes the application to use that mode of communication.
  • Referring now to FIG. 18, the output from a plurality of the applications is shown in an interface 540. Examples of the output include trends and data at specific times. The information to create the trends and specific times was pulled from the server 170, and the user's applications manipulate the data to provide the information. Other configurations are possible.
  • FIG. 19 shows the section 514 of the notebook portion 502 including information about the sensor devices 110 that are associated with the user. For example, the section 514 lists a weight sensor, including the name of the sensor, product number, and gateway number corresponding to the gateway device 120. Any applications associated with the sensor device are also listed.
  • The various embodiments described above are provided by way of illustration only and should not be construed as limiting. Those skilled in the art will readily recognize various modifications and changes that may be made without following the example embodiments and applications illustrated and described herein, and without departing from the true spirit and scope of the disclosure.

Claims (20)

1. A gateway device configured to forward information from one or more body-worn sensors to a server, the gateway device comprising:
a processor;
a power source;
a transceiver in electrical communication with the processor, the transceiver being configured to communicate over a wireless network to both receive data from at least one body-worn sensor and transmit the data; and
a plurality of indicator lights in electrical communication with the processor;
wherein a first of the indicator lights indicates successful power-on of the gateway device;
wherein a second of the indicator lights indicates establishment of a Bluetooth connection with a body-worn sensor;
wherein a third of the indicator lights indicates successful creation of a WiFi connection; and
wherein a fourth of the indicator lights indicate successful creation of a cellular connection.
2. The device of claim 1, wherein the device does not include a display screen.
3. The device of claim 1, further comprising a recessed power button used to power on the gateway device.
4. The device of claim 1, wherein the gateway device is programmed to continuously forward the data from the body-worn sensor to the server.
5. The device of claim 4, further comprising a system memory configured to store the data when a connection to the server is unavailable.
6. The device of claim 1, wherein the device is sized to be received in a pocket of a user wearing the body-worn sensor.
7. The device of claim 6, wherein the device is approximately a size of a credit card.
8. The device of claim 1, further comprising contrasting writing on a housing of the device.
9. The device of claim 8, wherein the housing is black, and the writing is white.
10. A system for storing data collected by a body-worn sensor, the system comprising:
a central processing unit (CPU) that is configured to control operation of a gateway device; and
one or more computer readable data storage media storing software instructions that, when executed by the CPU, cause the gateway device to:
receive a MAC address of a new sensor and a protocol version associated with the new sensor from a server;
attempt to contact the new sensor using the protocol version and the MAC address;
when a response is received, sending the response to the server for validation;
when the response is validated by the server, establishing communications with the new sensor; and
forwarding data from the new sensor to a second server.
11. The system of claim 10, wherein the second server includes a super application associated with a user of the new sensor, the super application identifying a database in which the data from the new sensor is stored.
12. The system of claim 11, wherein the super application identifies a plurality of databases in which data from a plurality of sensors associated with the user is stored.
13. The system of claim 10, further comprising a notification module programmed to generate a notification to a user when the data meets a certain criteria.
14. The system of claim 13, wherein the notification module is programmed to notify a plurality of individuals when the data meets a second criteria.
15. A method for storing data from one or more body-worn sensors, the method comprising:
receiving data from a gateway device, the gateway device being worn by a user associated with one or more body-worn sensors generating the data;
identifying the user associated with the data;
allowing a super application associated with the user to identify a database for storage of the data based on the user and a type of body-worn sensor that generated the data; and
forwarding the data to the database for storage.
16. The method of claim 15, further comprising:
receiving a request for access to the data;
allowing the super application to authenticate the request;
forming a query to access the data;
sending the query to the database; and
returning the data.
17. The method of claim 15, further comprising:
analyzing the data; and
generating one or more notifications based on the analysis.
18. The method of claim 17, further comprising allowing the user to configure a type of the notifications and a number of individuals to receive the notifications.
19. The method of claim 15, further comprising allowing the user to select one or more applications to analyze the data and display information about the data.
20. The method of claim 19, further comprising allowing the applications to access the data through the super application.
US12/907,873 2010-10-19 2010-10-19 Platform for patient monitoring Abandoned US20120094600A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/907,873 US20120094600A1 (en) 2010-10-19 2010-10-19 Platform for patient monitoring

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/907,873 US20120094600A1 (en) 2010-10-19 2010-10-19 Platform for patient monitoring
PCT/US2011/055709 WO2012054257A2 (en) 2010-10-19 2011-10-11 Platform for patient monitoring
US14/488,917 US9872087B2 (en) 2010-10-19 2014-09-17 Platform for patient monitoring

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/488,917 Division US9872087B2 (en) 2010-10-19 2014-09-17 Platform for patient monitoring

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20120094600A1 true US20120094600A1 (en) 2012-04-19

Family

ID=45934565

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/907,873 Abandoned US20120094600A1 (en) 2010-10-19 2010-10-19 Platform for patient monitoring
US14/488,917 Active 2031-03-01 US9872087B2 (en) 2010-10-19 2014-09-17 Platform for patient monitoring

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/488,917 Active 2031-03-01 US9872087B2 (en) 2010-10-19 2014-09-17 Platform for patient monitoring

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (2) US20120094600A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2012054257A2 (en)

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20130007196A1 (en) * 2011-06-30 2013-01-03 Alfano Frank M Connectionless Operation in a Wireless Network
US20140266596A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Tyfone, Inc Configurable personal digital identity device responsive to user interaction with user authentication factor captured in mobile device
US20140374276A1 (en) * 2013-06-25 2014-12-25 Lifescan Scotland Limited Physiological monitoring system communicating with at least a social network
US20150057013A1 (en) * 2013-08-21 2015-02-26 Cisco Technology, Inc. Network-enabled light fixture for locating movable object
US9143938B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-09-22 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device responsive to user interaction
US9154500B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-10-06 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with microphone responsive to user interaction
US9183371B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-11-10 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with microphone
US9215592B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-12-15 Tyfone, Inc. Configurable personal digital identity device responsive to user interaction
US9231945B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-01-05 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with motion sensor
US9319881B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-04-19 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with fingerprint sensor
CN105829877A (en) * 2013-10-16 2016-08-03 豪夫迈·罗氏有限公司 Communication interface clip for a handheld medical device
US9436165B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-09-06 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with motion sensor responsive to user interaction
US9448543B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-09-20 Tyfone, Inc. Configurable personal digital identity device with motion sensor responsive to user interaction
EP3203397A1 (en) * 2016-02-08 2017-08-09 PARI Pharma GmbH Medical evaluation device
US9734319B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-08-15 Tyfone, Inc. Configurable personal digital identity device with authentication using image received over radio link
US9781598B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-10-03 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with fingerprint sensor responsive to user interaction
US20180241864A1 (en) * 2015-07-02 2018-08-23 Xovia Limited Wearable Devices
WO2018167278A1 (en) * 2017-03-17 2018-09-20 Pari Pharma Gmbh Control device for aerosol nebulizer system
US10226200B2 (en) * 2012-04-05 2019-03-12 Welch Allyn, Inc. User interface enhancements for physiological parameter monitoring platform devices

Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090201636A1 (en) * 2008-02-08 2009-08-13 Motion Computing, Inc. Ergonomic Solvent Resistant Portable Computer

Family Cites Families (309)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH023698A (en) 1988-06-20 1990-01-09 Denka Seiken Co Ltd Monoclonal antibody against human lymphotoxin, hybridoma capable of producing the same antibody, method for purifying and measuring human lymphotoxin using the same antibody and measuring reagent
US5301270A (en) 1989-12-18 1994-04-05 Anderson Consulting Computer-assisted software engineering system for cooperative processing environments
US5410695A (en) 1992-03-30 1995-04-25 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus and method for list management in a coupled data processing system
US7299240B1 (en) 1992-04-10 2007-11-20 Intellisync Corporation Method for translating computer data from one record structure to another
US5392390A (en) 1992-04-10 1995-02-21 Intellilink Corp. Method for mapping, translating, and dynamically reconciling data between disparate computer platforms
US5231990A (en) 1992-07-09 1993-08-03 Spacelabs, Medical, Inc. Application specific integrated circuit for physiological monitoring
AT176744T (en) 1992-11-27 1999-02-15 Ibm Multicast routing between areas
DE4408300C2 (en) 1993-03-15 2003-09-18 Hitachi Ltd Chromatography methods and apparatus
DE4329898A1 (en) 1993-09-04 1995-04-06 Marcus Dr Besson Wireless medical diagnostic and monitoring equipment
US5771354A (en) 1993-11-04 1998-06-23 Crawford; Christopher M. Internet online backup system provides remote storage for customers using IDs and passwords which were interactively established when signing up for backup services
US6243765B1 (en) 1994-04-28 2001-06-05 Nortel Networks Limited Method and apparatus for data communication
US5862377A (en) 1994-05-26 1999-01-19 Bay Networks Groups, Inc. Technique for sharing information between applications
US5687734A (en) 1994-10-20 1997-11-18 Hewlett-Packard Company Flexible patient monitoring system featuring a multiport transmitter
US5579775A (en) 1994-10-20 1996-12-03 Hewlett-Packard Company Dynamic control of a patient monitoring system
US5715314A (en) 1994-10-24 1998-02-03 Open Market, Inc. Network sales system
US6199116B1 (en) 1996-05-24 2001-03-06 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for managing data while sharing application programs
US6647432B1 (en) 1996-08-19 2003-11-11 Geoquest, A Division Of Schlumberger Technology Corporation Distributed framework for intertask communication between workstation applications
US5924074A (en) 1996-09-27 1999-07-13 Azron Incorporated Electronic medical records system
US5882300A (en) 1996-11-07 1999-03-16 Spacelabs Medical, Inc. Wireless patient monitoring apparatus using inductive coupling
US5860917A (en) 1997-01-15 1999-01-19 Chiron Corporation Method and apparatus for predicting therapeutic outcomes
US5959529A (en) 1997-03-07 1999-09-28 Kail, Iv; Karl A. Reprogrammable remote sensor monitoring system
US6220510B1 (en) 1997-05-15 2001-04-24 Mondex International Limited Multi-application IC card with delegation feature
US6025841A (en) 1997-07-15 2000-02-15 Microsoft Corporation Method for managing simultaneous display of multiple windows in a graphical user interface
US5960411A (en) 1997-09-12 1999-09-28 Amazon.Com, Inc. Method and system for placing a purchase order via a communications network
US6469714B2 (en) 1998-01-26 2002-10-22 International Business Machines Corporation Infocenter user interface for applets and components
US6704804B1 (en) 1998-01-26 2004-03-09 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for communicating information among interactive applications
US7542878B2 (en) 1998-03-03 2009-06-02 Card Guard Scientific Survival Ltd. Personal health monitor and a method for health monitoring
US7299159B2 (en) 1998-03-03 2007-11-20 Reuven Nanikashvili Health monitor system and method for health monitoring
US6446253B1 (en) 1998-03-20 2002-09-03 Novell, Inc. Mechanism for achieving transparent network computing
EP1068693B1 (en) 1998-04-03 2011-12-21 Vertical Networks, Inc. System and method for transmitting voice and data using intelligent bridged tdm and packet buses
US6181694B1 (en) 1998-04-03 2001-01-30 Vertical Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for multiple mode voice and data communciations using intelligently bridged TDM and packet buses
US6266340B1 (en) 1998-04-03 2001-07-24 Vertical Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for multiple voice data communication which includes interface cards including configurable clocks that are dynamically coupled to a TDS bus
US6453356B1 (en) 1998-04-15 2002-09-17 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Data exchange system and method
US6208345B1 (en) 1998-04-15 2001-03-27 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Visual data integration system and method
US5906004A (en) 1998-04-29 1999-05-25 Motorola, Inc. Textile fabric with integrated electrically conductive fibers and clothing fabricated thereof
US6080690A (en) 1998-04-29 2000-06-27 Motorola, Inc. Textile fabric with integrated sensing device and clothing fabricated thereof
US6057758A (en) 1998-05-20 2000-05-02 Hewlett-Packard Company Handheld clinical terminal
US6799165B1 (en) 1998-07-28 2004-09-28 Eimar M. Boesjes Apparatus and methods for inventory, sale, and delivery of digitally transferable goods
US6266645B1 (en) 1998-09-01 2001-07-24 Imetrikus, Inc. Risk adjustment tools for analyzing patient electronic discharge records
US6154465A (en) 1998-10-06 2000-11-28 Vertical Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for multiple mode voice and data communications using intelligenty bridged TDM and packet buses and methods for performing telephony and data functions using the same
CN1251450A (en) 1998-10-21 2000-04-26 国际商业机器公司 Method of shearing data between multiple applied programmes of handheld device
US6857123B1 (en) 1998-12-18 2005-02-15 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for a Meta Data Service in a data processing system
US6456305B1 (en) 1999-03-18 2002-09-24 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for automatically fitting a graphical display of objects to the dimensions of a display window
US6414698B1 (en) 1999-04-13 2002-07-02 International Business Machines Corporation Method for enabling adaptive sizing of display elements
US6735487B1 (en) 1999-07-01 2004-05-11 Ods Properties, Inc. Interactive wagering system with promotions
US6452597B1 (en) 1999-08-24 2002-09-17 Microsoft Corporation Displaying text on a limited-area display surface
JP4167359B2 (en) 1999-09-30 2008-10-15 株式会社東芝 Data management system and data management method
US6785891B1 (en) 1999-10-12 2004-08-31 International Business Machines Corporation Data sharing between application environments
US6785691B1 (en) 1999-10-13 2004-08-31 Avaya Technology Corp. Object oriented processing system and data sharing environment for applications therein
US6527711B1 (en) 1999-10-18 2003-03-04 Bodymedia, Inc. Wearable human physiological data sensors and reporting system therefor
JP4460693B2 (en) 1999-10-26 2010-05-12 富士通株式会社 Network system with an information search function
US6920633B1 (en) 2000-01-14 2005-07-19 Microsoft Corporation Cross-process common system resource data sharing
US6757682B1 (en) 2000-01-28 2004-06-29 Interval Research Corporation Alerting users to items of current interest
US20020082893A1 (en) 2000-02-29 2002-06-27 Dennis Barts Delivery system and method for vehicles and the like
US7249159B1 (en) 2000-03-16 2007-07-24 Microsoft Corporation Notification platform architecture
US7526437B1 (en) 2000-04-06 2009-04-28 Apple Inc. Custom stores
US6496705B1 (en) 2000-04-18 2002-12-17 Motorola Inc. Programmable wireless electrode system for medical monitoring
AU2001264654B2 (en) 2000-05-19 2005-06-16 Welch Allyn Protocol Inc. Patient monitoring system
US6308113B1 (en) 2000-06-09 2001-10-23 The United States Of America As Represented By The United States National Aeronautics And Space Administration Assembly for moving a robotic device along selected axes
US6605038B1 (en) * 2000-06-16 2003-08-12 Bodymedia, Inc. System for monitoring health, wellness and fitness
US7689437B1 (en) 2000-06-16 2010-03-30 Bodymedia, Inc. System for monitoring health, wellness and fitness
PT1292218E (en) 2000-06-23 2006-09-29 Bodymedia Inc System for the surveillance of health, welfare and skills
US20060122474A1 (en) 2000-06-16 2006-06-08 Bodymedia, Inc. Apparatus for monitoring health, wellness and fitness
US7261690B2 (en) 2000-06-16 2007-08-28 Bodymedia, Inc. Apparatus for monitoring health, wellness and fitness
US20020016719A1 (en) 2000-06-19 2002-02-07 Nemeth Louis G. Methods and systems for providing medical data to a third party in accordance with configurable distribution parameters
CN101833415B (en) 2000-06-22 2014-09-24 英特尔公司 Communicating objects between users or applications
US7188158B1 (en) 2000-07-15 2007-03-06 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. System and method for component-based software development
US20040127802A1 (en) 2001-07-17 2004-07-01 Gmp Companies, Inc. Wireless ECG system
AU7596501A (en) 2000-07-18 2002-01-30 Motorola Inc Wireless electrocardiograph system and method
US7933642B2 (en) 2001-07-17 2011-04-26 Rud Istvan Wireless ECG system
USD439981S1 (en) 2000-08-09 2001-04-03 Bodymedia, Inc. Armband with physiological monitoring system
WO2002015515A2 (en) 2000-08-11 2002-02-21 Manugistics, Inc. System and method for integrating disparate networks for use in electronic communication and commerce
US20020073241A1 (en) 2000-08-24 2002-06-13 Spx Corporation Global signaling memory
US6934740B1 (en) 2000-09-19 2005-08-23 3Com Corporation Method and apparatus for sharing common data objects among multiple applications in a client device
USD451604S1 (en) 2000-09-25 2001-12-04 Bodymedia, Inc. Vest having physiological monitoring system
JP2002108756A (en) 2000-09-28 2002-04-12 Hitachi Ltd User interface integrating method
US20030033284A1 (en) 2000-11-13 2003-02-13 Peter Warren User defined view selection utility
US20030164857A1 (en) 2000-11-13 2003-09-04 Exobrain, Inc. Database view utility implemented through database records
US20030154183A1 (en) 2000-11-13 2003-08-14 Exobrian, Inc. Component processing system
US20030058267A1 (en) 2000-11-13 2003-03-27 Peter Warren Multi-level selectable help items
US20030163779A1 (en) 2000-11-13 2003-08-28 Peter Warren Administrative control for data views
US20030101165A1 (en) 2000-11-13 2003-05-29 Exobrain, Inc. User editable help items
US6678413B1 (en) 2000-11-24 2004-01-13 Yiqing Liang System and method for object identification and behavior characterization using video analysis
US20020065919A1 (en) 2000-11-30 2002-05-30 Taylor Ian Lance Peer-to-peer caching network for user data
US6745193B1 (en) 2001-01-25 2004-06-01 Microsoft Corporation System and method for defining, refining, and personalizing communications policies in a notification platform
US6723046B2 (en) 2001-01-29 2004-04-20 Cybernet Systems Corporation At-home health data management method and apparatus
US7237032B2 (en) 2001-02-16 2007-06-26 Microsoft Corporation Progressive streaming media rendering
US7302634B2 (en) 2001-03-14 2007-11-27 Microsoft Corporation Schema-based services for identity-based data access
US20030023513A1 (en) 2001-04-06 2003-01-30 Phil Festa E-business systems and methods for diversfied businesses
WO2002080762A1 (en) 2001-04-06 2002-10-17 Medic4All Inc. A physiological monitoring system for a computational device of a human subject
US20030023512A1 (en) 2001-04-06 2003-01-30 Phil Festa Interactive on-line catalog
US20030023506A1 (en) 2001-04-06 2003-01-30 Jay Skibinski Virtual business restructuring methods
US20030061195A1 (en) 2001-05-02 2003-03-27 Laborde Guy Vachon Technical data management (TDM) framework for TDM applications
US20030105811A1 (en) 2001-05-02 2003-06-05 Laborde Guy Vachon Networked data stores for measurement data
US20020188629A1 (en) 2001-05-21 2002-12-12 Burfoot Daniel C. System, protocol, and methods for the creation of distributed spreadsheets
US6840904B2 (en) 2001-10-11 2005-01-11 Jason Goldberg Medical monitoring device and system
US7375647B2 (en) 2001-10-15 2008-05-20 Imetrikus, Inc. Method and apparatus for communicating data between a medical device and a central data repository
US7409403B1 (en) 2001-10-30 2008-08-05 Red Hat, Inc. Alert management data infrastructure and configuration generator
US6643541B2 (en) 2001-12-07 2003-11-04 Motorola, Inc Wireless electromyography sensor and system
US20030107487A1 (en) 2001-12-10 2003-06-12 Ronen Korman Method and device for measuring physiological parameters at the wrist
AUPR966101A0 (en) 2001-12-20 2002-01-24 Canon Information Systems Research Australia Pty Ltd A user interface for interaction with smart card applications
US7310673B2 (en) 2001-12-21 2007-12-18 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Network resource assignment system and method
US20030135403A1 (en) 2002-01-17 2003-07-17 Sanderson Gary M. Method for tracking future support engineering requests
US20030159030A1 (en) 2002-02-15 2003-08-21 Imetrikus, Inc. Method and system for the secure transmission of a portion of a web page over a computer network
US20030163604A1 (en) 2002-02-26 2003-08-28 Parametric Technology Corporation Method and apparatus for design and manufacturing application feature interoperability
US20050080322A1 (en) 2002-03-18 2005-04-14 Ronen Korman Monitoring method and monitoring system for assessing physiological parameters of a subject
JP3821034B2 (en) 2002-03-22 2006-09-13 ブラザー工業株式会社 Network management system, the managed device, the management device, the program
US6931405B2 (en) 2002-04-15 2005-08-16 Microsoft Corporation Flexible subscription-based event notification
AU2003223652A1 (en) 2002-04-16 2003-11-03 Carematix, Inc. Method and apparatus for remotely monitoring the condition of a patient
US7200779B1 (en) 2002-04-26 2007-04-03 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Fault notification based on a severity level
US7610404B2 (en) 2002-05-22 2009-10-27 Cast Iron Systems, Inc. Application network communication method and apparatus
US8296433B2 (en) 2002-05-22 2012-10-23 International Business Machines Corporation Virtualization method and apparatus for integrating enterprise applications
US7177859B2 (en) 2002-06-26 2007-02-13 Microsoft Corporation Programming model for subscription services
US7698276B2 (en) 2002-06-26 2010-04-13 Microsoft Corporation Framework for providing a subscription based notification system
US20040002988A1 (en) 2002-06-26 2004-01-01 Praveen Seshadri System and method for modeling subscriptions and subscribers as data
US20040002958A1 (en) 2002-06-26 2004-01-01 Praveen Seshadri System and method for providing notification(s)
US7006614B2 (en) 2002-07-01 2006-02-28 Converged Data Solutions Llc Systems and methods for voice and data communications including hybrid key system/PBX functionality
US7020508B2 (en) 2002-08-22 2006-03-28 Bodymedia, Inc. Apparatus for detecting human physiological and contextual information
US20040039989A1 (en) 2002-08-26 2004-02-26 Peter Warren Structured forms with configurable labels
US20040036718A1 (en) 2002-08-26 2004-02-26 Peter Warren Dynamic data item viewer
US20040036715A1 (en) 2002-08-26 2004-02-26 Peter Warren Multi-level user help
US20040036722A1 (en) 2002-08-26 2004-02-26 Peter Warren Configurable type-over text box prompt
US7386672B2 (en) 2002-08-29 2008-06-10 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus and method for providing global session persistence
US7294105B1 (en) 2002-09-03 2007-11-13 Cheetah Omni, Llc System and method for a wireless medical communication system
AU2003291637A1 (en) 2002-10-09 2004-05-04 Bodymedia, Inc. Apparatus for detecting, receiving, deriving and displaying human physiological and contextual information
US7657596B2 (en) 2002-10-24 2010-02-02 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Distributed data sharing methods and systems
CA2414861A1 (en) 2002-12-20 2004-06-20 Cognos Incorporated Structure and method for sharing large databases
US7378955B2 (en) * 2003-01-03 2008-05-27 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. System and method for correlating biometric trends with a related temporal event
US7154398B2 (en) 2003-01-06 2006-12-26 Chen Thomas C H Wireless communication and global location enabled intelligent health monitoring system
US20060142648A1 (en) 2003-01-07 2006-06-29 Triage Data Networks Wireless, internet-based, medical diagnostic system
US20050148882A1 (en) 2004-01-06 2005-07-07 Triage Wireless, Incc. Vital signs monitor used for conditioning a patient's response
US7396330B2 (en) 2003-01-07 2008-07-08 Triage Data Networks Wireless, internet-based medical-diagnostic system
US20040139444A1 (en) 2003-01-14 2004-07-15 Hope Clifford C. Notification service in an event management system
US8230445B2 (en) 2003-01-14 2012-07-24 International Business Machines Corporation Event management method and system
US7493140B2 (en) 2003-01-22 2009-02-17 Johnson Controls Technology Company System, method and device for providing communication between a vehicle and a plurality of wireless devices having different communication standards
US7092958B2 (en) 2003-01-29 2006-08-15 Battelle Energy Alliance, Llc Knowledge information management toolkit and method
US7439856B2 (en) 2004-03-20 2008-10-21 Welch Allyn, Inc. Health care patient status event processing and reporting
JP2006520657A (en) 2003-03-21 2006-09-14 ウェルチ・アリン・インコーポレーテッド Personal status physiological monitoring systems and structures, and monitoring method
US8010717B2 (en) 2003-04-17 2011-08-30 Imetribus, Inc. Method and system for communication and collaboration between a patient and healthcare professional
US7743391B2 (en) 2003-07-15 2010-06-22 Lsi Corporation Flexible architecture component (FAC) for efficient data integration and information interchange using web services
US20050015355A1 (en) 2003-07-16 2005-01-20 Apple Computer, Inc. Method and system for data sharing between application programs
US7559902B2 (en) 2003-08-22 2009-07-14 Foster-Miller, Inc. Physiological monitoring garment
US7302678B2 (en) 2003-09-10 2007-11-27 Sap Aktiengesellschaft Symmetric transformation processing system
EP1667579A4 (en) 2003-09-12 2008-06-11 Bodymedia Inc Method and apparatus for measuring heart related parameters
US7129836B2 (en) 2003-09-23 2006-10-31 Ge Medical Systems Information Technologies, Inc. Wireless subject monitoring system
US7137099B2 (en) 2003-10-24 2006-11-14 Microsoft Corporation System and method for extending application preferences classes
WO2005046433A2 (en) 2003-11-04 2005-05-26 General Hospital Corporation Life sign detection and health state assessment system
US20050101843A1 (en) 2003-11-06 2005-05-12 Welch Allyn, Inc. Wireless disposable physiological sensor
US7752603B2 (en) 2003-12-08 2010-07-06 Notable Solutions, Inc. Systems and methods for data interchange among autonomous processing entities
US20050125742A1 (en) 2003-12-09 2005-06-09 International Business Machines Corporation Non-overlapping graphical user interface workspace
CN1627311B (en) 2003-12-10 2010-08-11 国际商业机器公司 Method and system for service providers to personalize event notifications to users
JP4317000B2 (en) 2003-12-10 2009-08-19 インクリメント・ピー株式会社 Guiding introducer, the system, the method, the program, and a recording medium recording the program
US20050216199A1 (en) 2004-03-26 2005-09-29 Triage Data Networks Cuffless blood-pressure monitor and accompanying web services interface
US7509672B1 (en) 2004-04-01 2009-03-24 Compuware Corporation Cross-platform single sign-on data sharing
US20060009698A1 (en) 2004-04-07 2006-01-12 Triage Wireless, Inc. Hand-held monitor for measuring vital signs
US20060084878A1 (en) 2004-10-18 2006-04-20 Triage Wireless, Inc. Personal computer-based vital signs monitor
US7238159B2 (en) 2004-04-07 2007-07-03 Triage Wireless, Inc. Device, system and method for monitoring vital signs
US20050228297A1 (en) 2004-04-07 2005-10-13 Banet Matthew J Wrist-worn System for Measuring Blood Pressure
US20080058614A1 (en) 2005-09-20 2008-03-06 Triage Wireless, Inc. Wireless, internet-based system for measuring vital signs from a plurality of patients in a hospital or medical clinic
US20050261598A1 (en) 2004-04-07 2005-11-24 Triage Wireless, Inc. Patch sensor system for measuring vital signs
US7179228B2 (en) 2004-04-07 2007-02-20 Triage Wireless, Inc. Cuffless system for measuring blood pressure
US20060009697A1 (en) 2004-04-07 2006-01-12 Triage Wireless, Inc. Wireless, internet-based system for measuring vital signs from a plurality of patients in a hospital or medical clinic
US20050228244A1 (en) 2004-04-07 2005-10-13 Triage Wireless, Inc. Small-scale, vital-signs monitoring device, system and method
US7004907B2 (en) 2004-04-07 2006-02-28 Triage Wireless, Inc. Blood-pressure monitoring device featuring a calibration-based analysis
GB2414146A (en) 2004-05-13 2005-11-16 Toumaz Technology Ltd Encoding information as time shifts between data pulses and reference pulses, at least two data pulses sharing a common reference pulse
US7206630B1 (en) 2004-06-29 2007-04-17 Cleveland Medical Devices, Inc Electrode patch and wireless physiological measurement system and method
US20060047447A1 (en) 2004-08-24 2006-03-02 Impact Sports Technologies, Inc. System, method and device for monitoring an athlete
IL163796D0 (en) 2004-08-30 2005-12-18 Gribova Orna A Device for detecting changes in blood glucose level or dardiovacular condition
US20060047215A1 (en) 2004-09-01 2006-03-02 Welch Allyn, Inc. Combined sensor assembly
US7546335B2 (en) 2004-09-02 2009-06-09 Broadway Technology, Llc System and method for a data protocol layer and the transfer of data objects using the data protocol layer
US7970823B2 (en) 2004-09-02 2011-06-28 Broadway Technology, Llc System for sharing data objects among applications
US20060079794A1 (en) 2004-09-28 2006-04-13 Impact Sports Technologies, Inc. Monitoring device, method and system
US8056123B2 (en) 2004-09-30 2011-11-08 International Business Machines Corporation Method, apparatus and program storage device for providing service access control for a user interface
US7487512B2 (en) 2004-09-30 2009-02-03 Sap Ag Publish-subscribe event notifications
US7987356B2 (en) 2004-11-29 2011-07-26 Broadcom Corporation Programmable security platform
US7658716B2 (en) 2004-12-07 2010-02-09 Triage Wireless, Inc. Vital signs monitor using an optical ear-based module
US20060122520A1 (en) 2004-12-07 2006-06-08 Dr. Matthew Banet Vital sign-monitoring system with multiple optical modules
US20060155589A1 (en) 2005-01-10 2006-07-13 Welch Allyn, Inc. Portable vital signs measurement instrument and method of use thereof
JP2008526443A (en) 2005-01-13 2008-07-24 ウェルチ・アリン・インコーポレーテッド Vital signs monitor
US7318009B2 (en) 2005-01-18 2008-01-08 American Power Conversion Corporation Event customization
US9052879B2 (en) 2005-02-18 2015-06-09 International Business Machines Corporation Mapping assurance method and apparatus for integrating systems
US8378811B2 (en) 2005-03-11 2013-02-19 Aframe Digital, Inc. Mobile wireless customizable health and condition monitor
US7616110B2 (en) 2005-03-11 2009-11-10 Aframe Digital, Inc. Mobile wireless customizable health and condition monitor
US20060241999A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods of exposing a sequence of instructions into an object-oriented programming language
US20060242176A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods of exposing business configuration dependencies
US20060293934A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-12-28 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods and systems for providing an integrated business application configuration environment
US20060293935A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-12-28 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods and systems for incrementally exposing business application errors using an integrated display
US20060242174A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Igor Tsyganskiy Systems and methods for using object-oriented tools to debug business applications
US20060293940A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-12-28 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods and systems for applying intelligent filters and identifying life cycle events for data elements during business application debugging
US20060242196A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods of exposing application layer integrity as object oriented programming language elements
US7720879B2 (en) 2005-04-22 2010-05-18 Sap Ag Methods of using an integrated development environment to configure business applications
US20060242197A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods of transforming application layer structure as objects
US20060242188A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods of exposing a missing collection of application elements as deprecated
US7958486B2 (en) 2005-04-22 2011-06-07 Sap Ag Methods and systems for data-focused debugging and tracing capabilities
US7542980B2 (en) 2005-04-22 2009-06-02 Sap Ag Methods of comparing and merging business process configurations
US7702638B2 (en) 2005-04-22 2010-04-20 Sap Ag Systems and methods for off-line modeling a business application
US8539003B2 (en) 2005-04-22 2013-09-17 Sap Ag Systems and methods for identifying problems of a business application in a customer support system
US20060282458A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-12-14 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods and systems for merging business process configurations
US20060242172A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Igor Tsyganskiy Systems and methods for transforming logic entities of a business application into an object-oriented model
US20060242171A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods of using code-based case tools to verify application layer configurations
US20060241961A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods of optimizing legacy application layer control structure using refactoring
US20060242177A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Igor Tsyganskiy Methods of exposing business application runtime exceptions at design time
EP1718088B1 (en) 2005-04-25 2018-06-27 BlackBerry Limited Architecture optimized for application data sharing within a mobile communications device
US7894809B2 (en) 2005-04-25 2011-02-22 Research In Motion Limited Architecture optimized for application data sharing within a mobile communications device
EP1881787A4 (en) 2005-05-11 2009-12-09 Imetrikus Inc Methods and systems for monitoring and enhancing patient compliance with a health treatment program
AU2006243904A1 (en) 2005-05-11 2006-11-16 Imetrikus, Inc. Methods for ensuring accuracy of health-related data transmission over a network
WO2006122324A2 (en) 2005-05-11 2006-11-16 Imetrikus, Inc. Interactive user interface for accessing health and financial data
US9398853B2 (en) 2005-06-03 2016-07-26 LifeWatch Technologies, Ltd. Communication terminal, medical telemetry system and method for monitoring physiological data
US7725476B2 (en) 2005-06-14 2010-05-25 International Business Machines Corporation System and method for automated data retrieval based on data placed in clipboard memory
DE102005039343B4 (en) 2005-08-19 2007-10-31 Siemens Ag A method of transmitting data packets and data processing unit
US7885945B2 (en) 2005-08-25 2011-02-08 Microsoft Corporation Secure schema identifier generation
US7433888B2 (en) 2005-08-25 2008-10-07 Microsoft Corporation Schema packaging, distribution and availability
US20070055166A1 (en) 2005-09-02 2007-03-08 Chandrashekhar Patil Method and system for recording and transmitting data from biometric sensors
US20070073178A1 (en) 2005-09-29 2007-03-29 Berkeley Heartlab, Inc. Monitoring device for measuring calorie expenditure
US20070071643A1 (en) 2005-09-29 2007-03-29 Berkeley Heartlab, Inc. Internet based system for monitoring blood test, vital sign and exercise information from a patient
WO2007040975A2 (en) 2005-09-29 2007-04-12 Berkeley Heartlab, Inc. Internet-based patient-monitoring system featuring interactive messaging engine
US7420472B2 (en) 2005-10-16 2008-09-02 Bao Tran Patient monitoring apparatus
US9497600B2 (en) 2005-10-28 2016-11-15 Hewlett Packard Enterprise Development Lp Service chaining
US20070116223A1 (en) 2005-10-28 2007-05-24 Burke Paul M Telephony and web services coordination
WO2007062260A2 (en) 2005-11-28 2007-05-31 L-3 Communications Corporation Distributed physics based training system and methods
WO2007065015A2 (en) 2005-12-03 2007-06-07 Masimo Corporation Physiological alarm notification system
US20070129958A1 (en) 2005-12-07 2007-06-07 Calyx Technology, Inc. D/B/A Calyx Software Data sharing system and method
US7741976B2 (en) * 2005-12-16 2010-06-22 Hunt Power, L.P. Server and method for processing meter data into a common format
US20070142715A1 (en) 2005-12-20 2007-06-21 Triage Wireless, Inc. Chest strap for measuring vital signs
US8032872B2 (en) 2006-01-09 2011-10-04 Oracle America, Inc. Supporting applets on a high end platform
US8032397B2 (en) 2006-01-19 2011-10-04 Oliver Charles Lawless Integrated prescription management and compliance system
US20070185393A1 (en) 2006-02-03 2007-08-09 Triage Wireless, Inc. System for measuring vital signs using an optical module featuring a green light source
US7680767B2 (en) 2006-03-23 2010-03-16 Microsoft Corporation Mapping architecture with incremental view maintenance
US7647298B2 (en) 2006-03-23 2010-01-12 Microsoft Corporation Generation of query and update views for object relational mapping
EP2146628B1 (en) 2007-04-18 2011-11-09 Jäger, Robert Device for detecting and analyzing vital parameters of the body, such as particularly the pulse and respiration
FR2900523A1 (en) * 2006-04-28 2007-11-02 France Telecom Identification of nodes in a network
US7993275B2 (en) 2006-05-25 2011-08-09 Sotera Wireless, Inc. Bilateral device, system and method for monitoring vital signs
US9149192B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2015-10-06 Sotera Wireless, Inc. System for measuring vital signs using bilateral pulse transit time
EP1872717B1 (en) 2006-06-29 2010-09-08 General Electric Company A medical telemetry system
US20080013120A1 (en) 2006-07-12 2008-01-17 Arcsoft, Inc. Method for automatically adjusting the position and size of each object of an image mask to fit an image page
US20100058480A1 (en) * 2006-07-13 2010-03-04 Sven-Erik Hedberg Information management in devices worn by a user
US7788250B2 (en) 2006-08-04 2010-08-31 Mohammad Salman Flexible request and response communications interfaces
US20080059877A1 (en) 2006-08-29 2008-03-06 David Brookler Method for automatically adjusting the components of a screen region to maintain layout integrity in multiple languages
US8442607B2 (en) 2006-09-07 2013-05-14 Sotera Wireless, Inc. Hand-held vital signs monitor
US20080082004A1 (en) 2006-09-08 2008-04-03 Triage Wireless, Inc. Blood pressure monitor
US20080094228A1 (en) 2006-10-12 2008-04-24 Welch James P Patient monitor using radio frequency identification tags
US8126730B2 (en) 2006-10-24 2012-02-28 Medapps, Inc. Systems and methods for storage and forwarding of medical data
US20080097550A1 (en) 2006-10-24 2008-04-24 Kent Dicks Systems and methods for remote patient monitoring and command execution
CN101601040A (en) 2006-10-24 2009-12-09 麦德爱普斯股份有限公司 Systems and methods for adapter-based communication with a medical device
US20080097914A1 (en) 2006-10-24 2008-04-24 Kent Dicks Systems and methods for wireless processing and transmittal of medical data through multiple interfaces
US8126728B2 (en) 2006-10-24 2012-02-28 Medapps, Inc. Systems and methods for processing and transmittal of medical data through an intermediary device
US8126735B2 (en) 2006-10-24 2012-02-28 Medapps, Inc. Systems and methods for remote patient monitoring and user interface
US20080097913A1 (en) 2006-10-24 2008-04-24 Kent Dicks Systems and methods for wireless processing and transmittal of data from a plurality of medical devices
US8126732B2 (en) 2006-10-24 2012-02-28 Medapps, Inc. Systems and methods for processing and transmittal of medical data through multiple interfaces
US20080097912A1 (en) 2006-10-24 2008-04-24 Kent Dicks Systems and methods for wireless processing and transmittal of medical data through an intermediary device
US8126729B2 (en) 2006-10-24 2012-02-28 Medapps, Inc. Systems and methods for processing and transmittal of data from a plurality of medical devices
US8126733B2 (en) 2006-10-24 2012-02-28 Medapps, Inc. Systems and methods for medical data interchange using mobile computing devices
US8126734B2 (en) 2006-10-24 2012-02-28 Medapps, Inc. Systems and methods for adapter-based communication with a medical device
US20080097917A1 (en) 2006-10-24 2008-04-24 Kent Dicks Systems and methods for wireless processing and medical device monitoring via remote command execution
US8214007B2 (en) 2006-11-01 2012-07-03 Welch Allyn, Inc. Body worn physiological sensor device having a disposable electrode module
US8449469B2 (en) 2006-11-10 2013-05-28 Sotera Wireless, Inc. Two-part patch sensor for monitoring vital signs
JP2008158452A (en) 2006-12-26 2008-07-10 Oki Electric Ind Co Ltd Electronic paper, and application cooperation system using electronic paper
US20080294020A1 (en) * 2007-01-25 2008-11-27 Demetrios Sapounas System and method for physlological data readings, transmission and presentation
US20080221461A1 (en) 2007-03-05 2008-09-11 Triage Wireless, Inc. Vital sign monitor for cufflessly measuring blood pressure without using an external calibration
US20080221399A1 (en) 2007-03-05 2008-09-11 Triage Wireless, Inc. Monitor for measuring vital signs and rendering video images
US20090093687A1 (en) 2007-03-08 2009-04-09 Telfort Valery G Systems and methods for determining a physiological condition using an acoustic monitor
US9430552B2 (en) 2007-03-16 2016-08-30 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc View maintenance rules for an update pipeline of an object-relational mapping (ORM) platform
CA2631016A1 (en) 2007-05-10 2008-11-10 Research In Motion Limited Sharing the common session between two applications on the same server
US20080300572A1 (en) * 2007-06-01 2008-12-04 Medtronic Minimed, Inc. Wireless monitor for a personal medical device system
JP5324567B2 (en) 2007-06-12 2013-10-23 フェイスブック,インク. Application content for personalized social network
US8602997B2 (en) 2007-06-12 2013-12-10 Sotera Wireless, Inc. Body-worn system for measuring continuous non-invasive blood pressure (cNIBP)
WO2008154643A1 (en) 2007-06-12 2008-12-18 Triage Wireless, Inc. Vital sign monitor for measuring blood pressure using optical, electrical, and pressure waveforms
US8574161B2 (en) 2007-06-12 2013-11-05 Sotera Wireless, Inc. Vital sign monitor for cufflessly measuring blood pressure using a pulse transit time corrected for vascular index
US20080312542A1 (en) 2007-06-13 2008-12-18 Triage Wireless, Inc. Multi-sensor array for measuring blood pressure
US20080319327A1 (en) 2007-06-25 2008-12-25 Triage Wireless, Inc. Body-worn sensor featuring a low-power processor and multi-sensor array for measuring blood pressure
KR100914633B1 (en) * 2007-07-03 2009-09-02 서울대학교산학협력단 System and Method for Patient-oriented Healthcare
WO2009009761A1 (en) 2007-07-11 2009-01-15 Triage Wireless, Inc. Device for determining respiratory rate and other vital signs
CN101355638B (en) 2007-07-25 2012-07-04 深圳Tcl新技术有限公司 Method and apparatus for providing red alert event notification
US8926509B2 (en) 2007-08-24 2015-01-06 Hmicro, Inc. Wireless physiological sensor patches and systems
US20090069642A1 (en) * 2007-09-11 2009-03-12 Aid Networks, Llc Wearable Wireless Electronic Patient Data Communications and Physiological Monitoring Device
US8591430B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2013-11-26 Corventis, Inc. Adherent device for respiratory monitoring
US9411936B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2016-08-09 Medtronic Monitoring, Inc. Dynamic pairing of patients to data collection gateways
US20090076341A1 (en) 2007-09-14 2009-03-19 Corventis, Inc. Adherent Athletic Monitor
WO2009036319A1 (en) 2007-09-14 2009-03-19 Corventis, Inc. Adherent emergency patient monitor
EP2194864B1 (en) 2007-09-14 2018-08-29 Medtronic Monitoring, Inc. System and methods for wireless body fluid monitoring
WO2009036256A1 (en) 2007-09-14 2009-03-19 Corventis, Inc. Injectable physiological monitoring system
WO2009036260A1 (en) 2007-09-14 2009-03-19 Corventis, Inc. Data collection in a multi-sensor patient monitor
US8116841B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2012-02-14 Corventis, Inc. Adherent device with multiple physiological sensors
EP2194856A4 (en) 2007-09-14 2014-07-16 Corventis Inc Adherent cardiac monitor with advanced sensing capabilities
EP2195076A4 (en) 2007-09-14 2014-12-31 Corventis Inc Adherent device for cardiac rhythm management
US9178957B2 (en) 2007-09-27 2015-11-03 Adobe Systems Incorporated Application and data agnostic collaboration services
US20090099469A1 (en) 2007-10-11 2009-04-16 Flores Pamela A Wireless ECG/EKG patient telemetry monitoring system
US20090112769A1 (en) 2007-10-24 2009-04-30 Kent Dicks Systems and methods for remote patient monitoring
US20090112072A1 (en) 2007-10-26 2009-04-30 Triage Wireless, Inc. System that displays both vital sign information and entertainment content on a common video monitor
US20090118628A1 (en) 2007-11-01 2009-05-07 Triage Wireless, Inc. System for measuring blood pressure featuring a blood pressure cuff comprising size information
US20090156946A1 (en) 2007-12-13 2009-06-18 Welch Allyn, Inc. Blood pressure motion sensing
US20090234721A1 (en) 2007-12-21 2009-09-17 Bigelow David H Persistent collaborative on-line meeting space
JP4763020B2 (en) 2007-12-27 2011-08-31 シャープ株式会社 Information providing device, information display device, an information providing system, information providing method, program, and program and computer readable recording medium
KR101425621B1 (en) 2008-01-15 2014-07-31 삼성전자주식회사 Method and system for sharing contents securely
US8205216B2 (en) 2008-05-01 2012-06-19 International Business Machines Corporation Data sharing between applications where only one application knows the business purpose of the data
US20100130875A1 (en) 2008-06-18 2010-05-27 Triage Wireless, Inc. Body-worn system for measuring blood pressure
US20090319535A1 (en) 2008-06-20 2009-12-24 Webber Robert C System and method for interacting with clinical trial operational data
US20090327230A1 (en) 2008-06-27 2009-12-31 Microsoft Corporation Structured and unstructured data models
KR101483713B1 (en) 2008-06-30 2015-01-16 삼성전자 주식회사 Apparatus and Method for capturing a motion of human
US20100037240A1 (en) 2008-08-08 2010-02-11 Microsoft Corporation Non Intrusive Application Mechanism
US8505031B2 (en) 2008-08-18 2013-08-06 Oracle America, Inc. Method for sharing data
US20100052914A1 (en) * 2008-08-28 2010-03-04 Chi-Sheng Tsai Portable body temperature continuous monitoring system
US20100082646A1 (en) 2008-09-26 2010-04-01 Microsoft Corporation Tracking constraints and dependencies across mapping layers
US8266612B2 (en) 2008-10-03 2012-09-11 Microsoft Corporation Dynamic, customizable and configurable notification mechanism
US8831566B2 (en) 2008-11-21 2014-09-09 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Femtocell local breakout management services
US9032312B2 (en) 2008-12-15 2015-05-12 Mastercard International Incorporated Platform for generating composite applications
US20100324936A1 (en) * 2009-04-22 2010-12-23 Suresh-Kumar Venkata Vishnubhatla Pharmacy management and administration with bedside real-time medical event data collection
US20110246123A1 (en) 2010-03-30 2011-10-06 Welch Allyn, Inc. Personal status monitoring
US20120053423A1 (en) * 2010-08-24 2012-03-01 Christopher Kenalty Smart mattress

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090201636A1 (en) * 2008-02-08 2009-08-13 Motion Computing, Inc. Ergonomic Solvent Resistant Portable Computer

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20130007196A1 (en) * 2011-06-30 2013-01-03 Alfano Frank M Connectionless Operation in a Wireless Network
US10226200B2 (en) * 2012-04-05 2019-03-12 Welch Allyn, Inc. User interface enhancements for physiological parameter monitoring platform devices
US9734319B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-08-15 Tyfone, Inc. Configurable personal digital identity device with authentication using image received over radio link
US9576281B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-02-21 Tyfone, Inc. Configurable personal digital identity card with motion sensor responsive to user interaction
US10211988B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2019-02-19 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity card device for fingerprint bound asymmetric crypto to access merchant cloud services
US9143938B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-09-22 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device responsive to user interaction
US9154500B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-10-06 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with microphone responsive to user interaction
US9183371B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-11-10 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with microphone
US9207650B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2015-12-08 Tyfone, Inc. Configurable personal digital identity device responsive to user interaction with user authentication factor captured in mobile device
US9215592B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-12-15 Tyfone, Inc. Configurable personal digital identity device responsive to user interaction
US9231945B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-01-05 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with motion sensor
US9906365B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-02-27 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with fingerprint sensor and challenge-response key
US9563892B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-02-07 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity card with motion sensor responsive to user interaction
US9319881B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-04-19 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with fingerprint sensor
US9781598B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-10-03 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with fingerprint sensor responsive to user interaction
US20140266596A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Tyfone, Inc Configurable personal digital identity device responsive to user interaction with user authentication factor captured in mobile device
US9436165B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-09-06 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with motion sensor responsive to user interaction
US9448543B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-09-20 Tyfone, Inc. Configurable personal digital identity device with motion sensor responsive to user interaction
US9659295B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-05-23 Tyfone, Inc. Personal digital identity device with near field and non near field radios for access control
CN105453091A (en) * 2013-06-25 2016-03-30 生命扫描苏格兰有限公司 Physiological monitoring system communicating with at least one social network
WO2014206995A1 (en) * 2013-06-25 2014-12-31 Lifescan Scotland Limited Physiological monitoring system communicating with at least one social network
US20140374276A1 (en) * 2013-06-25 2014-12-25 Lifescan Scotland Limited Physiological monitoring system communicating with at least a social network
US20150057013A1 (en) * 2013-08-21 2015-02-26 Cisco Technology, Inc. Network-enabled light fixture for locating movable object
US9253748B2 (en) * 2013-08-21 2016-02-02 Cisco Technology, Inc. Network-enabled light fixture for locating movable object
CN105829877A (en) * 2013-10-16 2016-08-03 豪夫迈·罗氏有限公司 Communication interface clip for a handheld medical device
US10054579B2 (en) * 2013-10-16 2018-08-21 Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc. Communication interface clip for a handheld medical device
US20160238588A1 (en) * 2013-10-16 2016-08-18 Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc. Communication interface clip for a handheld medical device
US20180241864A1 (en) * 2015-07-02 2018-08-23 Xovia Limited Wearable Devices
EP3203397A1 (en) * 2016-02-08 2017-08-09 PARI Pharma GmbH Medical evaluation device
WO2017137424A1 (en) * 2016-02-08 2017-08-17 Pari Pharma Gmbh Medical evaluation device
WO2018167278A1 (en) * 2017-03-17 2018-09-20 Pari Pharma Gmbh Control device for aerosol nebulizer system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO2012054257A2 (en) 2012-04-26
WO2012054257A3 (en) 2012-06-21
US20150334474A1 (en) 2015-11-19
US9872087B2 (en) 2018-01-16

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Sneha et al. Enabling ubiquitous patient monitoring: Model, decision protocols, opportunities and challenges
Varshney Pervasive healthcare
US10007758B2 (en) Medical monitoring system
US7942844B2 (en) Remote monitoring for networked fluid infusion systems
JP5203185B2 (en) Method and system for monitoring medical data
US8348885B2 (en) Remote monitoring for networked fluid infusion systems
US9323894B2 (en) Health care sanitation monitoring system
US7993266B2 (en) Early detection of contagious diseases
US20080154099A1 (en) Health monitoring system and method
AU2010224089B2 (en) Systems and methods for viewing patient data
US6748250B1 (en) Method and system of monitoring a patient
Jurik et al. Remote medical monitoring
US10255994B2 (en) Physiological parameter alarm delay
US10032002B2 (en) Medical monitoring system
US20050102167A1 (en) Provisioning and controlling medical instruments using wireless data communication
KR101534420B1 (en) Wireless relay module for remote monitoring systems
US20080294020A1 (en) System and method for physlological data readings, transmission and presentation
US8170609B2 (en) Personal virtual assistant providing advice to a user regarding physiological information received about the user
US20090069642A1 (en) Wearable Wireless Electronic Patient Data Communications and Physiological Monitoring Device
US20180218792A1 (en) Alarm notification system
US20110167133A1 (en) System, method, and device for medical device data capture and processing
US9854972B2 (en) Remote monitoring of analyte measurements
US20160196388A1 (en) Medical device management system
US8694600B2 (en) Remote monitoring systems for monitoring medical devices via wireless communication networks
CA2955625C (en) Data permission management for wearable devices

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: WELCH ALLYN, INC., NEW YORK

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:DELLOSTRITTO, JAMES J;ROY CHOWDHURY, ATANU;MUGUNDHAN, HARRISH;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:025171/0602

Effective date: 20101019

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION