US20120089000A1 - Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitor For Providing Ease Of Use In Women And Method Of Use - Google Patents

Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitor For Providing Ease Of Use In Women And Method Of Use Download PDF

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US20120089000A1
US20120089000A1 US12901428 US90142810A US20120089000A1 US 20120089000 A1 US20120089000 A1 US 20120089000A1 US 12901428 US12901428 US 12901428 US 90142810 A US90142810 A US 90142810A US 20120089000 A1 US20120089000 A1 US 20120089000A1
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monitor
ecg
monitoring
skin
patient
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US12901428
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Jon Mikalson Bishay
Gust H. Bardy
Jason Felix
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Cardiac Science Corp
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Cardiac Science Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/68Arrangements of detecting, measuring or recording means, e.g. sensors, in relation to patient
    • A61B5/6801Arrangements of detecting, measuring or recording means, e.g. sensors, in relation to patient specially adapted to be attached to or worn on the body surface
    • A61B5/683Means for maintaining contact with the body
    • A61B5/6832Means for maintaining contact with the body using adhesives
    • A61B5/6833Adhesive patches
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/02Detecting, measuring or recording pulse, heart rate, blood pressure or blood flow; Combined pulse/heart-rate/blood pressure determination; Evaluating a cardiovascular condition not otherwise provided for, e.g. using combinations of techniques provided for in this group with electrocardiography or electroauscultation; Heart catheters for measuring blood pressure
    • A61B5/024Detecting, measuring or recording pulse rate or heart rate
    • A61B5/02438Detecting, measuring or recording pulse rate or heart rate with portable devices, e.g. worn by the patient
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/04Detecting, measuring or recording bioelectric signals of the body or parts thereof
    • A61B5/0402Electrocardiography, i.e. ECG
    • A61B5/0404Hand-held devices
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/04Detecting, measuring or recording bioelectric signals of the body or parts thereof
    • A61B5/0402Electrocardiography, i.e. ECG
    • A61B5/0428Input circuits specially adapted therefor
    • A61B5/04282Input circuits specially adapted therefor using insulating or floating elements, e.g. transformers, opto-couplers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/04Detecting, measuring or recording bioelectric signals of the body or parts thereof
    • A61B5/0402Electrocardiography, i.e. ECG
    • A61B5/0432Recording apparatus specially adapted therefor
    • A61B5/04325Recording apparatus specially adapted therefor using integrated circuit memory devices
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B2503/00Evaluating a particular growth phase or type of persons or animals
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B2560/00Constructional details of operational features of apparatus; Accessories for medical measuring apparatus
    • A61B2560/04Constructional details of apparatus
    • A61B2560/0406Constructional details of apparatus specially shaped apparatus housings
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B2560/00Constructional details of operational features of apparatus; Accessories for medical measuring apparatus
    • A61B2560/04Constructional details of apparatus
    • A61B2560/0406Constructional details of apparatus specially shaped apparatus housings
    • A61B2560/0412Low-profile patch shaped housings
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B2560/00Constructional details of operational features of apparatus; Accessories for medical measuring apparatus
    • A61B2560/04Constructional details of apparatus
    • A61B2560/0462Apparatus with built-in sensors
    • A61B2560/0468Built-in electrodes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/72Signal processing specially adapted for physiological signals or for diagnostic purposes
    • A61B5/7203Signal processing specially adapted for physiological signals or for diagnostic purposes for noise prevention, reduction or removal
    • A61B5/7207Signal processing specially adapted for physiological signals or for diagnostic purposes for noise prevention, reduction or removal of noise induced by motion artifacts

Abstract

A method for performing ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring on an adult female is provided. An ambulatory ECG monitor, that includes a plurality of sensing electrodes coupled to self-powered sensing circuitry, is provisioned. A monitoring site is located on the surface of a patient's chest at midline and above the body of the sternum adjacent to the fourth and fifth intercostal spaces between the breasts in the upper portion of the intermammary cleft. The electrodes are aligned and placed along the midline. Interference from breast tissue with placement of the ambulatory monitor at the monitoring site is evaluated. The ambulatory ECG monitor is removably adhered to the monitoring site clear of any breast tissue interference for the duration of monitoring. ECG data is sensed through the sensing electrodes at the monitoring site and the sensed ECG data is recorded into the sensing circuitry.

Description

    FIELD
  • [0001]
    This application relates in general to ambulatory electrocardiography and, in particular, to an ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor for providing ease of use in women and method of use.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    The cardiac electrical signal begins in the cells of the sinoatrial node in the right atrium. These cells spontaneously depolarize and create a cardiac action potential of electrical impulses that rapidly propagates outward across the right atrium and then the left atrium. The cardiac action potential in turn stimulates muscle cells of the atrial myocardium to depolarize and contract to push blood into the ventricles. Shortly thereafter, this atrial action potential encounters the atrioventricular node located at the juncture of the atria and ventricles near the center of the heart. The atrioventricular node slightly delays cardiac action potential propagation into the ventricles to ensure complete drainage of blood from the atria. Thereafter, the muscle cells of the ventricular myocardium are activated by the electrical wave front and are stimulated into systolic contraction. After a rest and reset period, the complete the heart beat cycle repeats. Any disruption in this process, which can include heart block, sinus bradycardia, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia, can lead to the symptoms ranging from dizziness to a sensation of heart fluttering or palpitations, loss of consciousness or even death. Being able to record the electrical signal of the heart is a fundamental diagnostic tool of every physician.
  • [0003]
    Identifying abnormal rhythms depends upon the manner in which and the amplitude of the depolarization signal of the muscle cells of the atrial and ventricular myocardium that in turn act as sequential voltage sources, which generate a current flow across the thoracic region of the body and result in a characteristic signal on the body surface. In a typical electrocardiographic (ECG) monitor, cardiac action potentials occur between 0.05 Hz to 150 Hz with a signal strength of around 3mVp-p (peak-to-peak). Although miniscule, the current flow can be measured to characterize the electrical activity of the heart using an ECG monitor or similar device. Voltage differentials from pairings of the electrodes are filtered, amplified, and combined into P, QRS, and T complexes.
  • [0004]
    Conventionally, cardiac action potentials are detected through electrodes attached to the skin on the chest and limbs based on the American Heart Association's classic 12-lead placement model, such as P. Libby et al., “Braunwald's Heart Disease—A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine,” Chs. 11 and 12 (8th ed. 2008), the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference. Both traditional in-clinic and ambulatory Holter-style ECG monitors follow the standard 12-lead model with variations on numbers and placement of leads. Generally, limb lead electrodes are placed on each arm and on the left leg, while precordial lead electrodes are placed on the left upper chest region over the heart in close proximity to the heart and at a location of strongest cardiac action potential signal strength. In turn, the monitoring circuitry relies on the superior signal strength from over-the-heart electrode placement and the relatively long signal vector length that is afforded by lead placement over a wider physical expanse of the body. For instance, based upon the large inter-electrode distances, signal amplification assumes a signal strength of around 3mVp-p (peak-to-peak). The limb leads can be re-positioned as necessary to compensate for variability in patient anatomy due to tissue and bone density and heart position.
  • [0005]
    The 12-lead placement model, however, is poorly suited to long-term ambulatory monitoring both from the perspective of comfort and from the perspective of reliability, particularly in adult women, as well as on other patients with large-girthed, fatty, or well-developed upper chest regions. The latter concern simply relates to how standard monitoring electrodes fall off with modest movement, as well as how signal quality diminishes when electrodes are placed over breast tissue, as is unavoidable in some women. In-clinic ECG monitoring, for instance, assumes that the patient will remain relatively stationary and that the limb leads can be repositioned as necessary to provide sufficient electrode separation for recording a signal of reasonable amplitude and to compensate for variability in patient anatomy. In contrast, during ambulatory monitoring, a woman's body is in continual motion, even during sleep, albeit to a lesser degree. Electrodes are apt to detach and signal quality degrades or is absent altogether. Additionally, in women, changes in body position, for instance, lying down, stretching, or bending over, can displace the positioning of the breasts and the corresponding changes in tissue and bone density can deleteriously affect any electrodes placed thereon. Breasts also exhibit pendulous motion in proportion to overall size in response to motor activities, such as walking, running, biking, or exercise. Such recurrent motion can act to progressively detach items adhered to the soft tissues, like the breasts, and are likely to irritate the skin when motion leads to electrode patch tension. Moreover, breast tissue can increases the distance between sensing electrodes placed and the underlying heart. Breast tissue may also force placement of the electrode in a suboptimal location for recording the cardiac signal to remain comfortable, especially during long-term monitoring. The trade-off in women, especially active or large breasted, buxom women, can account for poor ECG signal quality.
  • [0006]
    Holter and other forms of ambulatory ECG monitors generally rely on electrodes placed close to the heart as suggested by the 12-lead placement model. For instance, U.S. Pat. No. 3,215,136 issued Nov. 2, 1965 to Holter et al. discloses an electrocardiographic recording and playback means. Episodes of ventricular tachycardia, asystolic intervals, and ectopic heart activities are sensed by electrodes disposed on the patient's skin in a suitable location, with sufficient inter-electrode separation. These signals are ordinarily recorded via a compact recorder worn by the patient that records an electrocardiogram (ECG) while he engages in activities of daily living, which subsequently allows a cardiac specialist to temporally correlate patient symptoms and cardiac abnormalities with activities. A cardiac rhythm disorder, as well as the absence of a rhythm disorder during symptoms, can sometimes be identified by having the patient record those symptoms during the use of the Holter monitor.
  • [0007]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,117,077 issued Sep. 12, 2000 to Del Mar et al. discloses a long-term ambulatory physiological recorder provided in a relatively planar and triangular-shaped recorder housing with three adhesive electrode pads. The recorder is fully self-contained and mounted immediately adjacent to the organ system that is to be monitored. Electrode pads are adhesively and conductively attached to the patient's left chest in a position generally over the heart with positive and negative terminals in a relative vertical position from the top to the bottom of the heart. Additional electrode leads can also be connected to an input port on the recorder and placed over adjacent areas of the upper chest.
  • [0008]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,456,872 issued Sep. 24, 2002 to Faisandier discloses a Holter-type apparatus for recording physiological signals indicative of cardiac activity. A base unit is formed of a flexible sheet carrying electrodes and a recording case that carries a battery and flexible printed circuit material. The base unit is disposable and can be changed with each new patient examination. The recorder case is fixed in position on the patient's thorax through a plurality of electrodes affixed either through adhesion or through depression using suction cups. Alternatively, the base unit can be carried by a thoracic belt or a hanging strap collar. The recording case includes electronic circuits for the collection and processing of ECG signals and a data transmission port is provided for by-directional exchange of data, control parameters, and information.
  • [0009]
    U.S. Pat. No. 7,257,438 issued Aug. 14, 2007 to Kinast discloses a patient-worn medical monitoring device that includes a lanyard and electronics package supported in the manner of a pendant. A lanyard includes integral electrodes or other sensors for making physiological measurements, which may be stored in a monitor for later readout or transmitted, before or after processing, to a remote location. The device can locally process and analyze a patient's signals and transmit only summary data or analyzed results to a remote device.
  • [0010]
    Finally, U.S. Patent application, Publication No. 2007/0255153, filed Nov. 1, 2007, to Kumar et al.; U.S. Patent application, Publication No. 2007/0225611, filed Feb. 6, 2007, to Kumar et al.; and U.S. Patent application, Publication No. 2007/0249946, filed Feb. 6, 2007, to Kumar et al. disclose discloses a non-invasive cardiac monitor and methods of using continuously recorded cardiac data. A heart monitor suitable for use in primary care includes a self-contained and sealed housing. The housing encloses an electronic memory connected to electrodes on the upper left chest to detect an ECG. A thin, flexible, and tapered rim or lip is provided around the edges of the electronics portion of the monitor to increase the surface area available for adhesion. Continuously recorded cardiac monitoring is provided through a sequence of simple detect-store-offload operations that are performed by a state machine. The housing is adapted to remain affixed to a patient for at least seven days. The heart monitor can include an activation or event notation button, the actuation of which increases the fidelity of the ECG information stored in the memory. The stored information can be retrieved and analyzed offline to identify both normal and abnormal ECG events. The monitor is specifically intended to provide monitoring continuously and without interruption over an extended period. Despite the improvement in size and case of use of such a system, neither this device or any of the above described systems defines a device capable of extremely simple and reliable application for any body habitus and by any individual regardless of training. The application of this monitor is especially problematic for large breasted, buxom women.
  • [0011]
    Finally, U.S. Patent application, Publication No. 2008/0284599, filed Apr. 28, 2006, to Zdeblick et al. and U.S. Patent application, Publication No. 2008/0306359, filed Dec. 11, 2008, to Zdeblick et al., disclose a pharma-informatics system for detecting the actual physical delivery of a pharmaceutical agent into a body. An integrated circuit is surrounded by pharmacologically active or inert materials to form a pill, which dissolve in the stomach through a combination of mechanical action and stomach fluids. As the pill dissolves, areas of the integrated circuit become exposed and power is supplied to the circuit, which begins to operate and transmit a signal that may indicate the type. A signal detection receiver can be positioned as an external device worn outside the body with one or more electrodes attached to the skin at different locations. The receiver can include the capability to provide both pharmaceutical ingestion reporting and psychological sensing in a form that can be transmitted to a remote location, such as a clinician or central monitoring agency.
  • [0012]
    Therefore, a need remains for an ambulatory ECG monitoring device and method of use adapted to long term monitoring that resists body movement while providing ease and discreteness of use and patient comfort regardless of patient knowledge and regardless of patient body habitus.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0013]
    A small and anatomically adaptive ambulatory electrocardiogram monitor includes a disposable ECG monitor that is applied in-clinic by a primary care provider, by the patient at home, or by other healthcare or lay individuals to record ECG data over an extended time period while the patient engages in activities of daily living. The shape of the ECG monitor is adapted to placement on women and large-chested individuals. The patient's upper thoracic region is evaluated, including determining what affect breast physiology will have on extended placement of the ECG monitor. The ECG monitor is placed on the patient's chest at midline in the upper portion of the intermammary cleft, covering the center third of the sternum and centered between the manubrium and the xiphoid process on the inferior border of the sternum. This unique location for ECG monitor application and the monitor's small size allow for a uniformity of applicability by minimally trained physicians or even lay individuals. Upon completion of monitoring, the patient delivers the disposable monitor to a reading service, along with encoded patient medical information and a diary recording the patient's subjective impressions contemporaneous to the monitoring, such as described in commonly-assigned U.S. patent application, entitled “Computer-Implemented System And Method For Evaluating Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring of Cardiac Rhythm Disorders,” Ser. No. ______, filed Oct. 8, 2010, pending, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference. A unique identifier assigned to the disposable monitor is also provided with the sealable envelope. The reading service interprets the ECG data and patient medical information and, where indications of a cardiac rhythm disorder or other health concern arise, an automated referral to a cardiac specialist, or other healthcare specialist, is made. The patient and his primary care provider are also informed.
  • [0014]
    One embodiment provides a method for performing ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring on an adult female is provided. An ambulatory ECG monitor, that includes a plurality of sensing electrodes coupled to self-powered sensing circuitry, is provisioned. A monitoring site is located on the surface of a patient's chest at the sternal midline adjacent to the fourth and fifth intercostal spaces between the breasts in the upper portion of the intermammary cleft. The electrodes are aligned and placed along the midline. Interference from breast tissue with placement of the ambulatory monitor at the monitoring site is evaluated. The ambulatory ECG monitor is removably adhered to the monitoring site clear of any breast tissue interference for the duration of monitoring. ECG data is sensed through the sensing electrodes at the monitoring site and the sensed ECG data is recorded into the sensing circuitry.
  • [0015]
    A further embodiment provides a method for performing ambulatory ECG monitoring at a midline sternum-centered location of an adult female. An ambulatory ECG monitor, that includes a plurality of sensing electrodes coupled to self-powered sensing circuitry and enclosed in a flexible housing, is provisioned. The flexibility of the housing is integral to the design to comfortably adhere to the sternal surface. The sternal surface is non-planar, even in men, and the surface of the skin over the sternum has a subtle three-dimensional topography. A proper understanding of this topography is critical to device design, as provided through the shape and flexibility of the housing, to ensure that ECGs can be recorded from the sternal location in women. A layer of skin adhesive is independently suspended from a bottom of the flexible housing. A monitoring site is located on the surface of a patient's chest at midline and adjacent to the fourth and fifth intercostal spaces between the breasts in the upper portion of the intermammary cleft, a location ideal for recording both atrial and ventricular cardiac signals. Interference from breast tissue with placement of the ambulatory monitor at the monitoring site is evaluated. The ambulatory ECG monitor, due to its specific tapered and elongated triangulated shape with rounded edges, is conformably placed in this location, even in the face of significant cleavage. The electrodes are aligned and placed along the midline. The skin adhesive is removably adhered to the monitoring site to avoid the breast tissue interference. The housing is axially and laterally bendable along the non-planar contours of the monitoring site. ECG data is sensed through the sensing electrodes at the monitoring site and the sensed ECG data is recorded into the sensing circuitry.
  • [0016]
    A still further embodiment provides a ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitor for an adult woman. Self-powered ECG sensing circuitry is provided. A plurality of sensing electrodes are coupled to the sensing circuitry. A housing encloses the sensing circuitry. A skin adhesive layer facing a contact surface and independently suspended from the housing with a set of standoffs having non-uniform heights is affixed to and defines an increasingly wide gap between the skin adhesive layer and a bottom surface of the housing.
  • [0017]
    A yet even further embodiment provides ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitor with conformal shape and independent suspension for an adult woman. A flexible ECG circuitry body includes self-powered ECG sensing circuitry including a processor, memory, and finite power supply, a circuit board exhibiting axial and lateral flexibility and upon which the sensing circuitry is included, and a housing enclosing the circuit board. A plurality of sensing electrodes are coupled to the processor, which processes and stores sensed ECG data into the memory. A skin adhesion assembly includes a layer of skin adhesive facing a contact surface, and a set of standoffs having non-uniform heights affixed to and defining an increasingly wide gap between the skin adhesive layer and a bottom surface of the housing of the circuitry body.
  • [0018]
    An ambulatory ECG monitor in accordance with foregoing embodiments can be built at low cost, size and weight with a bill of materials of about one fifth of the cost of a conventional ambulatory ECG monitor. Low cost enables clinics and hospitals to maintain amble inventory at all times, thereby facilitating the ebb and flow of patients in need of ambulatory ECG monitoring who will not need to wait on monitor availability or laboratory staffing for use and overread.
  • [0019]
    Additionally a single-use ECG monitor in the form of an adhesive patch in accordance with foregoing embodiments can be constructed with a weight of less than two ounces and inter-electrode spacing of less than 6 cm, which presents three advantages. First, costs for shipping the monitors to clinics, hospitals, pharmacies, and other locations are reduced, especially when large quantities must be mailed around the world. Second, small size and weight ambulatory ECG monitors can be easily carried in the pockets of health care providers and therefore applied upon demand without the need to either retrieve the monitors from a special location or to send the patient to a separate laboratory. Third, small, lightweight ambulatory ECG monitors reduce shear forces on the skin, which further ensures good signal acquisition and long-term ECG recording by facilitating adherence to the skin and comfort for the patient.
  • [0020]
    Still other embodiments will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description, wherein are described embodiments by way of illustrating the best mode contemplated. As will be realized, other and different embodiments are possible and the embodiments' several details are capable of modifications in various obvious respects, all without departing from their spirit and the scope. Accordingly, the drawings and detailed description are to be regarded as illustrative in nature and not as restrictive.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0021]
    FIG. 1 is a front anatomical diagram showing placement of an ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor on a female patient.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 2 is a cutaway anatomical diagram showing placement of the ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor of FIG. 1.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of an ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor in accordance with one embodiment.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 4 is a side view of the ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor of FIG. 3.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 5 is a bottom view of the ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor of FIG. 3.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 6 is an exploded side view of the ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor of FIG. 3.
  • [0027]
    FIG. 7 is a functional block diagram showing the groups of electronic component of the ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor of FIG. 3.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0028]
    Ambulatory ECG monitoring can be improved by locating the lead electrodes to body positions better adapted to minimize artifacts due to body movement. FIG. 1 is a front anatomical diagram 10 showing placement of an ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitor 11 on an adult female patient 12. Placement of the monitor 11 on an adult female patient 12 can require additional considerations to ensure safety, comfort, and long-term adhesion over the course of the monitoring period. The same considerations may apply on non-adult female patients with large-girthed, fatty, or well-developed breasts to whom the present discussion is primarily focused. For clarity, the term “female” will apply to individuals in this entire class of patients without regard to age or gender or other physical characteristics or traits not germane to the selection of the monitoring site and placement of a monitor 11 on the patient's chest.
  • [0029]
    For these kinds of patients, the monitor 11 is placed between the breasts 14 a, 14 b in the upper portion of the intermammary cleft 15. The breast size, shape, position, symmetry, overall body physique, posture, and other factors, such as the type of brassiere worn and its fit or the presence of artificial implants are carefully evaluated relative to the size of the monitor 11 for ensuring that the monitor 11 does not overlap with, sit or press upon, and otherwise significantly interfere with the natural movement and positioning of the breasts 14 a, 14 b. The placement of the monitor 11 depends upon the width, length, depth, and relative location of the intermammary cleft 15. A skin adhesion layer of the monitor 11 is firmly adhered within the upper intermammary cleft 15 with the assembly housing the ECG recording circuitry bending in conformity to the shape of the sternum and being independently suspended above the skin adhesion layer to resist torsional body movement, as further described infra.
  • [0030]
    The monitor 11 may be applied in-clinic by a primary care provider, or by the patient herself, for instance, under a physician's orders after first obtaining the monitor 11 from a pharmacy or other authorized dispensary, such as described in commonly-assigned U.S. patent application, entitled “Computer-Implemented System and Method for Mediating Patient-Initiated Physiological Monitoring under Consolidated Physician Supervision,” Ser. No. ______, filed Oct. 8, 2010, pending, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference. The monitor 11 is typically used over a 24-48 hour period, but the monitoring period could be extended from seven days up to 30 days through use of a series of monitors. During monitoring, the patient 12 engages in activities of daily living, while the monitor 11 unobtrusively monitors and collects ECG data. Recording commences upon physical application of the monitor 11 and ends when the monitor 11 is removed, typically by the patient 12. Along with the monitor 11, the patient 12 receives instructions for having the monitor 11 processed post-monitoring, which can be performed by a reading service, such as described in commonly-assigned U.S. patent application, entitled “Computer-Implemented System And Method For Evaluating Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring of Cardiac Rhythm Disorders,” cited supra. As appropriate, the patient 12 is referred to a medical specialist for follow up care, such as described in commonly-assigned U.S. patent application, entitled “Computer-Implemented System and Method for Facilitating Patient Advocacy through Online Healthcare Provisioning,” Ser. No. ______, filed Oct. 8, 2010, pending, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference.
  • [0031]
    Proper placement of the monitor 11 is critical to recording high quality ECG data. FIG. 2 is a cutaway anatomical diagram 20 showing placement of the ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor 11 of FIG. 1. The ambulatory monitor 11 is removably adhered onto the skin on the patient's chest 21 at midline, covering the center third of the chest 21 over the sternum 26, roughly between the third and fifth ribs 25 a, 25 b and approximately centered between the suprasternal notch 23 on the superior border of the manubrium and the xiphoid process 24 on the inferior border of the sternum 26.
  • [0032]
    The midline sternum-centered monitoring site enables high P-wave and QRS-wave acquisition and provides several additional benefits over other more typical cutaneous monitoring locations like those locations over the left upper chest or in the left inframammary crease. First, electrical current originating from the atria and ventricles flow directly underneath the sternum 26 providing excellent P waves and QRS waves necessary for cardiac rhythm diagnosis. Signal quality is further improved by minimizing the depth of tissue, and noise thus generated by moving tissue, between the monitor's electrodes and the heart. Tissue depth is fairly consistent at the sternal midline where variations in the patient's weight and physical topology least interfere with ECG signal pickup. The midline sternum-centered location enables the monitor's electrodes to record an ECG of optimal signal quality from a location immediately above the strongest signal-generating aspects of the heart. Further, the surface of the skin located over the midline sternum-centered location remains relatively stationary, despite body motion or movement of underlying breast tissue 29, as well as muscle or other body tissue. Movement of the skin surfaces of the upper thoracic region can be of significant moment, particularly on obese patients or women with large or heavy breasts. Adhering the monitor 11 to a body position of minimal movement helps ensure that the monitor 11 remains adhered to the patient 12 throughout the entire monitoring period, as further described infra.
  • [0033]
    The ambulatory ECG monitor is constructed to provide low cost widespread use, with a particular emphasis in improving patient care at the primary care medical practice level, especially for women. FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view 40 of an ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor 41 in accordance with one embodiment. Physically, when viewed from above, the monitor 41 has an elongated triangular shape with rounded vertices, such as described in commonly-assigned U.S. Design Patent application, entitled “Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitor,” Ser. No. ______, filed Oct. 8, 2010, pending; the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference, with dimension's of approximately 3.8 cm (1.5 in) wide and 7.6 cm (3.0 in) long with a pair of electrodes 48 spaced less than 6 cm apart. The monitor 41 weighs about 14.2 g (0.5 oz) when assembled with electrodes 48 and a waterproof housing for the ECG recording circuitry, although a weight of up to 28 g (1.0 oz) would be acceptable. In one embodiment, the pair of electrodes 48 have an approximately 5.33 cm spacing, although other electrode spacing, generally less than 6 cm, and combinations of three or more electrodes could also be used. When adhered onto a patient's sternum, the narrowest part of the monitor 41 faces downwards towards the patient's feet. On a female patient, the narrow part fits partway into the upper intermammary cleft 15. The small and narrow size, as well as the taper, allow the monitor 41 to fit comfortably between the breasts.
  • [0034]
    The monitor 41 is constructed in a modular fashion and includes a flexible housing and standoff-separated skin adhesion assembly. The housing includes a cover 42, printed circuit board (PCB) 43, and cover base 44, and the skin adhesion assembly includes a set of standoffs 45 a, 45 b, a layer of skin adhesive 46, and a set of electrodes 48. The housing protects the electronic components for sensing and recording ECG data, as further described below with reference to FIG. 7, which are affixed to the PCB 43. The cover 42 conformably fits against the edges of the cover base 44. The cover 42 and cover base 44 form a water resistant enclosure that fully enclose the PCB 43. In a further embodiment, the housing 61 is vented, which allows the cover 42 to slightly “give” when pressed. A button 47 is formed on the top surface of the cover 42 that engages a switch on the PCB 43, which the patient can press during monitoring to mark an event occurrence, such as onset of dyspnea. An indicator light 49, such as a light emitting diode, visually signals the patient 12 that the monitor 11 is working. A steady light signifies normal operation, while a blinking light indicates a problem.
  • [0035]
    The outer materials are selected for extended term use. The cover 42 and cover base 44 are both constructed from flexible bio-safe materials, such as plastic, silicon, or foam, and can be vacuum-formed, extruded, or die cut. The adhesive layer 46 is constructed using an adhesive fabric or cloth, which can be woven, as well as latex, foam, and other materials that sufficiently resist the twisting and torquing of the skin's surface. In a further embodiment, darts are cut into the periphery of the adhesive layer 46 to more closely conform the adhesive layer 46 to an uneven or contoured skin surface. Other materials and methods of manufacture are possible.
  • [0036]
    The housing and skin adhesion assembly facilitate long term monitoring. Continuous and uninterrupted wear of the monitor 41 over the entire course of monitoring may be impracticable for every patient. Skin sensitivities, allergies, irritation, and similar factors have an effect on a patient's ability to tolerate the wearing of the monitor 41 for an extended period. Similarly, oil on the skin's surface, perspiration, and overall physical hygiene can affect monitor adhesion. As a result, the housing can be separated from the skin adhesion assembly to allow the patient 12 to reposition or replace the skin adhesion assembly. The set of electrodes 48 fit within set of standoffs 45 a, 45 b and a set of holes or “gel wells,” in the skin adhesive layer 46. In turn, the skin adhesive layer 46 is affixed to the cover base 44 through a combination of a pair of snap-on or similar form of removable connectors facing downwardly from the PCB 44 and adhesive applied to the upward facing surfaces of the standoffs 45 a, 45 b.
  • [0037]
    To facilitate overall long term monitoring through a series of short term monitoring periods, the housing can be separated from the skin adhesion layer and either a new skin adhesion layer can be applied, or the existing skin adhesion layer can be repositioned. Either the same housing or a new housing can be used during successive periods of monitoring. When the same housing is reused, the recording circuitry compensates for disconnection and reconnection of the sensing electrodes by stopping recording of ECG data during the gap in monitoring, as sensed by disconnection from the set of electrodes 48. The recording circuitry thereafter resumes recording upon being reconnected to a set of electrodes 48. If necessary, the patient 12 may choose to take a break and allow her skin to “breathe” between applications of the skin adhesion layer.
  • [0038]
    In one embodiment, the monitoring circuit for ECG recording used by the monitor 10 operates under microprogrammed control on a single channel of analog input signals. The signals originate as cardiac action potentials sensed from the skin's surface by a single sensing electrode pair, although multiple sensing electrode pairs could be employed with modifications to the monitoring circuit to factor in multiple input signal channels. The analog input signals are converted into digitized form and encoded for efficient compressed data storage in non-volatile memory. The monitoring circuit injects a reference feedback signal into both the analog input signal path and the patient's body. Thus, noise generated by the electronics is integrated into the input signals, rather than being filtered or rejected. The monitoring circuit is thereby able to operate unshielded, with no filtering, and through minimal power filtering components, which thereby eliminates the need for either the cover 42 or cover base 44 to include physical noise shielding is eliminated through unique printed circuit board design and layout, as well as careful selection of electronic components that naturally dampen received noise. As well, the digitization and compression of the original low noise analog signal requires less memory to store long term ECG data.
  • [0039]
    Referring back to FIG. 2, the body's surface over the sternum 26 is inherently uneven, even in children, due to the underlying bone structure of the body of the sternum 26 and ribs 28, as well as the muscle, fat, skin, and various tissue that cover the sternum 26 and adjacent regions. The front surface of the body of the sternum 26 is slightly convex in the east-west directions and the sternum's front surface angles in towards the thoracic cavity from around the fourth intercostal space 27 down to the xiphoid process 24 in the north-south directions. In the elderly, particularly in older males, the east-west convexity can become increasingly pronounced with age, resulting in a so-called “pigeon-chested” appearance.
  • [0040]
    Conforming fit and secure adhesion to this inherently uneven surface are provided through two interconnected structures: a flexible housing and standoff-separated skin adhesion assembly. FIGS. 4 and 5 are respectively side and bottom views 60, 65 of the ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor 41 of FIG. 3. The monitor 41 must adhere to the sternum 26 during the monitoring period. The cover 42 and cover base 44 provide a housing 61 for the monitor's electronic components. In one embodiment, the PCB 43 is about 0.02″ thick, which allows the PCB 43 to conform to the east-west convexity of the sternum 26 and to the natural north-sound inward curve towards the xiphoid process 24.
  • [0041]
    Objects adhered to the sternum 26 need to be able to both conform statically to the shape of the chest 21 and to accommodate dynamic torsional movement, as occurs during stretching, sleeping, and other body movement. The PCB 43 can bend axially and laterally, but the PCB's ability to stretch is limited by physical constraints on electronics packaging. To provide stretch, the monitor 41 utilizes a form of independent suspension that enables the skin adhesive layer 46 to stretch, as well as flex, independently of the housing 61. The monitor 41 is adhered to the patient's skin through a layer of skin adhesive 46 that is affixed to the bottom surface of the cover base 44 around the set of standoffs 45 a, 45 b. The skin adhesive layer 46 is slightly larger than the bottom of the cover base 44 by about 0.125 in, although other shapes, sizes, and dimensions could be used, including shapes that differ significantly from the top profile of the cover base 44. The set of electrodes 48 are removably affixed to a pair of snap-on connectors facing downwardly from the PCB 44 and are electronically connected to the PCB's circuitry. Other types of connectors that allow the set of electrodes 48 to be removably affixed could also be used. The set of electrodes 48 fit within openings formed in the set of standoffs 45 a, 45 b and a set of holes 66 a, 66 b, or “gel wells,” in the skin adhesive layer 46. The electrodes 48 are coated with a conductive gel that also assists with adhering the monitor 41 to the patient's chest 21. The independent suspension is provided through the set of two or more standoffs 46 a, 46 b that create a gap 62 of about 2.5 mm (0.1 in) to about 6.3 mm (0.25 in) between the bottom surface of the cover base 44 and the top surface of the skin adhesive layer 46. The heights of each of the standoffs 45 a, 45 b define an increasingly wide gap between the bottom of the housing 61 and the adhesive layer 46, which permits the monitor 41 to stay securely attached to the patient 12 during torsional movement, such as occurs when stretching or rolling over in bed. The standoffs 45 a, 45 b have non-uniform heights to compensate for the unevenness of the female anatomy, as further described below with reference to FIG. 6. The gap 62 allows the housing 61 to “float” above the skin contact surface, while the skin adhesive layer 46 can flex and stretch along with the skin's surface on the patient's sternum chest 21. The single-point contact of each of the standoffs 45 a, 45 b thus allows the monitor 41 to accommodate the patient's twisting and turning movements and remain affixed without danger of peeling off.
  • [0042]
    Breast tissue 29 (shown in FIG. 2) can increases the distance between sensing electrodes 48 placed and the underlying heart. FIG. 6 is an exploded side view 68 of the ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor 41 of FIG. 3. The degree of inward curvature of the sternum's front surface towards the thoracic cavity is more pronounced in women than in men. The PCB 43 permits north-south flex of housing 61, but the amount of inward flex may be insufficient to securely adhere the monitor 41 to an adult female's chest 21. To help compensate for the inward angle of the body of the sternum past the fourth intercostal space 27, especially in women, the standoffs 45 b located on the narrowest part of the monitor 41 have slightly greater heights. In one embodiment, the shorter standoffs 45 a have a height of about 2.5 mm (0.1 in) and the taller standoffs 45 b have a height of about 6.3 mm (0.25 in).
  • [0043]
    The electronics package of each monitor facilitates low-cost extended wear use. FIG. 7 is a functional block diagram 70 showing the groups of electronic components 71 of the ambulatory electrocardiographic monitor 41 of FIG. 3. The monitor 41 is self-contained and operates under microprogrammed control, such as described in commonly-assigned U.S. patent application, entitled “Microcontrolled Electrocardiographic Monitoring Circuit with Feedback Control,” Ser. No. ______filed ______, pending, and U.S. patent application, entitled “Microcontrolled Electrocardiographic Monitoring Circuit with Differential Voltage Encoding,” Ser. No. ______, filed Oct. 8, 2010, pending, the disclosures of which are incorporated by reference. Digitally-controlled ECG monitoring circuits provide the ability to handle the wide dynamic range occasioned by the short signal vector and low signal strength afforded by a midline sternum-centered ambulatory monitoring location.
  • [0044]
    In a functional sense, the electronic components 71 can be grouped into circuitry for a processor 72, memory 73, power supply or battery 74, data interface 75, and radio frequency identification (RFID) tag 77. The processor 72 is a discrete ECG recording circuit that operates under microprogrammed control on a single channel of analog input signals. To sense ECG data, the processor 72 interfaces to a set of external electrodes 76 through amplifiers and filters (not shown). Signals originate as action potentials sensed on the skin's surface by at least one of the electrodes 76 and a feedback signal is output through the other electrode 76. The sensed ECG data is processed into a stream of discrete digital values and encoded in the persistent non-volatile memory 73, which can be implemented as electrically-erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) or “flash” memory. The data interface 75 enables the processor 71 to download recorded ECG data from the memory 73 and receive programming instructions. The processor 71, memory 72, and data interface 74 can be a single discrete integrated circuit or a set of individual components interconnected through data channels. The battery 74 is a conventional power cell or capacitor that provides power to the recording circuitry sufficient to enable extended operation.
  • [0045]
    In a further embodiment, either or both of the memory 73 and the battery 74 can be separately provided on the skin adhesion layer 46 to facilitate long term monitoring through use of a series of short term monitoring periods. Space for storing recorded ECG data and power for operating the recording circuitry are continually depleted. Providing the memory 73 and the battery 74 on the skin adhesion layer 46 enables those resources to be replenished, while enabling use of the same physical recording circuitry throughout the entire monitoring period.
  • [0046]
    The RFID tag 77 contains a unique identifier for the monitor that is either included on the PCB 43 with the other electronic components, or is embedded into the housing 61, such as within a foam-constructed cover 42. The RFID tag 77 is used during monitoring to pair a monitor 41 to a tracking number that can be used by the patient 12, referral center, and physician or staff to track the physical whereabouts of the monitor 41 and to determine the post-monitoring status of diagnosis and follow up care. The RFID tag 77 is self-powered or can be powered through the battery 74. The RFID tag 77 is accessed using standard RFID transmitter and receiver units. Other components in addition to or in lieu of the electronic components 71 are possible, such as used to record additional types of patient physiometry or to provide further onboard capabilities.
  • [0047]
    In a further embodiment, the electronic components 71 also include an actimetry sensor 78 to measure gross motor activity undertaken by the patient, such as through walking, running, changing posture or sleep position, and other body motions. For instance, the actimetry sensor 78 may record movement, which indicates that the patient was climbing stairs at the same time that an increase in heart rate was recorded by the monitor 11. Particularly, when actigraphy is combined with the patient's subjective impressions as contemporaneously recorded in his diary, the physician can confirm or better understand hemodynamic changes and other aspects of cardiac physiology as reflected in the recorded ECG data.
  • [0048]
    The monitor 41 may be fully or partially disposable. For instance, the electronic components 71 on the PCB 43 may be refurbished and recycled for multiple uses, while the housing 61 and skin adhesive 46 would be disposed after a single use. During refurbishment, the battery 74 would be replaced and the memory 73 wiped clean. Alternatively, the entire monitor 41 may be used only once, followed by appropriate disposal.
  • [0049]
    While the invention has been particularly shown and described as referenced to the embodiments thereof, those skilled in the art will understand that the foregoing and other changes in form and detail may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope.

Claims (26)

  1. 1. A method for performing ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring on an adult female, comprising:
    provisioning an ambulatory ECG monitor comprising a plurality of sensing electrodes coupled to self-powered sensing circuitry;
    locating a monitoring site on the surface of a patient's chest at midline and above the body of the sternum adjacent to the fourth and fifth intercostal spaces between the breasts in the upper portion of the intermammary cleft;
    aligning and placing the electrodes along the midline;
    evaluating interference from breast tissue with placement of the ambulatory monitor at the monitoring site;
    removably adhering the ambulatory ECG monitor to the monitoring site clear of any breast tissue interference for the duration of monitoring; and
    sensing ECG data through the sensing electrodes at the monitoring site and recording the sensed ECG data into the sensing circuitry.
  2. 2. A method according to claim 1, further comprising:
    selecting a circuit board exhibiting axial and lateral flexibility;
    provisioning the sensing circuitry on the selected circuit board and enclosing the sensing circuitry within a housing; and
    conformably flexing the circuit board within the housing along the contours of the chest's surface.
  3. 3. A method according to claim 1, further comprising:
    enclosing the sensing circuitry within a housing;
    selecting a layer of skin adhesive and a set of standoffs comprised of non-uniform heights with the standoffs comprised of greater height located closer to the xiphoid process of the patient than the standoffs comprised of lesser height;
    attaching the skin adhesive layer to a bottom surface of the housing separated by the set of standoffs; and
    conformably adhering the skin adhesive layer to the chest's surface with the housing separated from the chest's surface by a gap formed by the heights of the set of standoffs.
  4. 4. A method according to claim 3, further comprising one of defining the skin adhesive layer in a shape comparable to the shape of the bottom of the housing; and
    defining the skin adhesive layer in a shape differing from the shape of the bottom of the housing.
  5. 5. A method according to claim 1, further comprising:
    fashioning a housing comprised of an elongated triangular shape with rounded vertices; and
    enclosing the sensing circuitry within a housing, wherein the housing is removably adhered to the monitoring site with the narrowest part of the triangular shape facing towards the patient's feet.
  6. 6. A method for performing ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring at a midline sternum-centered location of an adult female, comprising:
    provisioning an ambulatory ECG monitor comprising a plurality of sensing electrodes coupled to self-powered sensing circuitry and enclosed in a flexible housing;
    independently suspending a layer of skin adhesive from a bottom of the flexible housing;
    locating a monitoring site on the surface of a patient's chest at midline and above the body of the sternum adjacent to the fourth and fifth intercostal spaces between the breasts in the upper portion of the intermammary cleft;
    evaluating interference from breast tissue with placement of the ambulatory monitor at the monitoring site;
    conformably placing the ambulatory ECG monitor, comprising:
    aligning and placing the electrodes along the midline;
    removably adhering the skin adhesive to the monitoring site for the duration of monitoring;
    positioning the housing to avoid the breast tissue interference; and
    bending the housing axially and laterally along the contours of the monitoring site; and
    sensing ECG data through the sensing electrodes at the monitoring site and recording the sensed ECG data into the sensing circuitry.
  7. 7. A method according to claim 6, further comprising:
    identifying the breast tissue interference by evaluating each of width, length, depth, and relative location of the adult female patient's intermammary cleft based on one or more of breast size, shape, position, symmetry, overall body physique, posture, type and fit of brassiere worn, and presence of artificial breast implants relative to the size of the flexible housing.
  8. 8. A method according to claim 6, further comprising:
    providing a set of standoffs between the skin adhesive layer and the bottom surface of the housing, the standoffs comprised of non-uniform heights with the standoffs comprised of greater height affixed at opposite ends of the bottom surface of the housing than the standoffs comprised of lesser height; and
    permitting the skin adhesive layer to flex and stretch in conformity with the patient's skin at the monitoring site.
  9. 9. A method according to claim 6, further comprising one of:
    defining the skin adhesive layer in a shape comparable to the shape of the bottom of the housing; and
    defining the skin adhesive layer in a shape differing from the shape of the bottom of the housing.
  10. 10. An ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitor for an adult woman, comprising:
    self-powered ECG sensing circuitry;
    a plurality of sensing electrodes coupled to the sensing circuitry;
    a housing enclosing the sensing circuitry; and
    a skin adhesive layer facing a contact surface and independently suspended from the housing with a set of standoffs having non-uniform heights affixed to and defining an increasingly wide gap between the skin adhesive layer and a bottom surface of the housing.
  11. 11. A monitor according to claim 10, further comprising:
    a circuit board exhibiting axial and lateral flexibility and upon which the sensing circuitry is comprised.
  12. 12. A monitor according to claim 10, wherein one or more cutouts are defined around the periphery of the skin adhesive.
  13. 13. A monitor according to claim 10, wherein the skin adhesive layer comprises adhesive fabric, cloth, foam, and latex.
  14. 14. A monitor according to claim 10, wherein the skin adhesive layer is defined in a shape comparable to one of the shape of the bottom of the housing and a shape differing from the shape of the bottom of the housing.
  15. 15. A monitor according to claim 10, wherein the sensing circuitry compensates for gaps in recording of ECG data resulting from disconnection and reconnection of the sensing electrodes.
  16. 16. A monitor according to claim 10, wherein the housing is unshielded.
  17. 17. An ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitor with conformal shape and independent suspension for an adult woman, comprising:
    a flexible ECG circuitry body, comprising:
    self-powered ECG sensing circuitry comprising a processor, memory, and finite power supply;
    a circuit board exhibiting axial and lateral flexibility and upon which the sensing circuitry is comprised; and
    a housing enclosing the circuit board;
    a plurality of sensing electrodes coupled to the processor, which processes and stores sensed ECG data into the memory; and
    a skin adhesion assembly, comprising:
    a layer of skin adhesive facing a contact surface; and
    a set of standoffs having non-uniform heights affixed to and defining an increasingly wide gap between the skin adhesive layer and a bottom surface of the housing of the circuitry body.
  18. 18. A monitor according to claim 17, further comprising:
    a hole defined through a center of each of the standoffs, wherein the sensing electrodes are positioned in each of the holes facing the contact surface.
  19. 19. A monitor according to claim 17, wherein one or more cutouts are defined around the periphery of the skin adhesive.
  20. 20. A monitor according to claim 17, further comprising:
    a radio frequency identification tag comprised with the flexible ECG circuitry body and providing a unique identifier.
  21. 21. A monitor according to claim 17, further comprising:
    an actimetry sensor coupled with the sensing circuitry and storing gross motor activity data into the memory.
  22. 22. A monitor according to claim 17, wherein at least one of the memory and the finite power supply are comprised on the skin adhesive layer instead of the circuitry body.
  23. 23. A monitor according to claim 17, the skin adhesive layer comprises adhesive fabric, cloth, foam, and latex.
  24. 24. A monitor according to claim 17, wherein the skin adhesive layer is defined in a shape comparable to one of the shape of the bottom of the housing and a shape differing from the shape of the bottom of the housing.
  25. 25. A monitor according to claim 17, wherein the plurality of electrodes are spaced less than 6 cm apart.
  26. 26. A monitor according to claim 17, wherein the monitor weighs not more than 28 g (1.0 oz).
US12901428 2010-10-08 2010-10-08 Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitor For Providing Ease Of Use In Women And Method Of Use Abandoned US20120089000A1 (en)

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