US20110239487A1 - Boot covers - Google Patents

Boot covers Download PDF

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Publication number
US20110239487A1
US20110239487A1 US13077744 US201113077744A US2011239487A1 US 20110239487 A1 US20110239487 A1 US 20110239487A1 US 13077744 US13077744 US 13077744 US 201113077744 A US201113077744 A US 201113077744A US 2011239487 A1 US2011239487 A1 US 2011239487A1
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US
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
boot
cover
textile sheath
elastic cuff
throat portion
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13077744
Inventor
Maureen Renkes
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ACCESSORIES INTERNATIONAL LLC
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ACCESSORIES INTERNATIONAL LLC
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B23/00Uppers; Boot legs; Stiffeners; Other single parts of footwear
    • A43B23/24Ornamental buckles; Other ornaments for shoes without fastening function
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B23/00Uppers; Boot legs; Stiffeners; Other single parts of footwear
    • A43B23/02Uppers; Boot legs
    • A43B23/0245Uppers; Boot legs characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B23/0295Pieced uppers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/02Top-boots; Leg-boots; Shoes with batswing tabs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/16Overshoes
    • A43B3/20Heel-less overshoes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/24Collapsible or convertible footwear
    • A43B3/248Collapsible or foldable footwear, e.g. for travelling
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C1/00Shoe lacing fastenings
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C11/00Other fastenings specially adapted for shoes
    • A43C11/12Slide or glide fastenings
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D17/00Gaiters; Spats

Abstract

A boot cover for a boot having an elongated tubular throat portion is provided which includes a textile sheath having an upper edge and a lower edge, the upper edge having a length sized to at least partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at an upper attachment location offset from a mouth of the boot, and the lower edge having a length sized to at least partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at a lower attachment location in the lower region of the boot. The boot cover also includes an attachment system coupled to the textile sheath to removably attach the boot cover to the throat portion of the boot in a secure manner. The textile sheath is configured to conceal a substantial portion of the throat portion of the boot when the boot cover is attached thereto. Methods of attaching boot covers to a boot are also provided.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/320,192 filed Apr. 1, 2010, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND
  • 1. Technical Field
  • The present disclosure is related to accessories for footwear, and more particularly, to decorative and/or protective covers for boots having an elongated tubular throat portion.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Various footwear coverings are known which may protect footwear from the elements, such as, for example, rubber shoe coverings which include a sole and an upper integrally molded together. Such rubber shoe coverings may be stretched over a pair of casual or dress shoes, for example, to protect the shoes from rain and snow, for example. Theses rubber shoe coverings, however, can be cumbersome to attach to shoes and are often unsightly. Other types of shoe coverings include stretchable booties that may be placed over the soles of footwear to protect against soiling or contamination of a floor surface. These known foot coverings are limited to use on the soles and lower surrounding areas of footwear and are often unsightly. These footwear coverings are thus limited in the ability to provide coverage of footwear surfaces remote from the sole of footwear for protective and/or decorative purposes.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY
  • The boot covers described herein are particularly well suited for removably attaching to a boot having an elongated tubular throat portion, such as, for example, shearling or sheepskin style boots. Advantageously, the boot covers may be attached to boots of varying sizes to augment or enhance the appearance the boots and/or provide protection of the underlying boot structure from the elements, for example.
  • According to one embodiment, a boot cover for a boot having an elongated tubular throat portion may summarized as including a textile sheath having an upper edge and a lower edge, the upper edge having a length sized to at least partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at an upper attachment location offset from the mouth of the boot in a direction toward the lower region of the boot, and the lower edge having a length sized to at least partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at a lower attachment location in the lower region of the boot, and an attachment system coupled to the textile sheath to removably attach the boot cover to the throat portion of the boot, the textile sheath configured to conceal a substantial portion (i.e., greater than fifty percent) of the throat portion of the boot when the boot cover is attached thereto.
  • In some embodiments, the attachment system may include a first elastic cuff having a perimeter sized to completely encircle the throat portion of the boot in a stretched configuration at the lower attachment location and a second elastic cuff having a perimeter sized to completely encircle the throat portion of the boot in a stretched configuration at the upper attachment location, and the textile sheath may be tubular and extend between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff. Furthermore, the textile sheath may have a length exceeding the distance between the lower attachment location and upper attachment location such that the textile sheath loosely drapes between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff when the boot cover is attached to the boot. The textile sheath may also be generally cylindrical and a circumference of the textile sheath may be greater than a perimeter of the throat portion of the boot at any location along a height thereof. In some embodiments, the textile sheath may taper from one end to an opposing end.
  • In some embodiments, the upper edge may have a length sized to partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at the upper attachment location and the lower edge may have a length sized to partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at the lower attachment location, and the attachment system may be coupled to opposing side edges of the textile sheath. The attachment system may include one or more laces attached via eyelets to the opposing edges of the textile sheath which are configured to draw the opposing edges of the textile sheath together and bridge a gap therebetween. In other embodiments, the attachment system may include a zipper mechanism attached to the opposing edges of the textile sheath which is configured to draw at least a portion of the opposing edges of the textile sheath together and bridge a gap therebetween.
  • According to another embodiment, a method of attaching a boot cover to a boot having an elongated tubular throat portion may be summarized as including positioning a first elastic cuff of the boot cover at a lower attachment location in the lower region of the boot, the first elastic cuff having a perimeter sized to completely encircle the throat portion of the boot at the lower attachment location in a stretched configuration; and positioning a second elastic cuff at an upper attachment location offset from the mouth of the boot in a direction toward the lower region of the boot such that a tubular textile sheath extending between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff conceals a substantial portion (i.e., greater than fifty percent) of the throat portion of the boot, the second elastic cuff having a perimeter sized to completely encircle the throat portion of the boot at the upper attachment location in a stretched configuration. Positioning the first elastic cuff and positioning the second elastic cuff may include spacing the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff apart at a distance less than a length of the tubular textile sheath such that the tubular textile sheath drapes between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff. The method may further include repositioning one of the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff to reduce the distance therebetween and increase the degree to which the tubular textile sheath drapes between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff, or repositioning one of the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff to increase the distance therebetween and reduce the degree to which the tubular textile sheath drapes between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff. The method may further include repositioning the second elastic cuff to within a mouth of the boot or folding a portion of the throat of the boot over the second elastic cuff at the upper attachment location such that the second elastic cuff is concealed from view.
  • According to another embodiment, a method of attaching a boot cover to a boot having an elongated tubular throat portion may be summarized as including positioning a textile sheath of the boot cover so that a lower edge of the textile sheath is at a lower attachment location in the lower region of the boot and an upper edge of the textile sheath is at an upper attachment location offset from a mouth of the boot in a direction toward a lower region of the boot, the lower edge having a length sized to partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at the lower attachment location, and the upper edge having a length sized to partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at the upper attachment location; and attaching opposing sides of the textile sheath of the boot cover together so that the boot cover encircles and conceals a substantial portion (i.e., greater than fifty percent) of the throat portion of the boot. Attaching opposing sides of the textile sheath of the boot cover together may include drawing one or more laces attached to the opposing sides of the textile sheath via eyelets tighter. In other embodiments, attaching opposing sides of the textile sheath of the boot cover together may include drawing at least a portion of each of the opposing sides together with a zipper mechanism.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a boot cover according to one embodiment, shown during use on a boot having a relatively tall throat portion.
  • FIG. 2 is a rear perspective view of the boot cover of FIG. 1, shown during use on the boot of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the boot cover of FIG. 1, shown removed from and beside the boot of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of the boot cover of FIG. 1, shown during use on a boot having a relatively short throat portion.
  • FIG. 5 is a rear perspective view of the boot cover of FIG. 1, shown during use on the boot of FIG. 4.
  • FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of the boot cover of FIG. 1, shown during use on the boot of FIG. 4 with an end of the boot cover positioned within a mouth of the boot.
  • FIG. 7 is a side elevational view a boot cover according to another embodiment, shown during use on the boot of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 8 is a rear perspective view of the boot cover of FIG. 7, shown during use on the boot of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 9 is a side elevational view of a boot cover according to another embodiment, shown during use on the boot of FIG. 4.
  • FIG. 10 is a rear perspective view of the boot cover of FIG. 9, shown during use on the boot of FIG. 4.
  • FIG. 11 is a side elevational view of a boot cover according to yet another embodiment, shown during use on the boot of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 12 is a rear perspective view of the boot cover of FIG. 11, shown during use on the boot of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 13 a side elevational view of a boot cover according to yet another embodiment, shown during use on the boot of FIG. 1.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • In the following description, certain specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of various disclosed embodiments. However, one skilled in the relevant art will recognize that embodiments may be practiced without one or more of these specific details. In other instances, well-known structures and fabrication techniques associated with textiles and footwear may not be shown or described in detail to avoid unnecessarily obscuring descriptions of the embodiments.
  • Unless the context requires otherwise, throughout the specification and claims which follow, the word “comprise” and variations thereof, such as, “comprises” and “comprising” are to be construed in an open, inclusive sense, that is as “including, but not limited to.”
  • Reference throughout this specification to “one embodiment” or “an embodiment” means that a particular feature, structure or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least one embodiment. Thus, the appearances of the phrases “in one embodiment” or “in an embodiment” in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment. Furthermore, the particular features, structures, or characteristics may be combined in any suitable manner in one or more embodiments.
  • As used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a,” “an,” and “the” include plural referents unless the content clearly dictates otherwise. It should also be noted that the term “or” is generally employed in its sense including “and/or” unless the content clearly dictates otherwise.
  • FIGS. 1 through 6 illustrate one embodiment of a boot cover 100 which can be removably attached to a boot 102, 102′. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the boot cover 100 can be slipped over or positioned around a boot 102 or removed from the boot 102, as shown in FIG. 3. The boot cover 100 extends longitudinally between a first end 104 and an opposing second end 106. Each of the first and second ends 104, 106 in the illustrated embodiment terminates at an elastic cuff 108. Each elastic cuff 108 in the illustrated embodiment is circular or oblong in shape to extend around an elongated tubular throat 110 of the boot 102. A tubular sheath 122 of textile or fabric extends between the elastic cuffs 108 of the boot cover 100.
  • More particularly, when the cover 100 is attached to the boot 102, the tubular sheath 122 extends between a lower region 112 of the throat 110 of the boot 102 and an upper region 118 of the throat 110 of the boot 102. The lower region 112 of the throat 110 of the boot 102 is near an upper ankle of a wearer above the heel portion 114 and instep portion of the boot 102. The upper region 118 of the throat 110 is near the mouth 120 of the boot 102. Accordingly, the cover 100 extends from an area near the upper ankle of a wearer to a position near the upper end of the boot 102 offset from the mouth 120 to conceal a substantial portion (i.e., greater than fifty percent) of the throat 110 of the boot 102. In some embodiments, the sheath 122 of boot cover 100 may conceal between about seventy percent and ninety-five percent of the throat portion 110 of the boot 102 when the boot cover 100 is attached thereto.
  • As best illustrated in FIG. 3, when the boot cover 100 is removed from the boot 102, the natural perimeter of each of the cuffs 108 is smaller than the natural perimeter of the throat 110 of the boot 102 at a corresponding upper and lower attachment position. As such, when the boot cover 100 is slipped over or positioned around the throat 110 of the boot 102, as shown in FIG. 1, the cuffs 108 are stretched beyond their natural state. This stretching, and the residual forces created thereby, compress the throat 110 of the boot 102 within the cuff 108 and retain each of the cuffs 108 in the position desired by the user.
  • The sheath 122 of the boot cover 100, on the other hand, can be made with a perimeter considerably larger than the perimeter of the throat 110 of the boot 102. As a result, the textile or fabric of the sheath 122 can drape loosely over the portion of the throat 110 of the boot 102 covered by the boot cover 100. Depending on the textile or fabric used for the sheath 122 and the size of the perimeter of the sheath 122, the designer can vary the drape to obtain a preferred appearance. Similarly, by spacing the cuffs 108 closer together during use, the user can create additional loose textile or fabric in the sheath 122 during use; or by spacing the cuffs 108 further apart during use, the user can pull the textile or fabric of the sheath 122 taut during use.
  • The sheath 122 of the boot cover 100 can be made from a single piece of fabric sewn together along a single seam, and the seam can run either longitudinally or along any other path. Likewise, the sheath 122 can be assembled from several pieces of fabric, either like fabric or dissimilar fabric, along several seams.
  • FIGS. 1 through 6 illustrate boots 102, 102′ in the form of a shearling or sheepskin style boots having a relatively tall throat (FIGS. 1 through 3) or a relatively short throat (FIGS. 4 through 6). However, other styles of boots having an elongated tubular throat portion 110 could also be used in combination with embodiments of the present invention.
  • In particular embodiments, the boot cover 100 can range from five inches to twelve inches in length, although it could be longer or shorter if desired. The perimeter of the boot cover 100 can range from nine inches to fourteen inches in length; but again, this could be increased or decreased as desired. The sheath 122 can be generally cylindrical in shape or can be tapered anywhere up to one inch or more, as compared to the opposing end. In tapered versions, users may prefer to wear the boot cover 100 with the larger perimeter at the top of the boot 102, 102′.
  • The boot cover 100 can be long enough to cover the throat 110 of the boot 102, 102′ from a location in the upper region 118 of the boot 102 to a location in a lower region 112 of the boot 102 near the upper ankle of the wearer. In some embodiments, the sheath 122 can be long enough to be tucked into the mouth 120 of the boot 102, 102′, as illustrated in FIG. 6. Embodiments allow for one inch, two inches or more to be tucked into the mouth 120 of the boot 102, 102′ during use. At the same time, the boot cover 100 can be made shorter or can be compressed by moving one or both of the cuffs 108, causing the draping sheath 122 to drape even further. The same cover 100 can be used on boots 102, 102′ having different length throats 110 with varying degrees of draping.
  • The boot cover 100 can be made from just about any textile or fabric, including woven and nonwoven fabrics, with preferred embodiments made from cotton, polyester, rayon, spandex, wool, acetate, linen, modal, Lycra, silk, acrylic, nylon, or blends of one or more of these and other materials. The textile or fabric can be dyed one or more colors, can have a pattern and/or can be decorated with sequins, beads, leather, lace, ribbon, metallic flecks, metallic stitching, or any other decorative elements. Similarly, the boot cover 100 can be adorned with buckles, zippers, buttons, fasteners, beads, or the like, whether operative or purely for decorative purposes.
  • An individual of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate, after reviewing this disclosure, that any number of variations could be made to the embodiments illustrated and discussed above without deviating from the spirit of the invention.
  • FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate another embodiment of the present invention. In this particular embodiment, the boot cover 200 is shown positioned over a throat 110 of a boot 102 in which the throat 110 is relatively tall. To the extent aspects of this embodiment of the invention is the same or similar to the previous embodiments, some details have been omitted in the interest of brevity. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8, however, a sheath 222 of the boot cover 200 has a longitudinal gap 216 extending from a first end 204 of the sheath 222 to an opposing second end 206. In the illustrated embodiment, the gap 216 extends the entire length of the sheath 222. In other designs, the gap can extend only a portion of the length.
  • When the boot cover 200 is removed from the throat 110 of the boot 102, it can have an expanded perimeter larger than a corresponding perimeter of the throat 110 of the boot 102. As a result, the boot cover 200 can be slipped over the throat 110 of the boot 102 from above. The boot cover 200 could also be wrapped around the throat 110 of the boot 102 by removing the laces 220, extending the sheath 222 around the throat 110 of the boot 102, then lacing up the boot cover 200.
  • The gap 216 is lined along opposing edges 210, 212 of the boot cover 200 with eyelets 218, which may incorporate grommets for functional or decorative purposes. The illustrated embodiment incorporates seven eyelets 218 on each side of the gap 216. Depending on the size and style of the boot cover 200, the gap 216 can be lined with more or fewer eyelets 218.
  • One or more laces 220 can be interlaced between the eyelets 218 and across the gap 216, allowing the user to cinch the boot cover 200 onto the throat 110 of the boot 102. The laces 220 may be made from any suitable material, including but not limited to cotton, leather, nylon, polyester, spandex, Lycra and acrylic.
  • The boot cover 200 can be designed with additional gaps 216 and laces 220 for decorative or other purposes, and the gaps 216 can be aligned longitudinally, helically or in any other manner along the length of the boot cover 200.
  • The illustrated boot cover 200 is fabricated from a trapezoidal piece of cloth measuring 4.5 to 9 inches long, 9 to 14 inches wide at one longitudinal end, and 11 to 16 inches wide at the opposing longitudinal end. The boot cover 200 can be tapered back in approximately half an inch—or more or less—at the end corresponding to the upper region 118 of the throat 110 of the boot 102.
  • The boot cover 200 is sized such that an upper edge 230 of the sheath 222 can be located in the upper region 118 of the throat 110 of the boot 102 while a lower edge 232 of the sheath 222 can be located in the lower region 112 of the throat 110 of the boot 102. In this manner, the cover 200 can be configured to conceal a substantial portion (i.e., greater than fifty percent) of the throat 110 of the boot 102. In some embodiments, the sheath 222 of boot cover 200 may conceal between about seventy percent and ninety-five percent of the throat portion 110 of the boot 102 when the boot cover 200 is attached thereto.
  • FIGS. 9 and 10 illustrate another embodiment of the present invention. In this particular embodiment, the boot cover 250 is positioned over a throat 110 of a boot 102′ in which the throat 110 is relatively short. Features of this embodiment are similar to the embodiment described above; however, the size of the sheath 272, the length of the laces 270, and the number of eyelets 268 is reduced to correspond to the reduced length of the throat 110 of the boot 102′.
  • Other embodiments of the invention can incorporate a zipper, Velcro, frog buttons, or any other suitable fastener for coupling the opposing edges of the boot cover 200 across the gap 216. For example, FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate yet another embodiment of the present invention incorporating a zipper 308. In this particular embodiment, the boot cover 300 is shown positioned over a throat 110 of a boot 102 in which the throat 110 is relatively tall. To the extent aspects of this embodiment of the invention is the same or similar to the previous embodiments, some details have been omitted in the interest of brevity. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 12, however, a sheath 322 of the boot cover 300 has a zipper 308 attached to opposing side edges 310, 312 of the sheath 322. The zipper 308 is configured to draw the opposing edges 310, 312 of the sheath 322 together to attach the boot cover 300 securely in place.
  • Similar to the other described embodiments, the boot cover 300 is sized such that an upper edge 330 of the sheath 322 can be located in the upper region 118 of the throat 110 of the boot 102 while a lower edge 332 of the sheath 322 can be located in the lower region 112 of the throat 110 of the boot 102. In this manner, the cover 300 can be configured to conceal a substantial portion (i.e., greater than fifty percent) of the throat 110 of the boot 102. In some embodiments, the sheath 322 of boot cover 300 may conceal between about seventy percent and ninety-five percent of the throat portion 110 of the boot 102 when the boot cover 300 is attached thereto.
  • FIG. 13 illustrates still yet another embodiment of the present invention. In this illustrated embodiment, the boot cover 400 is positioned over a throat 110 of a boot 102 in which the throat 110 is relatively tall. Features of this embodiment are similar to other embodiments described herein. For example, the boot cover 400 includes a textile or fabric sheath 422 that extends between elastic cuffs 408 at opposing ends 404, 406 thereof. At an upper end 404 of the cover 400, however, a decorative trim 410, such as, for example, fur, fringe or other material, is attached such that it visually forms an upper end of the boot 102 that is distinct from the boot 102 unadorned with the cover 400. According to this illustrated embodiment, a wearer may prefer to position the upper elastic cuff 408 beyond the top end of the boot 102, as shown in FIG. 13. Alternatively, the upper elastic cuff 408 may be positioned near the mouth 120 of the boot 102 in the upper region 118 of the throat 110 of the boot 102. Further, although the decorative trim 410 is shown positioned at the top end of the throat 110 of the boot 102 near the mouth 120, the decorative trim 410 may be positioned at an intermediate position along the throat 110, offset from the mouth 120. Further, decorative trim may be added at the lower end 406 of the cover 400 or at other positions.
  • The above are just a few examples of embodiments of the present invention. Aspects of the various embodiments described above can be combined to provide further embodiments. Moreover, one of ordinary skill in the art, having reviewed this specification and the corresponding drawings, will immediately appreciate that deviations can be made to the illustrated embodiments and/or written details without deviating from the spirit of the invention.
  • In general, in the following claims, the terms used should not be construed to limit the claims to the specific embodiments disclosed in the specification and the claims, but should be construed to include all possible embodiments along with the full scope of equivalents to which such claims are entitled. Accordingly, the claims are not limited by the disclosure.

Claims (25)

  1. 1. A boot cover for a boot having an elongated tubular throat portion extending from a lower region of the boot toward a mouth of the boot, the boot cover comprising:
    a textile sheath having an upper edge and a lower edge, the upper edge having a length sized to at least partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at an upper attachment location offset from the mouth of the boot in a direction toward the lower region of the boot, and the lower edge having a length sized to at least partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at a lower attachment location in the lower region of the boot, and
    an attachment system coupled to the textile sheath to removably attach the boot cover to the throat portion of the boot, the textile sheath configured to conceal a substantial portion of the throat portion of the boot when the boot cover is attached thereto.
  2. 2. The boot cover of claim 1 wherein the attachment system includes a first elastic cuff having a perimeter sized to completely encircle the throat portion of the boot in a stretched configuration at the lower attachment location and a second elastic cuff having a perimeter sized to completely encircle the throat portion of the boot in a stretched configuration at the upper attachment location, and wherein the textile sheath is tubular and extends between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff, the textile sheath having a length exceeding the distance between the lower attachment location and upper attachment location such that the textile sheath loosely drapes between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff when the boot cover is attached to the boot.
  3. 3. The boot cover of claim 2 wherein the textile sheath is generally cylindrical and wherein a circumference of the textile sheath is greater than a perimeter of the throat portion of the boot at any location along a height thereof.
  4. 4. The boot cover of claim 2 wherein the textile sheath tapers from an upper end thereof towards a lower end thereof, wherein a perimeter of the tubular textile sheath at the upper end is greater than a perimeter of the throat portion of the boot at the upper attachment location, and wherein a perimeter of the tubular textile sheath at the lower end is greater than a perimeter of the throat portion of the boot at the lower attachment location.
  5. 5. The boot cover of claim 2 wherein the perimeter of the first cuff in a natural configuration is less than a perimeter of the throat of the boot at the lower attachment location and wherein the perimeter of the second cuff in a natural configuration is less than a perimeter of the throat of the boot at the upper attachment location.
  6. 6. The boot cover of claim 1 wherein the upper edge has a length sized to partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at the upper attachment location and the lower edge has a length sized to partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at the lower attachment location, and wherein the attachment system is coupled to opposing side edges of the textile sheath.
  7. 7. The boot cover of claim 6 wherein the attachment system includes one or more laces attached via eyelets to the opposing edges of the textile sheath, the one or more laces configured to draw the opposing edges of the textile sheath together and bridge a gap therebetween.
  8. 8. The boot cover of claim 6 wherein the attachment system includes a zipper mechanism attached to the opposing edges of the textile sheath, the zipper mechanism configured to draw at least a portion of the opposing edges of the textile sheath together and bridge a gap therebetween such that the boot cover completely encircles the throat portion of the boot when the boot cover is attached thereto.
  9. 9. The boot cover of claim 1 wherein the textile sheath is formed of a single piece of fabric sewn together along a single seam.
  10. 10. The boot cover of claim 1 wherein the textile sheath is formed of a plurality of fabric pieces sewn together.
  11. 11. The boot cover of claim 1 wherein the textile sheath of the boot cover has a trapezoidal shape.
  12. 12. The boot cover of claim 1 wherein the boot cover tapers from the upper edge toward the lower edge when attached to the boot.
  13. 13. The boot cover of claim 1 wherein a length of the textile sheath is equal to or greater than five inches but less than or equal to twelve inches.
  14. 14. The boot cover of claim 1 wherein the textile sheath of the boot cover conceals between about seventy percent and ninety-five percent of the throat portion of the boot when the boot cover is attached thereto.
  15. 15. The boot cover of claim 1, further comprising:
    decorative trim attached to the textile sheath.
  16. 16. A method of attaching a boot cover to a boot having an elongated tubular throat portion that extends from a lower region of the boot toward a mouth of the boot, the method comprising:
    positioning a first elastic cuff of the boot cover at a lower attachment location in the lower region of the boot, the first elastic cuff having a perimeter sized to completely encircle the throat portion of the boot at the lower attachment location in a stretched configuration; and
    positioning a second elastic cuff at an upper attachment location offset from the mouth of the boot in a direction toward the lower region of the boot such that a tubular textile sheath extending between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff conceals a substantial portion of the throat portion of the boot, the second elastic cuff having a perimeter sized to completely encircle the throat portion of the boot at the upper attachment location in a stretched configuration.
  17. 17. The method of claim 16 wherein positioning the first elastic cuff and positioning the second elastic cuff includes spacing the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff apart at a distance less than a length of the tubular textile sheath such that the tubular textile sheath drapes between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff.
  18. 18. The method of claim 17 further comprising:
    repositioning one of the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff to reduce the distance therebetween and increase the degree to which the tubular textile sheath drapes between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff.
  19. 19. The method of claim 17 further comprising:
    repositioning one of the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff to increase the distance therebetween and reduce the degree to which the tubular textile sheath drapes between the first elastic cuff and the second elastic cuff.
  20. 20. The method of claim 16 further comprising:
    repositioning the second elastic cuff to within the mouth of the boot.
  21. 21. The method of claim 16 further comprising:
    repositioning the second elastic cuff above the mouth of the boot, the boot cover including decorative trim at an upper end thereof.
  22. 22. The method of claim 16 further comprising:
    folding or rolling a portion of the throat of the boot over the second elastic cuff at the upper attachment location such that the second elastic cuff is concealed from view.
  23. 23. A method of attaching a boot cover to a boot having an elongated tubular throat portion that extends from a lower region of the boot toward a mouth of the boot, the method comprising:
    positioning a textile sheath of the boot cover so that a lower edge of the textile sheath is at a lower attachment location in the lower region of the boot and an upper edge of the textile sheath is at an upper attachment location offset from the mouth of the boot in a direction toward the lower region of the boot, the lower edge having a length sized to partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at the lower attachment location, and the upper edge having a length sized to partially encircle the throat portion of the boot at the upper attachment location; and
    attaching opposing sides of the textile sheath of the boot cover together so that the boot cover encircles and conceals a substantial portion of the throat portion of the boot.
  24. 24. The method of claim 23 wherein attaching opposing sides of the textile sheath of the boot cover together includes drawing one or more laces attached to the opposing sides of the textile sheath via eyelets tighter.
  25. 25. The method of claim 23 wherein attaching opposing sides of the textile sheath of the boot cover together includes drawing at least a portion of each of the opposing sides together with a zipper mechanism.
US13077744 2010-04-01 2011-03-31 Boot covers Abandoned US20110239487A1 (en)

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120174442A1 (en) * 2011-01-06 2012-07-12 Wanda Marie Castle Decorative Boot Clip
US20130133228A1 (en) * 2011-11-25 2013-05-30 Samantha Nugent Universal, readily interchangeable, and non-gaiter cover for wraping around and decorating only the shaft of an any sized and mundane boot and not the foot of the any sized and mundane boot
US20130283645A1 (en) * 2012-04-25 2013-10-31 Sharanda Houser System for straightening footwear
US20130340294A1 (en) * 2012-06-22 2013-12-26 Gayle Manning Versatile legwear
US20140020156A1 (en) * 2012-06-22 2014-01-23 Gayle Manning Versatile and convertible legwear
US20150327606A1 (en) * 2012-04-20 2015-11-19 Fiorima, S.A. Sock with gaiter integrally formed
US9210959B1 (en) * 2014-08-28 2015-12-15 Diamond Dust Design LLC Selectively decorative clothing article
US9254014B2 (en) * 2013-12-23 2016-02-09 Stuart Weitzman Ip, Llc Boot with stretchable opening
US20160309835A1 (en) * 2013-12-11 2016-10-27 Decathlon Method for producing a footwear item having a shoe provided with an external upper
USD782163S1 (en) * 2015-08-06 2017-03-28 Yvonne Hester Pant cuff with elastic
WO2017142567A1 (en) * 2016-02-17 2017-08-24 Conner Prielinso D Decorative and/or protective boot cover

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FR835354A (en) * 1938-03-17 1938-12-20 Dore & Fils clothing item for winter sports and other applications
US2439493A (en) * 1945-07-14 1948-04-13 Maurice C Smith Co Inc Double boot
US2398802A (en) * 1945-09-20 1946-04-23 Joseph L Morris Legging
US2427459A (en) * 1945-12-29 1947-09-16 Jastrzomb Wilma Boot or shoe shield
US2704898A (en) * 1952-07-31 1955-03-29 Victor M Sleyman Rain legging
US2847842A (en) * 1957-03-04 1958-08-19 Clarence E Almen Legging
US3083373A (en) * 1960-11-17 1963-04-02 Mary P Rizzotto Snow protector
US3633290A (en) * 1970-08-11 1972-01-11 Thomas J Rubeling Snow blocks invention
US3721997A (en) * 1972-07-17 1973-03-27 Sterling L O Dell Protective garment
US4001953A (en) * 1974-04-15 1977-01-11 Albert Lee Fugere Protective gaiter
US4474573A (en) * 1982-02-24 1984-10-02 Detty Garnett E Knee sleeve
US4542597A (en) * 1984-03-05 1985-09-24 Baptista Raymond J Snow shield foot and leg insulator
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US6342031B1 (en) * 1995-08-17 2002-01-29 Stephanie R. Vaughan Water gaiters and sleeves
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US5896676A (en) * 1997-08-08 1999-04-27 Island Aerobics, Inc. Wade fishing leg gaiter
US6131194A (en) * 1998-07-27 2000-10-17 Ardura Gonzalez; Manuel Safeguard device for playing golf
US6353939B1 (en) * 2000-12-04 2002-03-12 Janice Arber Disposable one-time use legging for covering, and protecting, a lower leg of a wearer from, and capturing, ticks
US20050188561A1 (en) * 2004-02-27 2005-09-01 Fine Edward A. Boot accessory
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US20140041260A1 (en) * 2012-08-08 2014-02-13 Kathleen Jewell Boot with sleeve to accomodate interchangeable decorative indicia

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120174442A1 (en) * 2011-01-06 2012-07-12 Wanda Marie Castle Decorative Boot Clip
US20130133228A1 (en) * 2011-11-25 2013-05-30 Samantha Nugent Universal, readily interchangeable, and non-gaiter cover for wraping around and decorating only the shaft of an any sized and mundane boot and not the foot of the any sized and mundane boot
US9254015B2 (en) * 2011-11-25 2016-02-09 Samantha Nugent Non-gaiter bootleg cover
US20150327606A1 (en) * 2012-04-20 2015-11-19 Fiorima, S.A. Sock with gaiter integrally formed
US20130283645A1 (en) * 2012-04-25 2013-10-31 Sharanda Houser System for straightening footwear
US20130340294A1 (en) * 2012-06-22 2013-12-26 Gayle Manning Versatile legwear
US20140020156A1 (en) * 2012-06-22 2014-01-23 Gayle Manning Versatile and convertible legwear
US10080398B2 (en) * 2013-12-11 2018-09-25 Decathlon Method for producing a footwear item having a shoe provided with an external upper
US20160309835A1 (en) * 2013-12-11 2016-10-27 Decathlon Method for producing a footwear item having a shoe provided with an external upper
US9254014B2 (en) * 2013-12-23 2016-02-09 Stuart Weitzman Ip, Llc Boot with stretchable opening
US9210959B1 (en) * 2014-08-28 2015-12-15 Diamond Dust Design LLC Selectively decorative clothing article
USD782163S1 (en) * 2015-08-06 2017-03-28 Yvonne Hester Pant cuff with elastic
WO2017142567A1 (en) * 2016-02-17 2017-08-24 Conner Prielinso D Decorative and/or protective boot cover

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