US20110214310A1 - Shoe chassis - Google Patents

Shoe chassis Download PDF

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Publication number
US20110214310A1
US20110214310A1 US13/111,288 US201113111288A US2011214310A1 US 20110214310 A1 US20110214310 A1 US 20110214310A1 US 201113111288 A US201113111288 A US 201113111288A US 2011214310 A1 US2011214310 A1 US 2011214310A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
cavity
surface
heel
pod
cushioning member
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US13/111,288
Inventor
Ori Rosenbaum
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Auri Footwear Inc
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Auri Footwear Inc
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US12/023,219 priority Critical patent/US7946060B2/en
Priority to US13/042,354 priority patent/US20120227291A1/en
Application filed by Auri Footwear Inc filed Critical Auri Footwear Inc
Priority to US13/111,288 priority patent/US20110214310A1/en
Assigned to Auri Footwear, Inc. reassignment Auri Footwear, Inc. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ROSENBAUM, ORI
Publication of US20110214310A1 publication Critical patent/US20110214310A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles

Abstract

The present invention relates to a shoe chassis. In one embodiment, the present invention is a shoe chassis including a board with a first end and a second end, the board having a portion defining a first hole at the second end. The shoe chassis also includes a stabilizing unit beneath the board and a pod beneath the stabilizing unit. A flexible membrane is positioned within the first hole to allow the heel to flex past or through the first hole and compress a cushioning material located within the pod and positioned under the flexible membrane.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This Application is a Continuation-in-Part Application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/023,219, entitled “SHOE CHASSIS” filed on Jan. 31, 2008, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,946,060, and of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/042,354, entitled “HIGH-HEELED FOOT APPAREL” filed on Mar. 7, 2011. The entire content of both applications are hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • BACKGROUND
  • 1. Field
  • The present invention relates to a shoe chassis. More particularly, the present invention relates to a shoe chassis having a board with an opening and a flexible membrane positioned within the opening to allow the heel to flex past or through the opening and compress a cushioning material positioned under the flexible membrane.
  • 2. Related Art
  • Many shoes have evolved to the point where they are used for aesthetic purposes. However, in developing shoes for aesthetic purposes, designers have often neglected two aspects of the shoe, comfort and functionality. Thus, while a pair of shoes may look stylish, they can often be cumbersome and painful to walk, jog, or run in. Therefore, there is a need for a shoe that is comfortable and functional allowing a user to move with ease.
  • SUMMARY
  • In one embodiment, the present invention is a shoe chassis including a board with a first end and a second end, the board having a portion defining a first hole at the second end. A flexible membrane may reside or be positioned within the first hole. The shoe chassis also includes a stabilizing unit beneath the board and a pod beneath the stabilizing unit. A cushioning material may be positioned below the flexible membrane.
  • In one embodiment, the present invention is a shoe chassis including a footbed with a first end and a second end and an outsole defining a first cavity for receiving a first cushioning member. The shoe chassis may also include an optional second cavity defined by the outsole for receiving a second cushioning member.
  • In one embodiment, the present invention is a shoe chassis including a footbed with a first end and a second end, a midsole defining a first cavity for receiving a first cushioning member, and an outsole for receiving the midsole. The midsole may also include an optional second cavity for receiving a second cushioning member.
  • In one embodiment, the present invention is a shoe chassis comprising: (1) a toe pod, (2) a heel pod having a top surface and enclosed walls surrounding the top surface forming a cavity, the heel pod further having a bottom surface for contacting a ground surface, (3) a heel cushion sized to fit within the cavity of the heel pod and having a top surface and a bottom surface, the bottom surface of the heel cushion contacting the top surface of the heel pod, and (4) a footbed including a first end configured to support a plurality of toes of a foot, and a second end configured to support a heel of a foot, the footbed contacting the top surface of the heel cushion.
  • In one embodiment, the present invention is a shoe chassis comprising: (1) an outsole having a ground contact surface and an upper surface, (2) a midsole defining a heel cavity and a toe cavity, the midsole for contacting the upper surface of the outsole, (3) a first cushion member for substantially filling the heel cavity, (4) a second cushion member for substantially filling the toe cavity, and (5) a foam insert having an inner surface for covering the midsole and the cushion member, and a foot surface for contacting a user's foot.
  • In one embodiment, the present invention is a shoe chassis comprising: (1) a heel pod defining a cavity therein, the heel pod including: a top outer surface for defining an upper boundary of the cavity, a bottom outer surface for contacting a ground, a bottom inner surface positioned between the top outer surface and the bottom outer surface, the bottom inner surface for defining a lower boundary of the cavity, and a side wall positioned between the top outer surface and the bottom inner surface for connecting the top outer surface and the bottom inner surface, and for defining a side boundary of the cavity; and (2) a cushion configured to fit within the cavity of the heel pod.
  • In one embodiment, the present invention is a shoe chassis comprising: (1) an outsole including a bottom surface for contacting a ground, the outsole further defining a first cavity and a second cavity, (2) a first cushion member sized to fit within the first cavity of the outsole, (3) a second cushion member sized to fit within the second cavity of the outsole, and (4) a footbed including a first end configured to support a plurality of toes of a foot, and a second end configured to support a heel of a foot, the footbed contacting the top surface of the first cushion and contacting the top surface of the second cushion.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The features, objects, and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the detailed description set forth below when taken in conjunction with the drawings, wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is an exploded disassembled perspective view of a shoe chassis or shoe sole according to an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is an exploded disassembled perspective view of a shoe chassis or shoe sole according to an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 3 is an exploded disassembled perspective view of a shoe chassis or shoe sole according to an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 4 is an exploded disassembled perspective view of a shoe chassis or shoe sole according to an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 5 is an exploded disassembled perspective view of a shoe chassis or shoe sole according to an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 6 is a footbed according to an embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • An apparatus that implement the embodiments of the various features of the present invention will now be described with reference to the drawings. The drawings and the associated descriptions are provided to illustrate embodiments of the present invention and not to limit the scope of the present invention. Reference in the specification to “one embodiment” or “an embodiment” is intended to indicate that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least an embodiment of the present invention. The appearances of the phrase “in one embodiment” or “an embodiment” in various places in the specification are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment. Throughout the drawings, reference numbers are re-used to indicate correspondence between referenced elements.
  • FIG. 1 is an exploded disassembled perspective view of a shoe chassis or shoe sole 2 according to an embodiment of the present invention. Shoe chassis 2 comprises a board 4, a flexible membrane 26, a cushioning material 24, a stabilizing unit 14, a first (i.e., front) pod 20, and a second (i.e., back) pod 18.
  • Board 4 has a first (i.e., front) end 6 and a second (i.e., back) end 8. Front end 6 can encompass an area proximate to a user's toes and back end 8 can encompass an area proximate to a user's heel. Board 4 may be made from a material such as paper, cardboard, wood, rubber, plastic, foam, leather, synthetic leather, or any combination of the above materials. Board 4 can also be constructed from any other firm, yet flexible material. Board 4 includes a first hole or opening 10 in or near second end 8 and a plurality of grooves 12 in or near first end 6. In one embodiment, plurality of grooves 12 are perforated. Plurality of grooves 12 allow board 4 to bend when shoe chassis 2 is bent in response to a movement from a user's foot. This allows for greater comfort for the user's foot and also allows the user better control of movement of shoe chassis 2.
  • The shape of first hole 10 is defined by the cutout in board 4. In one embodiment, first hole 10 is shaped and sized to be similar to the shape and size of a user's heel. The cutout allows the user's heel to fit within first hole 10 for better comfort and support. In FIG. 1, first hole 10 has a front side with a flat edge and a back side with a semi-circular edge. First hole 10 can be formed in the shape of a circle, an oval, a semi-circle, a square, a triangle, an ellipse, or any combination of the above shapes.
  • Flexible membrane 26 can cover or be positioned within first hole 10. Flexible membrane 26 allows the heel to flex past or through first hole 10 and compress cushioning material 24, which is under flexible membrane 26. As shown in FIG. 1, flexible membrane 26 is die cut and zig zag stitched to board 4. Flexible membrane 26 can also be attached to board 4 through a variety of means including, but not limited to, other types of stitching, adhesives, and/or fasteners.
  • In one embodiment, flexible membrane 26 is a soft, stretchable and durable cushion material or membrane such as ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), foam, plastic, and/or rubber. Flexible membrane 26 can also be formed from any other type of flexible material. In one embodiment, flexible membrane 26 has relatively the same thickness as board 4. It is also contemplated, however, that flexible membrane 26 can be thinner or thicker than board 4.
  • Stabilizing unit 14 is located beneath board 4 and includes a second hole 16 located directly beneath first hole 10 of board 4. Board 4 fits within stabilizing unit 14. Stabilizing unit 14 is constructed of thermoplastic polyurethane that is injection molded. Stabilizing unit 14 can also be constructed of any other type of material that is semi-flexible such as rubber, plastic, foam, etc. Stabilizing unit 14 can be used to stabilize the heel and shank of the user. If flexible membrane 26 is thicker than board 4, it may extend into second hole 16.
  • Second hole 16 has a front side with a flat edge and a back side with a semi-circular edge. Second hole 16 can be formed in the shape of a circle, an oval, a semi-circle, a square, a triangle, an ellipse, or any combination of the above shapes. Second hole 16 can also have the same shape or a different shape as first hole 10.
  • First pod 20 and second pod 18 are located below stabilizing unit 14 to provide support for stabilizing unit 14 and board 4. First pod 20 and second pod 18 can be connected together using an arch or bridge (not shown) made of a plastic, rubber or other material. Second pod 18 includes a cutout or depression 22 located directly beneath second hole 16. First pod 20 and second pod 18 are high abrasion rubber forefoot and heel pods, respectively. First pod 20 and second pod 18 can be constructed from flexible, yet extremely durable materials such as other types of rubber, plastic, etc.
  • Cushioning material 24 is located within depression 22. In one embodiment, cushioning material 24 is a soft and durable cushioning material such as ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), gel, foam, plastic, and/or rubber. Cushioning material 24 can be formed from any other type of cushioning material. In one embodiment, cushioning material 24 can fill depression 22 such that it has the same height as second pod 18. Cushioning material 24 can protrude upward from depression 22 and partially or completely fill second hole 16.
  • In operation, a user places a heel of his foot onto flexible membrane 26. The heel contacts and stretches or bends flexible membrane 26 and puts pressure on flexible membrane 26. The pressure is translated from flexible membrane 26 through second hole 16 and onto cushioning material 24.
  • Since the force is translated from flexible membrane 26 through second hole 16 and onto cushioning material 24, there is a greater cushioning effect. That is, the force from the heel will generally be absorbed by flexible membrane 26 and then absorbed by cushioning material 24 instead of being absorbed by board 4 and/or stabilizing unit 14. This is advantageous since flexible membrane 26 and cushioning material 24 provide better cushioning than board 4 and/or stabilizing unit 14.
  • Furthermore, by having two holes 10 and 16, that is first hole 10, which is covered by only flexible membrane 26, and second hole 16, the user's heel has relatively direct access to cushioning material 24. Such a configuration may prevent the user's heel from sliding around board 4 and may allow the user to have better control of shoe chassis 2. This allows the user to move at a faster pace with greater comfort. This can also be beneficial when a user is using shoe chassis 2 for strenuous activities such as walking rapidly, jogging, and/or running.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a shoe chassis 200 including an outsole 205, a first cushioning member 255, a second cushioning member 260 and a footbed 265. The shoe chassis 200 may be a portion of a shoe. As shown, outsole 205 may include a top surface 215 defining the upper bounds of a first cavity 220 and a second cavity 235, respectively. The top surface 215 may also define an arch support region of the outsole positioned between the first cavity 220 and the second cavity 235. As configured, the first cavity 220 may be located beneath or proximal to a user's forefoot (or the balls of the user's foot), while the second cavity 235 may be located beneath or proximal to a user's heel when the shoe chassis 200 is supporting a user's foot. The first cavity 220 may be defined by a first side wall 225 and a first bottom surface 230. The second cavity 235 may be defined by a second side wall 245 and a second bottom surface 250. As shown the first bottom surface 230 and the second bottom surface 250 may be positioned between the top surface 215 and a bottom surface for contacting a ground. The outsole 205 may further include an outer lip 210 attached to the circumference of the top surface 215. The outer lip 210 and the top surface 215 may define a third cavity for receiving the footbed 265 and/or any additional intervening layers (not shown). The outsole 205 may be constructed or molded out of any appropriate material such as rubber, plastic and the like. As shown, the outsole 205 may be configured to contact a ground surface and may keep the user's foot, protected, raised and/or supported.
  • The first cavity 220 and the second cavity 235 of the outsole 205 may be designed to receive and secure the first cushion member 255 and the second cushion member 260, respectively. The first cushioning member 255 may be sized and shaped to be substantially similar to the size and shape of the first cavity 220, thereby filling the first cavity 220 when positioned within the first side walls 225. In this manner, a top surface of the first cushioning member 255 may be planar with the top surface 215. Alternatively, the first cushioning member 255 may be designed to protrude out of the first cavity 220, or may be designed to have a smaller depth than a depth of the first cavity 220. Having a smaller depth may be beneficial where a thin layer of material may also be desired to fit within the first cavity 220 to provide cushioning or other functions. In an analogous manner, the second cushioning member 260 may be placed and secured within the second cavity 235. Furthermore, any attribute described with respect to the first cushioning member 255 may be provided to the second cushioning member 260.
  • The footbed 265 may be placed on top of the outsole 205, substantially covering the top surface 215, the first cushioning member 255 and the second cushioning member 260, thereby completing the shown portion of the shoe chassis 200.
  • The shoe chassis 200 may be considered a dual-cushioned shoe chassis as it includes two distinct cushioning members 255 and 260. In one embodiment, the outsole 205 may further define another cavity positioned between the first cavity 220 and the second cavity 235 for receiving a third cushioning member (not shown). In such an embodiment, the third cushioning member may be constructed out of the same or different material in order to provide support for the arch of the user's foot.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates another embodiment of a shoe chassis 300 including an outsole 305, a cushioning member 340 and a footbed 345. The outsole 305 may include a welting layer 310. The welting layer 310 may be constructed out of leather, suede or any other durable material, and may substantially span the entirety of the upper surface of the outsole 305. The welting layer 310 may also define an upper boundary of a cavity 330. As shown, the cavity 330 may be defined by a side wall 320 and a bottom surface 325. The cavity 330 may be positioned within the outsole 305, above a heel 315 of the outsole 305 without extending to a shank 335 of the outsole 305. The outsole 305 may be constructed out of one or more materials, including but not limited to rubber, plastic, cork, leather, and any combination or derivatives thereof (e.g., synthetic rubber, plastic, leatherette, etc.).
  • The heel 315 of the outsole 305 may be designed to be between 0.25 to 1.5 inches thick and may raise the overall profile of the shoe chassis 300. The heel 315 may be attached to the shank 335. The shank 335 may be substantially thinner than the heel 330, and may be 0.05 to 1.0 inches thick, and may be configured to support the arch and forefoot of the user's foot. As shown, the outsole 305 may be configured to contact a ground surface and may keep the user's foot, protected, raised and/or supported.
  • The cavity 330 of the outsole 305 may be designed to receive and secure the cushioning member 340. The cushioning member 340 may be sized and shaped to be substantially similar to the size and shape of the cavity 330, thereby filling the cavity 330 when positioned within the side walls 320. In this manner, a top surface of the cushioning member 340 may be planar with the top surface of the welting layer 310. Alternatively, the cushioning member 340 may be designed to protrude out of the cavity 330, or may be designed to have a smaller depth than a depth of the cavity 330. Having a smaller depth may be beneficial where a thin layer of material may also be desired to fit within the cavity 330 to provide cushioning or other functions.
  • As shown, the footbed 345 may be placed, and/or positioned, on the welting layer 310 and cover the cushioning member 340. The footbed 345 may be designed to contact a user's foot to provide additional cushioning and/or support.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates another embodiment of a shoe chassis 400 including an outsole 405, a cushioning member 460 and a footbed 465. As shown, the outsole 405 may include a forefoot portion 410 attached to a heel portion 440. The area directly proximal to the point of attachment may be for supporting an arch of a user's foot. The forefoot portion 410 may include a toe lip 415 which may extend upward (appearing in this embodiment as wings) about a portion of the perimeter of the outsole 405. The toe lip 415 may further extend into a portion of the heel portion 440. The heel portion 440 may include a heel 420 comprising three layers: an outer layer 425, a midsole 430 and an upper layer 435. The outer layer 425 may be constructed out of rubber or other suitable material for contacting a ground. The outer layer 425 may be attached to the midsole layer 430, which may be constructed out of EVA. The midsole layer 430 might not have a uniform thickness and may be thicker on a heel end and taper to a thinner thickness as it approaches the forefoot portion 410. In this manner, when the upper layer 435 is positioned on top of the midsole layer 430, it may provide a slanted or tapered supporting surface even if the upper layer 435 has a uniform thickness. As shown, the upper layer 435 may include the top surface of the heel portion 440 defining an upper boundary of a cavity 450, a side wall 445 defining a side boundary of the cavity 450 and a bottom surface 455 defining a bottom boundary of the cavity 450.
  • In one embodiment, the bottom surface 455 may be the top surface of the midsole layer 430. In this embodiment, the upper layer 435 may be considered to include an aperture for the receiving of the cushioning member 460.
  • The cushioning member 460 may be received and housed by the cavity 450. The cavity 450 of the outsole 405 may be designed to receive and secure the cushioning member 460. The cushioning member 460 may be sized and shaped to be substantially similar to the size and shape of the cavity 450, thereby filling the cavity 450 when positioned within the side walls 445. In this manner, a top surface of the cushioning member 460 may be planar with the top surface of the heel portion 440. Alternatively, the cushioning member 460 may be designed to protrude out of the cavity 450, or may be designed to have a smaller depth than a depth of the cavity 450. Having a smaller depth may be beneficial where a thin layer of material may also be desired to fit within the cavity 450 to provide cushioning or other functions.
  • The footbed 465 may be designed to cover the heel portion 440 and the forefoot portion 410, including the cushioning member 460. In this manner, the footbed 465 may be designed to contact a user's foot to provide additional cushioning and/or support.
  • While shown to be two distinct portions in FIG. 4, in one embodiment, the outsole 405 may include an integrated bed for supporting the forefoot, the arch and the heel of the user's foot.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates another embodiment of a shoe chassis 500. The shoe chassis 500 may include an outer sole 504, a midsole 545, a first cushioning member 585, a second cushioning member 590 and a footbed 595. As shown, the outer sole 504 may include a toe pod or toe portion 505 and a heel pod (or heel portion) 525. The toe pod 505 may include a supporting surface 515 and a toe lip 510 defining a receiving portion for receiving and securing a corresponding portion of the midsole 545. The toe pod 505 may further include a ground contacting surface 520 having one or more protrusions 521. The heel pod 525 may include a supporting surface 531 and a heel lip 535 defining a receiving portion for receiving and securing a corresponding portion of the midsole 545. The heel pod 525 may include a ground contacting surface 540 having one or more protrusions 541. In this embodiment, the toe pod 505 and the heel pod 525 might not be joined. However, a bridge or archway for attaching or integrating the toe pod 505 and the heel pod 525 may be included.
  • The midsole 545 may be attached and/or securely received by the toe pod 505 and the heel pod 525.
  • As shown, the midsole 545 may include a top surface 550 defining the upper bounds of a first cavity 555 and a second cavity 570, respectively. The top surface 550 may also define an arch support region of the outsole positioned between the first cavity 555 and the second cavity 570. As configured, the first cavity 555 may be located beneath or proximal to a user's forefoot (or the balls of the user's foot), while the second cavity 570 may be located beneath or proximal to a user's heel when the shoe chassis 500 is supporting a user's foot. The first cavity 555 may be defined by a first side wall 560 and a first bottom surface 565. The second cavity 570 may be defined by a second side wall 575 and a second bottom surface 580. As shown, the first bottom surface 565 and the second bottom surface 580 may be positioned between the top surface 550 and a bottom surface 551.
  • The midsole 545 may be constructed or molded out of any appropriate material such as polyurethane, rubber, plastic and the like. As shown, the bottom surface 551 of the midsole 545 may be configured to contact the surfaces 515 and 531 of the toe pod 505 and the heel pod 525, respectively.
  • The first cavity 555 and the second cavity 570 of the midsole 545 may be designed to receive and secure the first cushioning member 585 and the second cushioning member 590. The first cushioning member 585 may be sized and shaped to be substantially similar to the size and shape of the first cavity 555, thereby filling the first cavity 555 when positioned within the first side walls 560. In this manner, a top surface of the first cushioning member 585 may be planar with the top surface 550 of the midsole 545. Alternatively, the first cushioning member 585 may be designed to protrude out of the first cavity 555, or may be designed to have a smaller depth than a depth of the first cavity 555. Having a smaller depth may be beneficial where a thin layer of material may also be desired to fit within the first cavity 555 to provide cushioning or other functions. In an analogous manner, the second cushioning member 590 may be placed and secured within the second cavity 570. Furthermore, any attribute described with respect to the first cushioning member 585 may be provided to the second cushioning member 590.
  • The footbed 595 may be placed on top of the midsole 545, substantially covering the top surface 550 of the midsole 545, the first cushioning member 585 and the second cushioning member 590, thereby completing the shown portion of the shoe chassis 500. In one embodiment, the footbed 595 may have a flanged support portion which may protrude upwards, and may further be positioned on an inside surface of a shoe's vamp near the arch of the user's foot. The footbed 595 may be an insert and may be constructed out of foam or any other appropriate materials.
  • The shoe chassis 500 may be considered a dual-cushioned shoe chassis as it includes two distinct cushioning members 585 and 590. In one embodiment, the midsole 545 may further define another cavity positioned between the first cavity 555 and the second cavity 570 for receiving a third cushioning member (not shown). In such an embodiment, the third cushioning member may be constructed out of the same or different material in order to provide support for the arch of the user's foot.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a footbed 600 for usage as an insert for contacting the user's foot in any shoe chassis whether described herein or not. In certain embodiments, the footbed 600 may further include an overlaying material (not shown) such as leather, a cotton membrane, and the like for contacting the user's foot. The footbed 600 may be made from a material such as paper, cardboard, wood, rubber, plastic, foam, leather, synthetic leather, or any combination of the above materials. In certain embodiments, the footbed 600 may be the footbed 265, 345, 465 or 595.
  • The footbed 600 may include a forefoot portion 605 for supporting the balls of the user's foot, a midportion 610 for supporting an arch of the user's foot, and a heel portion 615 for supporting a heel of a user's foot. The forefoot portion 605 may include grooves or ridges 620 which may allow the footbed 600 to bend in response to a movement from the user's foot, and may define a first hole (not shown) for supporting a first flexible membrane 625. The heel portion 615 may include a second hole (not shown) for supporting a second flexible membrane 630 and a heel insert 635.
  • In one embodiment, the shape of the first hole and the second hole may be defined by cut-outs in the footbed 600. In one embodiment, the first hole and the second hole may be shaped and sized to be similar to the shape and size of a user's forefoot and heel, respectively. The first hole and/or the second hole may be formed in a geometric shape of a circle, an oval, a semi-circle, a square, a triangle, an ellipse, a combination of the above shapes or any non-geometric shape.
  • In one embodiment, the first flexible membrane 625 may cover or be positioned within the first hole. The first flexible membrane 625 allows the balls of the user's foot to flex past or through first hole and compress the first cushioning member (e.g., cushioning member 585), which may be underneath the flexible membrane 625. Analogously, the second flexible membrane 630 may cover or be positioned within the second hole. The second flexible membrane 630 may allow the heel of the user's foot to flex past or through the second hole and compress the second cushioning member (e.g., cushioning member 590). The first flexible membrane 625 and/or the second flexible membrane 630 may be attached to the footbed 600 through a variety of means including, but not limited to stitching, adhesives, and/or fasteners.
  • The first flexible membrane 625 and/or the second flexible membrane 630 may be a soft, stretchable and durable cushion material or membrane such as ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), foam, plastic, and/or rubber. The flexible membranes 625 and/or 630 may also be formed from any other type of flexible material. In one embodiment, the flexible membranes 625 and/or 630 may have relatively the same thickness as footbed 600. In certain embodiments, flexible membranes 625 and/or 630 may be thinner or thicker than the footbed 600.
  • The previous description of the disclosed examples is provided to enable any person of ordinary skill in the art to make or use the disclosed apparatus. Various modifications to these examples will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and the principles defined herein may be applied to other examples without departing from the spirit or scope of the disclosed apparatus. The described embodiments are to be considered in all respects only as illustrative and not restrictive and the scope of the present invention is, therefore, indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description. All changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are to be embraced within their scope.

Claims (20)

1. A shoe chassis comprising:
a toe pod;
a heel pod having a first surface and enclosed walls surrounding the first surface forming a cavity, the heel pod further having a second surface for contacting a ground surface;
a heel cushion sized to fit within the cavity of the heel pod and having a top surface and a bottom surface, the bottom surface of the heel cushion contacting the first surface of the heel pod; and
a footbed including a first end configured to contact the toe pod and to support a plurality of toes of a foot, and a second end configured to support a heel of a foot, the footbed contacting the top surface of the heel cushion.
2. The shoe chassis of claim 1, wherein the heel cushion is constructed out of a material selected from a group consisting of EVA, a foam, a plastic, a rubber, and combinations thereof.
3. The shoe chassis of claim 1, wherein the footbed is constructed out of a material selected from a group consisting of paper, cardboard, wood, rubber, plastic, foam, leather, synthetic leather, and combinations thereof.
4. The shoe chassis of claim 1, wherein the toe pod is constructed out of a material selected from a group consisting of rubber, plastic, and combinations thereof.
5. The shoe chassis of claim 1, wherein the heel pod is constructed out of a material selected from a group consisting of rubber, plastic, and combinations thereof.
6. The shoe chassis of claim 1, wherein the toe pod and the heel pod are attached.
7. The shoe chassis of claim 1, wherein the toe pod and the heel pod are separated.
8. A shoe chassis comprising:
an outsole having a ground contact surface and an upper surface;
a midsole defining a heel cavity and a toe cavity, the midsole for contacting the upper surface of the outsole;
a first cushioning member for substantially filling the heel cavity;
a second cushioning member for substantially filling the toe cavity; and
a foam insert having an inner surface for covering the midsole, the first cushioning member and the second cushioning member, the foam insert further having a foot surface for contacting a user's foot.
9. The shoe chassis of claim 8, wherein the first cushioning member is constructed out of a material selected from a group consisting of EVA, a gel, a foam, a plastic, a rubber, and combinations thereof, and wherein the second cushioning member is constructed out of a material selected from a group consisting of EVA, a gel, a foam, a plastic, a rubber and combinations thereof.
10. The shoe chassis of claim 8, wherein the second cushioning member has a footprint substantially similar in shape and size to a footprint of the heel cavity.
11. A shoe chassis comprising:
a heel pod defining a cavity therein, the heel pod including:
a top outer surface for defining an upper boundary of the cavity,
a bottom outer surface for contacting a ground,
a bottom inner surface positioned between the top outer surface and the bottom outer surface, the bottom inner surface for defining a lower boundary of the cavity, and
a side wall positioned between the top outer surface and the bottom inner surface for connecting the top outer surface and the bottom inner surface, and for defining a side boundary of the cavity; and
a cushioning member configured to fit within the cavity of the heel pod.
12. The shoe chassis of claim 11, wherein the cushioning member has a first depth and the side wall defines a second depth, and further wherein the first depth is greater than the second depth.
13. The shoe chassis of claim 11, wherein the cushioning member has a first depth and the side wall defines a second depth, and further wherein the first depth is lesser than the second depth.
14. The shoe chassis of claim 11, wherein the cushioning member has a first depth and the side wall defines a second depth, and further wherein the first depth is substantially equal to the second depth.
15. The shoe chassis of claim 11, wherein the cushioning member further includes a contacting surface defined as the portion of the cushioning which contacts the bottom inner surface, the contacting surface having a first surface area and a bottom inner surface having a second surface area, further wherein the first surface area is equal to or lesser than the second surface area.
16. The shoe chassis of claim 11, wherein the cushioning is constructed out a material selected from a group consisting of EVA, a foam, a plastic, a rubber, and combinations thereof.
17. A shoe chassis comprising:
an outsole including a bottom surface for contacting a ground, the outsole further defining a first cavity and a second cavity;
a first cushion sized to fit within the first cavity of the outsole;
a second cushion sized to fit within the second cavity of the outsole; and
a footbed including a first end configured to support a plurality of toes of a foot, and a second end configured to support a heel of a foot, the footbed contacting the top surface of the first cushion and contacting the top surface of the second cushion.
18. The shoe chassis of claim 17, wherein the first cushion is constructed out of EVA or gel, and wherein the second cushion is constructed out of EVA or gel.
19. The shoe chassis of claim 17, wherein the footbed and the first cushion are constructed out of different materials.
20. The shoe chassis of claim 17, wherein the first cushion and the second cushion are constructed out of different materials.
US13/111,288 2008-01-31 2011-05-19 Shoe chassis Abandoned US20110214310A1 (en)

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US13/042,354 US20120227291A1 (en) 2011-03-07 2011-03-07 High-heeled foot apparel
US13/111,288 US20110214310A1 (en) 2008-01-31 2011-05-19 Shoe chassis

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US20110162232A1 (en) * 2008-07-14 2011-07-07 Roberto Gazzara Sole structure
US20120137542A1 (en) * 2009-06-02 2012-06-07 Forme Limited Wellness shoe and method
US20140259766A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Laurence James Shoe Construction
US20140331519A1 (en) * 2009-05-11 2014-11-13 Brooks Sports, Inc. Shoe assembly with non-linear viscous liquid
CN106388126A (en) * 2016-12-13 2017-02-15 黎明职业大学 Insole with moisture absorption, shock absorption and sprain prevention functions
USD797422S1 (en) 2016-07-27 2017-09-19 Ariat International, Inc. Footwear outsole chassis
US20180000196A1 (en) * 2016-06-30 2018-01-04 Boot Royalty Company, L.P. Comfort system for boots

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110162232A1 (en) * 2008-07-14 2011-07-07 Roberto Gazzara Sole structure
US10016016B2 (en) * 2009-05-11 2018-07-10 Brooks Sports, Inc. Shoe assembly with non-linear viscous liquid
US20140331519A1 (en) * 2009-05-11 2014-11-13 Brooks Sports, Inc. Shoe assembly with non-linear viscous liquid
US20120137542A1 (en) * 2009-06-02 2012-06-07 Forme Limited Wellness shoe and method
US20140259766A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Laurence James Shoe Construction
US10238168B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2019-03-26 Laurence James Shoe construction
US20180000196A1 (en) * 2016-06-30 2018-01-04 Boot Royalty Company, L.P. Comfort system for boots
US10010135B2 (en) * 2016-06-30 2018-07-03 Boot Royalty Company, L.P. Comfort system for boots
USD865340S1 (en) 2016-07-27 2019-11-05 Ariat International, Inc. Footwear outsole
USD797422S1 (en) 2016-07-27 2017-09-19 Ariat International, Inc. Footwear outsole chassis
CN106388126A (en) * 2016-12-13 2017-02-15 黎明职业大学 Insole with moisture absorption, shock absorption and sprain prevention functions

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