US20110037261A1 - System And Method For Producing Electrical Power - Google Patents

System And Method For Producing Electrical Power Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110037261A1
US20110037261A1 US12539114 US53911409A US2011037261A1 US 20110037261 A1 US20110037261 A1 US 20110037261A1 US 12539114 US12539114 US 12539114 US 53911409 A US53911409 A US 53911409A US 2011037261 A1 US2011037261 A1 US 2011037261A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
turbine
electrical power
system
producing electrical
flow
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12539114
Inventor
Charles W. Champ
Richard Kauffman
Michael Tischendorf
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
KTCR Holding Inc
Original Assignee
KTCR Holding Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING WEIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER; OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D3/00Wind motors with rotation axis substantially perpendicular to the air flow entering the rotor 
    • F03D3/005Wind motors with rotation axis substantially perpendicular to the air flow entering the rotor  axis vertical
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60KARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PROPULSION UNITS OR OF TRANSMISSIONS IN VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PLURAL DIVERSE PRIME-MOVERS IN VEHICLES; AUXILIARY DRIVES FOR VEHICLES; INSTRUMENTATION OR DASHBOARDS FOR VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH COOLING, AIR INTAKE, GAS EXHAUST OR FUEL SUPPLY OF PROPULSION UNITS, IN VEHICLES
    • B60K16/00Arrangements in connection with power supply of propulsion units in vehicles from force of nature, e.g. sun or wind
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LELECTRIC EQUIPMENT OR PROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES, IN GENERAL
    • B60L8/00Electric propulsion with power supply from force of nature, e.g. sun, wind
    • B60L8/003Converting light into electric energy, e.g. by using photo-voltaic systems
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LELECTRIC EQUIPMENT OR PROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES, IN GENERAL
    • B60L8/00Electric propulsion with power supply from force of nature, e.g. sun, wind
    • B60L8/006Converting flow of air into electric energy, e.g. by using wind turbines
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING WEIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER; OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D13/00Assembly, mounting or commissioning of wind motors; Arrangements specially adapted for transporting wind motor components
    • F03D13/20Arrangements for mounting or supporting wind motors; Masts or towers for wind motors
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING WEIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER; OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D15/00Transmission of mechanical power
    • F03D15/10Transmission of mechanical power using gearing not limited to rotary motion, e.g. with oscillating or reciprocating members
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING WEIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER; OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D15/00Transmission of mechanical power
    • F03D15/20Gearless transmission, i.e. direct-drive
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING WEIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER; OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D3/00Wind motors with rotation axis substantially perpendicular to the air flow entering the rotor 
    • F03D3/04Wind motors with rotation axis substantially perpendicular to the air flow entering the rotor  having stationary wind-guiding means, e.g. with shrouds or channels
    • F03D3/0427Wind motors with rotation axis substantially perpendicular to the air flow entering the rotor  having stationary wind-guiding means, e.g. with shrouds or channels with augmenting action, i.e. the guiding means intercepting an area greater than the effective rotor area
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING WEIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER; OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D7/00Controlling wind motors
    • F03D7/06Controlling wind motors the wind motors having rotation axis substantially perpendicular to the air flow entering the rotor
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING WEIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER; OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D9/00Adaptations of wind motors for special use; Combinations of wind motors with apparatus driven thereby; Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations
    • F03D9/10Combinations of wind motors with apparatus storing energy
    • F03D9/11Combinations of wind motors with apparatus storing energy storing electrical energy
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING WEIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER; OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D9/00Adaptations of wind motors for special use; Combinations of wind motors with apparatus driven thereby; Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations
    • F03D9/20Wind motors characterised by the driven apparatus
    • F03D9/25Wind motors characterised by the driven apparatus the apparatus being an electrical generator
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING WEIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER; OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D9/00Adaptations of wind motors for special use; Combinations of wind motors with apparatus driven thereby; Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations
    • F03D9/30Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations
    • F03D9/32Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations on moving objects, e.g. vehicles
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING WEIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER; OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D9/00Adaptations of wind motors for special use; Combinations of wind motors with apparatus driven thereby; Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations
    • F03D9/007Adaptations of wind motors for special use; Combinations of wind motors with apparatus driven thereby; Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations the wind motor being combined with means for converting solar radiation into useful energy
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F05INDEXING SCHEMES RELATING TO ENGINES OR PUMPS IN VARIOUS SUBCLASSES OF CLASSES F01-F04
    • F05BINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO MACHINES OR ENGINES OTHER THAN NON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT MACHINES OR ENGINES, TO WIND MOTORS, TO NON-POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT PUMPS, AND TO GENERATING COMBUSTION PRODUCTS OF HIGH PRESSURE OR HIGH VELOCITY
    • F05B2240/00Components
    • F05B2240/10Stators
    • F05B2240/13Stators to collect or cause flow towards or away from turbines
    • F05B2240/133Stators to collect or cause flow towards or away from turbines with a convergent-divergent guiding structure, e.g. a Venturi conduit
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F05INDEXING SCHEMES RELATING TO ENGINES OR PUMPS IN VARIOUS SUBCLASSES OF CLASSES F01-F04
    • F05BINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO MACHINES OR ENGINES OTHER THAN NON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT MACHINES OR ENGINES, TO WIND MOTORS, TO NON-POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT PUMPS, AND TO GENERATING COMBUSTION PRODUCTS OF HIGH PRESSURE OR HIGH VELOCITY
    • F05B2240/00Components
    • F05B2240/90Mounting on supporting structures or systems
    • F05B2240/92Mounting on supporting structures or systems on an airborne structure
    • F05B2240/923Mounting on supporting structures or systems on an airborne structure which is a vehicle
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F05INDEXING SCHEMES RELATING TO ENGINES OR PUMPS IN VARIOUS SUBCLASSES OF CLASSES F01-F04
    • F05BINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO MACHINES OR ENGINES OTHER THAN NON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT MACHINES OR ENGINES, TO WIND MOTORS, TO NON-POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT PUMPS, AND TO GENERATING COMBUSTION PRODUCTS OF HIGH PRESSURE OR HIGH VELOCITY
    • F05B2270/00Control
    • F05B2270/10Purpose of the control system
    • F05B2270/1016Purpose of the control system in variable speed operation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02SGENERATION OF ELECTRIC POWER BY CONVERSION OF INFRA-RED RADIATION, VISIBLE LIGHT OR ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT, E.G. USING PHOTOVOLTAIC [PV] MODULES
    • H02S10/00PV power plants; Combinations of PV energy systems with other systems for the generation of electric power
    • H02S10/10PV power plants; Combinations of PV energy systems with other systems for the generation of electric power including a supplementary source of electric power, e.g. hybrid diesel-PV energy systems
    • H02S10/12Hybrid wind-PV energy systems
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/70Wind energy
    • Y02E10/72Wind turbines with rotation axis in wind direction
    • Y02E10/728Onshore towers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/70Wind energy
    • Y02E10/74Wind turbines with rotation axis perpendicular to the wind direction
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/60Other road transportation technologies with climate change mitigation effect
    • Y02T10/70Energy storage for electromobility
    • Y02T10/7072Electromobility specific charging systems or methods for batteries, ultracapacitors, supercapacitors or double-layer capacitors
    • Y02T10/7077Electromobility specific charging systems or methods for batteries, ultracapacitors, supercapacitors or double-layer capacitors on board the vehicle
    • Y02T10/7083Electromobility specific charging systems or methods for batteries, ultracapacitors, supercapacitors or double-layer capacitors on board the vehicle with the energy being of renewable origin

Abstract

The disclosed technology is an electrical power system that includes a turbine, a turbine housing, an incoming channel and a generator. The turbine has at least two turbine blades and the turbine housing has at least two openings. The incoming channel directs and amplifies a flow of a working fluid at one of the openings in the turbine housing and the incoming channel is mounted in such a way that the flow of the working fluid strikes an upper portion of turbine blades. This configuration allows the turbine to rotate which in turn allows the generator to produce electrical power.

Description

    FIELD
  • The disclosed technology relates to a system and method for producing electrical power, and more specifically, producing electrical power by directing and amplifying a flow of a working fluid towards a turbine.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Growing trends in the automotive industry, as well as other industries, have been pointing toward a greener approach in regards to energy consumption and production. In this regard, every major automobile manufacturer is displaying several models of fuel efficient cars such as electric, hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and/or hydrogen-powered vehicles.
  • A battery electric vehicle (BEV) is an alternative fuel automobile that uses electric motors and motor controllers for propulsion, in place of more common propulsion methods such as the internal combustion engine. Electric cars are commonly powered by on-board battery packs that need to be plugged into an electrical outlet in order to be recharged. These batteries pack, however, have limited range, do not have a long life expectancy and are expensive to replace.
  • A hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) is a hybrid vehicle that combines a conventional internal combustion engine propulsion system with an electric propulsion system. The presence of the electric powertrain is intended to achieve better fuel economy than a conventional vehicle. A hybrid electric vehicle is a form of electric vehicle. A variety of types of HEV exist, and the degree to which they function as EVs varies as well. The most common form of HEV is the hybrid electric car, an automobile driven by a gasoline internal combustion engine and electric motors powered by batteries.
  • A plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) is a hybrid vehicle with batteries that can be recharged by connecting a plug to an electric power source. It shares the characteristics of both traditional hybrid electric vehicles, having an electric motor and an internal combustion engine, and of battery electric vehicles, also having a plug to connect to the electric grid.
  • A hydrogen vehicle is a vehicle that uses hydrogen as its onboard fuel for power. The power plants of such vehicles convert the chemical energy of hydrogen to mechanical energy (torque) in one of two methods: combustion, or electrochemical conversion in a fuel-cell. In hydrogen internal combustion engine vehicles, the hydrogen is combusted in engines in fundamentally the same method as traditional internal combustion engine vehicles. In fuel-cell conversion, the hydrogen is reacted with oxygen to produce water and electricity, the latter being used to power an electric traction motor. Hydrogen, however, is not an energy source, but an energy carrier because it takes a great deal of energy to extract it from water. It is useful as a compact energy source in fuel cells and batteries. Many companies are working hard to develop technologies that can efficiently exploit the potential of hydrogen energy.
  • These above vehicles demonstrate that there is a need for more fuel-efficient or better yet, fuel-independent vehicles. But the technologies are still at their infancy and more work needs to be done to make a truly fuel-independent vehicle.
  • SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSED TECHNOLOGY
  • The disclosed technology may be used to build an electric vehicle that will not be restricted by an arbitrary range that is directly related to the capacity of its onboard battery pack, nor reliance upon a back up engine to recharge the batteries and extend the range. The disclosed technology gives a vehicle an almost unlimited range and will not require external recharge of its battery packs.
  • The disclosed technology discloses a system for producing electrical power comprising a turbine, a turbine housing, an incoming channel and at least one generator.
  • The turbine may have two or more turbine blades that spin on a single rotating axis. The turbine blades may be equally spaced around the axis and the tips of the blades may be parallel to the axis. The blades have a length and a curvature. In a preferred embodiment, the blade may have a backward curvature with a length of 7-21 inches. The blades tips may be weighted.
  • The turbine housing houses the turbine and may be cylindrical in shape. The housing may include two or more openings. These opening are used to receive and exhaust a flow of a working fluid in order to rotate the turbine.
  • In order to direct the flow into the housing, an incoming channel may be used. The incoming channel may direct and amplify the flow of the working fluid at the opening in the housing. The incoming channel may be mounted in such a way that the flow of working fluid strikes an upper portion of turbine blades as it enters into the housing.
  • A generator may be connected to the turbine for producing electrical power. The generator may be a 230/460 V, 60 Hz alternator or some other type of energy conversion system. The electrical generator may be directly or indirectly connected to the turbine. If indirectly connected, the electrical generator may be connected to the turbine via a belt/pulley system or a variable drive system.
  • The disclosed technology may also include an exhausting channel. The exhausting channel directs the flow of the working fluid from the second opening of the housing to the ambient atmosphere. The exhausting channel may be mounted in such a way that the flow of the working fluid expands and escapes through multiple exhaust openings.
  • The disclosed technology may also include a set of dampers mechanically louvered so as to modulate the velocity and volume of the incoming working fluid and deflect any excess.
  • A set of magnets may also be attached to the turbine and/or the turbine housing for generating electromagnetic energy and a control system may be implemented for monitoring and regulating electrical power production.
  • In one embodiment, the turbine may be a centrifugal turbine that has a drive shaft and three or more turbine blades attached to the drive shaft. The three turbine blades may be backward-curved blades. In this embodiment, the turbine may have two or more openings. The first opening may receive a flow of a working fluid and the second opening may exhaust the flow of the working fluid. The flow may be received from an incoming channel that directs and amplifies the flow of the working fluid at the first opening. The incoming channel may be mounted in such a way that the flow of the working fluid strikes an upper portion of turbine blades. The turbine may also be connected to at least one generator for producing electrical power.
  • In another embodiment, the turbine housing may include three openings. The first opening is for receiving a flow of a working fluid, the second opening is for exhausting the flow of the working fluid and the third opening is for receiving a recycled flow from a flow diverter. That is, the flow diverter directs the flow exhausted from the second opening to the third opening. This embodiment also may include an incoming channel for directing and amplifying working fluids at a first opening with the incoming channel being mounted in such a way that the working fluids strike an upper portion of turbine blades. A generator may also be connected to the turbine for producing electrical power.
  • In another embodiment, the system may include an exhausting channel. The exhausting channel directs the flow of the working fluid from the second opening to the ambient atmosphere. The exhausting channel may be mounted in such a way that the flow of the working fluid expands and escapes through multiple exhaust openings. The exhausting channel may also minimize turbulence and back pressure associated with exhausting working fluids. This embodiment also includes a turbine housing and a turbine and connected to a generator for producing electrical power.
  • The above systems may be incorporated and mounted into a moving vehicle. That is, the turbine and turbine housing may be mounted within the vehicle near the front of the vehicle. While the incoming channel may be located in a front opening mounted between the headlights of the moving vehicle. The generator(s) may be mounted behind the turbine and turbine housing and slightly below the axis of the turbine. The generator may be connected via a pulley/belt system to opposing ends of the turbine shaft with a pulley/belt ratio of 3:1. The exhaust channel may also be mounted behind the turbine and turbine housing. The exhausting channel may also include a series of interconnected channels that allows the working fluid, in this case air, to expand and escape through openings. These openings may be located near a vehicle's windshield, beneath the floor panels and/or through front wheel wells and fenders. The exhausting channel may eliminate any turbulence and back pressure that might otherwise be the result of the large volume of escaping air.
  • Other devices which may be incorporated into the moving vehicle include wheel hub motors, battery packs for storing electrical power produced from the generator, solar panels attached to a roof of the vehicle, programmable logic controllers for controlling power consumption and generation, variable transformers, regenerative drives, phase converters, electrical contactors, industrial inverters, transfer switches, disconnects, 3 pole motor/generators, 4 pole polyphase induction motor/generators, 4 pole polyphase induction squirrel cage motor/generators, capacitor banks and combinations thereof.
  • A method for producing electrical power comprises the steps of first directing and amplifying a flow of a working fluid at a turbine within a turbine housing. The flow of working fluid may strike an upper portion of turbine blades. This, in turn, produces electrical power via the rotation of the turbine. The flow is then exhausted and expanded out of the turbine housing.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the disclosed technology;
  • FIG. 2 a shows a perspective view of the turbine and turbine housing of the disclosed technology;
  • FIG. 2 a shows a side view of the turbine and turbine housing of the disclosed technology;
  • FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of generators mounted on a frame;
  • FIG. 4 shows a block drawing of the preferred embodiment of the disclosed technology using a belt/pulley system;
  • FIG. 5 shows an fluid flow diagram representing a preferred embodiment of the disclosed technology; and
  • FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of a second preferred embodiment of the disclosed technology;
  • FIG. 7 shows a top view of a moving vehicle having the disclosed technology mounted within its frame;
  • FIGS. 8 a-b show a perspective view of a turbine housing and turbine according to another embodiment of the disclosed technology; and
  • FIG. 9 shows a perspective view of another preferred embodiment of the disclosed technology.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The disclosed technology is a system and method that uses a uniquely designed turbine to produce electrical power. The device can be used with low to high flows of a working fluid to drive, directly or indirectly, electrical generators. The driving fluids rotate the turbine so that the turbine has sufficient revolutions per minute and torque to create a rotating force necessary to power an electrical generator, an alternator and/or a wheel hub motor.
  • The technological enhancements and capabilities disclosed herein would be beneficial to any application were a working fluid is flowing abundantly. In one embodiment, the disclosed technology is capable of generating electricity by utilizing wind that is produced by a vehicles forward momentum. In another embodiment, the disclosed technology is capable of generating electricity by utilizing water flows produced by a river's current.
  • The device can be manufactured using a wide variety of materials. The efficiency of the device varies based on the weight and dimensions of the materials and the fluid involved in the driving of the turbine.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, the system 10 includes a turbine housing 12, a turbine 14, an incoming channel 16 and an exhausting channel 18. The size of the unit is variable dependent on the electrical output needed.
  • The turbine housing 12 and turbine 14 is a modified centrifugal fan system. As shown in FIG. 2 a-b, the turbine 14 has a turbine wheel 20 composed of a number of turbine blades 22 a-c mounted around an axel or drive shaft 24. The drive shaft 24 passes through the turbine housing 12 and may connect at its ends to an electrical generator (not shown in this figure and will be more fully discussed below).
  • The turbine blades 22 a-c can be straight, slanted in the direction of the working fluid (forward-curved), or slanted opposite the direction of the working fluid (backward-curved or backward-inclined). In the preferred embodiment, backward-curved blades are used.
  • As shown in FIG. 5, backward-curved blades 22 a-c curve against the direction of the fan wheel's rotation R. The backward curvature mimics that of an airfoil and provides good operating efficiency with relatively economical construction techniques. This is true because, as the wind force 52 passes over the top of the blade 22 a-c, the wind force creates a negative pressure creating lift. As the turbine 14 rotates, the tips 26 a-c of the blades 22 a-c are exposed to a direct positive wind force which drives the turbine into rotation about an axis X. As each blade 22 a-c is exposed to this alternating negative-positive set of pressures, momentum is gained until a mass torque centripetal force reaches a maximum number of revolutions per minute which is maintained as long as the wind force 52 remains constant. If the wind force 52 varies in speed or volume or both, the maximum number of revolutions per minute will vary with each set of conditions. The shape (length and curvature), the number and location of blades 22 a-c will also vary the revolutions per minute.
  • In practice, any wind force 52 sufficient to provide the necessary mass torque centripetal force will rotate the turbine 14. The turbine mass torque centripetal force requirement includes the necessary wind force 52 to operate a mechanical electrical device 30 a-b for the purpose of producing electrical as the end result. This requires the design and manufacture of the turbine 14 to meet the torque and rotational speed parameters of the mechanical electrical device 30 a-b. Centripetal force can be increased or decreased based on the diameter D of the turbine 14 at any selected wind force speed or volume or both. The centripetal force created by the wind force 52 for a turbine 14 allows for the required operational torque to be met or exceeded.
  • Backward curved turbines 14 have a high range of specific speeds but are most often used for medium specific speed applications—high pressure, medium flow applications. Backward-curved turbines 14 are also much more energy efficient than radial blade fans and so, for high horsepower applications may be a suitable alternative to the lower cost radial bladed fan.
  • As shown in FIG. 2 a-b, the turbine 14 includes two or more scythe shaped blades 22 a-c in a horizontal or vertical plane where it rotates around and in the same plane of a single axis X. The wind turbine 14 may be approximately 14-42″ in diameter (D) and 9-27″ wide (W) but size is dependent on application and can be designed and manufactured with a variety of lengths and general circumferences. Each elongated blade 22 a-c has a length (L) of approximately 7-21 inches and is equally spaced around the core axis X. The tips of the blades 26 are elongated and are parallel to the rotating axis X. The blade ends 24 may be weighted and the turbine wheel 20 may be weighted with concentric rings (not shown) to increase centripetal force.
  • The turbine 14 determines the speed of the generator motors 30 a-b and the extent to which this speed can be varied. As shown in FIG. 3, the turbine 14 can be linked directly to the shaft 36 a-b of an electric motors 30 a-b, respectively. This means that the turbine wheel speed is identical to the motor's rotational speed. With this type of fan drive mechanism, the fan speed cannot be varied unless the generator torque is adjusted.
  • In FIG. 4, the turbine shaft can also be linked indirectly to electric generators (e.g., a 230/460 V, 60 Hz alternator) via a belt/pulley system 40 a-b. These belt driven turbines can use multiple belts 42 a-b that rotate in a set of sheaves 46 a-b and 44 a-b mounted on the motor shaft 36 a-b and the fan wheel shaft 24, respectively. The belts 42 a-b transmit the mechanical energy from the turbine shaft 24 to the generator 30 a-b. The generator speed depends upon the ratio of the diameter of the motor sheave 46 a-b to the diameter of the turbine sheave 44 a-b, e.g., a 2:1 ratio, 3:1 ratio, ect.
  • The turbine 14 can also use a variable drive system (not shown) that uses hydraulic or magnetic couplings (between the turbine drive shaft and the motor shaft) that allows control of the turbine speed independent of the generator speed. These speed controls are often integrated into automated systems to maintain the desired wheel speed. An alternate method of varying the fan speed is an electronic variable-speed drive which controls the speed of the motor driving the fan. This offers better overall energy efficiency at reduced speeds than mechanical couplings.
  • As shown in FIG. 5, the disclosed technology modified a standard centrifugal fan housing by eliminating air intake on the side of the fan wheel. By eliminating the side intake, the air flow no longer enters the turbine from the side of the unit where it use to make a 90 degree turn. Instead the housing or shroud 12 was modified so that two or more openings 50 a-b were placed on the outer skin 56 of the housing 12. Now, the air flow 52 can directly flow into the housing 12 and be directed to the tips 26 a-c of the blade 22 a-c itself. The wind force 52 necessary to operate the turbine can either be created by nature or machines.
  • The wind force 52 may be shaped, directed and/or controlled for volume and velocity through a straight wind channel, a louvered wind channel, a nozzle-type wind channel or combinations thereof. The wind channel 16 may channel wind with or without fans or blowers and can be designed as an angular, directional single direction system and/or directional return wind force system.
  • The nozzle-type wind channel 16 may be connected directly to fan or blower systems allowing for the compacting or concentrating of air being directed at the specified target onto the turbine 14 to increase centripetal force and, thereby, overcome the operational torque requirements of electrical motor/generators and electrical alternators 30 a-b. These nozzle-type wind channels 16 effectively amplify the wind speed by a factor of approximately 2-5. FIGS. 8 a-b shows a turbine housing 100 that includes a straight forward wind channel 102 and a straight rearward wind channel 104.
  • In the preferred embodiment, the wind channel or incoming channel 16 is nozzle-type wind channel and has a smooth internal finish 58 and a front opening 60 that is approximately 30″ by 30″ (or 900 square inches). The incoming channel can be reduced both in width and depth to a rear opening 62 that is approximately 8″ wide by 10″ deep (or 180 square inches).
  • Turbine dampers 64 are used to control flow into and out of the turbine housing 12. The dampers 64 may be installed on the incoming channel 16 or on the outlet side of the turbine, or both. Dampers 64 on the outlet side impose a flow resistance that is used to control the flow. Dampers on the inlet side (not shown) are designed to control airflow and to change how the flow enters the turbine housing. Inlet dampers reduce turbine energy usage due to their ability to affect the airflow pattern into the turbine housing. The dampers 64 may be mechanically louvered so as to modulate the velocity and volume of the incoming air and deflect any excess.
  • The turbine 14 and turbine housing 12 will be mounted immediately behind the incoming channel 16 in such a matter that the driving force of the wind will strike approximately an upper one third of an exposed turbine blade face (approximately 10″ by 18″ exposed through an opening in the shroud). The resultant force will initiate and maintain the rotation of the turbine 14.
  • The exhausting channel 18 will be comprised of a series of interconnected channels 66 that will allow the air to expand and escape through multiple exhausting channels 66. The resultant effect will be to eliminate any turbulence and back pressure that might otherwise be the result of the large volume of escaping air 54.
  • As shown in FIG. 6, a wind diverter 61 may be used in conjunction with the exhausting channel 18. The wind diverter 61 allows a portion of the exhausted air flow 54 to be recovered and recycled back into the turbine housing 12 through a separate opening 63. The volume of air from the wind diverter 61 is roughly ⅓ that of the original air flow and the flow must be equal to or greater than the primary source to add value.
  • The device may also have specific controls 38 to avoid overheating and control variant electrical discharge.
  • As shown in FIG. 3, the disclosed technology may comprise two main mounting components: an air frame 34 and a motor frame 32 a-b. The airframe 34 intersects the motor frame 32 a-b at ninety degrees. The common component in both the airframe 34 and motor frame 32 a-b is the turbine 14 as shown in FIG. 1. The turbine 14 may be connected directly to the motor/generator 30 a-b through a shaft 24 that allows for the conversion of wind power to mechanical power due to the wind power being created by the airframe providing sufficient torque and revolutions per minute to provide for push through for the motors to become generators.
  • Other components of the system may include programmable logic controllers, variable transformers, regenerative drives, phase converters, electrical contactors, industrial inverters, transfer switches, disconnects, 3 pole motor/generators, 4 pole polyphase induction motor/generators, 4 pole polyphase induction squirrel cage motor/generators and capacitor banks
  • As shown in FIG. 7, the wind force driven system may be utilized to power a vehicle 70 directly or can be incorporated into a vehicle's battery system 72. The turbine 74, which can be located in various places within vehicles, will provide sufficient mechanical (kinetic) energy through rotation that when connected to an electrical production device creates sufficient electrical power to recharge a battery or batteries 72, thereby, extending the distance that an electric powered vehicle 70 can achieve prior to standard recharge methods. The vehicle 70 that incorporates the wind force turbine can be of any size manufactured for any purpose. The efficiency of the system will vary dependent upon the electrical requirements of the vehicle.
  • The wind force driven turbine can also be incorporated into tractor trailer configurations (not shown) where the trailer requires electrical power for refrigeration. The wind force driven turbine is a single source wind power requirement that is provided by the vehicle moving forward. The wind power can be increased by the incorporation of wind channels that create the appropriate wind flow and wind direction to maximize the mass torque centripetal force needed for the electrical generation device that is employed in the system. The wind force turbine can be connected directly through its shaft or indirectly through pulley devices to the electric power producing device. The electric power producing device can be either an alternator or Tesla polyphase type designed wheel hub motors.
  • In order to avoid electrical flux or flow interruption the wind force driven system can be connected to a capacitor system 76 that allows for steady recharge of the battery or batteries 72. If more than one battery 72 is in the electrical vehicle system, an electrical control switch device 78 can be included to allow for the electrical energy to be directed to the appropriate battery.
  • When used in a vehicle 70, the system 10 will begin producing electricity when the vehicle 70 attains a forward speed of approximately 20-35 mph and will attain optimum output above 50 mph (1800 Turbine RPM). Although these speeds are dependent on the weight of the turbine 14, the dimensions of the turbine 14, the resistance of the generator bearings, the torque of the motors/alternators 30 a-b and the wind channel design 16, 18. Through testing, it has been determined that the low end speed for any commercial application is above 20 mph. The high end speed is dependent on the wind exhaust from the exhausting wind channel 18. That is, the balance of positive and negative wind forces (pressure) is dependent on the ability of the wind (air) to be released at a pressure that is lower than the pressure that would create a back force. Calculations show that the maximum wind speed over the turbine 74 is approximately 42% the speed of sound (0.42×768 mph) or 322 mph. At that point the vibration created by the wind overspeeds the turbine 74 and the turbine 74 loses any increased capability of doing more work.
  • The turbine 74 may be mounted in the hood 80 of the vehicle 70 and the front opening to the incoming wind channel 16 may be mounted in an area between the headlights 82 a-b. The alternators 30 a-b may be mounted behind the turbine and slightly below the axis of the turbine shaft 24. The alternators 30 a-b may be connected via a pulley/belt system 84 a-b on the opposing ends of the turbine shaft 24. The alternator/turbine pulley ratio may be, for example, a 2:1 ratio or 3:1 ratio which is based on optimum alternator output. The exhaust wind channeling system 18 will also be mounted behind the turbine 74. The exhausting channel 18 may be comprised of a series of interconnected channels 86 that will allow the air to expand and escape through openings in the hood (over windshield), beneath the floor panels and through the front wheel wells and fenders. The resultant effect will be to eliminate any turbulence and back pressure that might otherwise be the result of the large volume of escaping air.
  • The disclosed technology may utilize a four wheel hub motor 88 a-d which may be powered from the turbine 74. These motors 88 a-d serve two purposes. First, they provide propulsion for the vehicle 70 and, second, they produce additional electrical energy during deceleration (regenerative braking) The wheel hub motors 88 a-d may be 46 KW wheel hub motors with approximately 244 HP with an average hourly consumption of 21.2 KW.
  • The motors 88 a-d will provide adequate power and torque to propel a 3000-pound vehicle 70 to speeds in excess of 100 MPH. Further the vehicle 70 will be able to accelerate from 0 to 60 in less than 5 seconds. Under normal driving conditions and speeds, the vehicle will utilize approximately 21.2 Kilowatts per hour from the alternators 30 a-b and/or battery pack 72.
  • Initial power to the motors will be supplied by a battery pack (e.g., a 53 KW lithium ion battery pack). Once the vehicle attains speeds in excess of approximately 20 MPH, the resultant amplified head wind will initiate turbine rotation, which in turn, will drive the alternators and ultimately provide the electrical power necessary to drive the automobile.
  • The alternators 30 a-b may produce electrical energy that ranges from approximately 16 Kilowatts at 2000 RPM to 25.2 Kilowatts at its optimum RPM of 6500. At highway speeds, the turbine/alternator system will produce a surplus of approximately 4 Kilowatts per hour. This surplus will be used to operate auxiliary electrical devices, as well as for maintaining the battery packs charge.
  • The battery packs 72 may be located beneath the rear seats. They will consist of numerous lithium ion batteries and will have a total storage/output capacity of 53 KW. The vehicle 70 may also utilize a solar panel 90 (e.g. a 240 W rooftop solar panel having dimensions of 72″×50″) that may charge the battery pack 72 when parked, as well as supplementing the turbine 74 while driving.
  • Utilizing only the batteries 72, the vehicle 70 will have a range of approximately 150 miles under normal driving conditions. The batteries 72 have an expected life of approximately 10,000 cycles/recharges or 1.5 million miles before replacement becomes necessary far exceeding the average life cycle of an automobile.
  • In use, the start-up procedure for the unit is to first electrically energize the motor/generators 30 a-b with sufficient electrical power to create fully loaded torque and 1750 rpms. After the system 10 has reached those requirements, the dampers 64 are opened and airflow with a minimum speed of 20 MPH is introduced into the turbine 74. With the correct mass torque centripetal force ratio, the wind energy will push through the breakdown torque requirement of the generators 30 a-b and the generators 30 a-b (e.g., polyphase induction motors) will begin to generate electricity.
  • For speeds under 20 MPH, a first fan may be activated at a high start-up power to power the generators. Once the first fan (not shown) achieves steady state, a second fan (not shown) may be activated.
  • The device can be used either with open fluid force or channeled fluid force. The device efficiency is increased when used in conjunction with a fluid channeling tunnel that compacts the fluid and directs the fluid to the tips of the blades. The generation of the fluid force can be either natural or man made.
  • The device can be used in conjunction with other technologies such as electromagnetic generation for increased efficiency. As shown in FIG. 9, magnets 110 may be attached to wind turbine 14 and housing 12 to increase energy production.
  • The device is not limited to any single application. The device can be used in any vehicle or mechanism for the production of electricity. The device is generally most efficient when used in conjunction with the appropriate materials with a mass torque centripetal force ratio that is appropriate for the application.
  • The foregoing Detailed Description is to be understood as being in every respect illustrative and exemplary, but not restrictive, and the scope of the invention disclosed herein is not to be determined from the Detailed Description, but rather from the claims as interpreted according to the full breadth permitted by the patent laws. It is to be understood that the embodiments shown and described herein are only illustrative of the principles of the present invention and that various modifications may be implemented by those skilled in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention. Those skilled in the art could implement various other feature combinations without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

Claims (43)

  1. 1. A system for producing electrical power comprising:
    a turbine, the turbine having at least two turbine blades;
    a turbine housing, the housing having at least two openings, the at least two openings including a first opening and a second opening;
    an incoming channel, the incoming channel directing and amplifying a flow of a working fluid at the first opening, the incoming channel being mounted in such a way that the flow of working fluid strikes an upper portion of the turbine blades; and
    at least one generator being connected to the turbine for producing electrical power.
  2. 2. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 wherein the turbine has a single rotating axis.
  3. 3. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 2 wherein the blades are equally spaced around the axis.
  4. 4. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 3 wherein the tips of the blades are parallel to the axis.
  5. 5. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 wherein the blades have a length and a curvature.
  6. 6. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 5 wherein the turbine blades have a backward curvature and a length of 7-21 inches.
  7. 7. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 wherein the blades tips are weighted.
  8. 8. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 wherein the turbine housing is cylindrical.
  9. 9. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 further comprising:
    an exhausting channel, the exhausting channel directing the flow of the working fluid from the second opening to the ambient atmosphere.
  10. 10. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 9 wherein the exhaust channel is mounted in such a way that the flow of the working fluid allows the flow to expand and escape through multiple exhaust openings.
  11. 11. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 wherein the at least one electrical generator is a 230/460 V, 60 Hz alternator.
  12. 12. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 where the electrical generator is directly connected to the turbine.
  13. 13. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 wherein the electrical generator is connected to the turbine via a belt/pulley system.
  14. 14. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 wherein the electrical generator is connected to the turbine via a variable drive system.
  15. 15. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 further comprising:
    a set of dampers mechanically louvered so as to modulate the velocity and volume of the flow and deflect any excess.
  16. 16. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 further comprising:
    a set of magnets attached to the turbine and/or the turbine housing for generating electromagnetic energy.
  17. 17. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 1 further comprising:
    a control system for monitoring and regulating electrical power production and consumption.
  18. 18. A system for producing electrical power comprising:
    a centrifugal turbine, the centrifugal turbine having a drive shaft and at least three turbine blades attached to the drive shaft, the three turbine blades being backward-curved blades; and
    a turbine housing, the housing having at least two openings, the first opening receiving a flow of a working fluid and the second opening exhausting the flow of the working fluid.
  19. 19. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 18 further comprising:
    an incoming channel, the incoming channel directing and amplifying the flow of the working fluid at a first opening, the incoming channel being mounted in such a way that the flow of the working fluid strikes an upper portion of turbine blades.
  20. 20. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 19 further comprising:
    at least one generator being connected to the turbine for producing electrical power.
  21. 21. A system for producing electrical power comprising:
    a turbine, the turbine having at least two turbine blades; and
    a turbine housing, the housing having a first, a second and a third opening, the first opening receiving a flow of a working fluid, the second opening exhausting the flow of the working fluid; and
    a flow diverter, the flow diverter directing the flow exhausted from the second opening to the third opening.
  22. 22. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 21 further comprising:
    an incoming channel, the incoming channel directing and amplifying the flow of the working fluid at a first opening, the incoming channel being mounted in such a way that the flow of the working fluid strikes an upper portion of turbine blades.
  23. 23. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 22 further comprising:
    at least one generator being connected to the turbine for producing electrical power.
  24. 24. A system for producing electrical power comprising:
    a turbine, the turbine having at least two turbine blades;
    a turbine housing, the turbine housing having a first opening and a second opening, the first opening receiving a flow of a working fluid, the second opening exhausting the flow of the working fluid;
    an exhausting channel, the exhausting channel directing the flow of the working fluid from the second opening to the ambient atmosphere, the exhaust channel being mounted in such a way that the flow of the working fluid expands and escapes through multiple exhaust openings; and
    at least one generator being connected to the turbine for producing electrical power.
  25. 25. The system for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 24 wherein the exhausting channel minimizes turbulence and back pressure associated with exhausted working fluids.
  26. 26. A system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle comprising:
    a turbine, the turbine having at least three turbine blades;
    a turbine housing, the housing having at least two openings, the at least two openings including a first opening and a second opening;
    an incoming channel, the incoming channel directing and amplifying working fluids at the first opening, the incoming channel being mounted in such a way that the working fluids strike an upper portion of turbine blades;
    at least one generator being connected to the turbine for producing electrical power; and
    mounting means for mounting the turbine, the turbine housing, the incoming channel and the generator.
  27. 27. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 26 wherein the turbine and turbine housing are mounted within the vehicle near a front of the vehicle.
  28. 28. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 27 wherein the incoming channel is mounted between headlights of the moving vehicle.
  29. 29. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 28 wherein the at least one generator is mounted behind the turbine and turbine housing and slightly below an axis of the turbine.
  30. 30. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 29 wherein the at least one generator is connected via a pulley/belt system to opposing ends of a turbine shaft.
  31. 31. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 30 wherein the at least one generator and turbine have a pulley/belt ratio of 3:1.
  32. 32. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 29 wherein an exhaust channel is mounted behind the turbine and turbine housing.
  33. 33. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 32 wherein the exhausting channel includes a series of interconnected channels that allows the air to expand and escape through the interconnected channels.
  34. 34. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 33 wherein the interconnected channels open near a vehicle windshield, beneath floor panels and through front wheel wells and fenders.
  35. 35. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 34 wherein the exhausting channel eliminates any turbulence and back pressure that might otherwise be a result of exhausting an airflow.
  36. 36. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 27 further comprising:
    a set of wheel hub motors for propelling the vehicle.
  37. 37. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 36 wherein the wheel hub motors include a regenerative braking system.
  38. 38. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 27 further comprising:
    battery packs for storing electrical power produced from the generator.
  39. 39. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 27 further comprising:
    solar panels attached to a roof of the vehicle for producing electricity when the vehicle is not running
  40. 40. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 27 further comprising:
    programmable logic controllers for controlling power consumption and generation.
  41. 41. The system for producing electrical power in a moving vehicle as claimed in claim 27 further comprising:
    variable transformers, regenerative drives, phase converters, electrical contactors, industrial inverters, transfer switches, disconnects, three pole motor/generators, four pole polyphase induction motor/generators, four pole polyphase induction squirrel cage motor/generators, capacitor banks and combinations thereof.
  42. 42. A method for producing electrical power comprising the steps of:
    directing and amplifying a flow of a working fluid into a turbine housing, the flow of working fluid striking an upper portion of turbine blades; and
    producing electrical power from a rotation of the turbine blades.
  43. 43. A method for producing electrical power as claimed in claim 43 further comprising the step of:
    exhausting and expanding the flow of the working fluid out of the turbine housing.
US12539114 2009-08-11 2009-08-11 System And Method For Producing Electrical Power Abandoned US20110037261A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12539114 US20110037261A1 (en) 2009-08-11 2009-08-11 System And Method For Producing Electrical Power

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12539114 US20110037261A1 (en) 2009-08-11 2009-08-11 System And Method For Producing Electrical Power

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110037261A1 true true US20110037261A1 (en) 2011-02-17

Family

ID=43588142

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12539114 Abandoned US20110037261A1 (en) 2009-08-11 2009-08-11 System And Method For Producing Electrical Power

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20110037261A1 (en)

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110163549A1 (en) * 2009-09-16 2011-07-07 Sung-Chul Son Smart ship
US20110175366A1 (en) * 2010-01-19 2011-07-21 Johann Steinlechner Low-profile power-generating wind turbine
US20110187114A1 (en) * 2010-02-04 2011-08-04 Bert Socolove Wind driven turbine
US20110248666A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2011-10-13 Leigh Lorenson Turbine-powered electric vehicle
US8063502B1 (en) * 2007-12-26 2011-11-22 Voyles Robert L Shrouded wind turbine with dual coaxial airflow passageways
US20120049525A1 (en) * 2011-11-04 2012-03-01 Owens Andrew J System for a vehicle to capture energy from environmental air movement
CN102678456A (en) * 2011-03-07 2012-09-19 赵蒙 Wind power generation device used for vehicle
WO2012155970A1 (en) * 2011-05-18 2012-11-22 Youniverse-Unip.Lda Renewable energy self-charging system
CN102840100A (en) * 2012-09-12 2012-12-26 无锡中阳新能源科技有限公司 Solid-phase force arm type wind turbine
US20130038066A1 (en) * 2011-08-10 2013-02-14 Jose Diaz Electrical generator system for capturing wind energy on a moving vehicle
CN103410666A (en) * 2013-04-10 2013-11-27 黎幸龙 Wind driven generator electric energy applied to steamship, train and car
US20140358343A1 (en) * 2013-05-28 2014-12-04 Raymond Louis Chastang, JR. Vehicle tire frictional drive rotational power and energy source
US20150021917A1 (en) * 2013-07-17 2015-01-22 Brian Sellers Power generating apparatus
US20150097079A1 (en) * 2013-04-04 2015-04-09 Sunlight Photonics Inc. Method for airborne kinetic energy conversion
US20150116934A1 (en) * 2013-10-28 2015-04-30 Solar Turbines Inc. Power system enclosure
US20150137521A1 (en) * 2013-11-19 2015-05-21 Gabriel Ohiochioya Obadan Air powered electricity generating system
US20160169193A1 (en) * 2013-09-11 2016-06-16 Timothy T. Takahashi Compact wind power generation system
ES2583174A1 (en) * 2015-03-18 2016-09-19 Julián GUERRERO DÍEZ enveloping housing for wind turbines with a vertical axis
WO2017017627A1 (en) * 2015-07-29 2017-02-02 Venter Francois Energy generation and storage system

Citations (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4076448A (en) * 1975-08-21 1978-02-28 Sanders Jr Davis A Power generating water turbine
US4127356A (en) * 1977-06-09 1978-11-28 Thomas R. Tipps Wind motor machine
US4191505A (en) * 1978-02-24 1980-03-04 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Wind wheel electric power generator
US4279569A (en) * 1979-10-16 1981-07-21 Harloff Gary J Cross-flow turbine machine
US5009569A (en) * 1989-07-21 1991-04-23 Hector Sr Francis N Wind energy collection system
US5038049A (en) * 1990-09-12 1991-08-06 Shuichi Kato Vertical axis wind powered generator
US6158953A (en) * 1998-12-04 2000-12-12 Lamont; John S Wind turbine with variable position blades
US6849964B2 (en) * 2002-09-13 2005-02-01 Axis Usa, Inc. Wind powered energy generating machine
US6981839B2 (en) * 2004-03-09 2006-01-03 Leon Fan Wind powered turbine in a tunnel
US7112034B2 (en) * 2003-07-10 2006-09-26 Daryle Bezemer Wind turbine assembly
US7116005B2 (en) * 2005-02-16 2006-10-03 Corcoran Iii James John Tidal/wave flow electrical power generation system
US7215037B2 (en) * 2004-11-19 2007-05-08 Saverio Scalzi Protective wind energy conversion chamber
US7425772B2 (en) * 2005-04-11 2008-09-16 Maria Elena Novo Vidal Electric power generating system using ring-shaped generators
US7466035B1 (en) * 2008-02-26 2008-12-16 Simon Srybnik Transportable hydro-electric generating system with improved water pressure enhancement feature
US7521816B2 (en) * 2007-03-01 2009-04-21 Helfrich Jim C Water current powered motor
US7605490B2 (en) * 2007-12-10 2009-10-20 Simon Srybnik Transportable hydro-electric system
US7633177B2 (en) * 2005-04-14 2009-12-15 Natural Forces, Llc Reduced friction wind turbine apparatus and method
US7663262B2 (en) * 2003-07-14 2010-02-16 Marquiss Wind Power, Inc. System and method for converting wind into mechanical energy for a building and the like
US8072091B2 (en) * 2007-04-18 2011-12-06 Samuel B. Wilson, III Methods, systems, and devices for energy generation

Patent Citations (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4076448A (en) * 1975-08-21 1978-02-28 Sanders Jr Davis A Power generating water turbine
US4127356A (en) * 1977-06-09 1978-11-28 Thomas R. Tipps Wind motor machine
US4191505A (en) * 1978-02-24 1980-03-04 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Wind wheel electric power generator
US4279569A (en) * 1979-10-16 1981-07-21 Harloff Gary J Cross-flow turbine machine
US5009569A (en) * 1989-07-21 1991-04-23 Hector Sr Francis N Wind energy collection system
US5038049A (en) * 1990-09-12 1991-08-06 Shuichi Kato Vertical axis wind powered generator
US6158953A (en) * 1998-12-04 2000-12-12 Lamont; John S Wind turbine with variable position blades
US6849964B2 (en) * 2002-09-13 2005-02-01 Axis Usa, Inc. Wind powered energy generating machine
US7112034B2 (en) * 2003-07-10 2006-09-26 Daryle Bezemer Wind turbine assembly
US7663262B2 (en) * 2003-07-14 2010-02-16 Marquiss Wind Power, Inc. System and method for converting wind into mechanical energy for a building and the like
US6981839B2 (en) * 2004-03-09 2006-01-03 Leon Fan Wind powered turbine in a tunnel
US7215037B2 (en) * 2004-11-19 2007-05-08 Saverio Scalzi Protective wind energy conversion chamber
US7116005B2 (en) * 2005-02-16 2006-10-03 Corcoran Iii James John Tidal/wave flow electrical power generation system
US7425772B2 (en) * 2005-04-11 2008-09-16 Maria Elena Novo Vidal Electric power generating system using ring-shaped generators
US7633177B2 (en) * 2005-04-14 2009-12-15 Natural Forces, Llc Reduced friction wind turbine apparatus and method
US7521816B2 (en) * 2007-03-01 2009-04-21 Helfrich Jim C Water current powered motor
US8072091B2 (en) * 2007-04-18 2011-12-06 Samuel B. Wilson, III Methods, systems, and devices for energy generation
US7605490B2 (en) * 2007-12-10 2009-10-20 Simon Srybnik Transportable hydro-electric system
US7466035B1 (en) * 2008-02-26 2008-12-16 Simon Srybnik Transportable hydro-electric generating system with improved water pressure enhancement feature

Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8063502B1 (en) * 2007-12-26 2011-11-22 Voyles Robert L Shrouded wind turbine with dual coaxial airflow passageways
US8558404B2 (en) * 2009-09-16 2013-10-15 Sung-Chul Son Smart ship
US20110163549A1 (en) * 2009-09-16 2011-07-07 Sung-Chul Son Smart ship
US20110175366A1 (en) * 2010-01-19 2011-07-21 Johann Steinlechner Low-profile power-generating wind turbine
US9670899B2 (en) * 2010-01-19 2017-06-06 Wattenberg Industries, Llc Low-profile power-generating wind turbine
US20140265346A1 (en) * 2010-01-19 2014-09-18 Wattenberg Industries, Llc Low-profile power-generating wind turbine
US8791588B2 (en) * 2010-01-19 2014-07-29 Wattenberg Industries, Llc Low-profile power-generating wind turbine
US20110248666A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2011-10-13 Leigh Lorenson Turbine-powered electric vehicle
US20110187114A1 (en) * 2010-02-04 2011-08-04 Bert Socolove Wind driven turbine
CN102678456A (en) * 2011-03-07 2012-09-19 赵蒙 Wind power generation device used for vehicle
WO2012155970A1 (en) * 2011-05-18 2012-11-22 Youniverse-Unip.Lda Renewable energy self-charging system
US8618683B2 (en) * 2011-08-10 2013-12-31 Jose Diaz Electrical generator system for capturing wind energy on a moving vehicle
US20130038066A1 (en) * 2011-08-10 2013-02-14 Jose Diaz Electrical generator system for capturing wind energy on a moving vehicle
USRE46833E1 (en) * 2011-08-10 2018-05-08 Jose Diaz Electrical generator system for capturing wind energy on a moving vehicle
US20120049525A1 (en) * 2011-11-04 2012-03-01 Owens Andrew J System for a vehicle to capture energy from environmental air movement
US8344534B2 (en) * 2011-11-04 2013-01-01 Owens Andrew J System for a vehicle to capture energy from environmental air movement
CN102840100A (en) * 2012-09-12 2012-12-26 无锡中阳新能源科技有限公司 Solid-phase force arm type wind turbine
US20150097079A1 (en) * 2013-04-04 2015-04-09 Sunlight Photonics Inc. Method for airborne kinetic energy conversion
US9045234B2 (en) * 2013-04-04 2015-06-02 Sunlight Photonics Inc. Method for airborne kinetic energy conversion
CN103410666A (en) * 2013-04-10 2013-11-27 黎幸龙 Wind driven generator electric energy applied to steamship, train and car
US20140358343A1 (en) * 2013-05-28 2014-12-04 Raymond Louis Chastang, JR. Vehicle tire frictional drive rotational power and energy source
US20150021917A1 (en) * 2013-07-17 2015-01-22 Brian Sellers Power generating apparatus
US20160169193A1 (en) * 2013-09-11 2016-06-16 Timothy T. Takahashi Compact wind power generation system
US20150116934A1 (en) * 2013-10-28 2015-04-30 Solar Turbines Inc. Power system enclosure
US9376928B2 (en) * 2013-10-28 2016-06-28 Solar Turbines Incorporated Power system enclosure
US20150137521A1 (en) * 2013-11-19 2015-05-21 Gabriel Ohiochioya Obadan Air powered electricity generating system
ES2583174A1 (en) * 2015-03-18 2016-09-19 Julián GUERRERO DÍEZ enveloping housing for wind turbines with a vertical axis
WO2017017627A1 (en) * 2015-07-29 2017-02-02 Venter Francois Energy generation and storage system

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4132282A (en) Automotive electric generator
US4809803A (en) Drive system and vehicle for use therewith
US6838782B2 (en) Wind energy capturing device for moving vehicles
US6573675B2 (en) Method and apparatus for adaptive energy control of hybrid electric vehicle propulsion
US757800A (en) Wind-motor.
US6333620B1 (en) Method and apparatus for adaptively controlling a state of charge of a battery array of a series type hybrid electric vehicle
US6700215B2 (en) Multiple installation varie gated generators for fossil fuel-and electric-powered vehicles
US4314160A (en) Wind turbine generator for electrical powered vehicles
US20050046195A1 (en) Motor vehicle with wind generator device
US6817432B2 (en) Hybrid vehicle
US4648801A (en) Wind turbines
US6365985B1 (en) Electricity generation from air conditioning exhaust
US20080238105A1 (en) Fluid driven electric power generation system
US5762156A (en) Hybrid electric propulsion system using a dual shaft turbine engine
US20040174125A1 (en) Method and apparatus for adaptive control of hybrid electric vehicle components
US6492743B1 (en) Jet assisted hybrid wind turbine system
US8098040B1 (en) Ram air driven turbine generator battery charging system using control of turbine generator torque to extend the range of an electric vehicle
US6461266B1 (en) Differential electric engine with variable torque conversion
US7665554B1 (en) Recharging system for electrically powered vehicle, and vehicle incorporating same
US5432383A (en) Electric generator system for gas turbine
US5636509A (en) Flywheel engine improvements
US7211905B1 (en) Vehicle-mounted generator
US20100006351A1 (en) Electric vehicle with contra-recgarge system
US7434636B2 (en) Power system for electric and hybrid vehicles
US20020153178A1 (en) Regenerative electric vehicle

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: KTCR HOLDING, INC., CONNECTICUT

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:CHAMP, CHARLES W.;KAUFFMAN, RICHARD;TISCHENDORF, MICHAEL;SIGNING DATES FROM 20090817 TO 20091030;REEL/FRAME:023491/0885