US20110028208A1 - Game using independent-source game data - Google Patents

Game using independent-source game data Download PDF

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Publication number
US20110028208A1
US20110028208A1 US12512716 US51271609A US20110028208A1 US 20110028208 A1 US20110028208 A1 US 20110028208A1 US 12512716 US12512716 US 12512716 US 51271609 A US51271609 A US 51271609A US 20110028208 A1 US20110028208 A1 US 20110028208A1
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Prior art keywords
game
player
data
ongoing
system
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Abandoned
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US12512716
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Kyle Hodgetts
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LAI Games Australia Pty Ltd
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LAI Games International Pte Ltd
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/60Generating or modifying game content before or while executing the game program, e.g. authoring tools specially adapted for game development or game-integrated level editor
    • A63F13/65Generating or modifying game content before or while executing the game program, e.g. authoring tools specially adapted for game development or game-integrated level editor automatically by game devices or servers from real world data, e.g. measurement in live racing competition
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/50Controlling the output signals based on the game progress
    • A63F13/53Controlling the output signals based on the game progress involving additional visual information provided to the game scene, e.g. by overlay to simulate a head-up display [HUD] or displaying a laser sight in a shooting game
    • A63F13/537Controlling the output signals based on the game progress involving additional visual information provided to the game scene, e.g. by overlay to simulate a head-up display [HUD] or displaying a laser sight in a shooting game using indicators, e.g. showing the condition of a game character on screen
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/70Game security or game management aspects
    • A63F13/79Game security or game management aspects involving player-related data, e.g. identities, accounts, preferences or play histories
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/60Methods for processing data by generating or executing the game program
    • A63F2300/69Involving elements of the real world in the game world, e.g. measurement in live races, real video

Abstract

A game is disclosed that uses independent ongoing game data to define the game objective. The ongoing game data is defined by a source that is independent of the game program or gram operator. The ongoing game data is displayed to a player who is given an option to select which direction the next value of the game data. When the ongoing game data reaches its next value, the game determines whether the actual direction of the next value is the same as the direction selected by the player. If the two directions are the same, the player wins. The game will then display the results of the game to the player.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • This disclosure relates to games and more particularly to games that use data from sources independent of the game and the game operator.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Games have been a part of human existence likely from its beginning. People enjoy participating in games as amusement and entertainment. The gaming industry covers various aspects of gaming including entertainment games that people participate in for the sake of enjoyment only. People will purchase the game or purchase a turn on the game to attempt to complete the objective of the game. If the person wins he or she receives nothing more than the personal satisfaction of successfully achieving the objective of the game. Examples of entertainment games include games played on home gaming systems, such as Nintendo WII®, Microsoft Corporation's XBOX 360®, Sony Corporation's PLAYSTATION 3™, and the like. Entertainment games are also presented in free-standing game cabinets that are commonly found in arcades, malls, theaters, restaurants, theme parks, and other locations with large concentrations of people.
  • Another type of game, prize redemption games, are also popular for amusement and entertainment. They are commonly found in similar locations as the free-standing entertainment games. Typically the prize redemption games require a player to insert some form of monetary credit, token or the like to play the games. The games present circumstances to the player and allow the player to attempt to achieve a predetermined objective. If the player achieves the objective, the player is then rewarded with a prize. The typical prize in many prize redemption is very low cost, but may be enticing to persons as novelties. Typical prizes would include objects such as stuffed animals, trinkets, and the like. Some prize redemption games offer higher-valued prizes, depending on the skill level required to win and/or the amount of value the player provides to play the game. Still other types, such as LAI Game Sales, Inc.'s STACKER™ game, offer different levels and values of prizes associated with multiple levels of the game.
  • A further type of game, gambling games, are also very popular. In a gambling game, players place some kind of monetary unit at risk and play the game, which may require some skill on the part of the player and/or some element of chance. If the player wins a gambling game, he or she receives a monetary reward. The amount of this monetary reward may have various relationships to different criteria, including statistical analysis of the chances of a player winning, the amount of money placed at risk by the player, a relationship to the total monetary amount placed at risk by multiple players, or any combination thereof. Because of the potential amount of money involved, gambling games are typically highly regulated by the governmental units in the jurisdiction in which the gambling game machine is placed.
  • Because of the rapid development of computer technology, many modern games are controlled by a computer processor. Regardless of the type of game, all players want to know that the game play, especially game play controlled by a computer processor, is fair. However, commensurate with the current advanced state of computer technology, players may sometimes suspect that the programs in computer-controlled games or operators of these games manipulate the games and determine when the player wins or loses. This suspicion of manipulation may impact the level of satisfaction players get from playing the game and thus, diminishes the game s ability to draw and entertain players. In sum, though computerized games offer vast opportunities for player satisfaction and, consequently, increased earnings in entertainment establishments, those opportunities are currently being challenged by the issues described above.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY
  • The present teachings are directed to methods, systems and apparatus for operating a game so that a player of the game is assured that the game is not being manipulated by the operator of the game or the game's computer program. This assurance arises because the data used by the game originates from a source that is independent of the game and operator of the game and that would be available to the player to verify if he or she really wanted. Games operated consistently with these teachings have the potential to increase a player's satisfaction and, consequently, increase revenue to game operators.
  • In accordance with the foregoing, one representative embodiment of the present teachings involves a method for a game that includes presenting a visual timeline of independent ongoing game data on a first display screen where the visual timeline changes dynamically based on fluctuations in the ongoing game data. The game data is determined from a source independent from the game and an operator of the game. The method also includes receiving a first selection indicating a predicted direction of a next value of the game data from the current value. The next value is a position reached on one side or the other of the current game data value by virtue of the ongoing movement of the game data. The position on either side of the current game data value that corresponds to the next value is determined as a point that is a set distance or distances from the current game data value. This set distance is a predetermined number of points or other value units to one side or the other of the current value. The game is locked and the player can make no further selections for this game, in response to receiving the player selection. Afterwards, the game continues to monitor the ongoing game data to determine when this next value is reached on either side of the locked in current value. A win or loss is determined by whether the direction of the actual next value matches the direction of the predicted next value. A win occurs when the direction of the predicted next value matches the direction of the actual next value. In selected implementations of this representative embodiment, a prize or reward may be presented to the player if the player wins.
  • Another representative embodiment of the present teachings involves a game system for operating a game. The game system includes a central processing unit (CPU), a receiver and memory coupled to the CPU, and a game application stored on the memory. When executed by the CPU, the game application configures the game system to present a visual timeline of independent ongoing game data on a first display screen. The visual timeline changes dynamically based on fluctuations in the ongoing game data. This ongoing game data is determined from a source independent from the game and an operator of the game. The game application also configures the game system to receive a first selection indicating a prediction of the direction for a next value of the game data. The next value is the value, either on one side or the other, of the current game data value that is reached by the progression of the ongoing game data. Those values for the next value are set at a predetermined number of points on either side of the current value, respectively. The game application also configures the game system to monitor the ongoing game data to detect when the next value is reached. Further, the game application configures the game system to determine whether the player has won or lost when the next value is reached. A win occurs when the predicted direction of the next value matches the actual direction of the next value. In selected implementations of this representative embodiment, a prize or reward may be presented to the player if the player wins.
  • A further representative embodiment of the present teachings involves a computer program product having a computer readable storage medium with computer program logic recorded thereon. The computer program product includes code for presenting a visual timeline of independent ongoing game data on a first display screen. The visual timeline changes dynamically based on fluctuations in the ongoing game data. This game data is determined from a source independent from the game and an operator of the game. The computer program product also includes code for receiving a first selection indicating a predicted direction of a next value of the ongoing game data. The next value is the value reached through the progression of the ongoing game data on either side of the current value. This value is set at a predetermined number of points on one side or the other of the current value respectively. The computer program product also includes code for monitoring the ongoing game data to determine when the next value is reached and code for determining whether the player has won or lost. A win occurs when the predicted direction of the next value matches the actual direction of the next value. In selected implementations of this representative embodiment, a prize or reward may be presented to the player if the player wins.
  • The foregoing has outlined rather broadly the features and technical advantages of the present teachings in order that the detailed description of the teachings that follows may be better understood. Additional features and advantages of the teachings will be described hereinafter which form the subject of the claims of the teachings. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the conception and specific embodiment disclosed may be readily utilized as a basis for modifying or designing other structures for carrying out the same purposes of the present teachings. It should also be realized by those skilled in the art that such equivalent constructions do not depart from the spirit and scope of the teachings as set forth in the appended claims. The novel features which are believed to be characteristic of the teachings, both as to its organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages will be better understood from the following description when considered in connection with the accompanying figures. It is to be expressly understood, however, that each of the figures is provided for the purpose of illustration and description only and is not intended as a definition of the limits of the present teachings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • For a more complete understanding of the present teachings, reference is now made to the following descriptions taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating a game environment configured according to one embodiment of the present teachings
  • FIG. 2 is a flowchart illustrating example steps executed when implementing one embodiment of the present teachings;
  • FIG. 3; is an illustration of a system according to one embodiment of the teachings;
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a flow chart according to one embodiment of the teachings
  • FIGS. 5A-5F illustrate display screens according to one embodiment of the teachings;
  • FIG. 6 illustrates one embodiment of the teachings; and
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a computer system adopted to use various embodiments of the teaching.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating game environment 10 configured according to one embodiment of the present teachings. Game environment 10 presents game screen 101 to a player on display device 100 that allows the player to make predictions about the movement of independent game data. Game environment 10 includes ongoing game data 102 which is data that is independent from the game program or the game operator and which would be readily available and verifiable by a player. Thus, when presented with ongoing game data 102, the player would have assurance that an operator of the game or the game's computer program is not manipulating the game. In selected embodiments of the present teachings, the player may even be given a choice as to which game data to use. As shown in game environment 10 ongoing game data may be presented to the player in graphical form.
  • It should be noted that the ongoing game data from the independent source may be live or historical data. In selected embodiments in which historical game data is used, the game may identify to the player which historical period is being used so that the player could then use his or her knowledge of the period to help predict the next data movement. Other embodiments using historical data may simply present the data without any further explanation.
  • The ongoing game data used in game environment 10 is traffic data for the Lincoln Tunnel in New York city. The data tracks how many automobiles are in the tunnel at a given time. This data may be maintained by various independent sources, such as the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Game environment 10 displays the ongoing game data in a ticker tape-style display on game screen 101. It also renders touch screen buttons 103 (More) and 104 (Less), which provide the player with an opportunity to select (predict) the direction he or she believes the current number of automobiles in the tunnel will move by a certain set amount or a fixed number of points. This set amount may be determined by the game's program or the game operator. The game's program, for example may determine that the determinable traffic fluctuation is 100 cars for the next value in the “more” direction and 200 cars for the next value in the “less” direction. It should be noted that the fluctuation points designated for the more next value may or may not be the same as the fluctuation points used for the less next value. If the player selects that the number of cars in the tunnel will increase, the player will win if the number of cars in the tunnel increases by 100 cars from its current level to the more next value without first dropping to the less next value. Similarly, selecting the number of cars in the tunnel to go down will produce a win for the player if the number of cars in the tunnel drops by 200 points to the less next value without first rising to the more next value. Conversely, if the number of cars in the tunnel changes to the next value in the opposite direction than selected by the player, then the player will lose. In order to speed the time of play, game environment 10 allows the player a set amount of time in which to make his or her game prediction. Time notification 105 displays this time limit to the player. For example, current game environment 10 sets the time limit at 52 seconds. Furthermore, game environment 10 displays tunnel time 106 to the player. Because the total number of cars in the tunnel at any one time will have a direct relationship to the time of days tunnel time 106 provides relevant information to the player to make his or her selection.
  • Once the player makes a prediction by selecting either of buttons 103 or 104, game environment 10 immediately prevents the player from making another selection in the current game session. Thus, the selection is “locked in” for this game. Though the game is locked in., game environment 10 continues to present ongoing data 102. As such, the player can continue to monitor how the number of cars in the tunnel is moving in relation to the selected “more” and “less” levels or may begin a new game with a new prediction.
  • It should be noted that in additional and/or alternative embodiments of the present teachings, once the ongoing game data reaches the next level, game environment 10 presents the results to the player. In such alternative embodiments, if the player wins, game environment 10 may present the player an option to continue playing, such that as long as the player keep winning, he or she will be given an option to continue playing.
  • FIG. 2 is a flowchart illustrating example steps executed when implementing one embodiment of the present teachings. In step 200, independent ongoing game data is presented to a player. The player observes the ongoing game data and makes a prediction, which is received by the game environment in step 201, as to whether the next value of the ongoing game data will change in a first direction or second direction by a predetermined amount. Here, the next value means the movement of the ongoing data by the predetermined amount in one of the first or second directions. In step 202, the game environment locks in the player's selection and prevents the player from making another selection in the current game. The game environment continues to present and monitor the ongoing game data, in step 203, which the player may also observe in relation to the selected first and second directions. In step 204, a determination is made whether the game has ended. The game ends when the ongoing data first reaches either of the next level for the first direction or the next level for the second direction. If the game has not ended, then the game environment goes back to step 208 and continues to present and monitor the game data. Otherwise, if the game has ended, a further determination is made, in step 205, as to the results of the game, i.e., whether the player has won or lost. In step 206, the results are then presented to the player.
  • FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating game system 30 configured according to one embodiment of the present teachings. Game system 30 is presented in a free-standing device, such as game cabinet 309, and includes CPU 303, memory 302, buttons 310-311, and receiver 301 for receiving ongoing game data from independent source 306. Receiver 301 receives the ongoing game data over a network such as a wide or local area network (WAN/LAN), the internet, or the like. The received ongoing game data is stored on memory 302, which may be a disk, hard drive, Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory (EPROM), or the like. Game application 308 is also stored on memory 302. When game application 308 is executed by processor CPU 303, the game playing environment is enabled. Game system 30 presents the game playing environment, including the ongoing game data, to a player on primary display 304 and secondary display 305. Either or both of primary display 304 and secondary display 305 may be a touch screen display. The player can provide input to game system 30 through user interface pad 300. This input may include player identification information in addition to other information. Game system 30 also provides payment receiver 307, which accepts the player s game play payment.
  • It should be noted that in additional and/or alternative embodiments of the present teachings, receiver 301 may be a dedicated disk device that holds a read-only disk dedicated solely to maintaining the ongoing game data for the game. The data on the read-only disk is provided by independent source 306. In these particular additional and/or alternative embodiments, the ongoing game data remains on the read-only disk and is not transferred to memory 302. In this manner, the player may be assured that there is no opportunity for the independent ongoing game data to be manipulated by anyone other than independent source 306.
  • FIG. 4 is a flow chart illustrating example steps executed to implement one embodiment of the present teachings. The processes in flowchart 40 may be implemented in various different embodiments of the present teaching, including game system 30 (FIG. 3). In process 400, a game session is initiated. This initiation may include process 400A, which identifies a player and associates the player's identification with the game session. Identifying the player may include various known techniques, including biometric methods, such as identifying the player by fingerprint, facial recognition, hand and palm geometry, iris recognition, retina recognition, voice recognition, through various short range wireless standards, such as a radio frequency identifier (REID) device, Bluetooth Special Interest Group's (SIG) BLUETOOTH™, Nokia Oyj's WIBREE™, the Wifi Aliance's WIFI™ and the like, in addition to the various protocols falling within the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' (IEEE) standards IEEE 802.11 and IEEE 802.15 short range wireless protocols, and personal area networks (PANs), and the like, through long range wireless protocols such as in a mobile telecommunications system, such as CDMA, W-CDMA, GSM, OFDMA, the WiMAX Forum's Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WIMAX™), and the like, or through other conventional game identification methods, such as identification cards, manual entry of player identification, or the like. If the identification is directed to a physical feature of the player (biometric identification), this removes the responsibility of the player to possess other means of identification such as a card, token or other such tangible. However, any form of identification may be used in the teachings herein. If the player is using game system 30 for the first time, then user interface pad 300 receives player identification information, whether through biometric or physical means, and stores that information associated with the player in memory 304. In effect, this is the enrollment of the player. Subsequent to this enrollment, user interface pad 300 identifies the player by detecting the relevant identification parameter and comparing it with the stored information in memory 302.
  • In process 400B, which may be a part of the initiation of the game session, payment receiver 307 accepts payment from the player. After the game session is initiated, ongoing game data may be received from independent source 306 in process 401. The game data may be any type of data as long as it is ongoing for a definable period of time and is independent from the game and game operator. For example, the foreign currency exchange market is a source of independent readily available and verifiable information and may be used as the ongoing market data presented to the player in the game. As such, foreign exchange data and other similar types of market data provide beneficial user experiences that can be easily verified by the user. Other similar independent sources of ongoing market data include New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), American Stock Exchange (AMEX), National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations (NASDAQ), or New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) which provide publicly available and verifiable ongoing market data such as stock market, bond, currency and commodity prices.
  • It should be noted that additional forms of the ongoing game data may be used, as long as the ongoing and independent criteria are met. For instance, temperature data either for a particular area or the global average would be compatible with various embodiments of the present teachings. Furthermore, transportation data, such as the number of airplanes in flight at any given time over a given area. The embodiments of the present teachings are not limited to any specific type of ongoing game data.
  • In process 403, game system 30 provides the player with an opportunity to select (predict) whether the market price will move up or down to the up next level or down next level. The player may enter such selection using touch screen buttons, such as buttons 103 and 104 (FIG. 1), or using physical buttons located on the unit, such as buttons 310 and 311 on game cabinet 309. Process 404 limits the time the player has to make a prediction. If the player exceeds the time allotted to make the prediction, the game session ends in process 405. If the time limit has not been exceeded, in process 406, the player makes the directional selection and process 407 immediately prevents the player from making another selection in the current session. Thus, the selection is “locked in.”
  • Though the player's selection is “locked in,” process 408 allows the player to continue to monitor the received ongoing game data in relation to the player's selection. After the selection is “locked in,” the game session continues until the player wins or loses. Depending on the fixed fluctuation amount set by the game's program or the game operator, the game may go on for a long time. In certain embodiments, the game's program or the game operator may set a period, for example, two weeks after which the game session will be terminated if the player has not won or lost. Further, because the game may be over an extended period, the player may desire to take a break from the game and continue playing at some later time. Typically, to allow a returning player to continue playing the game as the same player, the computerized game identifies the player by a card issued to the player by the operator of the game. Often, however, circumstances in which the player finds himself or herself when desiring to play do not facilitate the use of these cards. For example, in some resorts, some vacationers do not move around with purses or wallets in which these cards are usually kept. This is especially true in resorts that include swimming facilities. Even when persons can move around with a card, few players want to be burdened with having to carry a card simply to play a game. Moreover, these cards are prone to being lost.
  • The identification methods disclosed herein enables the player to stop monitoring a game session and easily return at a later time to resume monitoring. As such, in process 409, the player may indicate that the player wishes to terminate the display of received ongoing game data. In response to a player s indication to terminate the game display, game system 30 stops displaying the ongoing game data, in process 410.
  • The game system 30 simply waits until the next person or any previous player come back and resume game monitoring or initiating a new game. In process 411, game system 30 determines whether there has been a request to resume monitoring. If that request has been made, user interface pad 300 collects data to identify the player in process 412. In process 413, central processing unit 303 in conjunction with memory 302 determines whether the player making the request has any ongoing or previous games. If the player has no previous games then the player may start a new game session in process 400B. If the player has an ongoing or previous game, in process 414, game system 30 displays a list of the ongoing or previous games. In process 415, the player is given an option to play a new game. If the player does not wish to play a new game the player is given an option, in process 416, to exit in process 417 or continue to monitor the ongoing game data in process 408.
  • Process 408 may also allow the games that are still running to be displayed on secondary display 305 (FIG. 3) or display 605 (FIG. 6). On these secondary screens, which may be large enough for an audience to view, the games still running may be displayed either as a running “Ticker Tape” or other format with the ongoing market data. Furthermore, on these secondary screens, the players may be identified, for example, by their initials. Accordingly, the players may monitor the games they are involved in without having to log into game system 30.
  • In process 418, whether the received ongoing game data is being displayed to the player or not, game system 30 determines whether the game has ended. If the game has ended, process 419 determines whether the player has won or lost. If the player has lost, the game session ends in process 420. If the player has won, then process 421 presents the player an option to redeem a player reward or continue playing. If the player selects to continue playing, then the player is prompted, in process 422 to make a further payment. If a further payment is made, a new game session is started in process 423. Because of this further payment, an incremental amount is added to the game play amount and the value of the potential player reward will also increase at an incremental rate commensurate with the new total game play amount. This allows the value of the player reward to increase significantly over a short amount of time. If the player selects not to continue playing, then, in process 424, the player is allowed to redeem any player reward won.
  • It should be noted that a player reward may constitute any number of different items that may be desirable or entertaining to a player. For example: depending on the laws of the particular jurisdiction in which game system 30 is located, a player reward may be cash, some kind of other monetary unit or indicia of value, a token or indicia representing free play of other games, food or event coupons or tokens, plush toys, electronics, trinkets, or other such prizes. The implementation of the various embodiments of the present teachings are not limited in the type of player reward offered to a winning player.
  • It should be noted that in selected embodiments of the present teachings a game may not require further payment to continue playing.
  • FIGS. 5A-5F illustrate display screens according to one embodiment of the present teachings. Display screens 501 to 505 depict the interface that is displayed to a player during a game, for example, on primary display 304 and/or secondary display 305. In FIG. 5A flowchart 50 illustrates the order in which screens 501 to 505 are presented to a player during a game. Screen 501 presents the player's identity and game session status. Because of the nature and the time of the game, a player may have several game sessions going at once. Screen 501 lists all of the player's active and completed games and indicates that the player has lost two games and won three. Screen 501 presents an option to the player to start a new game, redeem a player reward, continue a game, or exit the game. Accordingly, depending on the player's intentions, from screen 501, the player may proceed to screens 502 or 503 or a blank game screen (not shown) if the player chooses to exit.
  • When the player chooses to start a new game, screen 502 is presented, which displays the ongoing game data in the form of a graph. Screen 502 illustrates that the player is given 52 seconds to select whether the next level of the game data will be higher or lower than the current level. The next level in the embodiment illustrated in screen 502 is reached after the ongoing game data moves 100 points. The higher next level will be 100 point higher than the current level, while the lower next level will be 100 points lower than the current level. To make a game prediction, the player selects either of buttons 302A (Up) or 302B (Down), which may be touch screen buttons or normal push buttons. Once the player makes the selection, the selection is “locked in,” and the player can take no further action with this game session until the ongoing data reaches the next level. The player wins when he or she correctly predicts the direction of next level with respect to the current level. Until the player wins or loses, screen 503 is presented to the player illustrating only the movement of the ongoing market data. Screen 503 may be displayed for a predetermined period to allow other players to have access to the game. As such, any player who is not currently playing a game can monitor his ongoing game or games by viewing secondary display 305 (FIG. 3) or display 605 (FIG. 6).
  • If at screen 501, the player has chosen to redeem a player reward or play on, the player is presented with screen 504. Screen 504 provides an option to the player to redeem a player reward (in this case a MP3 USB player) or to make a further incremental payment to play for an incrementally more valuable player reward (in this case a digital camera). When the player chooses to redeem the player reward, screen 505 is displayed, congratulating the player, and illustrating the player reward won. Depending on the specific embodiment implemented., the player reward may be delivered to the player through a reward dispenser located at the gaming device or a game operator is notified who then arranges delivery of the player reward.
  • It should be noted that game system 30 (FIG. 3) is only one embodiment of the present teachings. In game system 30, cabinet 309 is about the size of a typical slot machine. In other embodiments however, game system 30 could be a larger standalone device with direct prize vending facilities or even a system operated on a personal computer or personal computing device. Still other embodiments of the present teachings may include differently configured units operated by the player.
  • FIG. 6 is a diagram illustrating gaming environment 60 configured according to one embodiment of the present teachings. Gaming environment 60 is set up in a location accessible to multiple people, such as a sports bar, restaurant, pub, or the like. Gaming environment 60 is accessed by several players through multiple handheld modules 601-603 and bar-top game unit 606 connected to server 600. Server 600 maintains the computer system that operates the software that defines the game. Communication between handheld modules 601 and 602 and server 600 is implemented wirelessly, while communication between handheld module 603 and bar-top game unit 606 and server 600 is wired. Any method or means capable of coupling handheld modules 601-603 and bar-top game unit 606 may be used. Handheld modules 601-603 provides a user input interface allowing the player the opportunity to make up or down selections while watching the presentation of the independent ongoing game data through game screen 604 on display 605. When a particular player wins, a communication is sent to the corresponding one of handheld modules 601-603 and bar-top game unit 606.
  • Additional and/or alternative embodiments of the game system may be an internet model that can be played via any computer such as laptop, mobile phone or any device that has a screen or display to display the game information and can be connected to the internet or game server by wire or wirelessly. In this embodiments a website may serve as the platform for playing the game by viewing the market data and making selections. The identification of the player in this case may be accomplished by various means, such as by the IP address of the player's computer, cookies stored on the player's computer, PI, password number or the like.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates computer system 700 adapted to use embodiments of the present teaching, e.g., storing and/or executing software associated with the embodiments. Central processing unit (“CPU” or “processor”) 701 is coupled to system bus 702. The CPU 701 may be any general purpose CPU. However, embodiments of the present teaching are not restricted by the architecture of CPU 701 as long as CPU 701 supports the inventive operations as described herein. Bus 702 is coupled to random access memory (RAM) 703, which may be SRAM, DPRAM, or SDRAM. ROM 704 is also coupled to bus 702, which may be PROM, EPROM, or EEPROM. RAM 703 and ROM 704 hold user and system data and programs as is well known in the art.
  • Bus 702 is also coupled to input/output (I/O) controller card 705, communications adapter card 711, user interface card 708, and display card 709. The I/O adapter card 705 connects storage devices 706, such as one or more of a hard drive, a CD drive, a floppy disk drive, a tape drive, to computer system 700. The I/O adapter 705 is also connected to a printer (not shown), which would allow the system to print paper copies of information such as documents, photographs, articles, and the like. Note that the printer may be a printer (e.g., dot matrix, laser, and the like), a fax machine, scanner, or a copier machine. Communications card 711 is adapted to couple the computer system 700 to a network 712, which may be one or more of a telephone network, a local (LAN) and/or a wide-area (WAN) network, an Ethernet network, and/or the Internet network. User interface card 708 couples user input devices, such as keyboard 713, pointing device 707 and the like, to the computer system 700. The display card 709 is driven by CPU 701 to control the display on display device 710.
  • Although the present teachings and its advantages have been described in detail, it should be understood that various changes, substitutions and alterations can be made herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the present teachings as defined by the appended claims. Moreover, the scope of the present application is not intended to be limited to the particular embodiments of the process, machine, manufacture, composition of matter, means, methods and steps described in the specification. As one of ordinary skill in the art will readily appreciate from the disclosure of the present teachings, processes, machines, manufacture, compositions of matter, means, methods, or steps, presently existing or later to be developed that perform substantially the same function or achieve substantially the same result as the corresponding embodiments described herein may be utilized according to the present teachings. Accordingly, the appended claims are intended to include within their scope such processes, machines, manufacture, compositions of matter, means, methods, or steps.

Claims (45)

  1. 1. A method for a game, said method comprising:
    presenting a visual timeline of ongoing game data on a first display screen, wherein said visual timeline changes dynamically based on fluctuations in said ongoing game data and wherein said ongoing game data is determined from a source independent from said game and an operator of said game;
    receiving a selection indicating a prediction of a direction of a next value of said ongoing game data, wherein said next value is a level of said ongoing game data reached after moving a predetermined number of points;
    monitoring said ongoing game data for said next value,
    responsive to detecting said next value, determining one of a win or a loss, wherein said win is when said predicted direction of said next value matches an actual direction of said next value.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1 further comprising:
    identifying a player of said game using one of:
    biometric data;
    wireless identification information;
    a tangible indicia of identification; and
    an identification number.
  3. 3. The method of claim 2 wherein said biometric data is selected from a group consisting of:
    fingerprint;
    face recognition:
    hand geometry;
    iris recognition;
    retina recognition; and
    voice recognition.
  4. 4. The method of claim 2 further comprising:
    storing said player's identity in association with an ongoing game.
  5. 5. The method of claim 4 further comprising:
    receiving a request to play said game from a player; and
    collecting identification data from said player.
  6. 6. The method of claim 5 further comprising:
    determining based on said collected identification data, whether said player has any ongoing or previous games;
    if said player has any ongoing or previous games, displaying a list of said ongoing and previous games to said player; and
    displaying options for said player to select a next action.
  7. 7. The method of claim 1 wherein said source of said ongoing game data is selected from a group consisting of a foreign exchange market, New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), American Stock Exchange (AMEX), National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations (NASDAQ), New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a commodities exchange market transportation data, and temperature data.
  8. 8. The method of claim 1 wherein said received ongoing game data is selected from the list consisting of: live data and historical data.
  9. 9. The method of claim 1 further comprising:
    responsive to said receiving said selection, locking in said selection for said game.
  10. 10. The method of claim 1 further comprising:
    responsive to said indication of said win, offering a player reward to a player.
  11. 11. The method of claim 10 wherein said player reward comprises one or more of:
    cash;
    monetary unit;
    indicia of monetary value;
    indicia representing free play of other games;
    food coupon;
    event coupon;
    a plush toy;
    an electronic device; and
    novelty prize.
  12. 12. The method of claim 10 further comprising:
    responsive to said indication of said win, providing an option for continued play.
  13. 13. The method of claim 12 wherein said continued play provides an opportunity to win a different player reward.
  14. 14. The method of claim 13 further comprising:
    providing a payment interface to said player to enter a new value for said continued play, wherein a value of said different player reward is higher than said player reward.
  15. 15. A game system comprising:
    a central processing unit (CPU);
    user interface pad coupled to said CPU, wherein said user interface pad is configured to receive identification information from a player of a game;
    a receiver coupled to said CPU;
    a memory coupled to said CPU;
    a game application stored on said memory, wherein, when executed by said CPU, said game application configures said game system to:
    present a visual timeline of ongoing game data on a first display screen, wherein said visual timeline changes dynamically based on fluctuations in said ongoing game data; wherein said ongoing game data is determined from a source independent from said game and an operator of said game
    receive a first selection indicating a prediction of a direction of a next value of said ongoing game data, wherein said next value is a value of said ongoing game data that is a predetermined number of points one of above and below a current value of said ongoing game data;
    monitor said ongoing game data for said next value;
    responsive to detecting said next value, determine one of a win or a loss, wherein said win is when said predicted direction of said next value matches an actual direction of said next value.
  16. 16. The system of claim 15 further comprising:
    a payment receiver configured to accept payment from said player.
  17. 17. The system of claim 15 wherein said identification information comprises one or more of:
    biometric data;
    wireless identification information;
    a tangible indicia of identification; and
    an identification number.
  18. 18. The system of claim 17 wherein said biometric data is selected from a group consisting of:
    fingerprint;
    face recognition;
    hand geometry;
    iris recognition;
    retina recognition; and
    voice recognition.
  19. 19. The system of claim 17 wherein said executed game application further configures said game system to store said identification information in association with an ongoing game.
  20. 20. The system of claim 15 wherein said executed game application further configures said game system to:
    receive a request to play said game from a player; and
    collect identification data from said player.
  21. 21. The system of claim 20 wherein said executed game application further configures said game system to:
    determine, based on said collected identification data, whether said player has any ongoing or previous games;
    if said player has any ongoing or previous games, display a list of said ongoing or previous games to said player; and
    display options for said player to select a next action.
  22. 22. The system of claim 15 wherein said source of said ongoing game data is selected from a group consisting of a foreign exchange market, New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), American Stock Exchange (AMEX), National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations (NASDAQ), New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a commodities exchange market, transportation data, and temperature data.
  23. 23. The system of claim 15 wherein said first display comprises a touch screen.
  24. 24. The system of claim 15 further comprising:
    a second display screen configured to display any selection from a group consisting of: said ongoing game data, a list of ongoing games and said ongoing games' player and advertising.
  25. 25. The system of claim 24 wherein a hand held module comprises said second display screen.
  26. 26. The system of claim 15 wherein said executed game application further configures said game system to:
    offer selection to a player to redeem a player reward responsive to determination of said win.
  27. 27. The system of claim 26 wherein said player reward comprises one or more of:
    cash;
    monetary unit;
    indicia of monetary value;
    indicia representing free play of other games;
    food coupon;
    event coupon;
    a plush toy;
    an electronic device; and
    novelty prize.
  28. 28. The system of claim 26 further comprising:
    a player reward dispenser configured to dispense said player reward on selection of said player to redeem said player reward.
  29. 29. The system of claim 26 wherein said executed game application further configures said game system to:
    provide an option for continued play responsive to said indication of said win.
  30. 30. The system of claim 29 wherein said continued play provides an opportunity to win a different player reward.
  31. 31. The system of claim 29 wherein said executed game application further configures said game system to:
    provide a payment interface to said player to enter a new value for said continued play, wherein a value of said different player reward is higher than said player reward.
  32. 32. A computer program product having a computer readable storage medium with computer program logic recorded thereon, said computer program product comprising:
    code for presenting a visual timeline of ongoing game data on a first display screen, wherein said visual timeline changes dynamically based on fluctuations in said ongoing game data and wherein said ongoing game data is determined from a source independent from said game and an operator of said game;
    code for receiving a selection indicating a prediction of a direction of a next value of said ongoing game data, wherein said next value is a level of said ongoing game data reached after moving a predetermined number of points;
    code for monitoring said ongoing game data for said next value,
    code, executable responsive to detecting said next value, for determining one of a win or a loss, wherein said win is when said predicted direction of said next value matches an actual direction of said next value.
  33. 33. The computer program product of claim 32 further comprising:
    code for identifying a player of said game using one or more of:
    biometric data;
    wireless identification information;
    a tangible indicia of identification; and
    an identification number.
  34. 34. The computer program product of claim 33 wherein said biometric data is selected from a group consisting of:
    fingerprint;
    face recognition;
    hand geometry;
    iris recognition;
    retina recognition; and
    voice recognition.
  35. 35. The computer program product of claim 33 further comprising:
    code for storing said player s identity in association with an ongoing game.
  36. 36. The computer program product of claim 35 further comprising:
    code for receiving a request to play said game from a player; and
    code for collecting identification data from said player.
  37. 37. The computer program product of claim 36 further comprising:
    code for determining, based on said collected identification data, whether said player has any ongoing or previous games;
    code, responsive to said player having ongoing or previous games, for displaying a list of said ongoing or previous games to said player; and
    code for displaying options for said player to select a next action.
  38. 38. The computer program product of claim 32 wherein said source of said ongoing game data is selected from one or more listings taken from a group consisting of: a foreign exchange market, New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), American Stock Exchange (AMEX), National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations (NASDAQ), New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a commodities exchange market, transportation data, and temperature data.
  39. 39. The computer program product of claim 32 wherein said received ongoing game data is selected from the list consisting of live data and historical data.
  40. 40. The computer program product of claim 32 further comprising:
    code, executable responsive to said receiving said selection, for locking in said selection for said game.
  41. 41. The computer program product of claim 32 further comprising:
    code, responsive to said indication of said win, for offering a player reward to a player.
  42. 42. The computer program product of claim 41 wherein said player reward comprises one or more of:
    cash;
    monetary unit;
    indicia of monetary value;
    indicia representing free play of other games;
    food coupon;
    event coupon;
    a plush toy;
    an electronic device; and
    novelty prize.
  43. 43. The computer program product of claim 41 further comprising:
    code, responsive to said indication of said win, for providing an option for continued play.
  44. 44. The computer program product of claim 43 wherein said continued play is offered for a different player reward.
  45. 45. The computer program product of claim 44 further comprising:
    code for providing a payment interface to said player to enter a new value for said continued play, wherein a value of said different player reward is higher than said player reward.
US12512716 2009-07-30 2009-07-30 Game using independent-source game data Abandoned US20110028208A1 (en)

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