US20110005752A1 - Water Sensitive Porous Medium to Control Downhole Water Production and Method Therefor - Google Patents

Water Sensitive Porous Medium to Control Downhole Water Production and Method Therefor Download PDF

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US20110005752A1
US20110005752A1 US12/835,023 US83502310A US2011005752A1 US 20110005752 A1 US20110005752 A1 US 20110005752A1 US 83502310 A US83502310 A US 83502310A US 2011005752 A1 US2011005752 A1 US 2011005752A1
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water
copolymers
acrylamide
flow
crosslinked
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US12/835,023
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Tianping Huang
Richard A. Mitchell
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Baker Hughes Inc
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Baker Hughes Inc
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Priority to US12/191,921 priority Critical patent/US7942206B2/en
Priority to US12/606,464 priority patent/US9303502B2/en
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Priority to US12/835,023 priority patent/US20110005752A1/en
Assigned to BAKER HUGHES INCORPORATED reassignment BAKER HUGHES INCORPORATED ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: HUANG, TIANPING, MITCHELL, RICHARD A.
Publication of US20110005752A1 publication Critical patent/US20110005752A1/en
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B34/00Valve arrangements for boreholes or wells
    • E21B34/06Valve arrangements for boreholes or wells in wells
    • E21B34/08Valve arrangements for boreholes or wells in wells responsive to flow or pressure of the fluid obtained
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/32Preventing gas- or water- coning phenomena, i.e. the formation of a conical column of gas or water around wells

Abstract

Water production produced from a subterranean formation is inhibited or controlled by consolidated water sensitive porous medium (WSPM) packed within the flow path of the wellbore device container. The WSPM includes solid particles having a water hydrolyzable polymer at least partially coating the particles. The WSPM is packed under pressure within the flow path of the wellbore device container to consolidate it. The WSPM increases resistance to flow as water content increases in the fluid flowing through the flow path and decreases resistance to flow as water content decreases in the fluid flowing through the flow path.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/191,921 filed Aug. 14, 2008 and is also a continuation-in-part application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/606,464 filed Oct. 27, 2009.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention relates to apparatus and methods for controlling the production of fluid through a device in a wellbore and methods for constructing said apparatus, and more particularly relates, in one non-limiting embodiment, to apparatus for and methods of inhibiting and controlling the flow of water through a wellbore from subterranean formations during hydrocarbon recovery operations and methods for constructing said apparatus.
  • TECHNICAL BACKGROUND
  • Hydrocarbons such as oil and gas are recovered from a subterranean formation using a wellbore drilled into the formation. Unwanted water production is a major problem in maximizing the hydrocarbon production potential of a subterranean well. Tremendous costs may be incurred from separating and disposing of large amounts of produced water, inhibiting the corrosion of tubulars contacted by the water, replacing corroded tubular equipment downhole, and surface equipment maintenance. Shutting off, preventing and controlling unwanted water production is a necessary condition to maintaining a productive field.
  • Oil and gas wells are typically completed by placing a casing along the wellbore length and perforating the casing adjacent each such production zone to extract the formation fluids (such as hydrocarbons) into the wellbore. These production zones are sometimes separated or isolated from each other by installing a packer between the production zones. Fluid from each production zone entering the wellbore is drawn into a tubing that runs to the surface. It is desirable to have substantially even drainage along the production zone. Uneven drainage may result in undesirable conditions such as an invasive gas cone or water cone. In the instance of an oil-producing well, for example, a gas cone may cause an in-flow of gas into the wellbore that could significantly reduce oil production. Similarly, a water cone may cause an in-flow of water into the oil production flow that reduces the amount and quality of the produced oil.
  • Accordingly, it is desired to provide even drainage across a production zone and/or the ability to selectively close off or reduce in-flow within production zones experiencing an undesirable influx of water and/or gas. In other words, it would additionally be desirable to discover an apparatus and method which could improve the control of unwanted water production from subsurface formations.
  • SUMMARY
  • There is provided in one non-limiting embodiment a wellbore device for controlling a flow of a fluid through a flow path therein. The wellbore device includes a container comprising a flow path and a consolidated water sensitive porous medium (WSPM) packed within the flow path of the wellbore device container. In turn, the WSPM includes solid particles and at least one water hydrolyzable polymer at least partially coated on the solid particles.
  • There is additionally provided in one non-restrictive version, a method of constructing a wellbore device for controlling a flow of a fluid through a flow path in the wellbore device, where the method involves mixing solid particles with at least one water hydrolyzable polymer in the presence of a fluid that may be water or brine to give a mixture. The method further includes at least partially drying the mixture. Additionally the method involves packing the at least partially dried mixture into the flow path of the container of the wellbore device to form a consolidated water sensitive porous medium (WSPM).
  • There is also provided, in another non-limiting form, a method for controlling a flow of a fluid through a flow path in a wellbore device in a wellbore. The method involves flowing the fluid through the flowpath in the wellbore device and controlling a resistance to flow of the fluid through the flow path whereby: resistance to flow increases as water content of the fluid increases, and resistance to flow decreases as water content of the fluid decreases. The wellbore device used includes a container (which may be coextensive therewith) comprising the flow path and a consolidated water sensitive porous medium (WSPM) packed within the flow path of the wellbore device container. In turn the WSPM includes solid particles and at least one water hydrolyzable polymer at least partially coated on the solid particles.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of water sensitive porous media (WSPM) installed inside a wellbore to control the production of water;
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B are schematic illustrations of different water cuts generating different flow resistance when flowing through a WSPM as a result of different degrees of polymer chain activation (expansion);
  • FIG. 3 is a graph of the pressure differential of WSPM (crosslinked VF-1 copolymer coated on 20-60 mesh (850-250 micron) HSP® proppant) at 200° F. (93° C.) with diesel and simulated formation brine (SFB);
  • FIG. 4 is a graph of a pressure drop response for different water cut fluids flowing through WSPM at 200° F. (93° C.);
  • FIG. 5 is a microphotograph of 20/40 mesh (850/425 micron) HSP ceramic proppant before polymer coating; and
  • FIG. 6 is a microphotograph of 20/40 mesh (850/425 micron) HSP ceramic proppant after polymer coating.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • A method has been discovered for building a water sensitive porous medium (WSPM) to control downhole water production through a flowpath in a wellbore device installed inside of a wellbore. The WSPM may be constructed of water-soluble or water-hydrolyzable, high molecular weight polymers which are coated on solid particles, such as sand, glass beads, and ceramic proppants. The coated particles are packed under high pressure to form a consolidated homogenous and high porosity porous medium within a container of a wellbore device. The container and the wellbore device may be separate structures, where the container is part of the wellbore device, or the container and the wellbore device may be the same and coextensive. After the polymers are fully hydrolyzed in water or brine, the polymers may be optionally crosslinked with crosslinking agents. The solid particles may be mixed with the polymer solution, e.g. in a blender or mixer, at a particular ratio.
  • As a blender or mixer is continuous stirring the mixture of solid particles and polymer solution, blowing ambient air, hot air, nitrogen, or vacuuming is applied to the mixture to at least partially or completely dry the polymer. The polymer coated particles are loaded into a container to pack into consolidated porous medium at high pressure. The packed container, as part of a downhole tool, is installed in a wellbore. When formation water is flowed through the WSPM interstitial flow channels, the coated polymers extend their polymer chains into the pore flow channels, resulting in increased fluid flow resistance. Conversely, when oil flows through the WSPM, the polymer chains shrink back to open the flow channels wider for the desired oil flow. This process has been demonstrated to be repeatable and reversible as water/oil fluid composition varies.
  • When water mixed with oil flows through the WSPM, the magnitude in pressure drop across the flow channels depends on the percentage of water in the mixture (water/oil ratio, or WOR). Higher water cuts result in higher resulting pressure drops. As will be discussed, lab testing data has confirmed that pressure drops across WSPM change with water percentage of flowing through fluids.
  • More specifically, the production of unwanted subterranean formation water may be prevented, controlled or inhibited by a method involving treating particles with high molecular weight, water-hydrolyzable polymers, and incorporating the particles into a water sensitive porous medium (WSPM) in a wellbore device placed within the wellbore. The polymer-coated particles are introduced into a container of a wellbore device under high pressure to form a consolidated WSPM in the device before its introduction downhole.
  • Generally, the relatively high molecular weight polymers that have components or functional groups that anchor, affiliate or attach onto the surface of the solid particles. The polymers are hydrophilic and/or hydrolyzable meaning they swell or expand in physical size upon contact with water. The average particle size of the particles may range from about 10 mesh to about 100 mesh (from about 2000 microns to about 150 microns). Alternatively, the average particle size of the particles may range from about 20 mesh independently to about 60 mesh (from about 840 microns to about 250 microns); where the term “independently” means that any lower threshold may be combined with any upper threshold. Thus, it should be understood that the solid particles which serve as a substrate to the water hydrolyzable polymer are relatively small, particulate matter, but should not be confused with atomic particles or subatomic particles.
  • The particles may be any of a wide variety of solid particulate material; suitable materials include, but are not necessarily limited to, sand, glass beads, ceramic beads, metal beads, bauxite grains, walnut shell fragments, aluminum pellets, nylon pellets and combinations thereof, including conventional proppants and gravel, and, including proppants and gravel of to-be-developed materials. Proppants are known in the oilfield as sized particles typically mixed with fracturing fluids to hold open fractures after a hydraulic fracturing treatment. Proppants are sorted for size and sphericity to provide an effective conduit for the production of oil and/or gas from the reservoir to the wellbore. “Gravel” has a particular meaning in the oilfield relating to particles of a specific size or specific size range which are placed between a screen that is positioned in the wellbore and the surrounding annulus. The size of the gravel is selected to prevent the passage of sand from the formation through the gravel pack.
  • Further, the solid particles, e.g. proppants or gravel, may suitably be a variety of materials including, but not necessarily limited to, sand (the most common component of which is silica, i.e. silicon dioxide, SiO2), glass beads, ceramic beads, metal beads, bauxite grains, walnut shell fragments, aluminum pellets, nylon pellets and combinations thereof.
  • The particles may be coated by a method that involves at least partially hydrolyzing the polymer in a liquid including, but not necessarily limited to, water, brine, glycol, ethanol and mixtures thereof. The particles are then intimately mixed or contacted with the liquid containing the polymer to contact the surfaces of the particles with the polymer. The liquid is then at least partially vaporized or evaporated through vacuum, or the use of heat and/or contact with a dry gas such as air, nitrogen, or the like. The coating method may be conducted at a temperature between ambient up to about 200° F. (about 93° C.), to facilitate quick drying of the coating. It may not be necessary in some embodiments to completely dry the coating.
  • The loading of the polymers may be a ratio of weight of solid particles to weight of dry water hydrolyzable polymer ranging from about 10,000:1 to about 10:1; alternatively ranging from about 500:1 independently to about 25:1. The solid particles should be at least partially coated by the polymer; that is, while it is desirable to completely coat the solid particles with the polymer, the method and apparatus may still be considered successful if the particles are at least partially coated to the extent the WSPM functions effectively for the purposes noted herein.
  • The high pressure used to pack the water hydrolyzable polymer coated particles into the container of the wellbore device through which the flow path exists may range from about 50 to about 2000 psi (about 0.3 to about 13.8 MPa), alternatively from about 100 independently to about 1000 psi (about 0.7 to about 6.9 MPa).
  • The WSPM placed in the wellbore will control unwanted formation water flowing through the wellbore while not adversely affecting the flow of oil and gas. When water flows into the WSPM, the polymers anchored on the solid particles expand to reduce the water flow channel and increase the resistance to water flow. The polymers may be understood to interact chemically, ionically or mechanically with a component of the produced or in-flowing formation fluids, e.g. water molecules. This desired response may be variously described as resistance, permeability, impedance, etc., where the flow of hydrocarbons (e.g. oil and gas) is desirable, but the flow of water is not. This interaction varies the resistance to flow across the flow path of the wellbore device. When oil and/or gas flow through this special porous media, the polymers shrink to open the flow channel for oil and/or gas flow. The pre-treated particles, (e.g. proppants) are expected to form homogeneous porous media with the polymer uniformly distributed in the media to increase the efficiency of the polymer controlling unwanted water production.
  • In more detail, suitable water hydrolyzable polymers include those having a weight average molecular weight greater than 100,000. Suitable, more specific examples of water hydrolyzable polymers include, but are not necessarily limited to, homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, sulfonated or quaternized homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, polyvinylalcohols, polysiloxanes, hydrophilic natural gum polymers and chemically modified derivatives thereof. Crosslinked versions of these polymers may also be suitable, including but not necessarily limited to, crosslinked homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, crosslinked sulfonated or quaternized homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, crosslinked polyvinylalcohols, crosslinked polysiloxanes, crosslinked hydrophilic natural gum polymers and chemically modified derivatives thereof. Further specific examples of suitable water hydrolyzable polymers include, but are not necessarily limited to, copolymers having a hydrophilic monomeric unit, where the hydrophilic monomeric unit is selected from the group consisting of ammonium and alkali metal salt of acrylamidomethylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPS), a first anchoring monomeric unit based on N-vinylformamide and a filler monomeric unit, where the filler monomeric unit is selected from the group consisting of acrylamide and methylacrylamide. Additional suitable water hydrolyzable polymers include, but are not necessarily limited to, copolymers of vinylamide monomers and monomers containing ammonium or quaternary ammonium moieties, copolymers of vinylamide monomers and monomers comprising vinylcarboxylic acid monomers and/or vinylsulfonic acid monomers, and salts thereof, and these aforementioned copolymers further comprising a crosslinking monomer selected from the group consisting of bis-acrylamide, diallylamine, N,N-diallylacrylamide, divinyloxyethane, divinyldimethylsilane.
  • In an optional embodiment, when the polymers are fully or essentially completely hydrolyzed, they may be cross-linked to increase their molecular weight. Suitable crosslinking agents include, but are not necessarily limited to, aluminum, boron, chromium, zirconium, titanium, and other inorganic based and organic based crosslinking agents and other conventional crosslinking agents.
  • These polymers are sometimes referred to as relative permeability modifiers (RPMs) and more information about RPMs suitable to be of use in the method and compositions described herein may be found in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,735,349; 6,228,812; 7,008,908; 7,207,386 and 7,398,825, all of which are incorporated by reference herein in their entirety.
  • Shown in FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of an oil well 10 having a wellbore 12, which happens to be vertical in part and horizontal in part, in a subterranean formation 14 that contains both oil and water. Water sensitive porous media (WSPM) within wellbore devices 16 have been installed at four locations between packers 18 along the horizontal section of the wellbore 12 to control the production of water. The flow of oil from the formation 14 into the wellbore 12 is schematically indicated by black arrows 20, whereas the flow of water is schematically indicated by gray arrows 22. The flow of oil 20 is uninhibited by the WSPM due to the lack of resistance of the unhydrolyzed polymer, whereas the flow of water is inhibited by the increased resistance of the hydrolyzed polymer, as indicated by the lower water flow at small gray arrows 24.
  • Shown in FIG. 2 is a schematic illustration of different water cuts generating different flow resistance when flowing through a WSPM 16 as a result of different degrees of polymer chain activation (expansion). As previously discussed, the WSPM 16 includes solid particles 30 having water hydrolyzable polymers 32 at least partially coated thereon or adhered thereto. The water droplets are schematically represented by gray circles 34 and the oil droplets are schematically represented by black circles 36. FIG. 2A schematically illustrates the WSPM 16 where a 25% water cut flows in the direction shown (left to right) where the relatively low amount of water droplets 34 cause a relatively small amount of the polymer 32 to swell, enlarge or hydrolyze increasing resistance to flow. FIG. 2B schematically illustrates the WSPM 16 where a larger 50% water cut flows in the direction shown (left to right) where the relatively equal amount of water droplets 34 compared to the oil droplets 36 cause a relatively larger amount of the polymer 32 to swell, enlarge or hydrolyze further increasing resistance to flow, as compared with FIG. 2A.
  • The invention will now be illustrated with respect to certain examples which are not intended to limit the invention in any way but simply to further illustrated it in certain specific embodiments.
  • EXAMPLES
  • FIG. 5 is a microphotograph of 20/40 mesh (850/425 micron) HSP® ceramic proppant before polymer coating. HSP proppant is available from Carbo Ceramics. FIG. 6 is a microphotograph of the same 20/40 mesh (850/425 micron) HSP ceramic proppant after polymer coating. It may be seen that each proppant particle in FIG. 6 is fully coated and bonded by the polymer using the coating method described.
  • One non-limiting packing procedure for building a WSPM as a water sensitive flow channel (WSFC) is set out in Table I. The procedure involves packing polymer coated proppants into 1 inch (2.5 cm) ID and 12 inch (30 cm) long stainless steel tube with both end caps forming a uniform porous medium.
  • TABLE I
    Packing Procedure
    1) The stainless steel tube (container, simulating a wellbore device) is affixed on one end with an end cap; a 100 mesh (150 micron) stainless screen is laid inside the end cap to hold the polymer coated proppants;
    2) The stainless steel tube is placed into a compressor with open end up;
    3) One spoon of polymer coated proppants (about 5 grams) is loaded inside of the tube,
    and a 0.97 inch (2.5) ID and 18 inch-long (45.7 cm) alumina rod is put against the
    proppants inside of the tube;
    4) 1200 pound force from a compressor is loaded onto the alumina rod to compress the
    polymer coated proppants into a consolidated porous medium;
    5) Steps 3) and 4) are repeated until the length of the porous medium reaches desired porous
    medium length;
    6) Another 100 mesh (150 micron) stainless screen is affixed on the top of the stainless steel tube;
    7) Stainless steel spacers are added into the tube if there is any open space inside of the tube; and
    8) The top end cap was tightened and the tube is ready for testing.
  • FIG. 3 is a graph of the pressure differential of crosslinked VF-1 copolymer coated on 20-60 mesh (850-250 micron) HSP proppant at 200° F. (93° C.) with diesel and simulated formation brine (SFB). VF-1 is a cross-linked vinylamide-vinylsulfonate copolymer. The HSP proppants were coated with the VF-1 polymer as described above. The polymer loading was 0.4% bw (by weight) of the proppant weight. FIG. 3 is a response test graph showing that the pressure differential of the polymer-coated proppant WSPM placed inside of a 12-inch long, 1-inch ID stainless steel tube (about 30 cm long by about 2.5 cm ID) changes when pumping with oil (diesel in this Example) relative to pumping with formation water (Simulated Formation Brine or SFB) flowing through the pack. This graph demonstrates that the pack exhibits high flow resistance for water and low flow resistance for oil.
  • FIG. 4 is a graph of a pressure drop response for different water cut fluids flowing through a WSPM at 200° F. (93° C.). The fluids were blends of brine and diesel. With increasing amounts of water (greater water cut percentage), the higher the pressure drop. The WSPM was made from VF-1 coated 50-60 mesh (297 to 250 micron) ceramic proppants with polymer loading 0.4%. Different water cuts are marked on FIG. 4.
  • In the foregoing specification, the invention has been described with reference to specific embodiments thereof, and has been demonstrated as effective in providing methods for inhibiting and controlling water flow through wellbores, particularly wellbore devices having flow paths containing solid particles coated with a water hydrolyzable polymer. However, it will be evident that various modifications and changes can be made thereto without departing from the broader spirit or scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims. Accordingly, the specification is to be regarded in an illustrative rather than a restrictive sense. For example, specific combinations of solid particles, water hydrolyzable polymers, wellbore devices and other components falling within the claimed parameters, but not specifically identified or tried in a particular composition or method, are expected to be within the scope of this invention. Further, it is expected that the components and proportions of the solid particles and polymers and steps of constructing the wellbore devices may change somewhat from wellbore device to another and still accomplish the stated purposes and goals of the methods described herein. For example, the assembly methods may use different pressures and additional or different steps than those exemplified herein.
  • The words “comprising” and “comprises” as used throughout the claims is interpreted “including but not limited to”.
  • The present invention may suitably comprise, consist or consist essentially of the elements disclosed and may be practiced in the absence of an element not disclosed. For instance, a wellbore device for controlling a flow of a fluid through a flow path may consist of or consist essentially of a container comprising a flow path and a consolidated water sensitive porous medium (WSPM) packed within the flow path of the wellbore device container, where the WSPM consists of or consists essentially of solid particles and at least one water hydrolyzable polymer at least partially coated on the solid particles.

Claims (23)

1. A wellbore device for controlling a flow of a fluid through a flow path therein, the wellbore device comprising:
a container comprising the flow path; and
a consolidated water sensitive porous medium (WSPM) packed within the flow path of the container, the WSPM comprising:
solid particles; and
at least one water hydrolyzable polymer at least partially coated on the solid particles.
2. The wellbore device of claim 1 where the average particle size of the solid particles ranges from about 10 to about 100 mesh (about 2000 to about 150 microns).
3. The wellbore device of claim 1 where the WSPM is packed within the container at a pressure ranging from about 50 to about 2000 psi (about 0.3 to about 13.8 MPa).
4. The wellbore device of claim 1 where the ratio of weight of solid particles to weight of dry water hydrolyzable polymer ranges from about 10,000:1 to about 10:1.
5. The wellbore device of claim 1 where the water hydrolyzable polymer is crosslinked.
6. The wellbore device of claim 1 where the water hydrolyzable polymer has a weight average molecular weight greater than 100,000 and is selected from the group consisting of:
homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, sulfonated or quaternized homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, polyvinylalcohols, polysiloxanes, hydrophilic natural gum polymers and chemically modified derivatives thereof;
crosslinked homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, crosslinked sulfonated or quaternized homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, crosslinked polyvinylalcohols, crosslinked polysiloxanes, crosslinked hydrophilic natural gum polymers and chemically modified derivatives thereof;
copolymers having a hydrophilic monomeric unit, where the hydrophilic monomeric unit is selected from the group consisting of ammonium and alkali metal salt of acrylamidomethylpropanesulfonic acid, a first anchoring monomeric unit based on N-vinylformamide and a filler monomeric unit, where the filler monomeric unit is selected from the group consisting of acrylamide and methylacrylamide; and
copolymers of vinylamide monomers and monomers containing ammonium or quaternary ammonium moieties, copolymers of vinylamide monomers and monomers comprising vinylcarboxylic acid monomers and/or vinylsulfonic acid monomers, and salts thereof, and these copolymers comprising a crosslinking monomer selected from the group consisting of bis-acrylamide, dialylamine, N,N-diallylacrylamide, divinyloxyethane, divinyldimethylsilane.
7. The wellbore device of claim 1 where the WSPM increases a resistance to flow as water content increases in the fluid flowing through the flow path and decreases a resistance to flow as water content decreases in the fluid flowing through the flow path.
8. The wellbore device of claim 1 where the solid particles comprise sand, glass beads, ceramic beads, metal beads, bauxite grains, walnut shell fragments, aluminum pellets, nylon pellets and combinations thereof.
9. A method of constructing a wellbore device for controlling a flow of a fluid through a flow path in the wellbore device, the method comprising:
mixing solid particles with at least one water hydrolyzable polymer in the presence of a fluid selected from the group consisting of water and brine to give a mixture;
at least partially drying the mixture;
packing the at least partially dried mixture into the flow path of a container of the wellbore device to form a consolidated water sensitive porous medium (WSPM).
10. The method of claim 9 further comprising:
where in mixing the solid particles with the water hydrolyzable polymer, the mixing is in the presence of an amount of water effective to fully hydrolyze the water hydrolyzable polymer; and
crosslinking the water hydrolyzable polymer with at least one crosslinking agent.
11. The method of claim 9 where the average particle size of the solid particles ranges from about 10 to about 100 mesh (about 2000 to about 150 microns).
12. The method of claim 9 where the WSPM is packed within the wellbore device container at a pressure ranging from about 50 to about 2000 psi (about 0.3 to about 13.8 MPa).
13. The method of claim 9 where the ratio of weight of solid particles to weight of dry water hydrolyzable polymer ranges from about 10,000:1 to about 10:1.
14. The method of claim 9 where the water hydrolyzable polymer has a weight average molecular weight greater than 100,000 and is selected from the group consisting of:
homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, sulfonated or quaternized homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, polyvinylalcohols, polysiloxanes, hydrophilic natural gum polymers and chemically modified derivatives thereof;
crosslinked homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, crosslinked sulfonated or quaternized homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, crosslinked polyvinylalcohols, crosslinked polysiloxanes, crosslinked hydrophilic natural gum polymers and chemically modified derivatives thereof;
copolymers having a hydrophilic monomeric unit, where the hydrophilic monomeric unit is selected from the group consisting of ammonium and alkali metal salt of acrylamidomethylpropanesulfonic acid, a first anchoring monomeric unit based on N-vinylformamide and a filler monomeric unit, where the filler monomeric unit is selected from the group consisting of acrylamide and methylacrylamide; and
copolymers of vinylamide monomers and monomers containing ammonium or quaternary ammonium moieties, copolymers of vinylamide monomers and monomers comprising vinylcarboxylic acid monomers and/or vinylsulfonic acid monomers, and salts thereof, and these copolymers comprising a crosslinking monomer selected from the group consisting of bis-acrylamide, diallylamine, N,N-diallylacrylamide, divinyloxyethane, divinyldimethylsilane.
15. The method of claim 9 where the WSPM increases a resistance to flow as water content increases in the fluid flowing through the flow path and decreases a resistance to flow as water content decreases in the fluid flowing through the flow path.
16. The method of claim 9 where the solid particles comprise sand, glass beads, ceramic beads, metal beads, bauxite grains, walnut shell fragments, aluminum pellets, nylon pellets and combinations thereof.
17. A method for controlling a flow of a fluid through a flow path in a wellbore device within a wellbore, the method comprising:
flowing the fluid through the flowpath in the wellbore device; and
controlling a resistance to flow of the fluid through the flow path whereby:
resistance to flow increases as water content of the fluid increases, and
resistance to flow decreases as water content of the fluid decreases;
the wellbore device comprising:
a container comprising the flow path; and
a consolidated water sensitive porous medium (WSPM) packed within the flow path of the container, the WSPM comprising:
solid particles; and
at least one water hydrolyzable polymer at least partially coated on the solid particles.
18. The method of claim 17 where the average particle size of the solid particles ranges from about 10 to about 100 mesh (about 2000 to about 150 microns).
19. The method of claim 17 where the WSPM is packed within the wellbore device container at a pressure ranging from about 50 to about 2000 psi (about 0.3 to about 13.8 MPa).
20. The method of claim 17 where the ratio of weight of solid particles to weight of dry water hydrolyzable polymer ranges from about 10,000:1 to about 10:1.
21. The method of claim 17 where the water hydrolyzable polymer is crosslinked.
22. The method of claim 17 where the water hydrolyzable polymer has a weight average molecular weight greater than 100,000 and is selected from the group consisting of:
homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, sulfonated or quaternized homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, polyvinylalcohols, polysiloxanes, hydrophilic natural gum polymers and chemically modified derivatives thereof;
crosslinked homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, crosslinked sulfonated or quaternized homopolymers and copolymers of acrylamide, crosslinked polyvinylalcohols, crosslinked polysiloxanes, crosslinked hydrophilic natural gum polymers and chemically modified derivatives thereof;
copolymers having a hydrophilic monomeric unit, where the hydrophilic monomeric unit is selected from the group consisting of ammonium and alkali metal salt of acrylamidomethylpropanesulfonic acid, a first anchoring monomeric unit based on N-vinylformamide and a filler monomeric unit, where the filler monomeric unit is selected from the group consisting of acrylamide and methylacrylamide; and
copolymers of vinylamide monomers and monomers containing ammonium or quaternary ammonium moieties, copolymers of vinylamide monomers and monomers comprising vinylcarboxylic acid monomers and/or vinylsulfonic acid monomers, and salts thereof, and these copolymers comprising a crosslinking monomer selected from the group consisting of bis-acrylamide, diallylamine, N,N-diallylacrylamide, divinyloxyethane, divinyldimethylsilane.
23. The method of claim 17 where the solid particles comprise sand, glass beads, ceramic beads, metal beads, bauxite grains, walnut shell fragments, aluminum pellets, nylon pellets and combinations thereof.
US12/835,023 2007-10-12 2010-07-13 Water Sensitive Porous Medium to Control Downhole Water Production and Method Therefor Abandoned US20110005752A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

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US12/191,921 US7942206B2 (en) 2007-10-12 2008-08-14 In-flow control device utilizing a water sensitive media
US12/606,464 US9303502B2 (en) 2009-10-27 2009-10-27 Method of controlling water production through treating particles with RPMS
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AU2011279476A AU2011279476A1 (en) 2010-07-13 2011-07-06 Water sensitive porous medium to control downhole water production and method therefor
BR112013000803A BR112013000803A2 (en) 2010-07-13 2011-07-06 porous water-sensitive means to control the downhole water production method therefor, and
CN2011800345143A CN103080472A (en) 2010-07-13 2011-07-06 Water sensitive porous medium to control downhole water production and method therefor
PCT/US2011/042993 WO2012009184A2 (en) 2010-07-13 2011-07-06 Water sensitive porous medium to control downhole water production and method therefor
MX2013000464A MX2013000464A (en) 2010-07-13 2011-07-06 Water sensitive porous medium to control downhole water production and method therefor.
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NO20130019A NO20130019A1 (en) 2010-07-13 2013-01-04 Vannfolsomt porous medium for a control water production in the wellbore and the process feed for this

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US9051819B2 (en) 2011-08-22 2015-06-09 Baker Hughes Incorporated Method and apparatus for selectively controlling fluid flow
US9334708B2 (en) 2012-04-23 2016-05-10 Baker Hughes Incorporated Flow control device, method and production adjustment arrangement

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AU2011279476A1 (en) 2013-01-24
WO2012009184A3 (en) 2012-04-05
WO2012009184A2 (en) 2012-01-19
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NO20130019A1 (en) 2013-02-13
CA2804663C (en) 2015-06-02

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