US20100283206A1 - Game of chance involving cards and bingo like play and method of playing therefor (90 cards) - Google Patents

Game of chance involving cards and bingo like play and method of playing therefor (90 cards) Download PDF

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US20100283206A1
US20100283206A1 US12776342 US77634210A US2010283206A1 US 20100283206 A1 US20100283206 A1 US 20100283206A1 US 12776342 US12776342 US 12776342 US 77634210 A US77634210 A US 77634210A US 2010283206 A1 US2010283206 A1 US 2010283206A1
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cards
bingo
column
game
card
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David W. Mahon
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Mahon David W
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3286Type of games
    • G07F17/3293Card games, e.g. poker, canasta, black jack

Abstract

A ninety card-based bingo game and method of playing thereof. The game consists of a deck of cards numbered from 1 to 90, 3x5 matrix card, dealer, players, and casino chips. Players can place multiple bets based on card development on whether a “Bingo”, represented by a one way pattern of five numbers in a row or three numbers in a column, is drawn by a dealer on or before a quantity of randomly pre-drawn cards are played with each card representing a number. If players obtain a “bingo” after the quantity of randomly pre-drawn cards are played, the player wins an amount of money based on a payout scale and the game is over. If the player does not obtain a bingo after the quantity of randomly pre-drawn cards are played, the player forfeits the amount of money bet against the dealer and the game is over.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • This provisional application generally relates to a ninety card bingo game, which is popular in the UK. More particularly, this application relates to placing bets on whether a “Bingo”, represented by a one way pattern of five numbers in a row or three numbers in a column, is drawn by a dealer on or before an exact quantity of randomly pre-drawn cards are played with each card representing a number on a community bingo card.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Ninety card bingo is a game of chance in which players purchase at least one printed or electronic matrix card having numbers thereon. The bingo cards contain twenty-seven squares arranged in nine vertical columns and three horizontal rows. Each row contains five numbers and four blank spaces. Each column contains either one, two, or very rarely three numbers. The first column can contain numbers 1 through 10. The second column can contain numbers 11 through 20. The third column can contain numbers 21 through 30. The fourth column can contain numbers 31 through 40. The fifth column can contain numbers 41 through 50. The sixth column can contain numbers 51 through 60. The seventh column can contain numbers 61 through 70. The eight column can contain numbers 71 through 80. The ninth column can contain numbers 81 through 90.
  • Game play begins with a caller randomly calling out numbers 1 through 90. Players mark off numbers on their 3×9 card as they are randomly called out. The first person to have a card where the drawn numbers form a specified pattern is the winner. When all the numbers required to win a prize have been marked off, the player calls out “Line” or “House” depending on the prize. Before the prize is distributed to the winner, the card is properly checked for accuracy before the “win” is officially confirmed at which time the prize is secured and a new game is begun.
  • In most ninety card bingo games, players can win through covering a horizontal line of five numbers on the ticket, two lines covering any two lines on the same ticket, or covering all fifteen numbers on the ticket. Dependent on the caller, various implementations of specified patterns may exist making ninety card bingo an exciting game in which players can have never ending fun.
  • Bingo attracts players from all ages to the chance of winning cash prizes. Bingo provides excitement to each player in part because of the uncertainty of the other players' cards and how close the other players are to receiving a bingo. A player with a relatively poor card may still win if the player is able to obtain several numbers in a row.
  • SUMMARY
  • This summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the DESCRIPTION OF THE APPLICATION. This summary is not intended to identify key features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.
  • In accordance with one aspect of the present application, a ninety card-based bingo game is presented. The game includes a dealer, at least one player for betting against the dealer, and a plurality of casino chips for the at least one player to make bets. In addition, the game includes a 3×9 standard bingo card having twenty-seven squares arranged in nine vertical columns and three horizontal rows. Each row contains five numbers and four blank spaces. Each column contains either one, two, or three numbers based on the limitation of the first column containing numbers one through ten, the second column containing numbers eleven through twenty, the third column containing numbers twenty-one through thirty, the fourth column containing numbers thirty-one through forty, the fifth column containing numbers forty-one through fifty, the sixth column containing numbers fifty-one through sixty, the seventh column containing numbers sixty-one through seventy, the eight column containing numbers seventy-one through eighty, and the ninth column containing numbers eighty-one through ninety.
  • Furthermore, the game includes a deck of ninety cards numbered from one to ninety. Cards numbered one to ten are associated with column one, cards numbered eleven to twenty are associated with column two, cards numbered twenty-one to thirty are associated with column three, cards numbered thirty-one to forty are associated with column four, cards numbered forty-one to fifty are associated with column five, cards numbered fifty-one to sixty are associated with column six, cards numbered sixty-one to seventy are associated with column seven, cards numbered seventy-one to eighty are associated with column eight, and cards numbered eighty-one to ninety are associated with column nine.
  • The game also includes a 3×5 bingo matrix card having fifteen squares arranged in five vertical columns and three horizontal rows. The 3×5 bingo matrix card includes all the previous numbers within the 3×9 standard bingo card shifted to the left.
  • In accordance with another aspect of the present application a game having four ways to win is presented. The game includes a first way of winning by obtaining a bingo after three cards are drawn. In addition, the game includes a second way of winning by obtaining a bingo after thirty-five cards are drawn and a third way of winning by obtaining a bingo after sixty-six cards are drawn. Furthermore, the game includes a fourth way of winning by obtaining a bingo after sixty-nine cards are drawn.
  • In accordance with another aspect of the present application, a ninety card bingo game providing multiple ways of winning by betting on chances of obtaining a bingo and allowing players to bet several times throughout the game is presented. The game includes a set amount of cards to be drawn. Players win if a bingo is obtained after the set amount of cards are drawn, otherwise, the players forfeit their bets.
  • In accordance with yet another aspect of the present application, an electronic device for playing the card-based bingo game described herein.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF ATTACH IVI NTS
  • ATTACHMENT A (13 Pages) titled “Multi-Play Bingo™ A MULTI-BET HOUSE BANKED BINGO GAME” discloses information related to the casino wagering game of chance described in this provisional application. ATTACHMENT A is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety, including, any appendices, screen shots, and references thereto.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • The novel features believed to be characteristic of the application are set forth in the appended claims. In the descriptions that follow, like parts are marked throughout the specification and drawings with the same numerals, respectively. The drawing figures are not necessarily drawn to scale and certain figures may be shown in exaggerated or generalized form in the interest of clarity and conciseness. The application itself, however, as well as a preferred mode of use, further objectives and advantages thereof, will be best understood by reference to the following detailed description of illustrative embodiments when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is an exemplary illustration showing a deck of cards numbered 1-90, a bingo card, a dealer position, player positions, casino chips, a board to play a card-based bingo game, and an automated card dispenser in accordance with one aspect of the present application;
  • FIGS. 2A, 2B and 2C depict a flow diagram illustrating exemplary processes performed in the card-based bingo game in accordance with one aspect of the present application;
  • FIG. 3 shows typical betting lines for an individual player on the table in accordance with one aspect of the present application;
  • FIG. 4 illustrates populating an exemplary 3×9 bingo board with numerical values restricted by ninety card bingo rules in accordance with one aspect of the present application;
  • FIG. 5 depicts condensing the exemplary populated bingo board to a 3×5 card in accordance with one aspect of the present application;
  • FIGS. 6A and 6B show filled spaces on the exemplary card after the first three cards are drawn from bin one in accordance with one aspect of the present application;
  • FIGS. 7A and 7B show filled spaces on the exemplary card after the next thirty-two cards are drawn from bin one in accordance with one aspect of the present application;
  • FIGS. 8A and 8B show filled spaces on the exemplary card after the next thirty-one cards are drawn from bin two in accordance with one aspect of the present application;
  • FIGS. 9A and 9B illustrate filled spaces on the exemplary board after the final three cards are drawn from bin three in accordance with one aspect of the present application; and
  • FIG. 10 illustrates a hand held device for playing the ninety card game in accordance with one aspect of the present application.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE APPLICATION
  • The description set forth below in connection with the appended drawings is intended as a description of presently-preferred embodiments of the application and is not intended to represent the only forms in which the present application may be constructed and/or utilized. The description sets forth the functions and the sequence of steps for constructing and operating the application in connection with the illustrated embodiments. It is to be understood, however, that the same or equivalent functions and sequences may be accomplished by different embodiments that are also intended to be encompassed within the spirit and scope of this application.
  • Generally described, this provisional application relates to a ninety card bingo game. More particularly, this application speeds up the relatively slow-paced game of bingo and allows players to win chips by placing bets on whether a “Bingo”, represented by a one way pattern of five numbers in a row or three numbers in a column, is drawn by a dealer on or before an exact quantity of randomly drawn cards are played, each card possibly corresponding to a number on the bingo matrix. In one illustrative embodiment, the game consists of drawing X number of cards, wherein X is a set value. After the X number of cards are drawn, the numbers on the cards are matched with numbers on a bingo 3×5 matrix. If a player obtains a bingo indicated by the X number of cards matched with the bingo 3×5 matrix, the player will win an amount of money bet against the dealer based on a payout scale and the game is over. Otherwise, if the player fails to obtain a bingo during the drawing of X number of cards, the player forfeits the amount of money bet against the dealer and the game is over.
  • To play the ninety card-based bingo game 100, five items are generally used as depicted in FIG. 1. These items include deck of cards 102, bingo 3×5 matrix 104, dealer 106, players 108, and casino chips 110. In addition, game 100 can include game table 112, individual betting areas 114, first card bin 116, second card bin 118, third card bin 120, discard bin 122, played card bin 124, and house take box 126. Optionally, game 100 can include an automated card dispenser 130 that not only keeps track of the number of cards 102 dealt, but also is capable of automatically populating the matrix 104 after scanning a card 102.
  • Deck of cards 102 include ninety cards 102, each typically labeled from one to ninety with no repeating numbers therein. Cards 102 can be grouped by numbers with one through ten associated with column one, eleven through twenty associated with column two, twenty-one through thirty associated with column three, thirty-one through forty associated with column four, forty-one through fifty associated with column five, fifty-one through sixty associated with column six, sixty-one through seventy associated with column seven, seventy-one through eighty associated with column eight, and eighty-one through ninety associated with column nine. Deck of cards 102 are generally labeled on one side indicating the number associated with the card 102. Cards 102 can also include trademarked logos on the other side such as Multi-Play Bingo™.
  • Preferably, cards 102 are reshuffled after each game 100. This allows for all cards 102 in play to be randomly distributed during game 100. Furthermore, this keeps the element of surprise for each game 100. While a single deck of cards 102 has been described, multiple decks of cards 102 may be switched in and out of play.
  • Continuing with FIG. 1, single bingo 3×5 matrix card 104 is shown. Bingo matrix card 104, as displayed on table 102, includes three rows intersected by five columns generating fifteen spaces. Each column can be marked with the letters B, I, N, G, and O. Furthermore, each row can indicate a number from one to three. By using a combination of letters and numbers, a space on card 104 can be easily located. For example grid 128 space B1 corresponds to column B/row 1, B2 corresponds to column B/row 2, B3 corresponds to column B/row 3, I1 corresponds to column I/row 1, I2 corresponds to column I/row 2, I3 corresponds to column I/row 3, N1 corresponds to column N/row 1, N2 corresponds to column N/row 2, N3 corresponds to column N/row 3, G1 corresponds to column G/row 1, G2 corresponds to column G/row 2, G3 corresponds to column G/row 3, O1 corresponds to column O/row 1, O2 corresponds to column O/row 2, and O3 corresponds to column O/row 3.
  • Bingo matrix card 104 can be printed onto paper and changed each game 100. Alternatively, and more preferably, bingo matrix card 104 can be fitted to a TV screen that electronically populates the matrix 104 each time a new game 100 is requested. Optimally, the TV screen is plasma, but can also be LCD or the like. Also, a touch-screen can be provided so that spaces on the card 104 can be easily marked.
  • While a 3×5 matrix card 104 is provided in the FIGURES, game 100 is not limited to fifteen spaces. As such, bingo matrix card 104 can have fewer or more rows and columns.
  • Bingos on card 104 can be generated either through horizontal or vertical lines. Nonetheless, different bingo patterns can be used. These patterns can be chosen by the players 108, dealer 106, or randomly.
  • Continuing with FIG. 1, game 100 can also include dealer 106. Dealer 106 is generally associated with the casino where game 100 is being played. Dealer 106 is usually placed at the head of table 112.
  • As provided in FIG. 1, six players 108 are capable of being seated at table 112. Nevertheless, only one player 108 can begin game 100. In addition, more than six players 108 can be part of game 100 and is generally dependent on the space around table 112. Players 108 are normally not allowed behind table 112. In other embodiments, game 100 can take place in an electronic or similar device, which will be discussed below.
  • Casino chips 110 allow each player to bet against dealer 106 and can come in the form of $5, $25, and $100 chips 110. Each player's casino chips 110 are placed within individual betting areas 114. Any bet not won against dealer 106 can be placed into house take box 126.
  • Each betting spot on individual playing card 114 can be the size of an actual regulation casino chip. Through individual playing cards 114, chips 110 can be tracked electronically through a high frequency RFID chip. The information can thereafter be supplied to a multi-play bingo mainframe. This allows a casino to track the progressive amounts, win/loss ratios, betting averages, and player 108 tendencies. In addition, tracking each player 108 allows the casino to award points to each player 108 through their in-house awards program.
  • First card bin 116, second card bin 118, third card bin 120, discard bin 122, and played card bin 124 allow cards 102 to be distinguished among each other. A more detailed description of the bins will be provided below.
  • With reference now to FIG. 2, a flow diagram illustrating exemplary processes, routines, or methods performed in game 100 are presented. Game 100 begins at block 202. At this point, game 100 has one or more players 108. At block 204, players 108 can bet on Bet Line 1 and Bet Line 2.
  • As shown in FIG. 3, players 108 can wager on Bet Line 1 to obtain the multi-link multi-progressive bingo jackpot. A multi-play, multi-progressive jackpot can be based on revenues brought in by each table 112. As described above, the revenue of each table 112 can be tracked through casino chips 110 at each table 112. A progressive jackpot is a jackpot for a series of tables 112 where the value of the jackpot increase a small amount every game 100 played. Normally, multiple tables 112 are linked together to form one large progressive jackpot that grows more quickly because multiple players 108 are contributing to the jackpot at the same time.
  • The jackpot is obtained when the first three cards 102 displays a vertical bingo on bingo matrix card 104. Typically, a bingo will occur when three cards 102 match the numbers in a single column of card 104. If multiple players 108 at the table 112 bet on the jackpot simultaneously when it is drawn the jackpot will be split at the table 112 proportionally. In reality, the chance of obtaining a bingo within the first three cards 102 is rare. In another embodiment, the multi-progressive jackpot can be given based on any number of first cards 102 dealt. When five cards 102 are dealt, a horizontal bingo may be obtained to receive the jackpot.
  • Typically, players 108 can make a minimal bet on Bet Line 1 on table 112 in order to obtain the jackpot. In other embodiments, a pay scale based on the amount of money placed on Bet Line 1 determines the return for players 108 if a bingo is obtained within the first three cards 102. For example, a fifty cent bet can provide half the jackpot, while a one dollar bet will provide the full amount of the jackpot.
  • Continuing with FIG. 3, Bet Lines 2 a and 2 b are known as the primary bet. Bet Line 2 on table 112 provides two exemplary ways to win. First, and shown on the left circular area of Bet Line 2 a, players 108 can bet on any vertical bingo. The pay scale for placing a bet on this first way is aX if a bingo is obtained on the first thirty-five cards 102 drawn. Second, and shown on the right circular area of Bet Line 2 b, a player 108 can bet on any horizontal solid line bingo. The pay scale for placing a bet on this second way is bX if a bingo is obtained on the first thirty-five cards 102 drawn or cX if a bingo is obtained on the first sixty-six cards 102 drawn.
  • After bets are placed on Bet Line 1 and/or Bet Line 2, dealer 106 draws thirty-five cards 102 face down and places them into Bin 1 116 at block 206. Alternatively, cards 102 can be dispensed one at a time via an automated card dispenser 130 with a card counting meter to keep track of the total cards 102 played. These thirty-five cards 102 are used in the multi-progressive jackpot round and the primary bet round.
  • At block 208, the dealer 106 draws thirty-one cards 102 face down and places them into Bin 2 118. Similar to above, cards 102 can be dispensed one at a time via an automated card dispenser 130 with a card counting meter to keep track of the total cards 102 played. The thirty-one cards 102 will be used in the second chance bet round as provided below. Another three cards 102 are drawn face down at block 210 and placed into Bin 3 120. These cards 102 can also be dispensed one at a time via an automated card dispenser 130 with a card counting meter to keep track of the total cards 102 played. The three additional cards 102 will be used in the last chance bet round. The remainder of cards 102 can be placed into the discard bin 124. Turn-and-burn concepts, familiar with those skilled in the relevant art, can be applied when separating the cards into Bin 1 116, Bin 2 118, and/or Bin 3 120. In another embodiment, no bins are required and cards 102 can be played off the deck of cards 102 or alternatively, cards 102 can be dispensed one at a time via the automated card dispenser 130 with the card counting meter to keep track of the total cards 102 played.
  • Continuing with FIG. 2, dealer 106 populates bingo 3×5 matrix 104 at block 212. To do this, however, a 3×9 ninety card bingo matrix card is randomly populated under the rules set forth in a ninety card bingo game. As shown in FIG. 4, the bingo card contains twenty-seven squares arranged in nine vertical columns and three horizontal rows. Each row generally contains five numbers and four blank spaces. Each column typically contains either one, two, or very rarely three numbers. The first column can contain numbers 1 through 10. The second column can contain numbers 11 through 20. The third column can contain numbers 21 through 30. The fourth column can contain numbers 31 through 40. The fifth column can contain numbers 41 through 50. The sixth column can contain numbers 51 through 60. The seventh column can contain numbers 61 through 70. The eight column can contain numbers 71 through 80. The ninth column can contain numbers 81 through 90.
  • Populating the 3×9 matrix can be performed by a computer or other method. Because this is done independently of the cards 102 drawn in blocks 206, 208, and 210, the odds of winning are random and there is no outside influence by the casino, dealer 106, or other source. As shown in FIG. 4, the number 4 occupies column 1/row 1, the number 10 occupies column 1/row 3, the number 17 occupies column 2/row 2, the number 18 occupies column 2/row 3, the number 34 occupies column 4/row 1, the number 39 occupies column 4/row 2, the number 43 occupies column 5/row 2, the number 59 occupies column 6/row 1, the number 52 occupies column 6/row 3, the number 66 occupies column 7/row 1, the number 63 occupies column 7/row 2, the number 69 occupies column 7/row 3, the number 72 occupies column 8/row 3, the number 81 occupies column 9/row 1, and the number 90 occupies column 9/row 2.
  • At block 214 of FIG. 2, the 3×9 matrix is condensed into the 3×5 card 104 on table 112 as shown in FIG. 5. Each row will have five numbers in accordance with the rules of ninety card bingo. The condensed 3×9 matrix into a 3×5 matrix is labeled with the familiar American letters of B-I-N-G-O along with row numbers. In one embodiment, the numbers located within the 3×9 matrix are simply shifted to the left. Continuing with the previous example, grid 128 space B1 contains 4, B2 contains 17, B3 contains 10, I1 contains 34, I2 contains 39, I3 contains 18, N1 contains 59, N2 contains 43, N3 contains 52, G1 contains 66, G2 contains 63, G3 contains 69, O1 contains 81, O2 contains 90, and O3 contains 72. In alternative embodiments, the numbers within the 3×9 matrix can be positioned into the 3×5 matrix through some other method.
  • Returning to FIG. 2, block 216 begins the multi-progressive jackpot round whereby dealer 106 draws the first three cards 102 from Bin 1 116. Alternatively card dispenser 130 can provide the three cards 102. Based on the first three cards 102, matches between the three cards 102 and spaces on bingo matrix 104 are located and marked accordingly. Matches can be manually marked, marked through a touch-screen, or automatically placed in matrix card 104 through an automatic card reader, which may be part of card dispenser 130. FIG. 6A, which continues the previous example, shows matches made from the first three cards 102 drawn from Bin 1 116 or from card dispenser 130. Only one card 102 has matched and space 12 has been marked. At this time three cards 102 have been drawn. Once the cards 102 have been drawn, unmatched cards 102 can be placed into the played bin 124. Typically, the played bin 124 will contain cards 102 that can be used for later reference.
  • As shown in FIG. 6B, a table is provided for reference that keeps track of the numbers not yet called, numbers not yet called on the live bingo board, and numbers called. Each of these can be color coded. For example, yellow can represent numbers not yet called, green can represent numbers not yet called on the live bingo board, and black can represent numbers called. Alternatively, they can be distinguished by a pattern or similar method. In the examples shown in FIGS. 6B, 7B, 8B, and 9B, the blank pattern represents numbers not yet called, diagonals represent numbers not yet called on the live bingo board, and checkered spaces represent numbers called. Typically, players 108 will not see the tables.
  • At block 218, dealer 106 determines if any bingo has been obtained through the first three cards 102. If not, and as shown in FIG. 6A, dealer 106 collects the bets on Bet Line 1 from each player card 114 at block 222. If, however, a bingo was achieved on the first three cards 102, dealer 106 pays on Bet Line 1, which is the multi-progressive jackpot, at block 220. In one alternative embodiment, not shown in FIG. 2, game 100 ends after the jackpot is paid.
  • After blocks 220 and 222, block 224 begins the primary bet round. Alternatively, game 100 can end after a multi-progressive jackpot is paid. Dealer 106 draws the remaining thirty-two cards 102 from Bin 1 116. Alternatively, the cards 102 can be provided by card dispenser 130. Based on the thirty-two cards 102 from Bin 1 116, matches between the thirty-two cards 102 and spaces on bingo matrix 104 are located and marked accordingly. Continuing the previous example, FIG. 7A shows matches made from all thirty-five cards 102 drawn from Bin 1 116 or from card dispenser 130. As shown, six out of the thirty-five cards 102 have matched and spaces B1, I2, G1, G2, O1, and O3 are marked accordingly. At this time thirty-five cards 102 have been drawn. Once the cards 102 have been drawn, unmatched cards 102 can be placed into the played bin 124. FIG. 7B represents all cards 102 played up to block 224.
  • At block 226, dealer 106 determines if any bingo has been obtained through the thirty-five cards 102. If a bingo was obtained on the thirty-five cards 102, dealer 106 pays on Bet Lines 2 a and 2 b at block 228 and the game 100 ends at block 252. If not, and as shown in FIG. 6A, players 108 can choose to enter a second chance betting round. At block 230, dealer 106 collects bets on Bet Line 2 a. In other embodiments, and not shown in FIG. 2, game 100 does not end after block 228, but instead control is given to block 232.
  • Players 108 are given a second chance bet beginning at block 232. Based on the first thirty-five cards from Bin 1 116 or from card dispenser 130, players 108 now have an opportunity to do additional side betting based on their new odds of completing a bingo. Players 108 can place bets on Bet Line 3 as depicted in FIG. 3.
  • Placing bets on Bet Line 3 allows players 108 to make secondary bets on individual horizontal lines and/or a set of vertical lines. Preferably, the bets on Bet Line 3 cannot exceed the bets on Bet Line 2. Bet Line 3 includes four places to bet. On the three left places to bet, players 108 can bet on whether a bingo can be obtained in any row. The pay scale for placing a bet on these three places is dX if a bingo is obtained on the additional thirty-one cards 102 drawn from Bin 2 118 or from card dispenser 130. On the right side place to bet, players 108 can bet on whether a bingo can be obtained in a set of columns. Preferably, the number of columns is three. However, one skilled in the relevant art will appreciate that more or less columns could be required. The pay scale for placing a bet on this place is eX if a bingo is obtained on the additional thirty-one cards 102 drawn from Bin 2 118 or from card dispenser 130. The secondary bets allow players 108 to evaluate their chances of obtaining bingos.
  • Dealer 106 draws the full thirty-one cards 102 from Bin 2 118 or from card dispenser 130 at block 234. Matches between the thirty-one cards 102 and spaces on bingo matrix 104 are located and marked accordingly. Continuing the previous example, FIG. 8A shows matches made from the additional thirty-one cards 102 drawn from Bin 2 118. As shown, eleven cards 102 have matched and spaces B1, I2, N1, N2, N3, G1, G2, G3, O1, O2, and O3 have been marked. At this time sixty-six cards 102 have been drawn. Once the cards 102 have been drawn, they can be placed into the played bin 124. FIG. 8B represents all the cards 102 played up to block 234.
  • At block 236, dealer 106 determines if any bingo has been obtained through the drawn sixty-six cards 102. If a bingo was obtained by the sixty-six cards 102, dealer 106 pays on Bet Line 2 b and Bet Line 3 at block 238 and the game 100 ends at block 252. If not, and as shown in FIG. 2, the first chance of winning for game 100 is over and the house wins all of the chips 110 on the table 112. In other embodiments, and not shown in FIG. 2, game 100 does not end after block 238, but instead control is given to block 240.
  • Prior to collecting the chips 110, however, players 108 are given an opportunity for a last chance at game 100. A last chance bet round begins at block 240 where players 108 can place a bet on Bet Line 4, which is represented as the “Buy 3 More” spot. Typically, players 108 will be on Bet Line 4 when they need only one more card 102 to obtain a bingo. Players 108 can place bets on Bet Line 4 not exceeding original bets on bet lines 2 b and 3.
  • Continuing with FIG. 2, dealer 106 determines if any bets were made on Bet Line 4 at block 242. If not, control is given to block 248. If bets were made on Bet Line 4, dealer 106 draws the three cards 102 from Bin 3 120 or from card dispenser 130 at block 244. Based on the drawn three cards 102 from Bin 3 120, matches are found on bingo matrix 104 and marked accordingly. Continuing the previous example, FIG. 9A shows matches made from the three cards 102 drawn from Bin 3 120 or from card dispenser 130. As shown, twelve cards 102 have matched and spaces B1, I1, I2, N1, N2, N3, G1, G2, G3, O1, O2, and O3 have been marked. At this time sixty-nine cards 102 have been drawn. Once the cards 102 have been drawn, they can be placed into the played bin 124. FIG. 9B represents all cards 102 played up until block 244.
  • At block 246, dealer 106 determines if any bingo has been obtained through the sixty-nine cards 102. If a bingo was obtained on the sixty-nine cards 102, dealer 106 pays on Bet Line 4 at block 250 and the game 100 ends at block 252. The pay scale for placing a bet on these Bet Line 4 is fX if a bingo is obtained on the additional three cards 102 drawn from Bin 3 120. If not, game 100 is over and the house wins all of the chips 110 on the table 112 at block 248 and the game 100 ends at block 252. As shown in FIG. 9A, spaces B1, I1, N1, G1, and O1 have been marked giving the players 108, who bet on Bet Line 4, a winning BINGO.
  • While FIG. 2 provided a multi-progressive jackpot round, primary bet round, second chance bet round, and a last chance bet round, the rounds do not necessarily have to occur in that order. Furthermore, more or less rounds can be included. These rounds can possibly include less or more cards placed within Bin 1 116, Bin 2 118, and Bin 3 120. In other embodiments, the order in which game 100 was presented can be interchangeable. For example, the separation of cards 102 does not necessarily occur after bets are placed. In addition, game 100 does not have to end after a bingo is achieved, but can continue to the next round for additional betting and winning.
  • In addition, while multiple pay scales have been described on each of the Bet Lines shown in FIG. 3, these are for illustrative purposes and should not be construed as limiting. In addition, one skilled in the relevant art will appreciate that there are multiple ways of setting up an individual player's card 114 for betting against dealer 106. Furthermore, a single player's card 114 can be used by all players 108 with the chips 110 distinguishing one player 108 from another.
  • FIGS. 1 through 9 generally relate to a table casino game 100. In other embodiments, game 100 can be played on a hand held device as shown in FIG. 10. As depicted, the device can be used to challenge other players on an online system. For example, bingo.com already has an online system where players can gamble and play bingo games.
  • In other embodiments, game 100 on the hand held device can be a stand alone game played against the dealer. In addition, other players can be computer based. In some formats, “fake” money would be used. Slot machines running game 100 may also be available to players 108.
  • While a table embodiment and a hand held device can be used to play game 100, multiple other variations of game 100 can exist. For example, game 100 can come within a home version. Furthermore, game 100 can also be played at work from an internet browser. Through these wide variety of ways to play game 100, multiple machines can be combined to form the multi-progressive jackpot.
  • While ninety card decks 102 have been provided, a number of decks can be use having different amounts of cards. The generalized concept of game 100 is that players bet in the chance that a bingo is obtained after a certain number of cards are drawn.
  • In the previous FIGURES, electronic versions of game 100 were shown. Each version can be implemented using hardware and software. An exemplary hardware and operating environment for implementing the electronic versions can include a general purpose computer system. Furthermore the hardware/software described below can be used for other electronic versions of game 100. The computer system may include a processing unit, system memory, and system bus that operatively couples various system components, including the system memory to the processing unit. There may be only one or there may be more than one processing unit, such that the processor of the computer comprises a single central processing unit (CPU), or a plurality of processing units, commonly referred to as a parallel processing environment. The computer may be a conventional computer, a distributed computer, a web server, a file server, or any other type of computer.
  • The system bus may be any of several types of bus structures including a memory bus or memory controller, a peripheral bus, a switched fabric, point-to-point connections, and a local bus using any of a variety of bus architectures. The system memory may also be referred to as simply the memory, and includes read only memory (ROM) and random access memory (RAM). A basic input/output system (BIOS), containing the basic routines that help to transfer information between elements within the computer, such as during start-up, is stored in ROM. The computer further includes a hard disk drive for reading from and writing to a hard disk, not shown, a magnetic disk drive for reading from or writing to a removable magnetic disk, and an optical disk drive for reading from or writing to a removable optical disk such as a CD ROM or other optical media.
  • The hard disk drive, magnetic disk drive, and optical disk drive are connected to the system bus by a hard disk drive interface, a magnetic disk drive interface, and an optical disk drive interface, respectively. The drives and their associated computer-readable media provide nonvolatile storage of computer-readable instructions; data structures, e.g., a catalog and a context-based index; program modules, e.g., a web service and an indexing robot; and other data for the computer. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that any type of computer-readable media that can store data that is accessible by a computer, for example, magnetic cassettes, flash memory cards, digital video disks, RAM, and ROM, may be used in the exemplary operating environment.
  • A number of program modules may be stored on the hard disk, magnetic disk, optical disk, ROM, or RAM, including an operating system, one or more application programs, other program modules, and program data. A user may enter commands and information into the personal computer through input devices such as a keyboard and pointing device, for example, a mouse. Other input devices (not shown) may include, for example, a microphone, a joystick, a game pad, a tablet, a touch screen device, a satellite dish, a scanner, a facsimile machine, a video camera, a touch screen board, single player wells, and an automated card reader. Input devices can also be individual player wells. These and other input devices are often connected to the processing unit through a serial port interface that is coupled to the system bus, but may be connected by other interfaces, such as a parallel port, game port or a universal serial bus (USB).
  • A monitor or other type of display device is also connected to the system bus via an interface, such as a video adapter. In addition to the monitor, computers typically include other peripheral output devices, such as a printers and speakers. These and other output devices are often connected to the processing unit through the serial port interface that is coupled to the system bus, but may be connected by other interfaces, such as a parallel port, game port, or a universal serial bus (USB).
  • The computer may operate in a networked environment using logical connections to one or more remote computers. These logical connections may be achieved by a communication device coupled to or integral with the computer; the application is not limited to a particular type of communications device. The remote computer may be another computer, a server, a router, a network personal computer, a client, a peer device, or other common network node, and typically includes many or all of the elements described above relative to the computer. Computer can be logically connected to the Internet. The logical connection can include a local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), personal area network (PAN), campus area network (CAN), metropolitan area network (MAN), or global area network (GAN). Such networking environments are commonplace in office networks, enterprise-wide computer networks, intranets and the Internet, which are all types of networks.
  • When used in a LAN environment, the computer may be connected to the local network through a network interface or adapter, which is one type of communications device. When used in a WAN environment, the computer typically includes a modem, a network adapter, or any other type of communications device for establishing communications over the wide area network. The modem, which may be internal or external, is connected to the system bus via the serial port interface. In a networked environment, program modules depicted relative to the personal computer, or portions thereof, may be stored in a remote memory storage device. It is appreciated that the network connections shown are exemplary and other means of and communications devices for establishing a communications link between the computers may be used.
  • The technology described herein may be implemented as logical operations and/or modules in one or more systems. The logical operations may be implemented as a sequence of processor-implemented steps executing in one or more computer systems and as interconnected machine or circuit modules within one or more computer systems. Likewise, the descriptions of various component modules may be provided in terms of operations executed or effected by the modules. The resulting implementation is a matter of choice, dependent on the performance requirements of the underlying system implementing the described technology. Accordingly, the logical operations making up the embodiments of the technology described herein are referred to variously as operations, steps, objects, or modules. Furthermore, it should be understood that logical operations may be performed in any order, unless explicitly claimed otherwise or a specific order is inherently necessitated by the claim language.
  • One skilled in the relevant art will appreciate that the computer system can include code that is loaded from a hard drive to be run on the processor. Alternatively, the system can be saved on a suitable storage medium such as a diskette, a CD, or like devices.
  • The system can take the form of an entirely hardware embodiment, an entirely software embodiment or an embodiment containing both hardware and software elements. In one embodiment, the system is implemented in software, which includes but is not limited to firmware, resident software, microcode, etc.
  • Furthermore, the system can take the form of a computer program product accessible from a computer-usable or computer-readable medium providing program code for use by or in connection with a computer or any instruction execution system. For the purposes of this description, a computer-usable or computer readable medium can be any apparatus that can contain, store, communicate, propagate, or transport the program for use by or in connection with the instruction execution system, apparatus, or device.
  • The medium can be an electronic, magnetic, optical, electromagnetic, infrared, or semiconductor system (or apparatus or device) or a propagation medium. Examples of a computer-readable medium comprise a semiconductor or solid-state memory, magnetic tape, a removable computer diskette, a random access memory (RAM), a read-only memory (ROM), a rigid magnetic disk and an optical disk. Current examples of optical disks comprise compact disk-read only memory (CD-ROM), compact disk-read/write (CD-R/W) and DVD.
  • A data processing system suitable for storing and/or executing program code comprises at least one processor coupled directly or indirectly to memory elements through a system bus. The memory elements can include local memory employed during actual execution of the program code, bulk storage, and cache memories that provide temporary storage of at least some program code in order to reduce the number of times code is retrieved from bulk storage during execution.
  • Input/output or I/O devices (including but not limited to keyboards, displays, pointing devices, etc.) can be coupled to the system either directly or through intervening I/O controllers.
  • Network adapters may also be coupled to the system to enable the data processing system to become coupled to other data processing systems or remote printers or storage devices through intervening private or public networks. Modems, cable modem and Ethernet cards are just a few of the currently available types of network adapters.
  • Described above, aspects of the present application are embodied in a World Wide Web (“WWW”) or (“Web”) site accessible via the Internet. As is well known to those skilled in the art, the term “Internet” refers to the collection of networks and routers that use the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (“TCP/IP”) to communicate with one another. The internet can include a plurality of local area networks (“LANs”) and a wide area network (“WAN”) that are interconnected by routers. The routers are special purpose computers used to interface one LAN or WAN to another. Communication links within the LANs may be wireless, twisted wire pair, coaxial cable, or optical fiber, while communication links between networks may utilize 56 Kbps analog telephone lines, 1 Mbps digital T-1 lines, 45 Mbps T-3 lines or other communications links known to those skilled in the art.
  • Furthermore, computers and other related electronic devices can be remotely connected to either the LANs or the WAN via a digital communications device, modem and temporary telephone, or a wireless link. It will be appreciated that the internet comprises a vast number of such interconnected networks, computers, and routers.
  • The Internet has recently seen explosive growth by virtue of its ability to link computers located throughout the world. As the Internet has grown, so has the WWW. As is appreciated by those skilled in the art, the WWW is a vast collection of interconnected or “hypertext” documents written in HTML, or other markup languages, that are electronically stored at or dynamically generated by “WWW sites” or “Web sites” throughout the Internet. Additionally, client-side software programs that communicate over the Web using the TCP/IP protocol are part of the WWW, such as web browsers, SOAP clients, JavaScript, Java Applets, instant messaging, e-mail, browser plug-ins, Macromedia Flash, chat and others. Other interactive hypertext environments may include environments such as those provided in America Online or other online service providers, as well as the “wireless Web” provided by various wireless networking providers, especially those in the cellular phone industry. It will be appreciated that the present application could apply in any such interactive communication environments, however, for purposes of discussion, the Web is used as an exemplary interactive hypertext environment with regard to the present application.
  • A website is a server/computer connected to the Internet that has storage capabilities for storing hypertext documents and that runs administrative software for handling requests for those stored hypertext documents as well as dynamically generating hypertext documents. Embedded within a hypertext document are a number of hyperlinks, i.e., highlighted portions of text which link the document to another hypertext document possibly stored at a website elsewhere on the Internet. Each hyperlink is assigned a URL that provides the name of the linked document on a server connected to the Internet. Thus, whenever a hypertext document is retrieved from any web server, the document is considered retrieved from the World Wide Web. Known to those skilled in the art, a web server may also include facilities for storing and transmitting application programs, such as application programs written in the JAVA.® programming language from Sun Microsystems, for execution on a remote computer. Likewise, a web server may also include facilities for executing scripts and other application programs on the web server itself.
  • A remote access user may retrieve hypertext documents from the World Wide Web via a web browser program. A web browser, such as Mozilla Firefox or Microsoft's Internet Explorer, is a software application program for providing a user interface to the WWW. Upon request from the remote access user via the web browser, the web browser requests the desired hypertext document from the appropriate web server using the URL for the document and the hypertext transport protocol (“HTTP”). HTTP is a higher-level protocol than TCP/IP and is designed specifically far the requirements of the WWW. HTTP runs on top of TCP/IP to transfer hypertext documents and user-supplied form data between server and client computers. The WWW browser may also retrieve programs from the web server, such as JavaScript or JAVA applets, for execution on the client computer. Finally, the WWW browser may include optional software components, called plug-ins, that run specialized functionality within the browser.
  • The foregoing description is provided to enable any person skilled in the relevant art to practice the various embodiments described herein. Various modifications to these embodiments will be readily apparent to those skilled in the relevant art, and generic principles defined herein may be applied to other embodiments. Thus, the claims are not intended to be limited to the embodiments shown and described herein, but are to be accorded the full scope consistent with the language of the claims, wherein reference to an element in the singular is not intended to mean “one and only one” unless specifically stated, but rather “one or more.” All structural and functional equivalents to the elements of the various embodiments described throughout this disclosure that are known or later come to be known to those of ordinary skill in the relevant art are expressly incorporated herein by reference and intended to be encompassed by the claims. Moreover, nothing disclosed herein is intended to be dedicated to the public regardless of whether such disclosure is explicitly recited in the claims.

Claims (4)

  1. 1. A ninety card-based bingo game comprising:
    a dealer;
    at least one player for betting against the dealer;
    a plurality of casino chips for the at least one player to make bets;
    a 3×9 standard bingo card having twenty-seven squares arranged in nine vertical columns and three horizontal rows, wherein each row contains five numbers and four blank spaces and each column contains either one, two, or three numbers based on the limitation of the first column containing numbers one through ten, the second column containing numbers eleven through twenty, the third column containing numbers twenty-one through thirty, the fourth column containing numbers thirty-one through forty, the fifth column containing numbers forty-one through fifty, the sixth column containing numbers fifty-one through sixty, the seventh column containing numbers sixty-one through seventy, the eight column containing numbers seventy-one through eighty, and the ninth column containing numbers eighty-one through ninety;
    a deck of ninety cards numbered from one to ninety with cards numbered one to ten associated with column one, cards numbered eleven to twenty associated with column two, cards numbered twenty-one to thirty associated with column three, cards numbered thirty-one to forty associated with column four, cards numbered forty-one to fifty associated with column five, cards numbered fifty-one to sixty associated with column six, cards numbered sixty-one to seventy associated with column seven, cards numbered seventy-one to eighty associated with column eight, cards numbered eighty-one to ninety associated with column nine; and
    a 3×5 bingo matrix card having fifteen squares arranged in five vertical columns and three horizontal rows, wherein the 3×5 bingo matrix card includes all the previous numbers within the 3×9 standard bingo card with the empty spaces removed.
  2. 2. A game having four ways to win comprising:
    a first way of winning by obtaining a bingo after three cards are drawn.
    a second way of winning by obtaining a bingo after thirty-five cards are drawn:
    a third way of winning by obtaining a bingo after sixty-six cards are drawn: and
    a fourth way of winning by obtaining a bingo after sixty-nine cards are drawn.
  3. 3. A ninety card bingo game providing multiple ways of winning by betting on chances of obtaining a bingo and allowing players to bet several times throughout the game, the game comprising:
    a set amount of cards to be drawn, wherein players win if a bingo is obtained after the set amount of cards are drawn, otherwise, the players forfeit their bets.
  4. 4. An electronic device for playing the card-based bingo game described herein.
US12776342 2009-05-07 2010-05-07 Game of chance involving cards and bingo like play and method of playing therefor (90 cards) Abandoned US20100283206A1 (en)

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