US20100242375A1 - Double Sintered Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond Cutting Elements - Google Patents

Double Sintered Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond Cutting Elements Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100242375A1
US20100242375A1 US12750526 US75052610A US2010242375A1 US 20100242375 A1 US20100242375 A1 US 20100242375A1 US 12750526 US12750526 US 12750526 US 75052610 A US75052610 A US 75052610A US 2010242375 A1 US2010242375 A1 US 2010242375A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
polycrystalline diamond
pcd
compact
segments
layer
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12750526
Inventor
David R. Hall
Ronald B. Crockett
Joseph R. Fox
Ashok Tamang
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Schlumberger Technology Corp
Hall David R
Original Assignee
Schlumberger Technology Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B24GRINDING; POLISHING
    • B24DTOOLS FOR GRINDING, BUFFING, OR SHARPENING
    • B24D99/00Subject matter not provided for in other groups of this subclass
    • B24D99/005Segments of abrasive wheels
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B22CASTING; POWDER METALLURGY
    • B22FWORKING METALLIC POWDER; MANUFACTURE OF ARTICLES FROM METALLIC POWDER; MAKING METALLIC POWDER
    • B22F3/00Manufacture of workpieces or articles from metallic powder characterised by the manner of compacting or sintering; Apparatus specially adapted therefor ; Presses and furnaces
    • B22F3/12Both compacting and sintering
    • B22F3/14Both compacting and sintering simultaneously
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B22CASTING; POWDER METALLURGY
    • B22FWORKING METALLIC POWDER; MANUFACTURE OF ARTICLES FROM METALLIC POWDER; MAKING METALLIC POWDER
    • B22F7/00Manufacture of composite layers, workpieces, or articles, comprising metallic powder, by sintering the powder, with or without compacting wherein at least one part is obtained by sintering or compression
    • B22F7/06Manufacture of composite layers, workpieces, or articles, comprising metallic powder, by sintering the powder, with or without compacting wherein at least one part is obtained by sintering or compression of composite workpieces or articles from parts, e.g. to form tipped tools
    • B22F7/08Manufacture of composite layers, workpieces, or articles, comprising metallic powder, by sintering the powder, with or without compacting wherein at least one part is obtained by sintering or compression of composite workpieces or articles from parts, e.g. to form tipped tools with one or more parts not made from powder
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C22METALLURGY; FERROUS OR NON-FERROUS ALLOYS; TREATMENT OF ALLOYS OR NON-FERROUS METALS
    • C22CALLOYS
    • C22C26/00Alloys containing diamond or cubic or wurtzitic boron nitride, fullerenes or carbon nanotubes
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B10/00Drill bits
    • E21B10/46Drill bits characterised by wear resisting parts, e.g. diamond inserts
    • E21B10/56Button type inserts
    • E21B10/567Button type inserts with preformed cutting elements mounted on a distinct support, e.g. polycrystalline inserts
    • E21B10/5676Button type inserts with preformed cutting elements mounted on a distinct support, e.g. polycrystalline inserts having a cutting face with different segments, e.g. mosaic-type inserts
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B10/00Drill bits
    • E21B10/46Drill bits characterised by wear resisting parts, e.g. diamond inserts
    • E21B10/56Button type inserts
    • E21B10/567Button type inserts with preformed cutting elements mounted on a distinct support, e.g. polycrystalline inserts
    • E21B10/573Button type inserts with preformed cutting elements mounted on a distinct support, e.g. polycrystalline inserts characterised by support details
    • E21B10/5735Interface between the substrate and the cutting element

Abstract

Embodiments of the invention include a polycrystalline diamond compact comprising a plurality of double-sintered polycrystalline diamond segments. The polycrystalline diamond segments are configured to remain thermally stable at a first temperature. The polycrystalline diamond segments are positioned upon and bonded to a transition layer of single-sintered polycrystalline diamond that is configured to remain thermally stable at a second temperature lower than the first temperature. The transition layer is positioned upon and bonded to a substrate. Embodiments of the invention have improved thermally stability, resulting in fewer defects during manufacturing and improved longevity in use.

Description

    PRIORITY CLAIM
  • This application claims the benefit of and priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/164,770 filed on Mar. 30, 2009, which is incorporated herein in its entirety for all purposes by this reference.
  • FIELD
  • Embodiments of the present invention relate generally to the field of earth boring tools and in particular relates to polycrystalline diamond cutting elements used on drill bits for earth boring.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Specialized drill bits are used to drill well-bores, boreholes, or wells in the earth for a variety of purposes, including water wells; oil and gas wells; injection wells; geothermal wells; monitoring wells, mining; and, other similar operations. These drill bits come in two common types, roller cone drill bits and fixed cutter drill bits.
  • Wells and other holes in the earth are drilled by attaching or connecting a drill bit to some means of turning the drill bit. In some instances, such as in some mining applications, the drill bit is attached directly to a shaft that is turned by a motor, engine, drive, or other means of providing torque to rotate the drill bit.
  • In other applications, such as oil and gas drilling, the well may be several thousand feet or more in total depth. In these circumstances, the drill bit is connected to the surface of the earth by what is referred to as a drill string and a motor or drive that rotates the drill bit. The drill string typically comprises several elements that may include a special down-hole motor configured to provide additional or, if a surfaces motor or drive is not provided, the only means of turning the drill bit. Special logging and directional tools to measure various physical characteristics of the geological formation being drilled and to measure the location of the drill bit and drill string may be employed. Additional drill collars, heavy, thick-walled pipe, typically provide weight that is used to push the drill bit into the formation. Finally, drill pipe connects these elements, the drill bit, down-hole motor, logging tools, and drill collars, to the surface where a motor or drive mechanism turns the entire drill string and, consequently, the drill bit, to engage the drill bit with the geological formation to drill the well-bore deeper.
  • As a well is drilled, fluid, typically a water or oil based fluid referred to as drilling mud is pumped down the drill string through the drill pipe and any other elements present and through the drill bit. Other types of drilling fluids are sometimes used, including air, nitrogen, foams, mists, and other combinations of gases, but for purposes of this application drilling fluid and/or drilling mud refers to any type of drilling fluid, including gases. In other words, drill bits typically have a fluid channel within the drill bit to allow the drilling mud to pass through the bit and out one or more jets, ports, or nozzles. The purpose of the drilling fluid is to cool and lubricate the drill bit, stabilize the well-bore from collapsing or allowing fluids present in the geological formation from entering the well-bore, and to carry fragments or cuttings removed by the drill bit up the annulus and out of the well-bore. While the drilling fluid typically is pumped through the inner annulus of the drill string and out of the drill bit, drilling fluid can be reverse-circulated. That is, the drilling fluid can be pumped down the annulus (the space between the exterior of the drill pipe and the wall of the well-bore) of the well-bore, across the face of the drill bit, and into the inner fluid channels of the drill bit through the jets or nozzles and up into the drill string.
  • Roller cone drill bits were the most common type of bit used historically and featured two or more rotating cones with cutting elements, or teeth, on each cone. Roller cone drill bits typically have a relatively short period of use as the cutting elements and support bearings for the roller cones typically wear out and fail after only 50 hours of drilling use.
  • Because of the relatively short life of roller cone bits, fixed cutter drill bits that employ very durable polycrystalline diamond (PCD) compact cutters, tungsten carbide cutters, natural or synthetic diamond, other hard materials, or combinations thereof, have been developed. These bits are referred to as fixed cutter bits because they employ cutting elements positioned on one or more fixed blades in selected locations or randomly distributed. Unlike roller cone bits that have cutting elements on a cone that rotates, in addition to the rotation imparted by a motor or drive, fixed cutter bits do not rotate independently of the rotation imparted by the motor or drive mechanism. Through varying improvements, the durability of fixed cutter bits has improved sufficiently to make them cost effective in terms of time saved during the drilling process when compared to the higher, up-front cost to manufacture the fixed cutter bits.
  • Typically, a diamond cutter for use in a drill bit having a geometric size and shape normally characterized by unleached diamond cutting elements fabricated by assembling a plurality of polycrystalline diamond compact cutting elements in an array in a cutting slug that supports the cutting element. A challenge occurs, however, in bonding the PCD cutting elements to the cutting slug because the cutting slug—typically a cemented carbide substrate—has a different material than the PCD cutting elements and, therefore, has different material properties, such as a different rate of thermal expansion than the PCD cutting element. The differences in material properties can cause thermal stresses that lead the PCD cutting element to crack, delaminate, or otherwise become weakened and/or damaged at the interface between the cutting slug and the PCD cutting element.
  • Thus, there exists a need for a PCD cutting element that is, at least in part, has improved thermal compatibility with the underlying cutting slug.
  • Further, there is a need for a PCD cutting element that has improved bonding to a cutting slug as compared to the prior art.
  • In addition, there is a need for a PCD manufacturing process that improves the yield of usable PCD cutting elements coupled to cutting slugs that reduces the probability that the PCD cutting elements break and/or crack during a double sintering process.
  • SUMMARY
  • Various features and embodiments of the invention disclosed herein provide robust and durable PCD cutting elements coupled to a cutting slug. In addition, methods of coupling a PCD cutting elements to a cutting slug are also disclosed.
  • Embodiments of the invention include a first layer comprising at least one polycrystalline diamond segment positioned upon a second layer or transition layer. In those embodiments that include a plurality of PCD segments, a first PCD segment is positioned proximate a second PCD segment and separated therefrom by an interfacial boundary. The interfacial boundary optionally is non-planar relative to the first and/or the second PCD segment. Optionally, the interfacial boundary includes an abrasive material. Optionally, the interfacial boundary is contiguous with and formed of the same material as the second layer. In some embodiments, the first layer remains thermally stable at a higher temperature than the temperature below which the second table remains thermally stable. In some embodiments, the second layer is coupled to a substrate or cutting slug.
  • Embodiments of the PCD segments include those that have been processed to provide a granular structure comprising interstices with a reduced number of metallic catalysts. Other embodiments of the PCD segments include those that have been processed to provide a granular structure that include interstices infiltrated with a material that remains thermally stable at a higher temperature than the temperature below which the metallic catalysts remain thermally stable. Other embodiments of the granular structure of the PCD segments comprise interstices that include one or more non-metallic catalysts. Yet other embodiments of the granular structure of the PCD segments comprise substantially fully dense diamond, i.e., a granular structure being substantially free of voids and/or interstices with or without other materials within any remaining interstices.
  • Other embodiments of the invention include a body of abrasive material coupled to a substrate. The body includes a substantially pointed or conical shaped cutting surface. The body optionally includes one or more PCD segments coupled to and exposed in the conical cutting surface.
  • A method of forming a PCD cutting elements coupled to a cutting slug includes providing a canister or other container configured to receive a plurality of thermally stable pre-sintered polycrystalline diamond segments. The canister is filled with grains of polycrystalline diamond and, optionally, a catalytic material. The polycrystalline diamond segments are positioned upon the grains of polycrystalline diamond such that an interfacial boundary is formed from the grains of polycrystalline diamond to separate each of the plurality of polycrystalline diamond segments. A press than applies a temperature and a pressure to the container to sinter the grains of polycrystalline diamond and bond the polycrystalline diamond segments to the sintered grains of polycrystalline diamond.
  • As used herein, “at least one,” “one or more,” and “and/or” are open-ended expressions that are both conjunctive and disjunctive in operation. For example, each of the expressions “at least one of A, B and C,” “at least one of A, B, or C,” “one or more of A, B, and C,” “one or more of A, B, or C” and “A, B, and/or C” means A alone, B alone, C alone, A and B together, A and C together, B and C together, or A, B and C together.
  • Various embodiments of the present inventions are set forth in the attached figures and in the Detailed Description as provided herein and as embodied by the claims. It should be understood, however, that this Summary does not contain all of the aspects and embodiments of the one or more present inventions, is not meant to be limiting or restrictive in any manner, and that the invention(s) as disclosed herein is/are and will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art to encompass obvious improvements and modifications thereto.
  • Additional advantages of the present invention will become readily apparent from the following discussion, particularly when taken together with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • To further clarify the above and other advantages and features of the one or more present inventions, reference to specific embodiments thereof are illustrated in the appended drawings. The drawings depict only exemplary embodiments and are therefore not to be considered limiting. One or more embodiments will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings in which:
  • FIG. 1 is an isometric view of an embodiment of a PCD compact cutting element;
  • FIG. 2 is a microscopic level view of an embodiment of a granular structure of a PCD segment;
  • FIG. 3 is a microscopic level view of another embodiment of a granular structure of a PCD segment;
  • FIG. 4 is an isometric view of an embodiment of a metallic carbide disc for use in embodiments of methods of making a PCD segment;
  • FIG. 5 is an isometric view of another embodiment of a metallic carbide disc for use in embodiments of methods of making a PCD segment;
  • FIG. 6A is a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of a canister for use in embodiments of methods of making a PCD segment;
  • FIG. 6B is a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of a canister for use in embodiments of methods of making a PCD compact;
  • FIG. 7 is an orthogonal view of an embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 8 is an orthogonal diagram of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 9 is an orthogonal diagram of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 10 is an orthogonal diagram of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 11 is an orthogonal diagram of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 12 is an orthogonal diagram of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 13 is an orthogonal diagram of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 14 is an orthogonal diagram of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 17 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 18 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 19 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 20 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 21 is an isometric view of an embodiment of a rotary drag bit that includes an embodiment of a PCD compact cutting element in a close-up view;
  • FIG. 22 is an isometric view of an embodiment of a PCD compact cutting element that includes a transition layer with a conical surface;
  • FIG. 23 is an isometric view of another embodiment of a rotary drag bit that includes an embodiment of a PCD compact cutting element that includes a conical surface in a close-up view;
  • FIG. 24 is an orthogonal view of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • FIG. 25 is an orthogonal view of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element; and,
  • FIG. 26 is an orthogonal view of another embodiment of a PCD cutting element;
  • The drawings are not necessarily to scale.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 shows an isometric view of an embodiment of a polycrystalline diamond (PCD) compact 101. The PCD compact 101 includes a first table or layer 105 formed of a plurality of PCD segments 110 that, optionally, are sintered and/or preformed, as will be described in further detail below. The PCD segments 110 optionally are leached diamond, natural diamond, synthetic diamond, highly pressurized diamond, calcium carbonate sintered diamond, combinations thereof, and similar materials and for purposes of the claims a PCD segment and/or polycrystalline diamond encompasses all these materials and those that fall within the scope of this disclosure. In addition, the PCD segments 110 optionally are thermally stable as will be described in further detail below. In the embodiment of the PCD compact 101 illustrated in FIG. 1, the first layer 105 has a diameter of 130. Of course, one of skill in the art will appreciate that the first layer 105 can optionally have different dimensions and different shapes, including ovoid, half-circle, square, and other such shapes, and that all of these embodiments fall within the scope of the disclosure.
  • The plurality of PCD segments 110 are separated by an interfacial boundary 150 between each of the plurality of PCD segments 110. Optionally, the interfacial boundaries 150 comprises an abrasive material selected from a group that includes, but is not limited to, tungsten carbide, cubic boron nitride, thermally stable polycrystalline diamond, polycrystalline diamond, and the like. The interfacial boundaries 150 optionally are non-linear and/or non-planar relative to adjacent PCD segments 110. Optionally, the non-linear and/or non-planar quality of the interfacial boundary 150 creates an interlocking feature—best seen as interlocking feature 760 in FIG. 7 and interlocking feature 960 in FIG. 9—between the diamond segments 110, thereby reducing the likelihood that adjacent PCD segments 110 will move relative to each other and, therefore, reducing the likelihood of a PCD segment 110 being torn and/or damaged and/or removed undesirably from the PCD compact 101 during use.
  • The PCD compact 101 also includes a second table or layer 115, also referred to as a transition layer 115. The PCD segments 110 are positioned upon and bonded to the second layer 115. The second layer 115 optionally comprises an abrasive material selected from a group that includes, but is not limited to, tungsten carbide, cubic boron nitride, thermally stable polycrystalline diamond, polycrystalline diamond, and the like. The embodiment of the PCD compact 101 illustrates a second layer 115 that includes sintered PCD grains 120 that is optionally interspersed with a metallic catalyst. Optionally, the second layer 115 is contiguous with and comprises the same material as the interfacial boundary 150. In the embodiment of the PCD compact 101 illustrated in FIG. 1, the second layer 115 has a diameter of 135 that is the same, within manufacturing tolerances, as the diameter 130 of the first layer 105. Of course, one of skill in the art will appreciate that the second layer 115 can optionally have different dimensions and different shapes, including ovoid, half-circle, square, and other such shapes, including dimensions and shapes different from the first layer 105, and that all of these embodiments fall within the scope of the disclosure.
  • The second table 115 is bonded to a substrate 125 made from, for example, a metallic material. For example, the substrate 125 can be made from a metallic material selected from the group that includes, but is not limited to, tungsten carbide, titanium carbide, tungsten molybdenum carbide, tantalum carbide, combinations thereof, and other similar materials. In the embodiment of the PCD compact 101 illustrated in FIG. 1, the substrate 125 has a diameter of 140 that is the same, within manufacturing tolerances, as the diameter 130 of the first layer 105 and the diameter 135 of the second layer 115. Of course, one of skill in the art will appreciate that the substrate 125 can optionally have different dimensions and different shapes, including ovoid, half-circle, square, and other such shapes, including dimensions and shapes different from the first layer 105 and/or the second layer 115, and that all of these embodiments fall within the scope of the disclosure.
  • As noted, the PCD segments 110 typically are formed by sintering powdered diamond, and, optionally, various catalysts, typically metallic powders mixed with the diamond powder. The catalysts, typically metallic materials, such as cobalt and other similar metallic materials, act as a catalyst to reduce the temperature and/or the pressure at which the sintering process occurs and/or speeds the reaction by which the diamond grains and any other materials crystallize and form a granular structure. The diamond powder and any catalysts and/or other materials are placed in a canister or form that is compressed under a pressure and a temperature sufficient to sinter and crystallize the diamond powder and any other materials into a solid PCD segment.
  • Referring to FIG. 3, a sintered PCD granular structure 300 comprises polycrystalline diamond grains or crystals 301 and a catalyzing material 310 dispersed between the polycrystalline diamond grains or crystals 301. Optionally, the catalyzing material 310 is selected from a group of metallic materials, including, but not limited to, cobalt, nickel, iron, ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, platinum, chromium, manganese, tantalum, osmium, iridium, and combinations thereof.
  • Cobalt and other catalysts, however, typically result in a PCD granular structure that typically suffers from thermal degradation at temperatures (typically around from about 650 degrees Celsius to about 700 degrees Celsius) that the PCD granular structure can be exposed to during normal use. That is, the PCD granular structure exhibits increased tendencies to fail, crack, chip, delaminate, or otherwise wear more quickly during use at normal operating temperatures, leading to premature wear and reduced life.
  • To address the side-effect the catalysts 310 have on the thermal stability of the PCD granular structure 300, the PCD segments (such as segments 110 in FIG. 1) are processed after they have been sintered to reduce the amount of catalyst 310 present in the PCD granular structure 300 or remove the catalyst 310, either from the entire PCD segment or at least to a depth at which the PCD segment is heated through the transfer of heat generated during use less than the temperature at which the PCD granular structure begins to exhibit decreased thermal stability. Typically, the catalysts are removed via leaching and/or acid etching with acids that react with the catalysts and/or other known methods, leaving a PCD segment that is said to be thermally stable, typically referred to as thermally stable polycrystalline (TSP).
  • Illustrated in FIG. 2 is an idealized microscopic level view of a sintered PCD granular structure 200 that has been processed to remove the catalyst (e.g., catalyst 220 in FIG. 3), thereby leaving voids 220 and PCD grains 201, as discussed above. That is, the thermally stable PCD segments 110 of FIG. 1 optionally have been processed in such a way to improve the thermal stability of the PCD segments 110 relative to PCD segments that have not undergone such processing. Improved thermal stability means that the diamond segments remain stable, e.g., do not exhibit increased tendencies to fail, crack, chip, delaminate, or otherwise wear more quickly during use at higher temperatures than these failure modes would otherwise manifest themselves.
  • The PCD grains 201 typically are submicron in size, providing dimensional context for the FIGS. 2 and 3, typically from about 1 micron to about 50 microns and, more preferably, from about 5 microns to about 35 microns and, more preferably still, from about 7 microns to about 25 microns. In some embodiments, the PCD granular structure is processed to provide PCD grains 201 large enough such that the PCD grains 201 do not easily oxidize and burn up when subjected to the heat caused by friction during use.
  • Optionally, the PCD granular structure 200 is then subjected to additional processing, such as another sintering process (i.e., double sintering) to cause the PCD grains 201 to grow and expand into the interstices or voids 220, leaving PCD granular structure that is substantially diamond dense. That is, the PCD granular structure 200 comprises at least 90% PCD grains 201.
  • In other embodiments, the PCD granular structure 200 is sintered while in contact with non-catalytic materials, i.e., those materials that typically do not catalyze or cause the PCD granular structure to change crystal structure (e.g., from diamond to graphite) and/or lower the temperature at which the PCD granular structure 200 and PCD grains 201 begin to become thermally unstable. For example, a non-metallic catalyst 210 that is thermally stable, e.g., one having a coefficient of thermal expansion similar to that of the PCD grains 201 can be placed in contact with the PCD granular structure 201 during the sintering process, thereby causing the non-metallic catalyst 210 to infiltrate and/or grow within one or more of the interstices or voids 220. The non-metallic catalyst 210 can be selected from a group that includes, but is not limited to, silicon, silicon carbide, boron, carbonates, hydroxide, hydride, hydrate, phosphorus-oxide, phosphoric acid, carbonate, lanthanide, actinide, phosphate hydrate, hydrogen phosphate, phosphorus carbonate, combinations thereof, and other similar materials.
  • In yet other embodiments, the PCD granular structure 200 is sintered with one or more thermally stable materials 215, including, but not limited to, cobalt silicide, titanium, niobium, molybdenum, tungsten, tantalum, combinations thereof, and other similar materials. A benefit of these thermally stable materials 215 is that they tend to act to make the PCD granular structure 200 less brittle under impact loads.
  • Prior art PCD compacts typically had a PCD segment bonded directly to a substrate. This arrangement caused difficulties during manufacturing and use because, among other problems, the coefficient of thermal expansion differed, sometimes greatly, between the substrate and the PCD segment. During manufacturing, in which the PCD segment was to be bonded to the substrate, the different rates of thermal expansion often resulted in PCD segments that cracked due to the thermal stresses created at the interface of the substrate and the PCD segment as the substrate and PCD segment expanded and contracted at different rates while heating and cooling. Similar results occurred during use in which the PCD segment would be subjected to direct heating caused by friction, whereas the substrate is heated primarily through heat transferred by conduction through the PCD segment and to the substrate.
  • A benefit of the second layer or transition layer 115 is that it solves the previously unresolved problem of bonding a PCD segment to a substrate that has a different coefficient of thermal expansion. That is, embodiments of PCD compacts of the invention have improved thermal stability, improved bonding of the PCD segments to a substrate, improved reliability, and other benefits as described herein and one having skill in the art will understand by reading the disclosure.
  • Embodiments of methods of making first the PCD segments 110 are first discussed. As noted above, PCD segments 110 are formed by sintering diamond powder or other similar material and, optionally, a catalyst. Illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5 are discs 405, 410, that are provided. The discs 405, 410 optionally formed of a metallic carbide, such as those materials discussed above. The discs 405 and 410 are used to shape the PCD segments 110. The discs 405, 410 include one or more areas 415 in which the PCD segments 110 are formed, the areas 415 being separated by one or more ribs 420 on a front surface 409 of the discs 405, 410. The ribs 420 may be straight, non-liner, curvilinear, non-planar, combinations thereof, and the like. (It should be noted that shape and location of the ribs 420 is a mirror of the shape and location of the interfacial boundary 150 of the PCD compact 101 discussed above. Thus, the ribs 420 can optionally be of any shape and any dimension contemplated for the interfacial boundaries.) In addition, the ribs 420 separate the PCD segments 110 from coming into contact with each other during the manufacturing process.
  • Embodiments of the method making PCD include providing a canister or can 601 as seen in FIG. 6A. At least one disc or a first disc 405 is placed within the canister 601 and each area 415 of the disc 405 is filled with, for example, diamond powder 650 (and any catalysts and other materials, which are considered present in the discussion of the diamond powder 650), as discussed above, that will be sintered to form the PCD segment 110, as discussed above. In those instances in which a plurality of discs 405 are placed into the canister 601 so as to form a plurality of PCD segments 110, optionally another disc 630 separates each disc 405 from the diamond powder 650 proximate to a back surface 407 of each disc 405. The disc 630 optionally is made of niobium and/or similar such materials, which prevents, at least to some degree, the flow of diamond powder 650 and the growth of crystallized diamond grains into the back surface 407 of the disc 405 during sintering. The number of discs 405 positioned in the canister 601 and, consequently, the number of PCD segments 110 produced, is a function, in part, of the thickness 655 of the layer of diamond powder 650 and the thickness 408 of the discs 405. Of course, the thickness 655 of the diamond powder 650 and the thickness 408 of the disc 405 optionally can be varied in the same canister 601, thus producing PCD segments of different dimensions in one manufacturing batch. Further, as one having skill in the art will appreciate, the quantity of PCD segments 110 produced is a function, in part, on the configuration and number of ribs 420 on each disc 405. Further, different discs 405 with different configurations of ribs 420 can be used in a given canister 601, thus further affecting the yield of PCD segments 110.
  • Prior to placing the lid 660 on the canister 601 and sealing the canister 601, the diamond powder 650 may be tamped down or compacted with an applied pressure low enough to avoid breakage of any of the discs 405 and 630. Optionally, the canister 650 is heated to reduce or eliminate some or all of any impurities present in the diamond powder 650 and elsewhere in the canister 601 before sealing the canister 601. Typically, the lid 660 is sealed to the canister 601 through welding, such as laser welding and other known methods. In some embodiments of the present invention, the canister is sealed using a process described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,575,425 to Hall et al., which is herein incorporated by reference for all that it contains.
  • After the canister 601 is sealed, it is placed within a salt form (not shown). One or more salt forms are then stacked and placed on an anvil of a high-temperature, high-pressure press (not shown). The press applies a pressure and a temperature sufficiently high to cause the diamond powder 650 (and any catalysts and other materials) to sinter. During the sintering process, the diamond powder 650 typically reduces in volume as it becomes solid.
  • Once the sintering process is complete and the canister 601 is removed from both the press and the salt form, the diamond powder 650 will have become the sintered PCD segments 110. An advantage of the ribs 420 of the discs 405 is that the separate PCD segments 110 are easily separable from the discs 420, thus eliminating a step of cutting the PCD segments 110 out a solid cylinder of polycrystalline diamond with an electron discharge machining (EDM), a process that typically is time consuming and expensive. The separated PCD segments 110 are now ready for any post-sintering treatment such as leaching and/or acid baths, and other such treatments to improve the thermal stability of the PCD segments 110 as discussed above.
  • Embodiments of the method further include forming PCD compacts, such as those illustrated in FIG. 1, to combine PCD segments 110 with an unsintered abrasive powder or material that will form the second or transition layer 115 and a substrate 125. One or more PCD segments 2610 are placed in a canister 2601, similar to the canister 601, as illustrated in FIG. 6B. Unsintered abrasive material 2620, such as diamond powder, by way of example, is placed in the canister in between—at the interfacial boundary 2650—and on top of the PCD segments 2610 that typically have been processed to improve the thermal stability of the PCD segments 2610, as discussed above. As noted above, the unsintered abrasive material optionally includes metallic catalysts and/or non-metallic catalysts and/or other thermally stable materials as discussed above.
  • The substrate 2625 is placed on top of the unsintered abrasive material 2620. Prior to placing the lid 2660 on the canister 2601 and sealing the canister 2601, the unsintered abrasive material 2620 may be tamped down or compacted with an applied pressure low enough to avoid breakage of any of the PCD segments 2610. Optionally, the canister 2601 is heated to reduce or eliminate some or all of any impurities present in the unsintered abrasive material 2620 and elsewhere in the canister 2601 before sealing the canister 2601. Typically, the lid 2660 is sealed to the canister 2601 through welding, such as laser welding and other known methods. In some embodiments of the present invention, the canister is sealed using a process described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,575,425 to Hall et al. After the canister 2601 is sealed, it is placed within a salt form (not shown). One or more salt forms are then stacked and placed on an anvil of a high-temperature, high-pressure press (not shown). The press applies a pressure and a temperature sufficiently high to cause the unsintered abrasive material 2620 (and any catalysts and other materials) to sinter. During the sintering process, the abrasive material 2620 typically reduces in volume as it becomes solid. In addition, the PCD segments 2610 undergo a second, or double, sintering process, by which the PCD grains grow and/or other non-metallic catalysts and/or other thermally stable materials are incorporated and sintered into the PCD segments as discussed above.
  • During the sintering process, the abrasive material 2620 forms both a mechanical and a chemical bond or attachment with the PCD segments 2610 at the interfacial boundary 2650 and at a lower surface 2611. For example, the PCD segments 2610 would exhibit, in part, growth of PCD grains 201 (FIG. 2) into the interstices and voids 220 (FIG. 2) across and into a transition zone 2621 of the now sintered abrasive material 2620. In so doing, a solid, rigid diamond layer at the transition zone 2621 forms a mechanical bond between the sintered layer of abrasive material 2620 and the PCD segments 2610, reducing any residual stress concentrations that may otherwise occur. Further, the abrasive material 2620 may reduce in volume as it sinters, provided further space into which PCD grains may grow during the sintering process, further improving the mechanical bond. It should be noted that while the grain size of the PCD grains and the sintered abrasive material can vary substantially, a grain size that is similar between the PCD grains and the sintered abrasive material can improve and provide a more uniform bond between the two materials as compared to the bond that occurs when the grain sizes are dissimilar.
  • Another benefit is that whereas the PCD segments 2610—typically processed to be thermally stable—and the substrate 2625 typically have coefficients of thermal expansion that are quite different, as discussed above, the layer of sintered abrasive material 2620 acts as a transition layer, and is typically selected and prepared to have a coefficient of thermal expansion somewhere between that of the PCD segments 2610 and the substrate 2625. In so doing, the gradient of thermal stresses is changed gradually throughout the PCD compact rather than having a sharp transition at each interface. That is, a first layer of PCD segments 2610 is configured to remain thermally stable at a first temperature and a second layer or transition layer 2620 is configured to remain thermally stable at a second temperature lower than the first temperature.
  • Disclosed in FIGS. 7-14 are various, non-limiting embodiments of PCD compacts comprising PCD segments of various shapes and the interfacial boundaries between each PCD segment.
  • For example, the PCD compact 710 includes two PCD segments 710 and a single interfacial boundary 750 that is non-linear and non-planar and includes interlocking features 760, such as the illustrated dimples.
  • As illustrated in FIGS. 7-14, the PCD segments 710, 810, 910, 1010, 1110, 1210, 1310, and 1410 can be a variety of shapes, including, but not limited to, circular, square, hexagonal or a polygonal working surface. The PCD segments 710, 810, 910, 1010, 1110, 1210, 1310, and 1410 can be arranged symmetrically or asymmetrically around the PCD compacts 701, 801, 901, 1001, 1101, 1201, 1301, and 1401. Further, the PCD segments can be oriented relative to the direction of work so that the PCD segments perform the majority of the work as compared to the abrasive material.
  • As noted, the interfacial boundaries 750, 950, and others can include comprise interlocking features. The interfacial boundaries 950 includes a series of steps 960. The interlocking features 750, 850, 950, 1050, 1150, 1250, 1350, and 1450 optionally include also comprise complementary projections and recesses. For example, PCD compact 1201 in FIG. 12 includes a PCD segment 1210 that has a interfacial boundary 1250 that is a plurality of oval openings.
  • Disclosed in FIGS. 15-20 are cross-sections of various, non-limiting embodiments of PCD compacts 1501, 1601, 1701, 1801, 1901, and 2001. Each of the PCD compacts 1501, 1601, 1701, 1801, 1901, and 2001 include a plurality of PCD segments 1510, 1610, 1710, 1810, 1910, and 2010, respectively, with an interfacial boundary 1550, 1650, 1750, 1850, 1950, and 2050 separating them, respectively. The transition layers 1515, 1615, 1715, 1815, 1925, and 2015 are bonded at lower surface 1511, 1611, 1711, 1811, 1911, and 2011 to the PCD segments 1510, 1610, 1710, 1810, 1910, and 2010. Likewise, the transition layers 1515, 1615, 1715, 1815, 1925, and 2015 are bonded at upper surfaces 1524, 1624, 1724, 1824, 1924 and 2024 to the substrates 1525, 1625, 1725, 1825, 1925, and 2025, respectively. The lower surfaces 1511, 1611, 1711, 1811, 1911, and 2011 and the upper surfaces 1524, 1624, 1724, 1824, 1924 and 2024 optionally are non-linear and/or non-planar and/or include interlocking features, such as protrusions and steps.
  • FIG. 21 shows an embodiment of a drag bit 2800 that includes a plurality of PCD compacts or shear cutters 2801 as described above. The shear cutters 2801 are attached to blades 2880 that each extend from a head 2890 of the drag bit 2800 for cutting against the subterranean formation being drilled.
  • FIG. 22 discloses an embodiment of a PCD compact or pointed cutting element 3101 that includes PCD segments 3110 arranged about the PCD compact or cutting element 3101. The PCD segments 3110 can be arranged symmetrically or asymmetrically about the PCD compact 3101 as required for a particular application. A sintered abrasive material 3120 having a conical surface 3123 supports the PCD segments 3110 that, in turn, is supported by a substrate 3125.
  • FIG. 23 shows an embodiment of another drag bit 3100 that includes a plurality of pointed PCD compacts or cutting elements 3101. The PCD compacts 3101 may be pressed or machined into the desired shape or configuration. In other embodiments, the PCD compact 3101 may be used in road milling, pavement resurfacing, mining, and trenching applications.
  • Disclosed in FIGS. 24-26 are various, non-limiting embodiments of arrangements of the PCD segments 2410, 2510, and 2710 around conical or pointed PCD compacts 2401, 2501, and 2701, that are analogous to the PCD segments 3110 and the conical PCD compacts 3101 in FIGS. 22 and 23. The PCD segments 2410, 2510, and 2710 can be of various shapes and sizes, non-limiting examples of which include, but are not limited to, rectangular, trapezoidal, square, hexagonal or triangular shape and disposed within or exposed in the conical surface, such as conical surface 3123 in FIG. 22, as noted. The interfacial boundaries 2450, 2550, and 2750 can be formed of a sintered abrasive material.
  • Whereas the present invention has been described in particular relation to the drawings attached hereto, it should be understood that other and further modifications apart from those shown or suggested herein, may be made within the scope and spirit of the present invention.
  • The present invention, in various embodiments, includes providing devices and processes in the absence of items not depicted and/or described herein or in various embodiments hereof, including in the absence of such items as may have been used in previous devices or processes, e.g., for improving performance, achieving ease and/or reducing cost of implementation.
  • The foregoing discussion of the invention has been presented for purposes of illustration and description. The foregoing is not intended to limit the invention to the form or forms disclosed herein. In the foregoing Detailed Description for example, various features of the invention are grouped together in one or more embodiments for the purpose of streamlining the disclosure. This method of disclosure is not to be interpreted as reflecting an intention that the claimed invention requires more features than are expressly recited in each claim. Rather, as the following claims reflect, inventive aspects lie in less than all features of a single foregoing disclosed embodiment. Thus, the following claims are hereby incorporated into this Detailed Description, with each claim standing on its own as a separate preferred embodiment of the invention.
  • Moreover, though the description of the invention has included description of one or more embodiments and certain variations and modifications, other variations and modifications are within the scope of the invention, e.g., as may be within the skill and knowledge of those in the art, after understanding the present disclosure. It is intended to obtain rights which include alternative embodiments to the extent permitted, including alternate, interchangeable and/or equivalent structures, functions, ranges or steps to those claimed, whether or not such alternate, interchangeable and/or equivalent structures, functions, ranges or steps are disclosed herein, and without intending to publicly dedicate any patentable subject matter.

Claims (19)

  1. 1. A polycrystalline diamond compact comprising:
    a first layer, said first layer including a plurality of polycrystalline diamond segments positioned thereupon; said plurality of polycrystalline diamond segments being separated by an interfacial boundary formed of an abrasive material;
    a second layer, said first layer being bonded to a second layer, said second layer being formed in part from said abrasive material; and,
    a substrate, said second layer being positioned upon and bonded to said substrate.
  2. 2. The compact of claim 1, wherein said polycrystalline diamond segments have a granular structure comprised of polycrystalline diamond grains and interstices, said interstices being substantially free of a catalytic material.
  3. 3. The compact of claim 2, wherein said interstices include a non-catalytic material.
  4. 4. The compact of claim 3, wherein said non-catalytic material is a non-metallic material.
  5. 5. The compact of claim 1, wherein said polycrystalline diamond segments have a granular structure comprised substantially of polycrystalline diamond grains and substantially free of interstices.
  6. 6. The compact of claim 1, wherein said abrasive material comprises a granular structure comprised of polycrystalline diamond grains and a catalyst.
  7. 7. The compact of claim 1, wherein the second layer further comprises a substantially conical surface.
  8. 8. The compact of claim 1, wherein said first layer is configured to remain thermally stable at a first temperature and said second layer is configured to remain thermally stable at a second temperature lower than said first temperature.
  9. 9. A polycrystalline diamond compact comprising:
    a plurality of double-sintered polycrystalline diamond segments, said diamond segments configured to remain thermally stable at a first temperature;
    a transition layer of single-sintered polycrystalline diamond configured to remain thermally stable at a second temperature lower than said first temperature, said polycrystalline diamond segments positioned upon and bonded to said transition layer; and,
    a substrate, said transition layer positioned upon and bonded to said substrate.
  10. 10. The compact of claim 9, wherein said polycrystalline diamond segments have a granular structure comprised of polycrystalline diamond grains and interstices, said interstices being substantially free of a catalytic material.
  11. 11. The compact of claim 10, wherein said interstices include a non-catalytic material.
  12. 12. The compact of claim 11, wherein said non-catalytic material is a non-metallic material.
  13. 13. The compact of claim 9, wherein said polycrystalline diamond segments have a granular structure comprised substantially of polycrystalline diamond grains and substantially free of interstices.
  14. 14. The compact of claim 9, wherein said transition layer comprises a granular structure comprised of polycrystalline diamond grains and a catalyst.
  15. 15. The compact of claim 9, wherein the transition layer further comprises a substantially conical surface.
  16. 16. A method of forming a polycrystalline diamond compact comprising:
    providing a canister configured to receive a plurality of sintered polycrystalline diamond segments and an unsintered abrasive powder;
    filling said canister with said unsintered abrasive powder;
    positioning said plurality of polycrystalline diamond segments upon said unsintered abrasive powder, an interfacial boundary formed of said unsintered abrasive powder separating each of said plurality of polycrystalline diamond segments; and
    applying a temperature and a pressure to said canister to sinter said unsintered abrasive powder and bond said polycrystalline diamond segments to said sintered abrasive powder.
  17. 17. The method of claim 16, further comprising positioning a substrate in said canister, said unsintered abrasive powder being positioned between said substrate and said sintered polycrystalline diamond segments.
  18. 18. The method of claim 16, further comprising:
    providing another canister configured to receive at least a first disc, said first disc including at least one rib on a front surface of said first disc;
    filling said canister with at least diamond powder;
    placing said first disc in said canister such that said front surface of said first disc is in contact with said diamond powder; and,
    applying a temperature and a pressure to said canister to sinter said diamond powder to form said sintered polycrystalline diamond segments.
  19. 19. The method of claim 18, further comprising:
    removing said sintered polycrystalline diamond segments from said another canister;
    processing said polycrystalline diamond segments to make said polycrystalline diamond segments more thermally stable than unprocessed polycrystalline diamond segments.
US12750526 2009-03-30 2010-03-30 Double Sintered Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond Cutting Elements Abandoned US20100242375A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US16477009 true 2009-03-30 2009-03-30
US12750526 US20100242375A1 (en) 2009-03-30 2010-03-30 Double Sintered Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond Cutting Elements

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12750526 US20100242375A1 (en) 2009-03-30 2010-03-30 Double Sintered Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond Cutting Elements

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100242375A1 true true US20100242375A1 (en) 2010-09-30

Family

ID=42782408

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12750526 Abandoned US20100242375A1 (en) 2009-03-30 2010-03-30 Double Sintered Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond Cutting Elements

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20100242375A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2010117765A1 (en)

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100307069A1 (en) * 2008-10-03 2010-12-09 Us Synthetic Corporation Polycrystalline diamond compact
US20120267172A1 (en) * 2011-04-21 2012-10-25 Baker Hughes Incorporated Methods for forming polycrystalline materials including providing material with superabrasive grains prior to hpht processing, and polycrystalline compacts and cutting elements formed by such methods
GB2490480A (en) * 2011-04-20 2012-11-07 Halliburton Energy Serv Inc Selectively leached cutter and methods of manufacture
US20130291443A1 (en) * 2010-08-27 2013-11-07 Kaveshini Naidoo Method of making polycrystalline diamond material
US8616306B2 (en) 2008-10-03 2013-12-31 Us Synthetic Corporation Polycrystalline diamond compacts, method of fabricating same, and various applications
WO2014011855A1 (en) * 2012-07-11 2014-01-16 Smith International Inc. Thermally stable pcd with pcbn transition layer
US20140110180A1 (en) * 2012-10-22 2014-04-24 Smith International, Inc. Ultra-hard material cutting elements, methods of forming the same and bits incorporating the same
US8727046B2 (en) 2011-04-15 2014-05-20 Us Synthetic Corporation Polycrystalline diamond compacts including at least one transition layer and methods for stress management in polycrsystalline diamond compacts
WO2014078620A1 (en) * 2012-11-15 2014-05-22 Smith International Inc. Sintering of thick solid carbonate-based pcd for drilling application
US20140246252A1 (en) * 2013-03-01 2014-09-04 Baker Hughes Incorporated Polycrystalline compact tables for cutting elements and methods of fabrication
US20140246254A1 (en) * 2013-03-01 2014-09-04 Baker Hughes Incorporated Methods of attaching cutting elements to casing bits and related structures
US20140259962A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Smith International, Inc. CARBONATE PCD WITH A DISTRIBUTION OF Si AND/OR Al
WO2014143700A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Smith International, Inc. Carbonate pcd and methods of making the same
US20150259986A1 (en) * 2014-03-17 2015-09-17 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements having non-planar cutting faces with selectively leached regions, earth-boring tools including such cutting elements, and related methods
US9315881B2 (en) 2008-10-03 2016-04-19 Us Synthetic Corporation Polycrystalline diamond, polycrystalline diamond compacts, methods of making same, and applications
US9605488B2 (en) 2014-04-08 2017-03-28 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements including undulating boundaries between catalyst-containing and catalyst-free regions of polycrystalline superabrasive materials and related earth-boring tools and methods
CN106625896A (en) * 2017-01-11 2017-05-10 四川大学 Novel superhard cutter
US9657529B1 (en) * 2005-08-24 2017-05-23 Us Synthetics Corporation Polycrystalline diamond compact including a pre-sintered polycrystalline diamond table including a nonmetallic catalyst that limits infiltration of a metallic-catalyst infiltrant therein and applications therefor
US9714545B2 (en) 2014-04-08 2017-07-25 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements having a non-uniform annulus leach depth, earth-boring tools including such cutting elements, and related methods
US9863189B2 (en) 2014-07-11 2018-01-09 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements comprising partially leached polycrystalline material, tools comprising such cutting elements, and methods of forming wellbores using such cutting elements
US10060192B1 (en) * 2014-08-14 2018-08-28 Us Synthetic Corporation Methods of making polycrystalline diamond compacts and polycrystalline diamond compacts made using the same
US10137557B2 (en) 2015-11-18 2018-11-27 Diamond Innovations, Inc. High-density polycrystalline diamond

Citations (97)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2004315A (en) * 1932-08-29 1935-06-11 Thomas R Mcdonald Packing liner
US2124438A (en) * 1935-04-05 1938-07-19 Gen Electric Soldered article or machine part
US3254392A (en) * 1963-11-13 1966-06-07 Warner Swasey Co Insert bit for cutoff and like tools
US3397012A (en) * 1966-12-19 1968-08-13 Cincinnati Mine Machinery Co Cutter bits and means for mounting them
US3626775A (en) * 1970-10-07 1971-12-14 Gates Rubber Co Method of determining notch configuration in a belt
US3746396A (en) * 1970-12-31 1973-07-17 Continental Oil Co Cutter bit and method of causing rotation thereof
US3745623A (en) * 1971-12-27 1973-07-17 Gen Electric Diamond tools for machining
US3807804A (en) * 1972-09-12 1974-04-30 Kennametal Inc Impacting tool with tungsten carbide insert tip
US3830321A (en) * 1973-02-20 1974-08-20 Kennametal Inc Excavating tool and a bit for use therewith
US3932952A (en) * 1973-12-17 1976-01-20 Caterpillar Tractor Co. Multi-material ripper tip
US3945681A (en) * 1973-12-07 1976-03-23 Western Rock Bit Company Limited Cutter assembly
US4005914A (en) * 1974-08-20 1977-02-01 Rolls-Royce (1971) Limited Surface coating for machine elements having rubbing surfaces
US4006936A (en) * 1975-11-06 1977-02-08 Dresser Industries, Inc. Rotary cutter for a road planer
US4098362A (en) * 1976-11-30 1978-07-04 General Electric Company Rotary drill bit and method for making same
US4109737A (en) * 1976-06-24 1978-08-29 General Electric Company Rotary drill bit
US4156329A (en) * 1977-05-13 1979-05-29 General Electric Company Method for fabricating a rotary drill bit and composite compact cutters therefor
US4199035A (en) * 1978-04-24 1980-04-22 General Electric Company Cutting and drilling apparatus with threadably attached compacts
US4201421A (en) * 1978-09-20 1980-05-06 Besten Leroy E Den Mining machine bit and mounting thereof
US4255165A (en) * 1978-12-22 1981-03-10 General Electric Company Composite compact of interleaved polycrystalline particles and cemented carbide masses
US4268276A (en) * 1978-04-24 1981-05-19 General Electric Company Compact of boron-doped diamond and method for making same
US4277106A (en) * 1979-10-22 1981-07-07 Syndrill Carbide Diamond Company Self renewing working tip mining pick
US4303442A (en) * 1978-08-26 1981-12-01 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Diamond sintered body and the method for producing the same
US4333986A (en) * 1979-06-11 1982-06-08 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Diamond sintered compact wherein crystal particles are uniformly orientated in a particular direction and a method for producing the same
US4333902A (en) * 1977-01-24 1982-06-08 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Process of producing a sintered compact
US4373593A (en) * 1979-03-16 1983-02-15 Christensen, Inc. Drill bit
US4387287A (en) * 1978-06-29 1983-06-07 Diamond S.A. Method for a shaping of polycrystalline synthetic diamond
US4439250A (en) * 1983-06-09 1984-03-27 International Business Machines Corporation Solder/braze-stop composition
US4440246A (en) * 1981-04-11 1984-04-03 Christensen, Inc. Cutting member for rotary drill bits
US4465221A (en) * 1982-09-28 1984-08-14 Schmidt Glenn H Method of sustaining metallic golf club head sole plate profile by confined brazing or welding
US4484644A (en) * 1980-09-02 1984-11-27 Ingersoll-Rand Company Sintered and forged article, and method of forming same
US4489986A (en) * 1982-11-01 1984-12-25 Dziak William A Wear collar device for rotatable cutter bit
US4498549A (en) * 1981-03-21 1985-02-12 Norton Christensen, Inc. Cutting member for rotary drill bit
US4572722A (en) * 1982-10-21 1986-02-25 Dyer Henry B Abrasive compacts
US4636353A (en) * 1983-07-05 1987-01-13 Rhone-Poulenc Specialites Chimiques Novel neodymium/iron alloys
US4647111A (en) * 1984-06-09 1987-03-03 Belzer-Dowidat Gmbh Werkzeug-Union Sleeve insert mounting for mining pick
US4678237A (en) * 1982-08-06 1987-07-07 Huddy Diamond Crown Setting Company (Proprietary) Limited Cutter inserts for picks
US4682987A (en) * 1981-04-16 1987-07-28 Brady William J Method and composition for producing hard surface carbide insert tools
US4688856A (en) * 1984-10-27 1987-08-25 Gerd Elfgen Round cutting tool
US4725098A (en) * 1986-12-19 1988-02-16 Kennametal Inc. Erosion resistant cutting bit with hardfacing
US4726718A (en) * 1984-03-26 1988-02-23 Eastman Christensen Co. Multi-component cutting element using triangular, rectangular and higher order polyhedral-shaped polycrystalline diamond disks
US4729603A (en) * 1984-11-22 1988-03-08 Gerd Elfgen Round cutting tool for cutters
US4764434A (en) * 1987-06-26 1988-08-16 Sandvik Aktiebolag Diamond tools for rock drilling and machining
US4765687A (en) * 1986-02-19 1988-08-23 Innovation Limited Tip and mineral cutter pick
US4765686A (en) * 1987-10-01 1988-08-23 Gte Valenite Corporation Rotatable cutting bit for a mining machine
US4776862A (en) * 1987-12-08 1988-10-11 Wiand Ronald C Brazing of diamond
US4784023A (en) * 1985-12-05 1988-11-15 Diamant Boart-Stratabit (Usa) Inc. Cutting element having composite formed of cemented carbide substrate and diamond layer and method of making same
US4797138A (en) * 1986-02-18 1989-01-10 General Electric Company Polycrystalline diamond and CBN cutting tools
US4797241A (en) * 1985-05-20 1989-01-10 Sii Megadiamond Method for producing multiple polycrystalline bodies
US4861350A (en) * 1985-08-22 1989-08-29 Cornelius Phaal Tool component
US4880154A (en) * 1986-04-03 1989-11-14 Klaus Tank Brazing
US4919220A (en) * 1984-07-19 1990-04-24 Reed Tool Company, Ltd. Cutting structures for steel bodied rotary drill bits
US4932723A (en) * 1989-06-29 1990-06-12 Mills Ronald D Cutting-bit holding support block shield
US4940288A (en) * 1988-07-20 1990-07-10 Kennametal Inc. Earth engaging cutter bit
US4943488A (en) * 1986-10-20 1990-07-24 Norton Company Low pressure bonding of PCD bodies and method for drill bits and the like
US4944559A (en) * 1988-06-02 1990-07-31 Societe Industrielle De Combustible Nucleaire Tool for a mine working machine comprising a diamond-charged abrasive component
US4944772A (en) * 1988-11-30 1990-07-31 General Electric Company Fabrication of supported polycrystalline abrasive compacts
US4951762A (en) * 1988-07-28 1990-08-28 Sandvik Ab Drill bit with cemented carbide inserts
US4956238A (en) * 1987-06-12 1990-09-11 Reed Tool Company Limited Manufacture of cutting structures for rotary drill bits
US4991467A (en) * 1989-08-14 1991-02-12 Smith International, Inc. Diamond twist drill blank
US5011515A (en) * 1989-08-07 1991-04-30 Frushour Robert H Composite polycrystalline diamond compact with improved impact resistance
US5027912A (en) * 1988-07-06 1991-07-02 Baker Hughes Incorporated Drill bit having improved cutter configuration
US5028177A (en) * 1984-03-26 1991-07-02 Eastman Christensen Company Multi-component cutting element using triangular, rectangular and higher order polyhedral-shaped polycrystalline diamond disks
US5030276A (en) * 1986-10-20 1991-07-09 Norton Company Low pressure bonding of PCD bodies and method
US5037704A (en) * 1985-11-19 1991-08-06 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Hard sintered compact for a tool
US5092687A (en) * 1991-06-04 1992-03-03 Anadrill, Inc. Diamond thrust bearing and method for manufacturing same
US5112165A (en) * 1989-04-24 1992-05-12 Sandvik Ab Tool for cutting solid material
US5116568A (en) * 1986-10-20 1992-05-26 Norton Company Method for low pressure bonding of PCD bodies
US5141289A (en) * 1988-07-20 1992-08-25 Kennametal Inc. Cemented carbide tip
US5154245A (en) * 1990-04-19 1992-10-13 Sandvik Ab Diamond rock tools for percussive and rotary crushing rock drilling
US5186725A (en) * 1989-12-11 1993-02-16 Martell Trevor J Abrasive products
US5186892A (en) * 1991-01-17 1993-02-16 U.S. Synthetic Corporation Method of healing cracks and flaws in a previously sintered cemented carbide tools
US5193948A (en) * 1991-12-16 1993-03-16 Gte Valenite Corporation Chip control inserts with diamond segments
US5199832A (en) * 1984-03-26 1993-04-06 Meskin Alexander K Multi-component cutting element using polycrystalline diamond disks
US5205684A (en) * 1984-03-26 1993-04-27 Eastman Christensen Company Multi-component cutting element using consolidated rod-like polycrystalline diamond
US5217081A (en) * 1990-06-15 1993-06-08 Sandvik Ab Tools for cutting rock drilling
US5238074A (en) * 1992-01-06 1993-08-24 Baker Hughes Incorporated Mosaic diamond drag bit cutter having a nonuniform wear pattern
US5251964A (en) * 1992-08-03 1993-10-12 Gte Valenite Corporation Cutting bit mount having carbide inserts and method for mounting the same
US5264283A (en) * 1990-10-11 1993-11-23 Sandvik Ab Diamond tools for rock drilling, metal cutting and wear part applications
US5332348A (en) * 1987-03-31 1994-07-26 Lemelson Jerome H Fastening devices
US5417475A (en) * 1992-08-19 1995-05-23 Sandvik Ab Tool comprised of a holder body and a hard insert and method of using same
US5447208A (en) * 1993-11-22 1995-09-05 Baker Hughes Incorporated Superhard cutting element having reduced surface roughness and method of modifying
US5524719A (en) * 1995-07-26 1996-06-11 Dennis Tool Company Internally reinforced polycrystalling abrasive insert
US5535839A (en) * 1995-06-07 1996-07-16 Brady; William J. Roof drill bit with radial domed PCD inserts
US5542993A (en) * 1989-10-10 1996-08-06 Alliedsignal Inc. Low melting nickel-palladium-silicon brazing alloy
US5871060A (en) * 1997-02-20 1999-02-16 Jensen; Kenneth M. Attachment geometry for non-planar drill inserts
US6026919A (en) * 1998-04-16 2000-02-22 Diamond Products International Inc. Cutting element with stress reduction
US6241035B1 (en) * 1998-12-07 2001-06-05 Smith International, Inc. Superhard material enhanced inserts for earth-boring bits
US6315067B1 (en) * 1998-04-16 2001-11-13 Diamond Products International, Inc. Cutting element with stress reduction
US20020034631A1 (en) * 2000-09-20 2002-03-21 Griffin Nigel Dennis High volume density polycrystalline diamond with working surfaces depleted of catalyzing material
US20050050801A1 (en) * 2003-09-05 2005-03-10 Cho Hyun Sam Doubled-sided and multi-layered PCD and PCBN abrasive articles
US20050087915A1 (en) * 1999-12-08 2005-04-28 Diamicron, Inc. Carbides as a substrate material in prosthetic joints
US20080029310A1 (en) * 2005-09-09 2008-02-07 Stevens John H Particle-matrix composite drill bits with hardfacing and methods of manufacturing and repairing such drill bits using hardfacing materials
US7347292B1 (en) * 2006-10-26 2008-03-25 Hall David R Braze material for an attack tool
US20080308276A1 (en) * 2007-06-15 2008-12-18 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements for casing component drill out and subterranean drilling, earth boring drag bits and tools including same and methods of use
US20090097788A1 (en) * 2007-10-15 2009-04-16 Us Synthetic Corporation Hydrodynamic bearing assemblies, and hydrodynamic bearing apparatuses and motor assemblies using same
US20100084197A1 (en) * 2008-10-03 2010-04-08 Smith International, Inc. Diamond bonded construction with thermally stable region
US20100198353A1 (en) * 2000-01-30 2010-08-05 Pope Bill J USE OF Ti and Nb CEMENTED IN TiC IN PROSTHETIC JOINTS

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB0423597D0 (en) * 2004-10-23 2004-11-24 Reedhycalog Uk Ltd Dual-edge working surfaces for polycrystalline diamond cutting elements
US7998573B2 (en) * 2006-12-21 2011-08-16 Us Synthetic Corporation Superabrasive compact including diamond-silicon carbide composite, methods of fabrication thereof, and applications therefor

Patent Citations (105)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2004315A (en) * 1932-08-29 1935-06-11 Thomas R Mcdonald Packing liner
US2124438A (en) * 1935-04-05 1938-07-19 Gen Electric Soldered article or machine part
US3254392A (en) * 1963-11-13 1966-06-07 Warner Swasey Co Insert bit for cutoff and like tools
US3397012A (en) * 1966-12-19 1968-08-13 Cincinnati Mine Machinery Co Cutter bits and means for mounting them
US3626775A (en) * 1970-10-07 1971-12-14 Gates Rubber Co Method of determining notch configuration in a belt
US3746396A (en) * 1970-12-31 1973-07-17 Continental Oil Co Cutter bit and method of causing rotation thereof
US3745623A (en) * 1971-12-27 1973-07-17 Gen Electric Diamond tools for machining
US3807804A (en) * 1972-09-12 1974-04-30 Kennametal Inc Impacting tool with tungsten carbide insert tip
US3830321A (en) * 1973-02-20 1974-08-20 Kennametal Inc Excavating tool and a bit for use therewith
US3945681A (en) * 1973-12-07 1976-03-23 Western Rock Bit Company Limited Cutter assembly
US3932952A (en) * 1973-12-17 1976-01-20 Caterpillar Tractor Co. Multi-material ripper tip
US4005914A (en) * 1974-08-20 1977-02-01 Rolls-Royce (1971) Limited Surface coating for machine elements having rubbing surfaces
US4006936A (en) * 1975-11-06 1977-02-08 Dresser Industries, Inc. Rotary cutter for a road planer
US4109737A (en) * 1976-06-24 1978-08-29 General Electric Company Rotary drill bit
US4098362A (en) * 1976-11-30 1978-07-04 General Electric Company Rotary drill bit and method for making same
US4333902A (en) * 1977-01-24 1982-06-08 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Process of producing a sintered compact
US4156329A (en) * 1977-05-13 1979-05-29 General Electric Company Method for fabricating a rotary drill bit and composite compact cutters therefor
US4199035A (en) * 1978-04-24 1980-04-22 General Electric Company Cutting and drilling apparatus with threadably attached compacts
US4268276A (en) * 1978-04-24 1981-05-19 General Electric Company Compact of boron-doped diamond and method for making same
US4387287A (en) * 1978-06-29 1983-06-07 Diamond S.A. Method for a shaping of polycrystalline synthetic diamond
US4303442A (en) * 1978-08-26 1981-12-01 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Diamond sintered body and the method for producing the same
US4201421A (en) * 1978-09-20 1980-05-06 Besten Leroy E Den Mining machine bit and mounting thereof
US4255165A (en) * 1978-12-22 1981-03-10 General Electric Company Composite compact of interleaved polycrystalline particles and cemented carbide masses
US4373593A (en) * 1979-03-16 1983-02-15 Christensen, Inc. Drill bit
US4425315A (en) * 1979-06-11 1984-01-10 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Diamond sintered compact wherein crystal particles are uniformly orientated in the particular direction and the method for producing the same
US4412980A (en) * 1979-06-11 1983-11-01 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Method for producing a diamond sintered compact
US4333986A (en) * 1979-06-11 1982-06-08 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Diamond sintered compact wherein crystal particles are uniformly orientated in a particular direction and a method for producing the same
US4277106A (en) * 1979-10-22 1981-07-07 Syndrill Carbide Diamond Company Self renewing working tip mining pick
US4484644A (en) * 1980-09-02 1984-11-27 Ingersoll-Rand Company Sintered and forged article, and method of forming same
US4498549A (en) * 1981-03-21 1985-02-12 Norton Christensen, Inc. Cutting member for rotary drill bit
US4440246A (en) * 1981-04-11 1984-04-03 Christensen, Inc. Cutting member for rotary drill bits
US4682987A (en) * 1981-04-16 1987-07-28 Brady William J Method and composition for producing hard surface carbide insert tools
US4678237A (en) * 1982-08-06 1987-07-07 Huddy Diamond Crown Setting Company (Proprietary) Limited Cutter inserts for picks
US4465221A (en) * 1982-09-28 1984-08-14 Schmidt Glenn H Method of sustaining metallic golf club head sole plate profile by confined brazing or welding
US4572722A (en) * 1982-10-21 1986-02-25 Dyer Henry B Abrasive compacts
US4489986A (en) * 1982-11-01 1984-12-25 Dziak William A Wear collar device for rotatable cutter bit
US4439250A (en) * 1983-06-09 1984-03-27 International Business Machines Corporation Solder/braze-stop composition
US4636353A (en) * 1983-07-05 1987-01-13 Rhone-Poulenc Specialites Chimiques Novel neodymium/iron alloys
US5028177A (en) * 1984-03-26 1991-07-02 Eastman Christensen Company Multi-component cutting element using triangular, rectangular and higher order polyhedral-shaped polycrystalline diamond disks
US5199832A (en) * 1984-03-26 1993-04-06 Meskin Alexander K Multi-component cutting element using polycrystalline diamond disks
US5205684A (en) * 1984-03-26 1993-04-27 Eastman Christensen Company Multi-component cutting element using consolidated rod-like polycrystalline diamond
US4726718A (en) * 1984-03-26 1988-02-23 Eastman Christensen Co. Multi-component cutting element using triangular, rectangular and higher order polyhedral-shaped polycrystalline diamond disks
US4647111A (en) * 1984-06-09 1987-03-03 Belzer-Dowidat Gmbh Werkzeug-Union Sleeve insert mounting for mining pick
US4919220A (en) * 1984-07-19 1990-04-24 Reed Tool Company, Ltd. Cutting structures for steel bodied rotary drill bits
US4688856A (en) * 1984-10-27 1987-08-25 Gerd Elfgen Round cutting tool
US4729603A (en) * 1984-11-22 1988-03-08 Gerd Elfgen Round cutting tool for cutters
US4797241A (en) * 1985-05-20 1989-01-10 Sii Megadiamond Method for producing multiple polycrystalline bodies
US4861350A (en) * 1985-08-22 1989-08-29 Cornelius Phaal Tool component
US5037704A (en) * 1985-11-19 1991-08-06 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Hard sintered compact for a tool
US4784023A (en) * 1985-12-05 1988-11-15 Diamant Boart-Stratabit (Usa) Inc. Cutting element having composite formed of cemented carbide substrate and diamond layer and method of making same
US4797138A (en) * 1986-02-18 1989-01-10 General Electric Company Polycrystalline diamond and CBN cutting tools
US4765687A (en) * 1986-02-19 1988-08-23 Innovation Limited Tip and mineral cutter pick
US4880154A (en) * 1986-04-03 1989-11-14 Klaus Tank Brazing
US4943488A (en) * 1986-10-20 1990-07-24 Norton Company Low pressure bonding of PCD bodies and method for drill bits and the like
US5116568A (en) * 1986-10-20 1992-05-26 Norton Company Method for low pressure bonding of PCD bodies
US5030276A (en) * 1986-10-20 1991-07-09 Norton Company Low pressure bonding of PCD bodies and method
US4725098A (en) * 1986-12-19 1988-02-16 Kennametal Inc. Erosion resistant cutting bit with hardfacing
US5332348A (en) * 1987-03-31 1994-07-26 Lemelson Jerome H Fastening devices
US4956238A (en) * 1987-06-12 1990-09-11 Reed Tool Company Limited Manufacture of cutting structures for rotary drill bits
US4764434A (en) * 1987-06-26 1988-08-16 Sandvik Aktiebolag Diamond tools for rock drilling and machining
US4765686A (en) * 1987-10-01 1988-08-23 Gte Valenite Corporation Rotatable cutting bit for a mining machine
US4776862A (en) * 1987-12-08 1988-10-11 Wiand Ronald C Brazing of diamond
US4944559A (en) * 1988-06-02 1990-07-31 Societe Industrielle De Combustible Nucleaire Tool for a mine working machine comprising a diamond-charged abrasive component
US5027912A (en) * 1988-07-06 1991-07-02 Baker Hughes Incorporated Drill bit having improved cutter configuration
US5141289A (en) * 1988-07-20 1992-08-25 Kennametal Inc. Cemented carbide tip
US4940288A (en) * 1988-07-20 1990-07-10 Kennametal Inc. Earth engaging cutter bit
US4951762A (en) * 1988-07-28 1990-08-28 Sandvik Ab Drill bit with cemented carbide inserts
US4944772A (en) * 1988-11-30 1990-07-31 General Electric Company Fabrication of supported polycrystalline abrasive compacts
US5112165A (en) * 1989-04-24 1992-05-12 Sandvik Ab Tool for cutting solid material
US4932723A (en) * 1989-06-29 1990-06-12 Mills Ronald D Cutting-bit holding support block shield
US5011515A (en) * 1989-08-07 1991-04-30 Frushour Robert H Composite polycrystalline diamond compact with improved impact resistance
US5011515B1 (en) * 1989-08-07 1999-07-06 Robert H Frushour Composite polycrystalline diamond compact with improved impact resistance
US4991467A (en) * 1989-08-14 1991-02-12 Smith International, Inc. Diamond twist drill blank
US5542993A (en) * 1989-10-10 1996-08-06 Alliedsignal Inc. Low melting nickel-palladium-silicon brazing alloy
US5186725A (en) * 1989-12-11 1993-02-16 Martell Trevor J Abrasive products
US5154245A (en) * 1990-04-19 1992-10-13 Sandvik Ab Diamond rock tools for percussive and rotary crushing rock drilling
US5217081A (en) * 1990-06-15 1993-06-08 Sandvik Ab Tools for cutting rock drilling
US5496638A (en) * 1990-10-11 1996-03-05 Sandvik Ab Diamond tools for rock drilling, metal cutting and wear part applications
US5264283A (en) * 1990-10-11 1993-11-23 Sandvik Ab Diamond tools for rock drilling, metal cutting and wear part applications
US5186892A (en) * 1991-01-17 1993-02-16 U.S. Synthetic Corporation Method of healing cracks and flaws in a previously sintered cemented carbide tools
US5092687A (en) * 1991-06-04 1992-03-03 Anadrill, Inc. Diamond thrust bearing and method for manufacturing same
US5193948A (en) * 1991-12-16 1993-03-16 Gte Valenite Corporation Chip control inserts with diamond segments
US5238074A (en) * 1992-01-06 1993-08-24 Baker Hughes Incorporated Mosaic diamond drag bit cutter having a nonuniform wear pattern
US5251964A (en) * 1992-08-03 1993-10-12 Gte Valenite Corporation Cutting bit mount having carbide inserts and method for mounting the same
US5417475A (en) * 1992-08-19 1995-05-23 Sandvik Ab Tool comprised of a holder body and a hard insert and method of using same
US5447208A (en) * 1993-11-22 1995-09-05 Baker Hughes Incorporated Superhard cutting element having reduced surface roughness and method of modifying
US5535839A (en) * 1995-06-07 1996-07-16 Brady; William J. Roof drill bit with radial domed PCD inserts
US5524719A (en) * 1995-07-26 1996-06-11 Dennis Tool Company Internally reinforced polycrystalling abrasive insert
US5871060A (en) * 1997-02-20 1999-02-16 Jensen; Kenneth M. Attachment geometry for non-planar drill inserts
US6026919A (en) * 1998-04-16 2000-02-22 Diamond Products International Inc. Cutting element with stress reduction
US6315067B1 (en) * 1998-04-16 2001-11-13 Diamond Products International, Inc. Cutting element with stress reduction
US6241035B1 (en) * 1998-12-07 2001-06-05 Smith International, Inc. Superhard material enhanced inserts for earth-boring bits
US20050087915A1 (en) * 1999-12-08 2005-04-28 Diamicron, Inc. Carbides as a substrate material in prosthetic joints
US20100198353A1 (en) * 2000-01-30 2010-08-05 Pope Bill J USE OF Ti and Nb CEMENTED IN TiC IN PROSTHETIC JOINTS
US20020034631A1 (en) * 2000-09-20 2002-03-21 Griffin Nigel Dennis High volume density polycrystalline diamond with working surfaces depleted of catalyzing material
US20050050801A1 (en) * 2003-09-05 2005-03-10 Cho Hyun Sam Doubled-sided and multi-layered PCD and PCBN abrasive articles
US20080029310A1 (en) * 2005-09-09 2008-02-07 Stevens John H Particle-matrix composite drill bits with hardfacing and methods of manufacturing and repairing such drill bits using hardfacing materials
US20080099249A1 (en) * 2006-10-26 2008-05-01 Hall David R Tool with a large volume of a superhard material
US7347292B1 (en) * 2006-10-26 2008-03-25 Hall David R Braze material for an attack tool
US7353893B1 (en) * 2006-10-26 2008-04-08 Hall David R Tool with a large volume of a superhard material
US7469756B2 (en) * 2006-10-26 2008-12-30 Hall David R Tool with a large volume of a superhard material
US20080100124A1 (en) * 2006-10-26 2008-05-01 Hall David R Tool with a Large Volume of a Superhard Material
US20080308276A1 (en) * 2007-06-15 2008-12-18 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements for casing component drill out and subterranean drilling, earth boring drag bits and tools including same and methods of use
US20090097788A1 (en) * 2007-10-15 2009-04-16 Us Synthetic Corporation Hydrodynamic bearing assemblies, and hydrodynamic bearing apparatuses and motor assemblies using same
US20100084197A1 (en) * 2008-10-03 2010-04-08 Smith International, Inc. Diamond bonded construction with thermally stable region

Cited By (42)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9657529B1 (en) * 2005-08-24 2017-05-23 Us Synthetics Corporation Polycrystalline diamond compact including a pre-sintered polycrystalline diamond table including a nonmetallic catalyst that limits infiltration of a metallic-catalyst infiltrant therein and applications therefor
US9134275B2 (en) 2008-10-03 2015-09-15 Us Synthetic Corporation Polycrystalline diamond compact and method of fabricating same
US9932274B2 (en) 2008-10-03 2018-04-03 Us Synthetic Corporation Polycrystalline diamond compacts
US8766628B2 (en) 2008-10-03 2014-07-01 Us Synthetic Corporation Methods of characterizing a component of a polycrystalline diamond compact by at least one magnetic measurement
US8616306B2 (en) 2008-10-03 2013-12-31 Us Synthetic Corporation Polycrystalline diamond compacts, method of fabricating same, and various applications
US20100307069A1 (en) * 2008-10-03 2010-12-09 Us Synthetic Corporation Polycrystalline diamond compact
US9459236B2 (en) 2008-10-03 2016-10-04 Us Synthetic Corporation Polycrystalline diamond compact
US9315881B2 (en) 2008-10-03 2016-04-19 Us Synthetic Corporation Polycrystalline diamond, polycrystalline diamond compacts, methods of making same, and applications
US9114504B2 (en) * 2010-08-27 2015-08-25 Element Six Abrasives S.A. Method of making polycrystalline diamond material
US20130291443A1 (en) * 2010-08-27 2013-11-07 Kaveshini Naidoo Method of making polycrystalline diamond material
US8727046B2 (en) 2011-04-15 2014-05-20 Us Synthetic Corporation Polycrystalline diamond compacts including at least one transition layer and methods for stress management in polycrsystalline diamond compacts
GB2490480A (en) * 2011-04-20 2012-11-07 Halliburton Energy Serv Inc Selectively leached cutter and methods of manufacture
US9868099B2 (en) * 2011-04-21 2018-01-16 Baker Hughes Incorporated Methods for forming polycrystalline materials including providing material with superabrasive grains prior to HPHT processing
US20120267172A1 (en) * 2011-04-21 2012-10-25 Baker Hughes Incorporated Methods for forming polycrystalline materials including providing material with superabrasive grains prior to hpht processing, and polycrystalline compacts and cutting elements formed by such methods
CN104395547A (en) * 2012-07-11 2015-03-04 史密斯国际有限公司 Thermally stable PCD with PCBN transition layer
JP2015530263A (en) * 2012-07-11 2015-10-15 スミス インターナショナル インコーポレイテッド Thermally stable pcd with Pcbn transition layer
WO2014011855A1 (en) * 2012-07-11 2014-01-16 Smith International Inc. Thermally stable pcd with pcbn transition layer
US20140110180A1 (en) * 2012-10-22 2014-04-24 Smith International, Inc. Ultra-hard material cutting elements, methods of forming the same and bits incorporating the same
GB2523679A (en) * 2012-11-15 2015-09-02 Smith International Sintering of thick solid carbonate-based PCD for drilling application
CN104903032A (en) * 2012-11-15 2015-09-09 史密斯国际有限公司 Sintering of thick solid carbonate-based PCD for drilling application
US9475176B2 (en) 2012-11-15 2016-10-25 Smith International, Inc. Sintering of thick solid carbonate-based PCD for drilling application
WO2014078620A1 (en) * 2012-11-15 2014-05-22 Smith International Inc. Sintering of thick solid carbonate-based pcd for drilling application
CN105026678A (en) * 2013-03-01 2015-11-04 贝克休斯公司 Polycrystalline compact tables for cutting elements and methods of fabrication
US20140246254A1 (en) * 2013-03-01 2014-09-04 Baker Hughes Incorporated Methods of attaching cutting elements to casing bits and related structures
US9982490B2 (en) * 2013-03-01 2018-05-29 Baker Hughes Incorporated Methods of attaching cutting elements to casing bits and related structures
US20140246252A1 (en) * 2013-03-01 2014-09-04 Baker Hughes Incorporated Polycrystalline compact tables for cutting elements and methods of fabrication
US10094173B2 (en) 2013-03-01 2018-10-09 Baker Hughes Incorporated Polycrystalline compacts for cutting elements, related earth-boring tools, and related methods
US9428967B2 (en) * 2013-03-01 2016-08-30 Baker Hughes Incorporated Polycrystalline compact tables for cutting elements and methods of fabrication
US9539704B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2017-01-10 Smith International, Inc. Carbonate PCD and methods of making the same
US9539703B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2017-01-10 Smith International, Inc. Carbonate PCD with a distribution of Si and/or Al
WO2014143700A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Smith International, Inc. Carbonate pcd and methods of making the same
US20140259962A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Smith International, Inc. CARBONATE PCD WITH A DISTRIBUTION OF Si AND/OR Al
US20140259963A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Smith International, Inc. Carbonate pcd and methods of making the same
US9845642B2 (en) * 2014-03-17 2017-12-19 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements having non-planar cutting faces with selectively leached regions, earth-boring tools including such cutting elements, and related methods
US20150259986A1 (en) * 2014-03-17 2015-09-17 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements having non-planar cutting faces with selectively leached regions, earth-boring tools including such cutting elements, and related methods
US9714545B2 (en) 2014-04-08 2017-07-25 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements having a non-uniform annulus leach depth, earth-boring tools including such cutting elements, and related methods
US10024113B2 (en) 2014-04-08 2018-07-17 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements having a non-uniform annulus leach depth, earth-boring tools including such cutting elements, and related methods
US9605488B2 (en) 2014-04-08 2017-03-28 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements including undulating boundaries between catalyst-containing and catalyst-free regions of polycrystalline superabrasive materials and related earth-boring tools and methods
US9863189B2 (en) 2014-07-11 2018-01-09 Baker Hughes Incorporated Cutting elements comprising partially leached polycrystalline material, tools comprising such cutting elements, and methods of forming wellbores using such cutting elements
US10060192B1 (en) * 2014-08-14 2018-08-28 Us Synthetic Corporation Methods of making polycrystalline diamond compacts and polycrystalline diamond compacts made using the same
US10137557B2 (en) 2015-11-18 2018-11-27 Diamond Innovations, Inc. High-density polycrystalline diamond
CN106625896A (en) * 2017-01-11 2017-05-10 四川大学 Novel superhard cutter

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
WO2010117765A1 (en) 2010-10-14 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5881830A (en) Superabrasive drill bit cutting element with buttress-supported planar chamfer
US6021859A (en) Stress related placement of engineered superabrasive cutting elements on rotary drag bits
US6401844B1 (en) Cutter with complex superabrasive geometry and drill bits so equipped
US7628234B2 (en) Thermally stable ultra-hard polycrystalline materials and compacts
US7942219B2 (en) Polycrystalline diamond constructions having improved thermal stability
US7841428B2 (en) Polycrystalline diamond apparatuses and methods of manufacture
US20080085407A1 (en) Superabrasive elements, methods of manufacturing, and drill bits including same
US7635035B1 (en) Polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutting element having multiple catalytic elements
US20060191723A1 (en) Thermally stable polycrystalline diamond materials, cutting elements incorporating the same and bits incorporating such cutting elements
US7426969B2 (en) Bits and cutting structures
US7493972B1 (en) Superabrasive compact with selected interface and rotary drill bit including same
US20110031031A1 (en) Cutting element for a drill bit used in drilling subterranean formations
US20080164071A1 (en) Superabrasive cutting elements with enhanced durability and increased wear life, and drilling apparatus so equipped
US7842111B1 (en) Polycrystalline diamond compacts, methods of fabricating same, and applications using same
US20060032677A1 (en) Novel bits and cutting structures
US20120222364A1 (en) Polycrystalline tables, polycrystalline elements, and related methods
US5924501A (en) Predominantly diamond cutting structures for earth boring
US20110120782A1 (en) Polycrystalline diamond compact including a substrate having a raised interfacial surface bonded to a leached polycrystalline diamond table, and applications therefor
US5979579A (en) Polycrystalline diamond cutter with enhanced durability
US20080035380A1 (en) Pointed Diamond Working Ends on a Shear Bit
US20110067929A1 (en) Polycrystalline diamond compacts, methods of making same, and applications therefor
US20110031037A1 (en) Polycrystalline diamond material with high toughness and high wear resistance
US20080135304A1 (en) Methods of attaching a shank to a body of an earth-boring drilling tool, and tools formed by such methods
US20110259642A1 (en) Cutting elements for earth-boring tools, earth-boring tools including such cutting elements and related methods
US6374932B1 (en) Heat management drilling system and method

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SCHLUMBERGER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION, TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HALL, DAVID R.;REEL/FRAME:030386/0913

Effective date: 20100122

AS Assignment

Owner name: HALL, DAVID R., UTAH

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:CROCKETT, RONALD B.;FOX, JOSEPH R.;TAMANG, ASHOK;REEL/FRAME:036247/0988

Effective date: 20150715

Owner name: SCHLUMBERGER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION, TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HALL, DAVID R.;REEL/FRAME:036248/0232

Effective date: 20150731