US20100132122A1 - Bed-Mounted Computer Terminal - Google Patents

Bed-Mounted Computer Terminal Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100132122A1
US20100132122A1 US12629620 US62962009A US2010132122A1 US 20100132122 A1 US20100132122 A1 US 20100132122A1 US 12629620 US12629620 US 12629620 US 62962009 A US62962009 A US 62962009A US 2010132122 A1 US2010132122 A1 US 2010132122A1
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Prior art keywords
mount
computer terminal
bed
further comprises
base
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Abandoned
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US12629620
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Dan Hollingshead
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CONNECTED PATIENTS LLC
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CONNECTED PATIENTS LLC
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C21/00Attachments for beds, e.g. sheet holders, bed-cover holders; Ventilating, cooling or heating means in connection with bedsteads or mattresses
    • A47C21/003Lighting, radio, telephone or the like connected to the bedstead
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16MFRAMES, CASINGS, OR BEDS OF ENGINES OR OTHER MACHINES OR APPARATUS NOT SPECIFIC TO AN ENGINE, MACHINE, OR APPARATUS PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; STANDS OR SUPPORTS
    • F16M11/00Stands or trestles as supports for apparatus or articles placed thereon Stands for scientific apparatus such as gravitational force meters
    • F16M11/02Heads
    • F16M11/04Means for attachment of apparatus; Means allowing adjustment of the apparatus relatively to the stand
    • F16M11/06Means for attachment of apparatus; Means allowing adjustment of the apparatus relatively to the stand allowing pivoting
    • F16M11/10Means for attachment of apparatus; Means allowing adjustment of the apparatus relatively to the stand allowing pivoting around a horizontal axis
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16MFRAMES, CASINGS, OR BEDS OF ENGINES OR OTHER MACHINES OR APPARATUS NOT SPECIFIC TO AN ENGINE, MACHINE, OR APPARATUS PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; STANDS OR SUPPORTS
    • F16M13/00Other supports for positioning apparatus or articles; Means for steadying hand-held apparatus or articles
    • F16M13/02Other supports for positioning apparatus or articles; Means for steadying hand-held apparatus or articles for supporting on, or attaching to, an object, e.g. tree, gate, window-frame, cycle
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q30/00Commerce, e.g. shopping or e-commerce
    • G06Q30/02Marketing, e.g. market research and analysis, surveying, promotions, advertising, buyer profiling, customer management or rewards; Price estimation or determination
    • G06Q30/0241Advertisement
    • G06Q30/0273Fees for advertisement
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16MFRAMES, CASINGS, OR BEDS OF ENGINES OR OTHER MACHINES OR APPARATUS NOT SPECIFIC TO AN ENGINE, MACHINE, OR APPARATUS PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; STANDS OR SUPPORTS
    • F16M2200/00Details of stands or supports
    • F16M2200/04Balancing means
    • F16M2200/041Balancing means for balancing rotational movement of the head

Abstract

Provided is a system and method for increasing a patient's satisfaction with a care facility. The system includes a computer terminal, user interface, and network, which may improve bed-ridden patients' convalescence experiences by providing them with educational and informational materials, communication capabilities, and entertainment materials. The system also may provide feedback to the care facility by collecting data from the patients. The computer terminal may be mounted onto a patient's bedrail using an adjustable mount, examples of which are disclosed herein.

Description

    PRIORITY
  • This application claims priority to and benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/119,166, filed on Dec. 2, 2008, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • FIELD
  • Embodiments of the present invention relate, in general, to a bed-mounted computer terminal and, in particular, to a system and method for providing bed-ridden patients access to educational and informational materials, communication capabilities, and entertainment materials.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The healthcare market in the United States and worldwide is growing every year. All hospitals, nursing homes, and care facilities in general are competing for the additional market share necessary to drive even minute improvements in their operational efficiency. With skilled clinical and operational personnel coming at a premium, these facilities often look to technology to give them a strategic and operational advantage over the competition.
  • In addition, clinical and satisfaction data collected from patient surveys, such as the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey introduced by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, has become publicly available to all consumers of healthcare. This data, which is widely available on the internet, gives the consumer an opportunity to make healthcare decisions based on objective, site-specific results. Because no care facility wants to do poorly on these surveys and suffer the consequences of a public report of their low patient satisfaction, great attention is being focused on any reasonable strategy to maintain high scores or improve low scores. In an attempt to improve patients' experiences and overall satisfaction, and thereby improve their own ratings among patients, care facilities and healthcare providers seek solutions that are easily implemented and cost-effective. Improving patients' overall experience and satisfaction may result in greater market share.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The accompanying drawings incorporated in and forming a part of the specification illustrate several aspects of the present invention, and together with the description serve to explain the principles of the invention; it being understood, however, that the described embodiments are not limited to the precise arrangements shown. In the drawings, like reference numerals refer to like elements in the several views. In the drawings:
  • FIG. 1 is a situation view of an exemplary computer terminal mounted to a bedrail.
  • FIG. 2 is a front view of an exemplary adjustable mount.
  • FIG. 3 is a side view of the adjustable mount of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a portion of an exemplary clamp.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of another portion of an exemplary clamp.
  • FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an exemplary housing plate.
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view of an exemplary screw insert.
  • FIG. 8 is a perspective view of an exemplary housing component.
  • FIG. 9 is a side view of the housing component of FIG. 8.
  • FIG. 10 is a perspective view of an exemplary housing component.
  • FIG. 11 is a front view of an exemplary turret mechanism
  • FIG. 12 is a perspective view of an exemplary stalk.
  • FIG. 13 is a perspective view of an exemplary platform.
  • FIG. 14 is a perspective view of another exemplary adjustable mount having a stem in a vertical position.
  • FIG. 15 is a perspective view of the mount from FIG. 14 having a stem rotated 90 degrees.
  • FIG. 16 is a front view of the mount from FIG. 14.
  • FIG. 17 is a front, cross-sectional view of the mount from FIG. 14.
  • FIG. 18 is an exploded view of the base of the mount from FIG. 14.
  • FIG. 19 is a front view of an exemplary user interface.
  • FIG. 20 is a front view of an exemplary user interface.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Versions of the present invention comprise a system for improving bed-ridden patients' experience and satisfaction. As used herein, the term “care facility” refers to any hospital, nursing home, home care service, etc., that provides healthcare services. As used herein, the term “patient” refers to any individual receiving such care, whether it be in a hospital, nursing home, some other care facility, or in their home. As used herein, the term “bed” refers to any structure, whether it be a bed, sofa, chair, or other furniture, to which a patient may be limited.
  • In one embodiment, a bed-side system comprising a computer terminal, user interface, and network may improve bed-ridden patients' convalescence experience by providing them with educational and informational materials, communication capabilities, and entertainment materials. The bed-side system also may provide feedback to the care facility by collecting data from the patients.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, one version of a computer terminal 10 is shown. Computer terminal 10 may be, for example, a tablet PC with a touch screen.
  • In another example, computer terminal 10 may be a laptop computer. Other versions of computer terminal 10 will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art. For example, computer terminal 10 may be an iMac or other such computer wherein the processor and monitor are integrated. In another example, computer terminal 10 may comprise any standard computer monitor and keyboard connected to a separate computer processor (not pictured), which may reside in a location separate from computer terminal 10, such as underneath a patient's bed. Alternatively, the computer terminal 10 may be a “dummy” terminal, wherein all computer processing is performed by a computer processor in another location. For example, computer terminal 10 may be connected to a computer processor (not pictured) located in a care facility's local server or in a mainframe computer off-site. To withstand the rigorous environments of some care facilities, computer terminal 10 may be structurally robust and resistant to dust, chemicals, and liquids. For example, computer terminal 10 may have an antimicrobial compound manufactured into its plastic shell. Additionally, computer terminal 10 may be configured for quiet operation such as, for example, by having a fanless design. Computer terminal 10 may also have the capability for mass storage. For example, computer terminal 10 may have a solid state disk, an SD card, RAM-drive, hard disk drive, etc., for mass storage. Computer terminal 10 may be compliant with all device regulations of the care facility. Computer terminal 10 may have other features such as a camera, fingerprint scanner, speakers, microphone, integrated battery, wireless bluetooth capability, wireless USB capability, wi-fi capability, USB port, Ethernet port, and memory card slot. Other features that may be provided by computer terminal 10 will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art. For example, computer terminal 10 may have an LCD touch screen interface. Computer terminal 10 may also have the capability to have its location monitored electronically. For example, computer terminal 10 may include a radio-frequency-identification (RFID) tag or a global positioning system (GPS) receiver.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, computer terminal 10 may be easily accessed by a bed-ridden patient by being situated near the patient or fastened to a bed or other furniture, wall, floor, or ceiling. For example, computer terminal 10 may be fastened to a bedrail 14 via an adjustable mount 12. Adjustable mount 12 may allow computer terminal 10 to pivot or swivel or rotate about a fulcrum or axis or joint to allow for ease of use by the patient as well as other users, such as physicians, nurses, other healthcare providers, care facility staff, patient visitors, etc. Additionally, the construction of adjustable mount 12 may allow for ease of use regardless of the position or angle of a patient's bed. For example, computer terminal 10 may be situated in a first position via adjustable mount 12 while a patient's bed is in an upright position, and computer terminal 10 may be moved to a second position via adjustable mount 12 if the patient wishes to lower the bed to sleep. Moreover, adjustable mount 12 may allow for computer terminal 10 to be positioned in a less obstructive manner. For example, if a nurse needs full access to a patient for a procedure such as a sponge bath or if a patient needs to be transported to another location inside or outside of the care facility, adjustable mount 12 may allow computer terminal 10 to be arranged in a more convenient position, such as under the bed or flat up against the side of the bed.
  • Another example of adjustable mount 12 is shown in FIGS. 2-13. FIGS. 2-3 shows an adjustable mount 12 comprising base 60, stalk 62, and platform 64. FIGS. 4-13 illustrate different components that mount 12 may comprise. Base 60 may comprise a housing 100 and at least one turret mechanism 102. Turret mechanism 102 may be enclosed within housing 100. Housing 100 may enclose and encompass base 60. At least one screw 104 may be located in housing 100. The at least one screw 104 may provide a clamping force that secures adjustable mount 12 to a bedrail 14 or other structure. FIG. 2 shows an example of a clamp 80 that may be included in base 60. Screws 104 may be tightened or loosened to apply the necessary force to secure adjustable mount 12 to a bedrail 14 or other structure. A cap may cover a screw 104 after installation. Clamp 80 may include a right hinge 110, as shown in FIG. 4, and a left hinge 150, as shown in FIG. 5. Screws 104 may be tightened or loosened to open or close right hinge 110 or left hinge 150. Clamp 80 may allow for a range of adjustment around the structure, such as bedrail 14, to which adjustable mount 12 is secured. For example, claim 80 may allow for a range of adjustment of between 1.3 inches and 1.6 inches. Additionally, clamp 80 may be manufactured to reduce slip between the clamp 80 and bedrail 14 or other structure. For example, clamp 80 may be made of a low durometer slip-resistant material or a low durometer slip-resistant material insert may be integrated with clamp 80 to provide traction between base 60 and bedrail 14 or other structure to which adjustable mount 12 is secured.
  • Additional components that may comprise housing 100 are shown in FIGS. 6-10. For example, FIG. 6 shows an exemplary plate 106. Plate 106 may be the structure to which hinges 110 and 150 are fastened. For example, hinges 110 and 150 may be fastened to plate 106 at brackets 220. In addition, turret mechanism 102 may be attached to plate 106. For example, turret mechanism 102 may be welded to plate 106. FIG. 7 shows a view of a screw insert 230. Screw inserts 230 may be molded with threads and included in housing 100. The size of thread that may be used will be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art. For example, a ¼-28 size thread may be used. Screws 104 may be fastened into screw inserts 230 to provide a clamping force. FIGS. 8-9 show a bottom half of the housing 100, having holes into which screw inserts 230 and screws 104 may be placed.
  • FIG. 11 shows a more detailed view of a turret mechanism 102. Turret mechanism 102 may comprise a top disc 340, bottom disc 342, clip 344, spring 346, and end disc 348. In addition, turret mechanism 102 may include ball bearings 350 and sleeve 352. Ball bearings 350 may be located between top disc 340 and bottom disc 342 so as to provide for smooth adjustment of stalk 62, and therefore computer monitor 10, with minimal lash. Sleeve 352 may be machined into top disc 340. Sleeve 352 may be hollow to allow a power cable to pass through. Spring 346 may be an expansion spring. For example, spring 346 may be a ⅞ inch by 1 inch expansion spring at ⅓ compression. Turret mechanism 102 may allow for movement of stalk 62 and computer terminal 10. For example, spring 346 may create a frictional force within the joint, such that, once moved into a desired position, stalk 62 and/or computer terminal 10 will remain in that position. Spring 346 may keep pressure on top disc 340 and bottom disc 342. Such pressure may provide sufficient force to keep turret mechanism 102 from moving easily, while not completely restricting movement of adjustable mount 12. As shown in FIG. 2, for example, two turret mechanisms 102 are shown, which may permit rotation of stalk 62 and computer terminal 10 about base 60 in both horizontal and vertical directions. A vertically-oriented turret mechanism 102 may allow for horizontal movement of stalk 62 and computer terminal 10. For example, if a bed-ridden patient is using the bed-side system such that computer terminal 10 is facing the patient lying in bed, and thereafter a caregiver standing near the bed wants to use the same bed-side system, a vertically-oriented turret mechanism 102 may allow for rotation of stalk 62 and computer terminal 10 such that computer terminal 10 may face the caregiver instead of the patient. Such a vertically-oriented turret mechanism 102 may allow for 360 degrees of rotation. Alternatively, at least one detent pin (not pictured) may be included in base 60 such that rotational movement may be limited to no more than 180 degrees in any direction. A horizontally-oriented turret mechanism 102 may allow for vertical movement of stalk 62 and computer terminal 10. For example, if a bed-ridden patient is sitting up in bed he may desire computer terminal 10 to be at one height, whereas if the patient is lying down in bed he may desire computer terminal 10 to be at a second height to keep computer terminal 10 in the patient's line of sight. Such a vertically-oriented turret mechanism 102 may allow for 360 degrees of rotation. Alternatively, at least one detent pin (not pictured) may be included in base 60 such that rotational movement may be limited to no more than 180 degrees in any direction.
  • Referring to FIG. 12, an exemplary stalk 62 is shown. Stalk 62 may be connected to both base 60 and platform 64. Stalk 62 may be comprised of four parts: lower arm 370, middle arm 372, upper arm 374, and shoulder 376. Shoulder 376 may be attached to or included among base 60. For example, shoulder 376 may be screwed into plate 106. Lower arm 370 may be engaged with shoulder 376 in such a way as to allow lower arm 370 to rotate about shoulder 376 and base 60. For example, lower arm 370 and shoulder 376 may comprise a typical ball-and-socket joint allowing for such rotational movement. This rotational movement may allow computer terminal 10 and the bed-side system as a whole to be used by a plurality of users. For example, if base 60 is clamped to a bedrail 14 in such a way to allow a bed-ridden patient to use the system, without loosening clamp 80 and re-positioning base 60, stalk 62 may be rotated about base 60 to allow a physician or nurse standing at bed-side to use the system. Alternatively, lower arm 370, middle arm 372, and upper arm 374 may be one whole piece. In another embodiment, shoulder 376 may comprise a turret mechanism 102, which may allow for rotation of stalk 62 and therefore computer terminal 10. For example, should 376 may comprise a horizontally-oriented turret mechanism 102, which may permit rotation of stalk 62 in a vertical direction (i.e., to raise or lower stalk 62). Stalk 62 may be hollow to allow for passage of a power cable through base 60 and into bedrail 14, for example.
  • FIG. 13 displays an exemplary platform 64. Platform 64 may be of any shape or structure sufficient to secure a computer terminal 10. For example, platform 64 may be a 100 mm. VESA pattern. In addition, platform 64 may include angle adjustment mechanism 420. Angle adjustment mechanism 420 may be used to adjust the angle of computer terminal 10. For example, a user could use angle adjustment mechanism 420 to adjust computer terminal 10 to reduce any glare there may be on a computer screen. Angle adjustment mechanism 420 may comprise a ball-and-socket joint to allow movement of computer terminal 10 along or about at least one axis. Alternatively, angle adjustment mechanism 420 may comprise a turret mechanism 120 similar to that which may be found in base 60. Furthermore, angle adjustment mechanism 420 may include a hand knob (not pictured), which may lock a selected angle in place.
  • As shown in FIGS. 14-18, another exemplary version of an adjustable mount 500 is shown. Similar to mount 12, adjustable mount 500 may be coupled with a patient's bed and a computer terminal 10. As shown in the figures, adjustable mount 500 may comprise a stem 502 and a base 504. Stem 502, to which a computer terminal 10 (not shown) may be coupled, is rotatable about base 504 as shown in FIGS. 14 and 15. In this way, the mount 500 may be adjustable to permit the computer terminal 10 to be used by a patient or other user. FIG. 14 shows the stem 502 in an upright position and FIG. 15 shows the stem 502 rotated down, to reside alongside the bedrail or other structure to which the mount 500 is secured. Stem may have a first end 505 and a second end 507, and the second end 507 may include at least one threaded coupler 508 for connection of the stem 502 with the computer terminal 10 via, for example, a VESA hinge or platform. Stem 502 may further comprise an inner channel 506 through which a power cord or cable may be passed.
  • Stem 502 may also comprise a threaded coupler (not pictured) at its first end 505, for engagement with a turret mechanism 510 of the base 504. As shown in the figures, turret 510 connects the stem 502 with the rest of the base 504 and permits the rotation of stem 502. By way of example, the turret 510 may permit rotation of 90 degrees in both directions from vertical. Rotation of the stem 510 may be prevented by a lock (not pictured) located in the base 504 or the turret 510. Turret 510 may also have a passageway through which a power cord or other cable may be positioned. As shown in the figures, an access cap 512 may be placed over the turret mechanism 510, which may also have a scalloped edge or indentation 513 for a user to grip while turning the turret 510 like a knob. In addition to stem 502, turret mechanism 510 may engage with the housing 514 of base 504. Housing 514 may be constructed into any suitable shape as will be appreciated by one of ordinary skill in the art. By way of example only, FIGS. 14-18 show housing having a substantially box-like shape. Among other capabilities, housing 514 may comprise a passageway through which a power cord or other cable may be positioned. For instance, a power cord may pass through the housing and into the inner channel 506 of the stem 502.
  • To secure the adjustable mount 500 to a bed rail or other structure, base 504 comprises webbing 516. As seen in the figures, webbing 516 is a substantially U-shaped strap, although other suitable shapes are within the scope of this disclosure. The webbing 516 defines a passage 518 through which a bedrail or other structure may be positioned. By way of example only, webbing 516 may permit the mount 500 to be secured to bedrails of various sizes from approximately 1-2.5 inches in diameter. Webbing 516 may be constructed from a polymer such as polyester or polypropylene, although any other suitable material or combination of materials may be used as should be understood in the art. For example, webbing 516 may be constructed out of polyester and coated with polypropylene.
  • Webbing 516 may be secured to base 504 via a variety of other components. FIGS. 17 and 18 illustrate some of those exemplary components. For example, base 504 may further comprise a rod 520 to retain the webbing 516, a rubber sheet 522 bonded to the housing 514, a clamp block 524 having a tension wedge 525 for tightening the webbing 516, and an anchor plate 526 that may be secured to the webbing 516 via one or more pins 518 before any tension is applied to the webbing 516. Pins 518 may pierce webbing 516 to prevent it from slipping.
  • To obtain power for the system, a power cable of computer terminal 10 may be routed through bedrail 14 via a hole in the rail. For example, a power cable may be routed through bedrail 14 via a small hole located on the underside of the rail. The power cable may terminate at the head of the bed or any other location where it may be easily plugged into an electrical outlet. In another example, a power cable may not be routed through bedrail 14 at all. Additionally, the bed-side system may also operate using battery power.
  • Computer terminal 10 may reside on a wireless 802.11a/b/g/n network that allows for connection to a local server in the care facility. In another example, computer terminal 10 may connect to a local server in a care facility via a wired network. Computer terminal 10 may connect to a server in a remote location. For example, computer terminal 10 may connect to a remote server via the internet and a virtual private network. The care facility may have a plurality of local servers to accommodate a plurality of computer terminals 10. In addition, a local server in the care facility may connect to a mainframe computer, and that connection may be secure. Alternatively, computer terminal 10 may operate independent of the network.
  • A local server in the care facility may be appropriately redundant, robust, and reliable. The local server may be connected to an uninterrupted power supply and connected to a mainframe computer. Connection to a mainframe computer may allow for the ability to diagnose and repair computer terminal 10, send new software and software updates to computer terminal 10, and send usage data from computer terminal 10. For example, usage data that may be sent to a mainframe computer could include which pages were viewed by a user at what times and for how long, and the number of times a particular advertisement was viewed by a user. In addition, survey data compiled from survey questions answered by a patient may be sent from computer terminal 10 to a mainframe computer for the healthcare provider to receive, analyze, and act upon. A mainframe computer may be capable of remote monitoring and servicing all care facility local servers and all computer terminals 10. For example, a mainframe computer may remotely be able to monitor the condition or state-of-repair of computer terminal 10 and the system itself. In addition, a mainframe may remotely be able to measure the throughput or network speed of the system.
  • Referring back to FIG. 1 as well as FIGS. 19 and 20, computer terminal 10 may include a user interface 20 to display content material available on the system. For example, in one embodiment, user interface 20 may include an LCD touch screen. The content materials displayed by user interface 20 may be based on an open-source platform such as Linux, Zope, or MySQL, etc., or a closed-source platform such as Microsoft. Additionally, the content material may be developed using a program that enables the development of rich internet applications. For example, programs such as Adobe Air, Ajax, Flex, and Flash may be used to develop content material for the bed-side system. Content materials that may be available to users of the bed-side system include, but should not be limited to, educational and informational materials, communication capabilities, and entertainment materials. For example, educational content such as a medical dictionary and/or encyclopedia, pharmaceutical dictionary and/or encyclopedia, examples of treatment plans for various disease processes, listings of classes offered in a community or within a care facility, information of or relating to a care facility and the services it provides, and information on any awards or accolades bestowed upon a care facility or its staff may be available to a user. In addition, content materials provided through the system may include communication capabilities such as textual email, instant messaging, VIOP-based phone or Skype or other software-based telephone service, video conferencing, and audio email. Entertainment materials that may be provided by the system may include single- and multi-user games, movies, television shows, and music. Other content materials, features, programs, applications, or capabilities that may be included in the system and displayed through user interface 20 will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art. For example, data collection capabilities such as user surveys and meal orders may be available on the system.
  • The bed-side system may provide a variety of educational and informational materials. For example, the system may provide a calendar feature informing a user of the time and date and allowing the user to add and delete entries from the calendar. For example, a patient could update the calendar with his medication schedule, physical therapy appointments, visitor hours, etc. In addition, the bed-side system may provide information on a care facility and its care providers. For example, the system may provide biographies or other information on the care facility staff and administration, its nurses, its physicians, as well as any others that may interact with or care for a patient. The system may also provide a menu listing the food and beverage options available at a care facility. Furthermore, the bed-side system may provide a reference library. For example, the system may provide reference materials pertaining to a patient's medical condition, medications, and recovery and treatment plans. The system may also include a patient's electronic medical records or chart. The system may also allow for computerized order entry. For example, the system may permit a physician to enter a medical order for a patient directly to a pharmacy or other entity or person with responsibility for fulfilling the order.
  • The bed-side system may also allow access to communication capabilities. For example, the system may provide a patient with a call button that allows the patient to communicate with the care facility staff via a camera, speakers, and/or microphone that may be integrated with computer terminal 10. The call button may be located on a touch screen user interface. Similar to a call button, the bed-side system may permit the calling of code. For example, a bystander, such as a family member of the patient, may be able to use the bed-side system to activate a hospital's code team. The system may also have internet capabilities allowing a user access to email, instant messaging, social networks, and other communication tools. In addition, the bed-side system may provide verbal communication abilities. For example, the system may include a video conferencing feature, utilizing a camera that may be integrated with computer terminal 10. The system may also provide a telephone. In yet another version, the bed-side system may have monitoring capabilities. By way of example only, the system may be used to monitor the status of the hospital bed(s) to which it is coupled. In this way, the system may monitor, for instance, the bed occupancy, whether the bed needs to be turned over for a new patient, etc.
  • The bed-side system may also provide a variety of entertainment materials to a user. For example, games, music, television programming, and movies may be available to a patient. In addition, through its internet capabilities, the system may provide a user with features found on the internet including, but not limited to, shopping, online newspapers, social networks, etc. The entertainment materials may reside on the local server or may be streamed via the internet.
  • In addition to providing content for a patient or other user, the bed-side system may provide information to the care facility. For example, the system may allow a user to input her food and beverage choice from the provided menu and that data may be collected by the care facility. In addition, the system may collect data from a patient by way of a survey or the like. A survey may be completed by a user on an on-going basis or may be completed all at once. The data may include, but should not be limited to, information such as level of satisfaction with the environment and atmosphere of the care facility; level of satisfaction with the care provided; level of satisfaction with the care facility staff, administration, and health care providers; and a patient's physical and mental status collected via tests performed by the patient to assess cognitive, neurological, and/or motor skills. The data may be collected in real-time. Collection of such survey data may allow a care facility to engage in any service recovery necessary for those patients who indicate a less than optimal satisfaction with the care they are receiving. For example, if a surveyed patient indicates that he is unhappy or unsatisfied in any way with the care that has been provided, such information may be collected by the bed-side system and analyzed by a healthcare provider, who may then determine the areas of care in which to improve, actually make improvements in those areas, increase patient satisfaction as a result of the improved care, and enjoy an improved reputation in the community and increased market share based on the satisfied patient's word-of-mouth and completion of a publicly available survey, such as the HCAHPS survey. In another example, the data collected from a user may include general usage data, such as which applications and features of the bed-side system the user selects and/or uses most and least often.
  • The bed-side system may also provide security measures to protect a user's personal information. For example, computer terminal 10 or user interface 20 may include a camera or fingerprint scanner that may allow for secure access to a user's information. In addition, the system's programming may permit a user to set up an account with accompanying login information and password to ensure that protected health information is secure.
  • As well as providing content for users and data collection capabilities for care facilities, the bed-side system may also provide a revenue source to a care facility and/or a system provider. For example, the system may be sold to a care facility or leased to a care facility for a fee. Additionally, third parties may pay to include their advertisements among the features and programming provided by the bed-side system. For example, a third party may pay to display its advertisement upon a user's selection of a certain feature, such as a medical reference library. As part of its data collection capabilities, the system may also track and record advertising metrics. Additionally, through its internet capabilities, the bed-side system may provide access to a hospital website to permit, for example, the payment of a co-pay before the patient leaves the hospital.
  • The bed-side system may also provide a marketing platform for a care facility. As part of the information provided to a user, the system may display advertisements and accolades of the care facility. The display of such care facility advertisements and accolades may be similar to the display of third party advertisements. Exposing patients to care facility advertisements may increase the level of satisfaction a patient has with the care facility, which may increase the public perception of the care facility, which may help the care facility gain a greater market share. For example, a patient may be influenced by an exposure to awards or accolades received by a care facility to give the facility high marks in a publicized survey, for instance, the HCAHPS. High patient satisfaction as publicized in a survey like HCAHPS may attract other patients, which would increase a care facility's market share.
  • The versions presented in this disclosure are examples. Those skilled in the art can develop modifications and variants that do not depart from the spirit and scope of the disclosed bed-side system and methods. Thus, the scope of the invention should be determined by appended claims and their legal equivalents, rather than by the examples given.
  • It should be understood that any feature(s) and/or operability described herein with respect to one particular adjustable mount (12, 500) may be incorporated into any other adjustable mount (12, 500) described herein. By way of example only, any of the mounts (12, 500) described herein may comprise a webbing 516 to secure the mount (12, 500) to a bedrail. Therefore, none of the teachings herein should be understood as applying to only one particular version or embodiment of mount (12, 500) described herein. Every teaching herein is contemplated as being interchangeable among versions and embodiments, such that every teaching herein may be applied to any mount (12, 500) described herein. Various ways in which the teachings herein may be interchanged among various versions and embodiments will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art in view of the teachings herein.
  • While several capabilities and designs of the bed-side system have been discussed in detail above, it should be understood that the components, features, configurations, and methods of using the bed-side system discussed are not limited to the contexts provided above. Having shown and described various versions in the present disclosure, further adaptations of the methods and systems described herein may be accomplished by appropriate modifications by one of ordinary skill in the art without departing from the scope of the present invention. Several of such potential modifications have been mentioned, and others will be apparent to those skilled in the art. For instance, the examples, versions, geometrics, materials, dimensions, ratios, steps, and the like discussed above are illustrative and are not required. Accordingly, the scope of the present invention should be considered in terms of the following claims and is understood not to be limited to the details of structure and operation shown and described in the specification and drawings.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A mount for securing a computer terminal to a bedrail, the mount comprising:
    a. a base; and
    b. a stem having a first end and a second end, the first end being connected to the base and the second end having a threaded coupler for engagement with a computer platform.
  2. 2. The mount of claim 1, wherein the stem further comprises a passageway through which a power cable may run.
  3. 3. The mount of claim 2, wherein the base further comprises a strap to secure the mount to a bedrail.
  4. 4. The mount of claim 3, wherein the base further comprises a rotatable knob to rotate the stem.
  5. 5. The mount of claim 4, rotatable knob permits rotation of the stem 90 degrees in both directions from vertical.
  6. 6. The mount of claim 3, wherein the base further comprises a housing containing one or more components for tightening the strap.
  7. 7. The mount of claim 6, wherein the base further comprises a passage through which a power cable may run.
  8. 8. The mount of claim 1, wherein the computer platform is a VESA mount.
  9. 9. The mount of claim 3, wherein the strap defines an opening through which the bedrail may be positioned.
  10. 10. An interactive bed-side system comprising:
    a. a computer terminal;
    b. a mount to which the computer terminal is affixed and to which a bed is connected, the mount having a means for moving the computer terminal from a first position to a second position;
    c. a user interface integrated with the computer terminal, wherein the user interface is configured to display content to a user; and
    d. a network connected to the computer terminal and user interface.
  11. 11. The interactive bed-side system of claim 10, wherein the mount further comprises:
    a. a base; and
    b. a stem having a first end and a second end, the first end being connected to the base and the second end having a threaded coupler for engagement with a computer platform.
  12. 12. The interactive bed-side system of claim 11, wherein the stem further comprises a passageway through which a power cable may run.
  13. 13. The mount of claim 12, wherein the base further comprises a strap to secure the mount to a bedrail.
  14. 14. The mount of claim 13, wherein the base further comprises a rotatable knob to rotate the stem.
  15. 15. The mount of claim 14, rotatable knob permits rotation of the stem 90 degrees in both directions from vertical.
  16. 16. The mount of claim 13, wherein the base further comprises a housing containing one or more components for tightening the strap.
  17. 17. The mount of claim 16, wherein the base further comprises a passage through which a power cable may run.
  18. 18. The mount of claim 11, wherein the computer platform is a VESA mount.
  19. 19. The mount of claim 13, wherein the strap defines an opening through which the bedrail may be positioned.
  20. 20. A method for increasing revenue at a care facility comprising:
    providing an interactive bed-side system comprising:
    a. a computer terminal;
    b. a mount to which the computer terminal is affixed and to which a bed is connected, the mount having a means for moving the computer terminal from a first position to a second position;
    c. a user interface integrated with the computer terminal, wherein the user interface is configured to display content to a user; and
    d. a network connected to the computer terminal and user interface.
    contracting with a third party advertiser to display a third party advertisement to a user through the user interface;
    displaying the third party advertisement to the user through the user interface; and
    collecting a fee from the third party advertiser in exchange for displaying the third party advertisement to the user through the user interface.
US12629620 2008-12-02 2009-12-02 Bed-Mounted Computer Terminal Abandoned US20100132122A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11915608 true 2008-12-02 2008-12-02
US12629620 US20100132122A1 (en) 2008-12-02 2009-12-02 Bed-Mounted Computer Terminal

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12629620 US20100132122A1 (en) 2008-12-02 2009-12-02 Bed-Mounted Computer Terminal

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US20100132122A1 true true US20100132122A1 (en) 2010-06-03

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US12629821 Active 2031-06-25 US8452586B2 (en) 2008-12-02 2009-12-02 Identifying music from peaks of a reference sound fingerprint
US13372381 Abandoned US20130044885A1 (en) 2008-12-02 2012-02-13 System And Method For Identifying Original Music

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US13372381 Abandoned US20130044885A1 (en) 2008-12-02 2012-02-13 System And Method For Identifying Original Music

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US20100145708A1 (en) 2010-06-10 application
US20130044885A1 (en) 2013-02-21 application
WO2010065673A2 (en) 2010-06-10 application
US8452586B2 (en) 2013-05-28 grant
WO2010065673A3 (en) 2010-08-19 application

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